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  • 1.
    Amofah, Lea Rastas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Maurice, Christian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology.
    The influence of temperature, pH/molarity and extractant on the removal of arsenic, chromium and zinc from contaminated soil2011In: Journal of Soils and Sediments, ISSN 1439-0108, E-ISSN 1614-7480, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 1334-1344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Normal soil washing leave high residual pollutant content in soil. The remediation could be improved by targeting the extraction to coarser fractions. Further, a low/high extraction pH and higher temperature enhance the pollutant removal, but these measures are costly. In this study, the utility of NaOH, oxalate-citrate (OC) and dithionite-citrate-oxalate (DCO) solutions for extracting of arsenic, chromium and zinc from contaminated soil were assessed and compared. In addition the effects of NaOH concentration and temperature on NaOH extractions, and those of temperature and pH on OC and DCO extractions, were evaluated. Materials and methods: A two-level, full-factorial design with a centre point was implemented. Two factors, concentration and temperature,were evaluated in NaOH extractions, and pH and temperature for OC and DCO solutions. In all cases, the extraction temperature was 20°C, 30°C and 40°C. The studied NaOH concentrations were 0.05, 0.075 and 0.1 M. The pH in OC solutions was 3, 5 and 7, and in DCO solutions, 4.7, 6.3 and 6.7. Water-washed and medium coarse soil fraction of arsenic, chromium and zinc contaminated soil was agitated for 15 min with the extraction solution. Results and discussion: In NaOH extractions, the temperature and (less strongly) NaOH concentration significantly affected As and Cr mobilisation, but only the latter affected Zn mobilisation. Both pH and temperature significantly (and similarly) influenced As and Cr mobilisation in OC extractions, while only the pH influenced Zn mobilisation. In contrast, the extraction temperature (but not pH) influenced As, Cr and Zn mobilisation in DCO extractions. Conclusions: For all extractants, mobilisation was most efficient at elevated temperature (40°C). None of the extractants reduced the soil's As content to below the Swedish EPA's guideline value. Use of DCO is not recommended because dithionite has a short lifetime and residual arsenic contents in DCO-extracted soil are relatively high. Instead, sequential extraction with NaOH followed by OC solutions (affording significant reductions in As, Cr and Zn levels in the soil with short extraction times) at 40°C is recommended

  • 2.
    Ascher, J.
    et al.
    University of Florence.
    Ceccherini, M.T.
    University of Florence.
    Guerri, G.
    University of Florence.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Landi, L.
    University of Florence.
    Mench, Michel
    Bordeaux 1 University.
    Nannipieri, P.
    University of Florence.
    Pietramellara, G.
    University of Florence.
    Renella, Giancarlo
    University of Florence.
    Is microbial species richness increased by aided phytostabilization of trace element contaminated soils?2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bert, Valérie
    et al.
    INERIS, Clean and Sustainable Technologies and Processes Unit, DRC/RISK, Parc Technologique Alata.
    Neu, S.
    Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Wood and Plant Chemistry.
    Zdanevitch, Isabelle
    NERIS, Clean and Sustainable Technologies and Processes Unit, DRC/RISK, Parc Technologique Alata.
    Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang
    AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Energy Department.
    Collet, Serge
    INERIS, Sources and Emissions Unit, DRC/CARA, Parc Technologique Alata.
    Gaucher, Rodolphe
    INERIS, Clean and Sustainable Technologies and Processes Unit, DRC/RISK, Parc Technologique Alata.
    Puschenreiter, Markus
    University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna – BOKU, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences.
    Müller, Ingo
    Saxon State Agency for Environment, Agriculture and Geology.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    How to manage plant biomass originated from phytotechnologies?: Gathering perceptions from end-users2017In: International journal of phytoremediation, ISSN 1522-6514, E-ISSN 1549-7879, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 947-954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A questionnaire survey was carried out in 4 European countries to gather end-user's perceptions of using plants from phytotechnologies in combustion and anaerobic digestion (AD). 9 actors of the wood energy sector from France, Germany and Sweden, and 11 AD platform operators from France, Germany and Austria were interviewed. Questions related to installation, input materials, performed analyses, phytostabilization and phytoextraction. Although the majority of respondents did not know phytotechnologies, results suggested that plant biomass from phytomanaged areas could be used in AD and combustion, under certain conditions. As a potential advantage, these plants would not compete with plants grown on agricultural lands, contaminated lands being not suitable for agriculture production. Main limitations would be related to additional controls in process' inputs and end-products and installations that might generate additional costs. In most cases, price of phytotechnologies biomass was mentioned as a driver to potentially use plants from metal-contaminated soils. Plants used in phytostabilisation or phytoexclusion were thought to be less risky and, consequently, benefited from a better theoretical acceptance than those issued from phytoextraction. Results were discussed according to national regulations. One issue related to the regulatory gap concerning the status of the plant biomass produced on contaminated land.

  • 4.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH-International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Sciences and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Vahter, Marie E.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Jaresjö, Jerker
    Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ahmad, Arslan
    KWR Watercycle Research Institute, Nieuwegein.
    Sparrenbom, Charlotta Jönsson
    Department Geology, Quaternary Sciences, Lund University.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH-International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Sciences and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Donselaar, Marinus Eric
    Department of Geoscience and Engineering, Delft Univ. of Technology.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH-International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Sciences and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Naidu, Ravi
    Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), Faculty of Science & Information Technology, The University of Newcastle.
    Editors’ foreword2016In: Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability: Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016 / [ed] Bhattacharya, Prosun; Vahter, Marie; Jarsjo, Jerker; Kumpiene, Jurate; Charlotte, Sparrenbom, London: CRC Press, 2016, p. xlv-xlviConference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bolan, Nanthi
    et al.
    Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia.
    Kunhikrishnanc, Anitha
    Chemical Safety Division, Department of Agro-Food Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Science.
    Thangarajan, Ramya
    Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Park, Jinhee
    Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, University of Queensland.
    Makino, Tomoyuki
    Soil Environmental Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba.
    Kirkham, Mary Beth
    Department of Agronomy, 2004 Throckmorton Plant Sciences Center, Kansas State University.
    Scheckel, Kirk
    National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 5995 Center Hill Avenue, Cincinnati.
    Remediation of heavy metal(loid)s contaminated soils: To mobilize or to immobilize?2014In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 266, p. 141-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    nlike organic contaminants, metal(loid)s do not undergo microbial or chemical degradation and persist for a long time after their introduction. Bioavailability of metal(loid)s plays a vital role in the remediation of contaminated soils. In this review, the remediation of heavy metal(loid) contaminated soils through manipulating their bioavailability using a range of soil amendments will be presented. Mobilizing amendments such as chelating and desorbing agents increase the bioavailability and mobility of metal(loid)s. Immobilizing amendments such of precipitating agents and sorbent materials decrease the bioavailabilty and mobility of metal(loid)s. Mobilizing agents can be used to enhance the removal of heavy metal(loid)s though plant uptake and soil washing. Immobilizing agents can be used to reduce the transfer to metal(loid)s to food chain via plant uptake and leaching to groundwater. One of the major limitations of mobilizing technique is susceptibility to leaching of the mobilized heavy metal(loid)s in the absence of active plant uptake. Similarly, in the case of the immobilization technique the long-term stability of the immobilized heavy metal(loid)s needs to be monitored.

  • 6.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Andreas, Lale
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Travar, Igor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ageing of ashes in a landfill top cover2011In: SARDINIA 2011: Thirteenth International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, S. Margherita di Pula, Cagliari, Italy; 3 - 7 October 2011 / [ed] Raffaello Cossu, Cagliari: CISA Publisher, Italy , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on studies on the effects of accelerated ageing on refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) fly ashes, in experiments under controlled laboratory conditions, intended to derive models to predict the stability of RDF fly ashes used in a landfill liner and the mineralogi-cal changes that occur in them. A reduced factorial design was applied, followed by multivariate data analysis, to evaluate the effects of five factors — carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, temperature, relative air humidity (RH), time and the quality of added water — on mineral transformations within the ashes, and leaching behaviour. The pH values of these ash specimens ranged from 7.2 to 7.6, indicating advanced carbonation. Ageing decreased pH values from 12.4 to 7.2, conse-quently affecting the leaching behaviour of most chemicals measured in the leachates. Levels of Ba, Ca, Cl, Cr, Cu, Pb, K and Na decreased over the study period while those of Mg, Zn and SO4 increased. Clay minerals could not be detected neither in fresh nor in aged ashes. However, geo-chemical modelling indicated that such minerals may precipitate.

  • 7.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Belmonte, Carles
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Characterisation of waste material mixtures for landfill top cover application2012In: Abstract proceedings of 7th Intercontinental Landfill Research Symposium: Södra Sunderbyn, June 25th to 27th, 2012 / [ed] Anders Lagerkvist, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2012, p. 54-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Changes in Element Solubility in Fly Ash and Biosolid Mixtures Used for Soil Fertilization2013In: 12th International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements, Athens, Georgia, USA, June 16-20, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Fly ash in landfill top covers: a review2016In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increase of energy recovery from municipal solid waste by incineration results in the increased amounts of incineration residues, such as fly ash, that have to be taken care of. Material properties should define whether fly ash is a waste or a viable resource to be used for various applications. Here, two areas of potential fly ash application are reviewed: the use of fly ash in a landfill top cover either as a liner material or as a soil amendment in vegetation layer. Fly ashes from incineration of three types of fuel are considered: refuse derived fuel (RDF), municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and biofuel. Based on the observations, RDF and MSWI fly ash is considered as suitable materials to be used in a landfill top cover liner. Whereas MSWI and biofuel fly ashes based on element availability for plant studies, could be considered suitable for the vegetation layer of the top cover. Responsible application of MSWI ashes is, however, warranted in order to avoid element accumulation in soil and elevation of background values over time.

  • 10.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Potential mobility of trace elements in soil as affected by organic matter and redox conditions2011In: 11th International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements, Florence, Italy July 3-7, 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Taraškevičius, Ricardas
    Institute of Geology and Geography.
    Zinkutė, Rimante
    Institute of Geology and Geography.
    Spatial variability of topsoil contamination by trace elements on the territories of kindergartens in Vilnius, Lithuania2009In: 10th International Conference on Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements: Frontiers in Trace Elements Research and Education, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Professional Support, Externfinansiering. Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology.
    Nilsson, Malin
    Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology.
    Skoglund, Nils
    Umeå University. Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology.
    Effect of residue combinations on plant uptake of nutrients and potentially toxic elements2014In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 132, p. 287-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the plant pot experiment was to evaluate potential environmental impacts of combined industrial residues to be used as soil fertilisers by analysing i) element availability in fly ash and biosolids mixed with soil both individual and in combination, ii) changes in element phytoavailability in soil fertilised with these materials and iii) impact of the fertilisers on plant growth and element uptake.Plant pot experiments were carried out, using soil to which fresh residue mixtures had been added. The results showed that element availability did not correlate with plant growth in the fertilised soil with. The largest concentrations of K (3534mg/l), Mg (184mg/l), P (1.8mg/l), S (760mg/l), Cu (0.39mg/l) and Zn (0.58mg/l) in soil pore water were found in the soil mixture with biosolids and MSWI fly ashes; however plants did not grow at all in mixtures containing the latter, most likely due to the high concentration of chlorides (82g/kg in the leachate) in this ash. It is known that high salinity of soil can reduce germination by e.g. limiting water absorption by the seeds. The concentrations of As, Cd and Pb in grown plants were negligible in most of the soils and were below the instrument detection limit values.The proportions of biofuel fly ash and biosolids can be adjusted in order to balance the amount and availability of macronutrients, while the possible increase of potentially toxic elements in biomass is negligible seeing as the plant uptake of such elements was low. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 13. Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Wolters, Martin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. Tekedo AB, Nyköping, Sweden.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Elements availability in soil fertilized with pelletized fly ash and biosolids2015In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 159, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of combined and pelletized industrial residues on availability and mobility of nutrients and potentially toxic elements in soil, plant growth and element uptake. Plant pot experiments were carried out using soil to which 2% of pelletized residue containing biosolids mixed with either municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MFA) or biofuel fly ash (BFA) was added. The tests showed that the plant growth did not correspond to the content of available nutrients in fertilised soil. MFA application to soil resulted in elevated concentrations of P (506 mg/kg), As (2.7 mg/kg), Cd (0.8 mg/kg) and Pb (12.1 mg/kg) in soil, lower plant uptake of Al (25 mg/kg) and Ba (51 mg/kg), but higher accumulation of As (4.3 mg/kg) and Cd (0.3 mg/kg) in plants compared to the unamended soil and soil amended with BFA. On average, the biomass of the plants grown in the soil containing MFA was larger than in other soils.Considering the use of industrial residue mixtures as soil amendments or fertilizers, the amount of added elements should not exceed those taken up by plants, by this preventing the increase of soil background concentrations.

  • 14.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Zamora, Carles Belmonte
    LTU.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Effect of industrial residue combinations on availability of elements2014In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 276, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial residues, such as fly ashes and biosolids, contain elements (e.g. N, P, K, S, Ca and Zn) that make them a viable alternative for synthetic fertilizers in forestry and agriculture. However, the use of these materials is often limited due to the presence of potentially toxic substances. It is therefore necessary to assess and, when warranted, modify the chemical and physical form of these and similar waste materials before any advantages are taken of their beneficial properties. Biofuel fly ash, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash, biosolids, peat, peat residues and gypsum board waste were combined in various proportions, and this resulted in increased leaching of N, P, S, Cu and Mn, but decreased leaching of Ca, K, Mg, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Al, As and Pb. Chemical fractionation revealed that elements Ca, K, Mg, S and Mn were predominantly exchangeable, while the rest of the elements were less mobile. Cadmium was mostly exchangeable in MSWI fly ash, but less mobile in biofuel fly ash mixtures. Recycling of MSWI fly ash in the mixtures with fertilizers is considerably less attractive, due to the high levels of salts and exchangeable Cd.

  • 15.
    Carabante, Ivan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Holmgren, Allan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Adsorption of As (V) on iron oxide nanoparticle films studied by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy2009In: Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, ISSN 0927-7757, E-ISSN 1873-4359, Vol. 346, no 1-3, p. 106-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stabilization of arsenic contaminated soils by iron oxides has been proposed as a remediation technique to prevent leaching of arsenate into the environment. Fundamental studies are needed to establish under which conditions the complexes formed are stable. In the present work, a powerful technique, viz. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, is adapted to studies of adsorption of arsenate species on iron oxides. This technique facilitates acquisition of both quantitative and qualitative in situ adsorption data.In the present work, about 800 nm thick films of 6-lineferrihydrite were deposited on ZnSe ATR crystals. Arsenate adsorption on the ferrihydrite film was studied at pD values ranging from 4 to 12 and at an arsenate concentration of 0.03 mM in D2O solution. The amount of adsorbed arsenate decreased with increasing pD as a result of the more negatively charged iron oxide surface at higher pD values. The adsorption and desorption kinetics were also studied. Arsenate showed a higher adsorption rate within the first 70 minutes and a much lower adsorption rate from 70 up to 300 minutes. The low adsorption rate at longer reaction times was partly due to a low desorption rate of already adsorbed carbonate species adsorbed at the surface. The desorption of carbonate species was evidenced by the appearance of negative absorption bands. The desorption of adsorbed arsenate complexes was examined by flushing with D2O at pD 4 and 8.5 and it was found that the complexes were very stable at pD 4 suggesting formation of mostly inner-sphere complexes whereas a fraction of the complexes at pD 8.5 were less stable than at pD 4, possibly due to the formation of outer-sphere complexes.In summary, the ATR technique was shown to provide in situ information about the adsorption rate, desorption rate and the speciation of the complexes formed within a single experiment, which is very difficult to obtain using other techniques.

  • 16.
    Carabante, Ivan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Holmgren, Allan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Influence of Zn(II) on the adsorption of arsenate onto ferrihydrite2012In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 46, no 24, p. 13152-13159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addition of iron oxide to arsenic-contaminated soil has been proposed as a means of reducing the mobility of arsenic in the soil. Arsenic and zinc are common coexisting contaminants in soils. The presence of zinc therefore may affect the adsorption properties of arsenic on iron oxide, and may thus affect its mobility in the soil. The influence of Zn(II) on the adsorption of arsenate ions on iron oxide was studied. Batch adsorption experiments indicated that Zn(II) increased the arsenate removal from a solution by ferrihydrite at pH 8. However, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy showed that no adsorption of arsenate on a ferrihydrite film occurred at pD 8 in the presence of Zn(II). Precipitation of zinc hydroxide carbonate followed by arsenate adorption onto the precipitate was found to be a plausible mechanism explaining the arsenate removal from a solution in the presence of Zn(II) at pH/pD 8. The previously suggested mechanisms attributing the enhanced removal of arsenate from solution in the presence of Zn(II) to additional adsorption on iron oxides could not be verified under the experimental conditions studied. It was also shown that at pH/pD 4, the presence of Zn(II) in the system did not significantly affect the adsorption of arsenate on ferrihydrite.

  • 17.
    Carabante, Ivan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Holmgren, Allan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    A powerful method for studying the adsorption of As(V) on iron oxides in situ2008In: Arsenic in the environment - Arsenic from nature to humans: Book of Abstracts, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Carabante, Ivan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Mouzon, Johanne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Andreas
    Mining Technology R and D, LKAB Kiruna Mine.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Reutilization of porous sintered hematite bodies as effective adsorbents for arsenic(V) removal from water2014In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 53, no 32, p. 12689-12696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method was developed to enhance the arsenic adsorption capacity of porous bodies of sintered hematite. The method comprised the formation of a coating of 1 wt % iron oxide nanoparticles on the raw material. The nanoparticles showed two distinct habits: spherical habit, likely ferrihydrite, and acicular habit, likely goethite and/or akaganéite. The specific surface area of the hematite raw material increased from 0.5 to 3.75 m2/g, and the adsorption capacity increased from negligible to 0.65 mg of [As]/g as calculated from equilibrium and breakthrough adsorption data. Equilibrium adsorption data of arsenate on the adsorbent from a solution at pH 5 followed the Langmuir model, while breakthrough adsorption data for a 500 μg/L arsenate solution at pH 5 followed the Thomas model. The adsorbed arsenic could be desorbed using distilled water at pH 12. These results show the potential for the reutilization of waste products comprising coarse hematite bodies as adsorbents.

  • 19.
    Herrmann, Inga
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Svensson, Malin
    Ecke, Holger
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Maurice, Christian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Andreas, Lale
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Hydraulic conductivity of fly ash: sewage sludge mixes for use in landfill cover liners2009In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 43, no 14, p. 3541-3547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Secondary materials could help meeting the increasing demand of landfill cover liner materials. In this study, the effect of compaction energy, water content, ash ratio, freezing, drying and biological activity on the hydraulic conductivity of two fly ash - sewage sludge mixes was investigated using a 27-1 fractional factorial design. The aim was to identify the factors that influence hydraulic conductivity, to quantify their effects and to assess how a sufficiently low hydraulic conductivity can be achieved. The factors compaction energy and drying, as well as the factor interactions material×ash ratio and ash ratio×compaction energy affected hydraulic conductivity significantly (α = 0.05). Freezing on 5 freeze-thaw cycles did not affect hydraulic conductivity. Water content affected hydraulic conductivity only initially. The hydraulic conductivity data were modelled using multiple linear regression. The derived models were reliable as indicated by R2adjusted values between 0.75 and 0.86. Independent on the ash ratio and the material, hydraulic conductivity was predicted to be between 1.7 × 10-11 m s-1 and 8.9 × 10-10 m s-1 if the compaction energy was 2.4 J cm-3, the ash ratio between 20 and 75 % and drying did not occur. Thus, the investigated materials met the limit value for non-hazardous waste landfills of 10-9 m s-1.

  • 20.
    Kasiuliene, Alfreda
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Carabante, Ivan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Hydrothermal carbonisation of peat-based spent sorbents loaded with metal(loid)s2019In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 26, no 23, p. 23730-23738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrothermal carbonisation (HTC) is a wet and relatively low-temperature process where, under autogenous pressures, biomass undergoes a chain of reactions leading to the defragmentation of organic matter. As well as its other uses (e.g. for producing low-cost carbon-based nano-compounds), HTC is utilised for the treatment of wet wastes, such as manure and biosludge. This study aimed to determine if hydrothermal carbonisation is a feasible treatment method for spent sorbents that are highly enriched with arsenic, chromium, copper, and zinc. The chemical properties of hydrochar and process liquid were evaluated after HTC treatment, where peat-based spent sorbents were carbonised at 230 °C for 3 h. Analysis of Fourier transform-infrared spectra revealed that during HTC, the oxygenated bonds of ethers, esters, and carboxylic groups were cleaved, and low-molecular-weight organic fragments were dissolved in the process liquid. A large fraction of arsenic (up to 62%), copper (up to 25%), and zinc (up to 36%) were transferred from the solids into the process water. Leaching of these elements from the hydrochars increased significantly in comparison with the spent sorbents.

  • 21.
    Kasiuliene, Alfreda
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Carabante, Ivan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Treatment of metal (loid) contaminated solutions using iron-peat as sorbent: is landfilling a suitable management option for the spent sorbent?2019In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study firstly aimed to investigate the potential of simultaneous metal (loid) removal from metal (oid) solution through adsorption on iron-peat, where the sorbent was made from peat and Fe by-products. Up-flow columns filled with the prepared sorbent were used to treat water contaminated with As, Cu, Cr, and Zn. Peat effectively adsorbed Cr, Cu, and Zn, whereas approximately 50% of inlet As was detected in the eluent. Iron-sand was effective only for adsorbing As, but Cr, Cu, and Zn were poorly adsorbed. Only iron-peat showed the simultaneous removal of all tested metal (loid)s. Metal (loid) leaching from the spent sorbent at reducing conditions as means to assess the behaviour of the spent sorbent if landfilled was also evaluated. For this purpose, a standardised batch leaching test and leaching experiment at reducing conditions were conducted using the spent sorbent. It was found that oxidising conditions, which prevailed during the standardised batch leaching test, could have led to an underestimation of redox-sensitive As leaching. Substantially higher amounts of As were leached out from the spent sorbents at reducing atmosphere compared with oxidising one. Furthermore, reducing environment caused As(V) to be reduced into the more-toxic As (III).

  • 22.
    Kasiuliene, Alfreda
    et al.
    Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Institute of Environment and Ecology, Kaunas.
    Paulauskas, Valdas A.
    Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Institute of Environment and Ecology, Kaunas.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Chelant-Assisted Accumulation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) Biomass as a Renewable Energy Feedstock2016In: Polish Journal of Environmental Studies, ISSN 1230-1485, E-ISSN 2083-5906, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 1985-1993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the environmental concerns regarding soil contamination by heavy metals and the possibility of growing a high biomass-yielding crop (i.e., rapeseed) as a tool of phytoremediation. The aim of our research was to investigate the growth parameters and the capacity of rapeseed to accumulate Cd, Cu, and Zn from the contaminated soil and to investigate the effects of the chelants (EDTA, EDDS) as potential heavy metal mobility-enhancing agents. A pot experiment was performed under greenhouse conditions where rapeseed was grown on heavy metal-contaminated soil taken from former septic drain fields. Chelants were applied twice using doses of 3 mmol kg(-1) of wet soil weight. Plants from contaminated soil produced more biomass and heavier seeds. The highest Cd concentrations were detected in rapeseed stems and leaves: Cu in roots and Zn in seeds and stems with leaves. Rapeseed in some cases exhibited translocation factor values for single plant parts greater than unity, whereas the bioconcentration factor was always below unity. Detected concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Zn in the biomass indicate that rapeseed may be considered an excluder rather than accumulator. Chelant application did not provide the expected enhancing effect on heavy metal uptake by rapeseed.

  • 23.
    Kasiuliene, Alfreda
    et al.
    Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Institute of Environment and Ecology, Kaunas.
    Paulauskas, Valdas A.
    Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Institute of Environment and Ecology, Kaunas.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Influence of nitrogen fertilizer on Cd and Zn accumulation in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) biomass2016In: Media History Monographs, ISSN 1406-894X, E-ISSN 2228-4907, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 418-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffuse soil contamination with heavy metals and Cd in particular is a matter of serious concern. Application of conventional remediation methods usually is not feasible due to the large territories and relatively low heavy metal content. Thus, phytoremediation is seen as an alternative. Rapeseed was grown on Cd and Zn contaminated as well as clean soil under the greenhouse conditions. Solid and liquid nitrogen fertilizers were applied during the pot experiment in order to test their influence on heavy metal accumulation in plant tissues. Vegetative parameters were measured four times during the pot experiment and it was concluded, that the elevated concentrations of Cd and Zn in the soil did not disrupt the development of rapeseed plants. Furthermore, plants from contaminated soil produced significantly bigger seeds in comparison to plants from uncontaminated soil. Calculated Bioconcentration factors for rapeseed grown on Cd and Zn contaminated soil in all cases were below unity, thus possibility to use this plant species for phytoextraction purposes is limited, but it can be successfully grown on contaminated land as an energy crop. Application of nitrogen fertilizers had a significant effect on heavy metal accumulation and decreased Cd and Zn concentrations in rapeseed roots and stems with leaves were recorded. Accumulation differences between the liquid and solid fertilizer applications were negligible.

  • 24.
    Kasiuliene, Alfroda
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Carabante, Ivan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Carporale, A.G.
    Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II.
    Adamo, P.
    Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Removal of metal(oid)s from contaminated water using iron-coated peat sorbent2018In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 198, p. 290-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at combining iron and peat to produce a sorbent suitable for a simultaneous removal of cations and anions from a solution. Peat powder, an industrial residue, was coated with iron by immersing peat into iron salt solutions. The adsorption efficiency of the newly produced sorbent towards As, Cr, Cu and Zn was tested by means of batch adsorption experiments at a constant pH value of 5. Coating of Fe on peat significantly increased the adsorption of As (from <5% to 80%) and Cr (from <3% to 25%) in comparison to uncoated peat. Removal of cations on coated peat slightly decreased (by 10–15%), yet remained within acceptable range. Electron Microscopy combined with X-Ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy revealed that iron coating on the peat was rather homogenous and As and Cr were abundantly adsorbed on the surface. By contrast, Cu and Zn displayed a sparing distribution on the surface of the iron coated peat. These results indicate that iron-peat simultaneously target sufficient amounts of both cations and anions and can be used for a one-step treatment of contaminated groundwater

  • 25.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Aktivitet: Nätverket Renare mark, höstmöte2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Assessment of trace element stabilization in soil2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis deals with the remediation of trace element contaminated soil by the chemical stabilization technique. The objective is to complement the knowledge about possibilities of applying the stabilization either (1) as an alternate soil remediation method to excavation and landfilling or (2) for a pre-treatment of contaminated soil before landfilling. The work is based on two case studies of the stabilization of 1) Cr, Cu, As, and Zn contaminated soil using metallic iron and 2) Pb and Cu contaminated soil amended with coal fly ash and natural organic matter. The questions in focus were: How efficient the stabilization is in a multi-element contaminated soil? How to assess the soil stabilization efficiency? Is the technique sufficiently developed to be used in large scale applications? A literature review, laboratory and pilot scale field experiments were performed to answer the raised questions. A relevance of various methods for the stability evaluations, as well as environmental, regulatory and economic aspects managing the treated soil are discussed.

  • 27.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Assessment of trace element stabilization in soil by short- and long-term leaching tests: results after 3 years assessment of trace element stabilization in soil with different types of amendments2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stabilization technique was applied to treat contaminated soils in laboratory and pilot scale field (lysimeter) experiments. Three types of amendments were tested for their abilities to reduce contaminant mobility in soil: zerovalet iron, coal fly ash from wood and coal combustion, and natural organic matter - peat. The stabilization of the soils contaminated with Pb and Cu (soil S) and wood impregnation chemical cremated copper arsenate (CCA) (soil R), as assessed by batch leaching tests, significantly reduced the leaching of all analyzed elements. Treatment efficiency decreased in the following order (%): Pb(>99)>Cu(98) in soil S and As(99)≈Zn(99)>Cu(93)>Cr(57) in soil R. The results obtained from the lysimeter experiments over a three-year observation period showed nearly as high treatment efficiency as that achieved in the laboratory experiments.

  • 28.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Immobilisation of arsenic in landfilled soil using amendments2012In: Understanding the geological and medical interface of arsenic, As2012: 4th International Congress Arsenic in the Environment, Sebel Cairns International Hotel, Cairns, Australia, 22-27 July 2012 / [ed] Jack C. Ng, Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2012, p. 326-327Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to assess the leaching of Arsenic (As) from chemically stabilized soil using sulfur-containing amendments under simulated landfill conditions (anaerobic environment). Three soils from former wood impregnation plants containing 270-4590 mg/kg As were mixed either with Coal Fly Ash (CFA), Calcium Sulfate (CaSO 4) or Calcium Sulfide (CaS) (3 wt% each) and incubated for one month in an anaerobic environment. None of the soil amendments were effective to reduce As leaching in anaerobic environment to the levels that were measured in aerobic conditions

  • 29.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Immobilisation of metals leached from municipal waste incineration bottom ashes2004In: Norsk-svenskt miljökemiskt vintermöte, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Role of soil organic matter for immobilisation of metals: treatment of leachate from MSWI bottom ashes2003Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, the focus is laid on the ability of natural organic matter (OM) to serve as a metal stabilising agent. The metal contaminants investigated arise from the MSWI bottom ash leachate. Besides the high content of metals, elevated pH and salinity are characteristic for ash leachate that, in turn, can alter the functionality of OM. Batch and column leaching tests were used to study the retention capacity of substrates with different amount of OM. Also, field observations were made of the influence of ash leachate on soil and plants. In this case, ash leachate was generated under field conditions from an experimental road built on municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ashes. It has been shown that copper, chromium, and lead retention is proportional to OM content of the substrates. Zinc retention showed to have the least dependence on OM. The metals were not leached in proportion to dissolved OM. Most probably several mechanisms were responsible for the retention of metals: (i) high concentration of Ca in ash leachate could lead to the formation of Ca-dissolved organic carbon (DOC) complexes that have the ability to precipitate some metals (ionic strength effect) and prevent metal transport; (ii) high solution pH could favour hydroxide formation and counteract the metal complexation with dissolved OM, as well as (iii) surface adsorption could contribute to metal retention. Despite the good metal retention capacity of OM, a continuous metal load will occupy binding sites of OM and therefore reduce its retention capacity. Metal retention capacity of rich in OM substrate could be improved by additional soil amendments and vegetation. Tolerant plant species that are capable to grow at high soil metal concentrations and immobilize pollutants within the root zone have a potential to be used for phytostabilisation of metal contaminated soil. Such plants are also associated with a low risk of the translocation of contaminants from soil through plant roots to shoots, i.e. from one media to another. Immobilization is not a technology for the removal of contaminants from soil but for the stabilization (inactivation) of potentially toxic metals. The aim of soil remediation is to reduce the contaminant exposure and spread. Then the reduced leaching, bioavailability, as well as ecotoxicity of metals as a result of phytostabilisation might be a proper solution. Development of suitable soil and amendment mixtures capable to retain broad range of metals and interaction of plants with stabilised matrix are the questions to be answered in the future research.

  • 31.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Trace element immobilization in soil using amendments2010In: Trace Elements in Soils, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2010, p. 353-380Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Utilisation of iron-stabilised soil for vegetation cover of landfills2008In: Contaminants and nutrients: availability, accumulation/exclusion and plant-microbia-soil interactions: WG1 Meeting. Book of Abstracts / [ed] Desana Liskova; Alexander Lux; Michal Martinka, Mgr. Pavola Cibulka, Copycentrum PACI , 2008, p. 39-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33. Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Andreas, Lale
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Utilization of chemically stabilized soil in a landfill top cover2008In: The 5th Intercontinental Landfill Research Symposium: 10-12 Sep 2008, Copper Mountain, CO, USA, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Antelo, Juan
    Technological Research Institute, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Carabante, Ivan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ek, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Komárek, Michael
    Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Czech Republic.
    Söderberg, Charlotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Wårell, Linda
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    In situ chemical stabilization of trace element-contaminated soil: Field demonstrations and barriers to transition from laboratory to the field : A review2019In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 100, p. 335-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chemical stabilization, or immobilization, of trace elements (metals and metalloids; TE) in contaminated soil has been studied for decades. A vast number of scientific publications are available on the method performance in laboratory settings, reporting that the application of various soil amendments to contaminated soil reduces TE mobility, bioavailability and toxicity. The most commonly used soil amendments include organic matter, iron oxides, phosphates, ashes, and lately biochar, alone or in combination with each other and/or lime. Most of the implemented field studies show a certain degree of improvement in soil and/or vegetation status following amendment. Regardless the positive performance of the technique in the laboratory, field validations and demonstrations remain scarce. The establishment of a field experiment often involves permits from authorities and agreements with site owners, both of which are considerably more time-consuming than laboratory tests. Due to conservative institutional structures, public authorities have been slow to adopt alternative remediation technologies, especially when the total TE concentration in soil remains the same and all of the associated risks are not yet convincingly described. For this reason, researchers should also focus on enhancing public knowledge of alternative remediation techniques so that future projects which aim to demonstrate the effectiveness of in situ immobilization techniques under natural conditions will be supported.

  • 35.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Bert, Valérie
    INERIS, Technologies and Sustainable and Clean Processes, Parc Technologique Alata, BP2, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte.
    Dimitriou, Ioannis
    Swedish University of Agriculture Sciences, Department of Crop Production Ecology.
    Eriksson, Jan
    Swedish University of Agriculture Sciences, Department of Soil and Environment.
    Friesl-Hani, Wolfgang
    AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Health and Environment Department.
    Galazka, Rafal
    Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute.
    Herzig, Rolf
    Phytotech Foundation and AGB, Quartiergasse 12, 3013 Bern.
    Janssen, Jolien
    Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek.
    Kidd, Petra
    Instituto de Investigaciones Agrobiológicas de Galicia (IIAG), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Santiago de Compostela.
    Mench, Michel
    UMR BIOGECO INRA 1202, Ecology of Communities, Bordeaux 1 University.
    Müller, Ingo
    Saxon State Office for Environment, Agriculture and Geology, Pillnitzer Platz 3, 01326 Dresden.
    Neu, Silke
    Saxon State Office for Environment, Agriculture and Geology, Pillnitzer Platz 3, 01326 Dresden.
    Oustriere, Nadège
    INRA, UMR1202 BIOGECO, F-33610 Cestas, France and Université de Bordeaux.
    Puschenreiter, Markus
    University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna — BOKU, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences.
    Renella, Giancarlo
    University of Florence, Department of Agrifood Production and Environmental Sciences, P.le delle Cascine 28, I-50144 Florence.
    Roumier, Pierre-Hevré
    Instituto de Investigaciones Agrobiológicas de Galicia (IIAG), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Santiago de Compostela.
    Siebielec, Grzegorz
    Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute.
    Vangronsveld, Jaco
    Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, B-3590 Diepenbeek.
    Manier, Nicolas
    INERIS, Expertise and Assays in Ecotoxicology, Parc Technologique Alata.
    Selecting chemical and ecotoxicological test batteries for risk assessment of trace element-contaminated soils (phyto)managed by gentle remediation options (GRO)2014In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 496, p. 510-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past decades a number of field trials with gentle remediation options (GRO) have been established on trace element (TE) contaminated sites throughout Europe. Each research group selects different methods to assess the remediation success making it difficult to compare efficacy between various sites and treatments. This study aimed at selecting a minimum risk assessment battery combining chemical and ecotoxicological assays for assessing and comparing the effectiveness of GRO implemented in seven European case studies. Two test batteries were pre-selected; a chemical one for quantifying TE exposure in untreated soils and GRO-managed soils and a biological one for characterizing soil functionality and ecotoxicity. Soil samples from field studies representing one of the main GROs (phytoextraction in Belgium, Sweden, Germany and Switzerland, aided phytoextraction in France, and aided phytostabilization or in situ stabilization/phytoexclusion in Poland, France and Austria) were collected and assessed using the selected test batteries. The best correlations were obtained between NH4NO3-extractable, followed by NaNO3-extractable TE and the ecotoxicological responses. Biometrical parameters and biomarkers of dwarf beans were the most responsive indicators for the soil treatments and changes in soil TE exposures. Plant growth was inhibited at the higher extractable TE concentrations, while plant stress enzyme activities increased with the higher TE extractability. Based on these results, a minimum risk assessment battery to compare/biomonitor the sites phytomanaged by GROs might consist of the NH4NO3 extraction and the bean Plantox test including the stress enzyme activities.

  • 36.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Professional Support. EXTfinansiering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Andreas, Lale
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Project: North Waste Infrastructure2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Taraškevičius, Ričardas
    Institute of Geology and Geography, Nature Research Centre.
    Aksamitauskas, Česlovas
    Vilnius Gediminas Technical University.
    Zinkutė, Rimantė
    Institute of Geology and Geography, Nature Research Centre.
    Spatial variability of topsoil contamination with trace elements in Preschools in Vilnius, Lithuania2011In: Journal of Geochemical Exploration, ISSN 0375-6742, E-ISSN 1879-1689, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 15-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An investigation of the spatial variability of topsoil contamination level was performed in 49 preschool playgrounds located in Vilnius city and correlated with urban (height and age of the preschools and height of surrounding buildings) and natural (altitude) factors. Composite samples, consisting of 20-30 sub-samples, were collected from 10 cm topsoil layer with a 3-5 m distance from each other. Sieved fraction (< 0.63 mm) was ashed at 400 °C, ground to < 1.0 μm and analysed for the real total concentrations of 22 trace elements (Ag, B, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Ga, Li, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Pb, Sc, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, Y, Yb, Zn and Zr) using optical atomic emission spectrophotometry. Information on construction year and height (number of building stories) of preschool and surrounding buildings was acquired from the Centre of Registers of Lithuania. Out of 22 analysed elements, 13 to a greater extent exceeded the background values in several areas and were used to calculate the total contamination index (Zs13). Out of 49 analysed areas, 21 had moderately hazardous to hazardous levels of contamination as indicated by Zs13. The main contaminating elements, exceeding the permissible concentrations were Ag, Cu, Mo, Pb, Sn and Zn, the origins of which coincide with city industry and traffic. Topsoil around the newer preschool buildings, despite their location, contained lower concentrations of contaminants, while areas at higher altitudes were more contaminated than those located at lower altitudes. The latter causality is biased, as the city industry, and hence the highest contamination, is in districts located higher above sea level than the remaining studied sites.

  • 38.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Wolters, Martin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Skoglund, Nils
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Cirba, Stasys
    Department of Mathematical Modelling, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University.
    Aksamitauskas, Vladislovas Ceslovas
    Department of Geodesy and Cadastre, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University.
    Phosphorus and cadmium availability in soil fertilized with biosolids and ashes2016In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 151, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recycling of hygienized municipal sewage sludge (biosolids) to soil as the source of phosphorus (P) is generally encouraged. The use of biosolids, however, has some concerns, such as the presence of elevated concentrations of potentially toxic trace elements, and the possible presence of pathogens, hormones and antibiotics. Organic substances are destroyed during combustion whereas trace elements could partly be separated from P in different ash fractions. Biomass combustion waste (ash) can instead be considered as an alternative P source. This study evaluates and compares the impact of biosolids and their combustion residues (ashes), when used as fertilizers, on P and Cd solubility in soil, plant growth and plant uptake of these elements. Biosolids were also amended with K and Ca to improve the composition and properties of P in ashes, and incinerated at either 800 °C or 950 °C. Combustion of biosolids improved the Cd/P ratio in ashes by 2-5 times, compared with the initial biosolids. The low Cd content in ashes (4-9 mg Cd (kg P)-1) makes this material a particularly attractive alternative to mineral fertilizers. Significantly higher pore water P (as well as total N) was measured in soils containing biosolids, but plants produced a higher biomass in soil fertilized with ashes. The K and Ca amendments prior to biosolids combustion generally decreased the total Cd in ash, but had little effect on P and Cd uptake and biomass growth. Similarly, the combustion temperature had negligible effect on these factors as well

  • 39.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Desogus, Paolo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Schulenburg, Sven
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Arenella, Mariarita
    Department of Plant, Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Florence.
    Renella, Giancarlo
    Department of Plant, Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Florence.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Andreas, Lale
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Utilisation of chemically stabilized arsenic-contaminated soil in a landfill cover2013In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 8649-8662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to determine if an As-contaminated soil, stabilized using zerovalent iron (Fe0) and its combination with gypsum waste, coal fly ash, peat, or sewage sludge, could be used as a construction material at the top layer of the landfill cover. A reproduction of 2 m thick protection/vegetation layer of a landfill cover using a column setup was used to determine the ability of the amendments to reduce As solubility and stimulate soil functionality along the soil profile. Soil amendment with Fe0 was highly efficient in reducing As in soil porewater reaching 99 % reduction, but only at the soil surface. In the deeper soil layers (below 0.5 m), the Fe treatment had a reverse effect, As solubility increased dramatically exceeding that of the untreated soil or any other treatment by one to two orders of magnitude. A slight bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri was detected in the Fe0 treatment. Soil amendment with iron and peat showed no toxicity to bacteria and was the most efficient in reducing dissolved As in soil porewater throughout the 2 m soil profile followed by iron and gypsum treatment, most likely resulting from a low soil density and a good air diffusion to the soil. The least suitable combination of soil amendments for As immobilization was a mixture of iron with coal fly ash. An increase in all measured enzyme activities was observed in all treatments, particularly those receiving organic matter. For As to be stable in soil, a combination of amendments that can keep the soil porous and ensure the air diffusion through the entire soil layer of the landfill cover is required.

  • 40.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ecke, Holger
    Maurice, Christian
    Impact of grassed swales on the fate of metals leached from roads built with municipal solid waste incineration bottom ashes2006In: Coal Combustion Byproducts and Environmental Issues: [Seventh International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements held at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden, from June 15-19, 2003], New York: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2006, p. 87-98Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Fitts, Jeffrey
    Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY.
    Mench, Michel
    Bordeaux 1 University.
    X-ray spectroscopic analyses of As contaminated mining spoils 10 years after chemical stabilization2009In: 10th International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements: Frontiers in Trace Elements Reasearch and Education, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Fitts, Jeffrey P.
    Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY.
    Mench, Michel
    Bordeaux 1 University.
    Arsenic fractionation in mine spoils 10 years after aided phytostabilization2012In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 166, p. 82-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aided phytostabilization using a combination of compost, zerovalent iron grit and coal fly ash (CZA) amendments and revegetation effectively promoted the biological recovery of mining spoils generated at a gold mine in Portugal. Selective dissolution of spoil samples in combination with solid phase characterization using microbeam X-ray absorption near edge structure (μXANES) spectroscopy and microbeam X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) mapping were used to assess As associations in spoils ten years after CZA treatment. The results show that As preferentially associates with poorly crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxides as opposed to crystalline Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide phases. The crystalline Fe(III)-phases dominated in the treated spoil and exceeded those of the untreated spoil three-fold, but only 2.6–6.8% of total As was associated with this fraction. Correlation maps of As:Fe reveal that As in the CZA-treated spoils is primarily contained in surface coatings as precipitates and sorbates. Arsenic binding with poorly crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxides did not inhibit As uptake by plants.

  • 43.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Giagnoni, Laura
    Department of Agrifood Production and Environmental Sciences, University of Florence.
    Marschner, Bernd
    Ruhr-Universität Bochum.
    Denys, Sébastien
    Joint Research Unit (UMR) Biodiversity, Genes & Communities (BIOGECO), French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA).
    Mench, Michel
    Agence Nationale de Sécurité Sanitaire (Anses).
    Andriaensen, Kristin
    i-CLEANTECH Vlaanderen.
    Vangronsveld, Jaco
    Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences.
    Puschenreiter, Markus
    University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna.
    Renella, Giancarlo
    Department of Agrifood Production and Environmental Sciences, University of Florence.
    Assessment of Methods for Determining Bioavailability of Trace Elements in Soils: A Review2017In: Pedosphere, ISSN 1002-0160, E-ISSN 2210-5107, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 389-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trace element-contaminated soils (TECSs) are one of the consequences of the past industrial development worldwide. Excessive exposure to trace elements (TEs) represents a permanent threat to ecosystems and humans worldwide owing to the capacity of metal(loid)s to cross the cell membranes of living organisms and of human epithelia, and their interference with cell metabolism. Quantification of TE bioavailability in soils is complicated due to the polyphasic and reactive nature of soil constituents. To unravel critical factors controlling soil TE bioavailability and to quantify the ecological toxicity of TECSs, TEs are pivotal for evaluating excessive exposure or deficiencies and controlling the ecological risks. While current knowledge on TE bioavailability and related cumulative consequences is growing, the lack of an integrated use of this concept still hinders its utilization for a more holistic view of ecosystem vulnerability and risks for human health. Bioavailability is not generally included in models for decision making in the appraisal of TECS remediation options. In this review we describe the methods for determining the TE bioavailability and technological developments, gaps in current knowledge, and research needed to better understand how TE bioavailability can be controlled by sustainable TECS management altering key chemical properties, which would allow policy decisions for environmental protection and risk management

  • 44.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Granström, H.
    Ruth, E.
    Maurice, Christian
    Immobilization of contaminants from bottom ashes: the role of soil organic matter2003In: Journal of Environmental Engineering and Landscape Management, ISSN 1648-6897, E-ISSN 1822-4199, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 14-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The utilization of bottom ashes from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) in road constructions might cause environmental problems due to the release of toxic metals. The present work is aimed at studying the suitability of soil as a treatment facility of metals leached out from bottom ashes. A laboratory experiment with three types of soil (forest soil, peat and mould soil), and with sand as a reference substrate, was performed to determine the binding capacity of each substrate towards heavy metals, such as Cu and Cr(VI). The results indicated that all the substrates were capable of removing on average 99,3 % of Cu from the solution, while only peat showed a high retention of Cr(VI) (96,2 %). The retention of Cr(VI) was directly proportional to the soil organic matter (SOM) content, while the retention of Cu had no correlation with the SOM of the substrates. A high retention of Cu shown by sand was due to its high content of pH which could favor the precipitation of Cu(OH)2. A synergetic effect of Cu on the retention of Cr(VI) by sand and mould was detected, i.e. increasing concentrations of Cu in the solution increased the retention of Cr. In all the other cases there was no statistically significant interaction between the retention of Cu and Cr(VI) by the analysed substrates.

  • 45.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Guerri, G.
    University of Florence.
    Landi, L.
    University of Florence.
    Pietramellara, G.
    University of Florence.
    Nannipieri, P.
    University of Florence.
    Renella, G.
    University of Florence.
    Microbial biomass, respiration and enzyme activities after in situ aided phytostabilization of a Pb- and Cu-contaminated soil2009In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 115-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted a pilot-scale experiment to study the effects of an aided phytostabilisation on soil microbial and biological endpoints in an ore dust-contaminated soil. Soil was amended with alkaline fly ashes plus peat to reduce mobility of trace elements and vegetated with a proprietary grass/herb mixture. Results indicated that the proposed aided phytostabilization approach of Cu-Pb contaminaed soil significantly increased microbial biomass and respiration, reduced microbial stress and increased key soil enzyme activities. Further research is needed to unambiguously determine whether the soil biochemical endpoints that were studied responded more to decreased metal mobility or to general soil amelioration.

  • 46.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Referensdata för miljöbedömning av alternativa material i sluttäckning av avfallsupplag2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil is commonly used materials in top layers of landfill covers with the consumptions rates in Sweden reaching several million tons per year. Soil stabilization techniques may allow utilisation of soil containing elevated concentrations of trace elements as a secondary construction material at landfills; by this considerably reducing the demand for landfill capacity, clean soil and transports. Materials classified as waste are tested differently from the conventional materials (which are usually not investigated at all). It means that it becomes more complicated to use secondary materials and they are often disregarded, although in practice they can have just as good or even better properties than virgin materials. In order to make a reasonable evaluation of the suitability of stabilised soil for landfill covers, a comparison with the quality of the conventional materials used in landfill vegetation layers should be performed. The aim of the project was to collect data on the chemical properties of the vegetation layer with conventional materials that can be used as a reference for the evaluation of alternative construction materials. Soil and soil pore water samples were taken from the 25-30 cm depth of the upper cover layer at several areas within six landfill sites in Sweden (in total 16 sampling points). The samples were tested for total solids and loss on ignition (soil only), electrical conductivity, pH, redox potential and chemical element content. Leaching test (L/S10) and methane oxidation test were also performed with the soil samples. The studied vegetation covers of landfills varied extensively in chemical composition, where elemental concentrations differed between the materials with several orders of magnitude. Despite the high total concentrations of trace elements, their solubility was relatively low. Most materials can be classified as inert waste and in five of sixteen cases as non-hazardous waste. Soil pore water from three covers had metal concentrations that exceeded the limits at which the effects on water organisms may start to occur. However, this comparison is a conservative estimate of potential impacts on water environment as the pore water from the covers is affected by various processes, such as adsorption and dilution before it reaches groundwater or surface water. Methane oxidising capacity of the top cover materials correlated to some degree with the amount of organic matter and it also tended to be higher in younger covers. No causality can be established on the basis of available data, but it seems reasonable that an abundant supply of landfill gas, nutrients and water has been beneficial for methane oxidation in the younger covers that also contained higher amounts of organic matter.

  • 47. Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Maurice, Christian
    Retention of metals leached from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ashes in soils2006In: Soil & sediment contamination, ISSN 1532-0383, E-ISSN 1549-7887, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 429-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Utilization of bottom ash in road construction may lead to a release of contaminants that can affect the soil of the swales constructed along these roads. Column tests were performed to evaluate the retention behavior of Cu, Cr, Zn, and Pb, originating from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash leachate, in two substrates: peat and mould (a cultural soil). A chemical sequential extraction method was used to predict the risk associated with the release of the retained elements with modifications of environmental conditions. Apart from the dissolution of organic matter (OM), ash leachate properties hindered the metal transport from peat. Mould was efficient only in removing Zn, making it a less favorable substrate for the leachate control along the roads. Readily soluble forms made up a minor fraction of the retained metals in peat, reducing the risk of metal release due to ion exchange and pH drop. Changes in redox potential might be the main cause of Zn desorption from peat as the Fe-Mn oxides were the main scavengers for this metal. Oxidation of OM would be the primary reason of Cu and Cr release, while for Pb both fractions (Fe-Mn oxides and OM) might equally contribute to the metal discharge.

  • 48. Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Maurice, Christian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Stabilization of As, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in soil using amendments: a review2008In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 215-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spread of contaminants in soil can be hindered by the soil stabilization technique. Contaminant immobilizing amendments decrease trace element leaching and their bioavailability by inducing various sorption processes: adsorption to mineral surfaces, formation of stable complexes with organic ligands, surface precipitation and ion exchange. Precipitation as salts and co-precipitation can also contribute to reducing contaminant mobility. The technique can be used in in situ and ex situ applications to reclaim and re-vegetate industrially devastated areas and mine-spoils, improve soil quality and reduce contaminant mobility by stabilizing agents and a beneficial use of industrial by-products. This study is an overview of data published during the last five years on the immobilization of one metalloid, As, and four heavy metals, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn, in soils. The most extensively studied amendments for As immobilization are Fe containing materials. The immobilization of As occurs through adsorption on Fe oxides by replacing the surface hydroxyl groups with the As ions, as well as by the formation of amorphous Fe(III) arsenates and/or insoluble secondary oxidation minerals. Cr stabilization mainly deals with Cr reduction from its toxic and mobile hexavalent form Cr(VI) to stable in natural environments Cr(III). The reduction is accelerated in soil by the presence of organic matter and divalent iron. Clays, carbonates, phosphates and Fe oxides were the common amendments tested for Cu immobilization. The suggested mechanisms of Cu retention were precipitation of Cu carbonates and oxyhydroxides, ion exchange and formation of ternary cation-anion complexes on the surface of Fe and Al oxy-hydroxides. Most of the studies on Pb stabilization were performed using various phosphorus-containing amendments, which reduce the Pb mobility by ionic exchange and precipitation of pyromorphite-type minerals. Zn can be successfully immobilized in soil by phosphorus amendments and clays.

  • 49. Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Maurice, Christian
    Stabilization of Pb- and Cu-contaminated soil using coal fly ash and peat2007In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 145, no 1, p. 365-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The stabilization of metal contaminated soil is being tested as an alternative remediation method to landfilling. An evaluation of the changes in Cu and Pb mobility and bioavailability in soil induced by the addition of coal fly ash and natural organic matter (peat) revealed that the amount of leached Cu decreased by 98.2% and Pb by 99.9%, as assessed by a batch test. Metal leaching from the treated soil was lower by two orders of magnitude compared to the untreated soil in the field lysimeters. A possible formation of mineral Cu- and Pb-bearing phases and active surface with oxides were identified by chemical equilibrium calculations. Low metal leaching during a two-year observation period, increased seed germination rate, reduced metal accumulation in plant shoots, and decreased toxicity to plants and bacteria, thereby demonstrating this stabilization method to be a promising technique for in situ remediation of Cu and Pb contaminated soil. Copper and lead mobility and bioavailability in soil can be effectively reduced by using a combination of coal fly ash and peat as soil amendments.

  • 50.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Lidelöw, Sofia
    Maurice, Christian
    Impact of water saturation level on arsenic leaching in iron-stabilized soil2007Conference paper (Other academic)
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