Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 15 of 15
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Berg, Jan
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Medier, ljudteknik och teater.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Perceived properties of parameterised music for interactive applications2006Inngår i: Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, ISSN 1690-4524, Vol. 4, nr 2, s. 65-71Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional implementations of sound and music in interactive contexts have their limitations. One way to overcome these and to expand the possibilities of music is to handle the music in a parameterised form. To better understand the properties of the musical parameters resulting from parameterisation, two experiments were carried out. The first experiment investigated selected parameters' capability to change the music; the second experiment examined how the parameters can contribute to express emotions. From these experiments, it is concluded that users without musical training perform differently from musicians on some of the parameters. There is also a clear association between the parameters and the expressed basic emotions. The paper is concluded with observations on how parameterisation might be used in interactive applications.

  • 2.
    Berg, Jan
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Medier ljudteknik och upplevelseproduktion och teater.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Relations between selected musical parameters and expressed emotions: extending the potential of computer entertainment2005Inngår i: Proceedings of the 2005 ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Advances in computer entertainment technology, IEEE Communications Society, 2005, s. 164-171Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A fundamental aspect of music is its ability to express emotions. To develop and extend the potential of music in computer entertainment, a deeper understanding of music's emotional aspects is essential. An experiment was designed to explore the suitability of a specially designed interface (REMUPP) as a means to investigate how musical parameters can contribute to expressing the emotions of 'happiness' and 'sadness'. In the experiment, a number of subjects listened to music examples where the musical performance was governed by a set of musical parameters that were controlled by the subject. The subjects adjusted the parameter settings to best express a given emotion. These settings were recorded and analyzed. The experiment verifies the REMUPP tool as a valid means for the investigation of musical parameters and emotion. Issues of importance for realization of music in the computer entertainment context are also addressed.

  • 3.
    Berg, Jan
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Medier ljudteknik och upplevelseproduktion och teater.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik och dans.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    Sonic Studio, Interactive Institute.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    Sonic Studio, Interactive Institute.
    Perceived properties of parameterised music for interactive applications2005Inngår i: Proceedings 2005: July 10 - 13, 2005, Orlando, Florida, USA / [ed] Nagib Callaos, Orlando, Fla: IIIS , 2005, Vol. 1, s. 409-414Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional implementations of sound and music in interactive contexts have their limitations. One way to overcome these and to expand the possibilities of music is to handle the music in a parameterised form. To better understand the properties of the musical parameters resulting from parameterisation, two experiments were carried out. The first experiment investigated selected parameters' capability to change the music; the second experiment examined how the parameters can contribute to express emotions. From these experiments, it is concluded that users without musical training perform differently from musicians on some of the parameters. There is also a clear association between the parameters and the expressed basic emotions. The paper is concluded with observations on how parameterisation might be used in interactive applications.

  • 4.
    Lefford, Nyssim
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Medier ljudteknik och upplevelseproduktion och teater.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik och dans.
    Sjömark, Cecilia
    Context, individuality and music's affect on listeners2005Inngår i: Modeling and using context: 5th international and interdisciplinary conference, CONTEXT 2005, Paris, France, July 5-8, 2005 ; proceedings, Berlin: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2005Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Nykänen, Arne
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Drift, underhåll och akustik.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University.
    Sundhage, Johan
    Mohlin, Peter
    Semcon AB.
    Sketching Sounds – listening, moving and listening again2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial design covers design of products taking all senses into account. However, most literature on product design focuses on vision. When designing multisensory human-machine interfaces tools and processes for design of sounds are needed. Sketching is essential in design. Schon and Wiggins discussed designers’ use of sketching and suggested that designers interact with the medium (typically pen and paper) in a seeing – moving – seeing way of working. First, the designer sketch to see a problem, then tries a solution by changing the sketch or suggesting a new sketch, and finally evaluates the solution by visual inspection. We suggest that design of sounds evolves through a similar process requiring the designer to listen, move and listen again. This process is facilitated by considering sounds created throughout the process as sketches. A case was studied where six designers were given the task to design a sound logotype for a car. Their processes were analyzed and compared with actions in visual sketching using pen and paper. The results support the idea of considering sound design as a listening – moving – listening process. Designing of sounds is a conversation with sounding material and crucially dependent on listening. By encouraging sound designers to use sounds as sketches during the design process creativity and efficiency were promoted.

  • 6.
    Nykänen, Arne
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Drift, underhåll och akustik.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, Sound and Music Production, Dalarna University.
    Sundhage, Johan
    Klevgränd Produktion, Klevgränd 1B, 116 46 Stockholm.
    Mohlin, Peter
    Semcon AB.
    Sketching Sounds: listening, moving and listening again2015Inngår i: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 39, s. 19-47Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, the use of sketching in sound design was studied. Based on Schon and Wiggins' model of how designers use sketching to see, move, and see again, we suggest that sound design evolves through a similar process requiring listening, moving, and listening again. This is facilitated by considering sounds as sketches. A case was followed in which six designers were asked to design a sound logotype. Processes and interactions were studied. The results suggest that sound design can be considered as a listen – move – listen process. Sound design is a conversation with sounding material, crucially dependent on listening. To assist in this, a computer interface was developed. Analysis of its use suggests that it supported co-designing.

  • 7. Sjömark, Cecilia
    et al.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Axelsson, Karin
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Omvårdnad.
    Berg, Jan
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Medier ljudteknik och upplevelseproduktion och teater.
    Musical parameters for promoting relaxation and stress-reduction in listeners2005Inngår i: Ambience05 Proceedings, Tampere University of Technology, 2005Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 8.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik och dans.
    Making music mean: on functions of, and knowledge about, narrative music in multimedia2008Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Narrative media music - music used for narrative purposes in multimedia such as film and computer games - is often, especially for young people, the largest source of daily musical experience. This PhD thesis is based on three articles, in different ways exploring functions of, and knowledge about, narrative media music. The overarching research question of the thesis is: ‘How can meaning-making functions of narrative media music be described - and how are attitudes, awareness and knowledge about such functions expressed through the different modes of musical sound and speech?' The first article discusses how the musical underscore in narrative media achieves meaning in multimodal interplay with the visuals and other available modes of representation. Three short film scenes are examined from the perspectives of ideational, interpersonal and textual meanings. Even if music in such situations usually does not attain a high degree of conscious salience, it is clear that it often contributes meaning that is essential for the understanding of the overall narrative. It is concluded that what we (think we) see is often to a large degree determined by what we hear. The second article presents the first part of a study, where 23 young participants (12-13 years old), using a software tool, were given the task of adapting musical expression to make it ‘fit as well as possible' different visual scenes shown on a computer screen. They also answered a questionnaire, asking about their musical training and media habits. Numerical data from the trial sessions, representing differences in musical expression, were analyzed statistically. The results indicated a strong degree of in-group conformity and consensus, indicating knowledge of culturally available functions and conventions of narrative media music. The third article describes the second part of the study. Each participant was interviewed in a stimulated recall situation where they commented and reflected on their own musical expressions of their completed trials. From the analysis of the interviews, examining the verbal expression of ideational, interpersonal and textual meanings, five different types of statements could be discerned: the Unclear, Intuitive, Associative, Analytical and Transformative types. These statements were also seen as reflecting various aspects of Swanwick's (1994) concepts of intuitive and analytical knowledge. Combining the verbal statements with how each participant musically had demonstrated conformity or non-conformity to narrative conventions, contributed to a fuller and more nuanced account of their expressed musical knowledge. The thesis concludes with a discussion of the learning opportunities offered by narrative multimedia in the escalating media society and of its implications for formal music education.

  • 9.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik och dans.
    Narrative functions of film music in a relational perspective2004Inngår i: Sound Worlds to Discover: ISME 2004 Proceedings, International Society for Music Education , 2004Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 10.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik och dans.
    Narrative music: towards an understanding of musical narrative functions in multimedia2005Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    As the computer screen is replacing the book as the dominant medium for communication (Kress, 2003), questions about how meaning is constituted by the multimodal interaction of different media (including music) is becoming increasingly important in contemporary research of pedagogy, sociology and media studies. The overall aim with this licentiate thesis is to explore musical narrative functions as they appear in multimedia such as film and computer games. The thesis is based on three publications. Publication 1 proposes a classification of musical narrative functions, with 6 narrative classes(the Emotive, Informative, Descriptive, Guiding, Temporal and Rhetorical classes) and 11 categories. The relational interplay of music with contextual factors is emphasized. Publication 2 describes the design of a software tool, REMUPP (Relations Between Musical Parameters and Perceived Properties), to be used for experimental studies of musical expression. REMUPP is used for real time alteration of musical expression, by the manipulation of musical parameters such as tempo, harmony, rhythm, articulation, etc. Publication 3 describes a quasi-experiment using REMUPP, where a group of young participants (12-13 years old) were given the task of adapting musical expression - by manipulating 7 parameters - to make it fit 3 visual scenes shown on a computer screen. They also answered a questionnaire asking about their musical backgrounds and habits of listening to music, watching movies and playing computer games. Numerical data from the manipulations were analyzed statistically with regards to the preferred values of the musical parameters in relation to the different visual scenes. The results indicated awareness and knowledge about codes and conventions of musical narrative functions, and were to some degree affected by the participants' gender, musical backgrounds and media habits.

  • 11.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik och dans.
    REMUPP - a tool for investigating musical narrative functions2006Inngår i: Proceedings of the Audio Mosty Conference: a Conference on Sound in Games, Interactive Institute , 2006Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 12. Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Berg, Jan
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Medier ljudteknik och upplevelseproduktion och teater.
    Liljedahl, M.
    Sonic Studio, Interactive Institute, Acusticum.
    Lindberg, S.
    Sonic Studio, Interactive Institute, Acusticum.
    REMUPP: an interface for evaluation of relations between musical parameters and perceived properties2005Inngår i: ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology: ACE 05 ; June 15 - 17, 2005, Valencia, Spain, Curran Associates, Inc., 2005, s. 346-349Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    New media offers new roles, functions and challenges to music, calling for new methods and tools for music research. To meet these increasingly important challenges. REMUPP, a new software tool for the investigation of relations between music and perceived properties or characteristies, was designed. The ideas behind REMUPP and the technology used to realize it is deseribed. In order to test the sensitivity and validity of REMUPP. a simple experiment aimed to examine some properties of music was carried out. 38 subjects were listening to music and instructed to indicate their priority for different aspects of the music (musical parameters) while they actively controlled these aspects. The results show that REMUPP is able to bring out significant differences between the musical parameters, and that these differences correspond well with findings by others.

  • 13. Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Brändström, Sture
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik och dans.
    Berg, Jan
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Medier, ljudteknik och teater.
    Narrative music, visuals and meaning in film2010Inngår i: Visual Communication, ISSN 1470-3572, E-ISSN 1741-3214, Vol. 9, nr 2, s. 193-210Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Narrative media music, music used for narrative purposes in multimedia such as film, television or computer games, is becoming one of the largest sources of musical experience in our daily lives. Though typically experienced on an unconscious and unreflected level, this kind of music actively contributes narrative meaning in multimodal interplay with image, speech and sound effects. Often, what we (think we) see is to a large degree determined by what we hear. Using Halliday's (1978) metafunctions of communication as a starting point, two short film scenes (from Jaws and The Secret of My Success) are examined, with a focus on the intermodal relationships of music and image. The examples illustrate how musical and visual expressions combine to form multimodal statements where the whole is certainly different than the sum of the parts.

  • 14. Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Brändström, Sture
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik och dans.
    Berg, Jan
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Medier, ljudteknik och teater.
    Young adolescents' usage of narrative functions of media music by manipulation of musical expression2008Inngår i: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 36, nr 2, s. 193-214Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates usage and knowledge of musical narrative functions in contemporary multimedia. A group of young adolescents were given the task of adapting musical expression, using the non-verbal research tool REMUPP, to fit different visual scenes shown on a computer screen. This was accomplished by manipulating seven musical parameters: instrumentation, tempo, harmonic complexity, rhythmic complexity, register, articulation and reverb. They also answered a questionnaire giving information about their musical training and media habits. Numerical data from the manipulation of the musical parameters were analysed to search for tendencies within the group with regard to the musical expression in relation to the different visual scenes shown. The results showed a large degree of in-group consensus regarding narrative functions of music, indicating knowledge about musical narrative codes and conventions. Also, the results were clearly influenced by factors such as the participants' musical training, gender and habits of music listening, playing computer games and watching movies - highlighting the complexity of learning and pointing to the impact of the increasing availability of narrative media on our attitudes and knowledge

  • 15.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik och dans. Sonic studio, Interactive Institute, Piteå.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    Sonic studio, Interactive Institute, Piteå.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    Sonic studio, Interactive Institute, Piteå.
    Berg, Jan
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Medier ljudteknik och upplevelseproduktion och teater. Sonic studio, Interactive Institute, Piteå.
    REMUPP: an interactive tool for investigating musical properties and relations2005Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    A typical experiment design within the field of music psychology is playing music to a test subject who listens and reacts - most often by verbal means. One limitation of this kind of test is the inherent difficulty of measuring an emotional reaction in a laboratory setting. This paper describes the design, functions and possible uses of the software tool REMUPP (Relations between musical parameters and perceived properties), designed for investigating various aspects of musical experience. REMUPP allows for non-verbal examination of selected musical parameters (such as tonality, tempo, timbre, articulation, volume, register etc.) in a musical context. The musical control is put into the hands of the subject, introducing an element of creativity and enhancing the sense of immersion. Information acquired with REMUPP can be output as numerical data for statistical analysis, but the tool is also suited for the use with more qualitatively oriented methods.

1 - 15 of 15
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf