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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Project: Fuzzy front end - ledning och organisering av produkt- och processinnovation2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vinnova

  • 2.
    Anokhin, Sergey
    et al.
    Department of Marketing and Entrepreneurship, Kent State University.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A conceptual framework for misfit technology commercialization2011In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 78, no 6, p. 1060-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emerging literature on outbound open innovation has highlighted innovation processes, which presuppose active outward technology transfer to increase firm profits. To contribute to this discourse, our paper goes beyond the emphasis on core-related technologies and knowledge that currently dominates the technology management literature and develops the novel concept of misfit technology. This concept captures technologies that are not aligned with a focal firm's current knowledge base and/or business model, but which may still be of great value to the firm if alternative commercialization options are considered. By developing a framework that acknowledges (1) Sources of misfit technology, (2) Environmental uncertainty, (3) Organizational slack, (4) Industry appropriability regime and (5) Technological complexity, we theorize on how different modes of commercialization relate to misfit technology commercialization success. The paper is conceptual and is presented with the purpose to spawn further research on this important topic, but simultaneously touches upon the issues of utmost relevance to R&D management practice

  • 3.
    Brattström, Anna
    et al.
    Lund University .
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Anders, Richtner
    Stockholm School of Economics .
    Björk, Jennie
    The Royal Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Boxing in and box breaking of attention: A process model of innovation measurement2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Brattström, Anna
    et al.
    Sten K Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, Lund University.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Richtnér, Anders
    Stockholm School of Economics .
    Pfluger, Dane
    HEC, Paris .
    Can innovation be measured?: A framework of how measurement of innovation engages attention in firms2018In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 48, p. 64-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many firms manage the innovation process by using metrics. Yet, whether measurement supports or hinders innovation continues to be a topic of debate. To shed new light on this debate, this paper presents a conceptual framework of how measurement engages attention in firms. We draw on attention based theory and conceptualize innovation measurement as an attention-focusing device. We identify two ideal types of measurement practices. i) Directional Measurement: which is based on few and unidirectional metrics and encourages exploitative innovation efforts. ii) Conversational Measurement: which is based on multiple and ambiguous metrics and encourages exploration. We extend theory building in the technology and accounting literatures by theorizing the role of metrics and measurement for attention and by discussing the implications of such attentional engagement for innovation performance. In so doing, we engage closely with the managerial task of managing innovation while simplifying its conditions, thereby providing actionable advice.

  • 5.
    Dusana, Hullova
    et al.
    University of Portsmouth.
    Pavel, Laczko
    University of Portsmouth.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A Knowledge-flow Framework for Transitioning from a Product-centric Business to Provider of a Customer-centric Solution2017In: BAM 2017, Warwick, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Patel, Pankaj C.
    Villanova University, Villanova School of Business.
    Rönnberg Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Managing Interorganizational Innovation Projects: Mitigating the Negative Effects of Equivocality Through Knowledge Search Strategies2016In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 691-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equivocality, or divergent interpretations and understandings of tasks and knowledge, has negative effects on performance because it increases conflicts and creates communication and coordination challenges in inter-organizational innovation projects. However, equivocality may also stimulate team members to discuss beliefs and interpretations in ways that provide improved understanding of knowledge and tasks. We theorize that mitigation of negative effects of equivocality on project performance is conditional on explorative or exploitative knowledge search mode. Exploitative search (increasing search depth) allows for rapid learning based on the partners' existing knowledge, but it also limits a team's ability to interpret and combine diverse knowledge. Explorative search (increasing search breadth), on the other hand, allows for novel combinations of diverse knowledge and thereby alleviates the negative effect of equivocality on performance. Based on quantitative data from 251 respondents in 52 heavy-engineering innovation projects in four multinational corporations based in Sweden and from their 29 collaborating partner firms worldwide, we find that equivocality reduces project performance, but that joint explorative search mitigates the negative effect of equivocality on project performance. However, we do not find support for the moderation effect of exploitative search on the relationship between equivocality and project performance. Theoretical and managerial contributions as well as limitations and suggestions for future research are presented

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sjödin, David Rönnberg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Osäkerhet och tvetydighet: problem i investeringsprojekt2013In: Process Nordic, ISSN 1652-0114, p. 8-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Floren, Henrik
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    From preliminary ideas to corroborated product definitions: managing the front end of new product development2012In: California Management Review, ISSN 0008-1256, E-ISSN 2162-8564, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 20-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Front-end activities largely influence the outcomes of new product development processes, because it is here that firms create new ideas, give them direction, and set them in motion. We show that the front end can be understood as comprising three core activities: idea/concept development, idea/concept alignment, and idea/concept legitimization, which allow firms to create corroborated product definitions. This article provides important implications for managers interested in front-end management. It devotes specific attention to the differences between incremental and radical front-end development and to the front end in the light of increasingly open innovation processes.

  • 9. Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Where new product development begins: critical success factors, concepts and controversies in the fuzzy front end2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Lee, Carmen
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Ericsson, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Höganäs AB.
    A Framework for Raw Materials Management in Process Industries2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Center for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Halmstad University .
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Löf, Anton
    Raw Materials Group, Stockholm.
    Ericsson, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Raw materials management in iron and steelmaking firms2018In: Mineral Economics, ISSN 2191-2203, E-ISSN 2191-2211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper adds new knowledge on how raw materials should be managed in iron and steelmaking firms. While previous research has contributed significantly to how firms should deal with functional challenges related to raw materials, the understanding of Raw Materials Management from a holistic perspective is largely lacking, and extant research does not provide qualified advice to firms on this matter. This study provides such knowledge by drawing on insights from Höganäs AB, a world leader in ferrous powder metallurgy, and their efforts to identify key aspects and principles of raw materials management. Our elaboration of a more holistic view on raw materials management builds on two elements. First, we depict five external uncertainties and three internal conditions that impact firm-level raw materials management. Second, we present six critical capabilities that underpin proficient firm-level raw materials management. The paper concludes with a discussion of implications for both firms aiming to increase their raw materials proficiency and to future investigations into this important area.

  • 12.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Critical success factors in early new product development: a review and a conceptual model2018In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 411-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on the front end in the New Product Development (NPD) literature is fragmented with respect to the identification and analysis of the factors that are critical to successful product development. The article has a two-fold purpose. First, it describes, analyses, and synthesizes those factors through a literature review of the research on the front end in NPD. Second, it conceptualizes a framework that features two types of success factors: foundational success factors (common to all the firm’s projects) and project-specific success factors (appropriate for the firm’s individual projects). The article makes recommendations for the management of this important phase of product development, discusses limitations of relevant previous research, and offers suggestions for future research. The article makes a theoretical contribution with its analysis and synthesis of the reasons for success in front-end activities and a practical contribution with its conceptual framework that can be used as an analytical tool by firms and their product managers.

  • 13. Frishammar, Johan
    An exploration of motives for further studying the link between environmental scanning and innovation2003In: Innovation management, Halmstad, 2003, p. 77-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14. Frishammar, Johan
    Characteristics in information processing approaches2002In: International Journal of Information Management, ISSN 0268-4012, E-ISSN 1873-4707, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 143-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and compares different information processing approaches (terms). The purpose is to identify similarities and differences in the terms, relate them to and compare them with each other, but also to identify their underlying concepts and the course of events they represent. The terms or approaches addressed are Environmental scanning, Business, Competitive, Competitor, Market and Political intelligence, Marketing research and Information management. It was concluded that all approaches have a strong future orientation and strong ties to decision-making, and advocate that information is ennobled in one way or the other. The main differences lie in their focus, and in their scope.

  • 15. Frishammar, Johan
    Fragments of a framework for studying information use in new product development2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16. Frishammar, Johan
    Information use in strategic decision making2003In: Management Decision, ISSN 0025-1747, E-ISSN 1758-6070, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 318-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the issue of information use in strategic decision making. The study employs a case study as a research strategy together with personal interviews and documentation as means of data collection. The starting-point is four specific strategic decisions recently made by medium-sized companies in Sweden. The study provides the reader with an insight into management information behaviour when taking strategic decisions, by addressing questions such as: Why is information used? What kind of information does management use? How do they obtain it? And finally, where do they obtain it? In addition, a short review of the literature pertaining to the above stated questions is provided.

  • 17. Frishammar, Johan
    Intelligence use in offensive and defensive strategic decision-making2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18. Frishammar, Johan
    Managing information in new product development: a literature review2005In: International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management (IJITM), ISSN 0219-8770, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 259-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new product development (NPD) process is frequently described as a sequence of information processing activities, but "information in NPD" occupies a broader conceptual space than the reduction of uncertainty. This article reviews the area of "information in NPD" by examining the literature on environmental scanning, market orientation, gatekeepers, cross-functional integration, and information use. It is argued that we can understand the process of managing information in terms of three steps: Acquiring, sharing and using. A tentative framework for this area is proposed, and managerial implications resulting from this literature review and tentative frame are outlined and presented.

  • 19.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Organizational environment revisited: a conceptual review and integration2006In: International Studies of Management and Organization, ISSN 0020-8825, E-ISSN 1558-0911, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 22-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innumerable books and articles state that "the environment" is important to organizations and merits attention, as it is thought to influence organizations' actions as well as outcomes. Still, little agreement exists on what the environment is and how to apprehend it. This paper presents a review of four different perspectives in organization-environment research: the adaptive, the resource-dependence, the cognitive, and the population-ecology perspectives. All perspectives present assumptions about environmental structure, sources of environmental change, level of analysis, and so forth, but they also imply different meta-theoretical assumptions that constitute distinct frames of references. In this paper, the author suggests that the ideas in the realist paradigm in strategy research, the logic of appropriateness, and high general applicability and prescriptive value contribute to explaining the dominant position of the adaptive perspective. It is further argued that viewing "environment" from only one angle is too limited a conceptualization, and "environment" is suggested to be a feasible avenue for combining and integrating characteristics from different perspectives in order to overcome limitations with a single-frame approach.

  • 20.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Three essays on the organization - environment interface2003Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The environment is considered to be of importance to organizations, albeit for different reasons. This thesis presents an introduction to the concept of organizational environment and will provide the reader with a review of four different perspectives in organization - environment thinking. The perspectives reviewed are the adaptive, the resource-dependence, the cognitive, and the population-ecology perspective. These four perspectives are compared and contrasted on seven different dimensions, in an attempt to identify their similarities and differences. There then follows a discussion on how these perspectives relate to the appended papers, the evolution of these papers, and a summary of the papers. Finally, suggestions for future research are presented. There are three appended papers. The first paper, named Characteristics in information processing approaches, aims to describe and compare different information processing approaches. The purpose of the paper is to identify similarities and differences in different terms used to describe information acquisition, relate them to and compare them with each other, but also to identify their underlying concepts and the course of events they represent. The approaches addressed include environmental scanning, business intelligence, and information management. The second paper is entitled Information use in strategic decision-making. This paper addresses the issue of information use in decisions characterized as strategic. The method employed is a case study, where four decisions are highlighted. By addressing questions such as: Why is information used? What kind of information does management use? How do they obtain it? And finally, where do they obtain it?, the study provides the reader with an insight into management information behavior when taking strategic decisions. The third paper, The influence of environmental scanning on innovation performance, addresses the question of weather or not those firms that are better at managing external information also are better innovators. Data were collected by means of a mail survey, and the results show that a positive relationship exists between environmental scanning and innovation performance. Moreover, sharing information across functions/departments as well as using environmental information in decision-making concerning new product/service development were also found to correlate positively with innovation performance. The results also show that firms that are skilful at collecting, sharing and making use of information when deciding on new products/services are those that exhibit the highest degree of innovation performance in comparison with others.

  • 21.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Towards a theory of managing information in new product development2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with various information aspects of new product development (NPD). In total, the thesis consists of 6 research articles appended in full, and an introductory text that integrates and theorizes with and from these papers. The first paper is a review article examining the literature on and role of information in NPD. The main argument put forward here is that information processing can be understood in terms of three steps: acquiring, sharing, and using information. The second paper is a largescale survey that examines the relationship between market and entrepreneurial orien-tation and performance in NPD. A market orientation is to a large extent about acquiring, disseminating and using market information, while an entrepreneurial orientation partly is about ignoring such information, and instead trying to be innovative, proactive, and take risks. The results show that a market orientation and innovativeness are positively related to NPD performance, and that neither product nor environmental characteristics moderate these relationships. The third paper is also a survey, and investigates the extent to which management of external information is associated with innovation performance. The main findings are that scanning the technological sector of the environment was positively associated with innovation performance, while scanning customers, suppliers, and competitors proved to be negatively correlated with innovation performance. Crossfunctional integration in the form of collaboration as well as using information from the industry environment also proved to be positively related to innovation performance. The last three papers have a centre of gravity in “management of information & environ-ment”, and not so much in new product development per se. Paper four describes and com-pares different information processing approaches (e.g. environmental scanning, marketing research) in order to identify their similarities and differences, but also their underlying con-cepts and the course of events they represent. The main conclusion is that differences exist primarily in terms of focus and scope. Paper five is a review and tentative integration of different perspectives in organization – environment research: the adaptive, the resource-dependence, the cognitive and the population-ecology perspective. The review identifies differences and similarities among these perspectives, suggests tentative conclusions on why the adaptive perspective is so frequently utilized at the expense of the other three, and suggests constructivism as a feasible avenue for combining and integrating these perspectives. Finally, the sixth and final paper deals with information use in the context of strategic decisionmaking. With a case study approach, the questions of why information is used, what kind of information is used, where it is obtained, and how it is obtained were addressed, and the results from this paper are mainly descriptive. The purpose of the introductory text is two-fold. In addition to providing integration of the appended papers, the main purpose is theory construction (i.e. elicitation of constructs and propositions). In the introduction, all six appended papers together with a new literature search and a new pilot case study are used to generate propositions about management of information, information sources, and the need for cross-functional integration in three different phases of the NPD process. In addition, suggestions regarding theoretical connections are made. The introduction text concludes with reflections, managerial implications, limitations, and future research.

  • 22.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Andersson, Svante
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    The overestimated role of strategic orientations for international performance in smaller firms2006In: McGill International Entrepreneurship (MIE) Conference: Conference Extended Abstracts, 2006, p. 41-42Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Andersson, Svante
    Halmstad University.
    The overestimated role of strategic orientations for international performance in smaller firms2009In: Journal of International Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1570-7385, E-ISSN 1573-7349, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 57-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how market orientation (MO) and entrepreneurial orientation (EO) relate to international performance in small firms. Empirically, the article draws on survey data from 188 Swedish SMEs. Results show that strategic orientations have a very limited influence on international performance in these firms. Proactiveness and, to some extent, a market orientation proved positively associated with international performance, while innovativeness and risk taking show no such relationship. Our findings highlight the problems associated with using "traditional" MO and EO constructs in an SME setting and point to the need of developing more appropriate constructs tailored to this context. We also note that the MO construct was developed from a "causal view" of marketing, while successful small international firms rely more on effectuation logic. The article also contributes to the debate between the two dominant perspectives that address firms' early internationalization processes: the process theory of internationalization and the international new venture perspective, where our results are in favor of the latter.

  • 24.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Cenamor, Javier
    Department of Business Administration, School of Economics and Management, Lund University.
    Cavalli-Björkman, Harald
    re:newcell AB, Cardellgatan 1, SE-114 36 Stockholm.
    Hernell, Emma
    HUI Research, SE-103 29 Stockholm.
    Carlsson, Johan
    EVRY Sweden AB, Olof Asklunds Gata 10, 421 30 Västra Frölunda.
    Digital strategies for two-sided markets: A case study of shopping malls2018In: Decision Support Systems, ISSN 0167-9236, E-ISSN 1873-5797, Vol. 108, p. 34-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization is fundamentally changing the retailing ecosystem for shopping malls as digital and analogue elements get increasingly intertwined. We conceptualize shopping malls as two-sided markets whose primary function is connecting shoppers and retailers. By means of an interpretative case study, the article then presents an omnichannel strategy typology for how shopping malls can meet the evolving digitalization challenge. We identify three generic strategies labeled digital awaiter, digital data gatherer, and digital embracer. The paper provides implications for research in omnichannel strategies, digitalization, and two-sided markets by explicating different strategies that involve physical and digital resources, and different ecosystem agents, i.e., retailers and shoppers. It also provides insights for other organizations beyond retailing and which operate under a two-sided market regime.

  • 25.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Chronéer, Diana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    An 'inside-out' perspective on managing information in new product development2006In: International Journal of Technology Intelligence and Planning (IJTIP), ISSN 1740-2832, E-ISSN 1740-2840, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 248-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A continuous stream of books and papers has suggested that firms need to apprehend information about environmental factors such as customers, competitors and new technologies in order to enable effective New Product Development (NPD). Often, this literature takes an 'outside-in' perspective, and argues that firms need to utilise tools such as industry structure analysis and the OT component of SWOT to increase NPD performance. This paper outlines an alternative 'inside-out' perspective, and suggests that firms should start not by focusing on the environment, but rather on their resources and capability for managing information. The paper develops and explicates a three-component capability of managing information in NPD. The paper concludes with managerial implications by pointing to a variety of techniques and tools that management and other practitioners involved with NPD can use to build and sustain the capability of managing information.

  • 26.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Dahlskog, Emmy
    I3tex.
    Krumlinde, Charlotte
    WSP Sverige AB.
    Yazgan, Kerem
    Axel Johnson Group.
    The front end for radical innovation: A case study of idea- and concept development at Prime group2016In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 179-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A firm's ability to develop radical innovation is heavily contingent on the front-end phases where ideas and concepts are created, yet few empirical studies provide detailed insights into radical idea and concept development. Using literature on problem finding and problem solving, we explore how radically new ideas and concepts emerge, and outline the process by which they are created. Based on multiple case studies of five completed and two ongoing projects conducted by a highly innovative consultancy firm, Prime Group, the article proposes a six-step process for radical idea and concept development. The insights provide theoretical implications and advice for how firms can increase novelty and success rates of emergent radical ideas and concepts

  • 27.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Dasselaar, Manfred
    Ericsson SE.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    When product meets service: Digitalizing industrial innovation2015In: Ericsson Business Review, ISSN 1653-9486, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ericson, ÅsaLuleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Addressing societal challenges2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Introduction: Addressing societal challenges2018In: Addressing Societal Challenges / [ed] Editors Johan Frishammar Åsa Ericson, Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2018, p. 1-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As an area of excellence in research and innovation, EffectiveInnovation & Organization (EIO) at Luleå University ofTechnology (LTU) represents an important initiative aimedat addressing societal challenges by combining engineeringand social science research. EIO enables the pooling of resourcesfrom various scientific disciplines to address manyof the societal challenges Sweden is currently facing. Thisbook is one result from such pooling of disciplines, resourcesand cross-disciplinary discussions. Here, some leading EIOresearchers have jointly analysed and reflected upon fivekey societal challenges to identify some of their implicationsand future pathways for research at LTU. All of these challengesspan multiple scientific domains, and competence ininnovation and organisation will be critical if they are to beaddressed effectively.

  • 30.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ericsson, Kristian
    TRUMPF Machine Tools International.
    Patel, Pankaj
    Miller College of Business, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana.
    The dark side of knowledge transfer: Exploring knowledge leakage in joint R&D projects2015In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 41-42, p. 75-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge leakage refers to loss of technological knowledge intended to stay within a firm׳s boundaries and may cause a “weakened state” in which a focal firm loses its competitive advantage and industry position. Based on multiple case studies of knowledge leakage in joint research and development (R&D) projects in large firms in Sweden, this paper makes two contributions. First, in contrast to the uni-dimensional dyadic leakage process assumed in the literature, we find that the knowledge leakage process is multi-dimensional and exists in three varieties: i) a process whereby an external party assimilates knowledge from a focal firm, ii) a process whereby an external party assimilates knowledge from another external party, and iii) a process whereby the focal firm uses knowledge already shared with an external party in such a way that it becomes sensitive. Second, where the prior literature suggests that core knowledge must be protected from leakage, we find that some core knowledge can leak without negative effects, whereas some knowledge, being non-core to a focal firm, can have severe negative effects. These insights provide novel theoretical implications and new insights into how firms can manage knowledge leakage in practice.

  • 31.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Floren, Henrik
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    What is the "fuzzy front end", why is it important, and how can it be managed?2009In: Managing Innovation: Integrating technological, market and organizational change, Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, 2009, 4, p. 341-343Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Floren, Henrik
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Beyond managing uncertainty: insights from studying equivocality in the fuzzy front end of product and process innovation projects2011In: IEEE transactions on engineering management, ISSN 0018-9391, E-ISSN 1558-0040, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 551-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown uncertainty reduction to be critical in the fuzzy front end of the innovation process, but little attention has been given to the equally important concept of equivocality, although it is a defining characteristic of many front-end projects. To address this research gap, this paper report the results from a longitudinal, multiple case study of four large companies oriented to both product and process innovation. First, our results show that both uncertainty and equivocality is more effectively reduced in successful front-end projects than in unsuccessful ones. Second, the negative consequences of equivocality appear more critical to front-end performance than the consequences following uncertainty. Third, our results show that uncertainty and equivocality are reduced sequentially in successful projects and simultaneously in unsuccessful projects. Finally, uncertainty and equivocality takes longer time to reduce in process innovation projects than in product innovation projects, which is a consequence of the systemic nature of process innovation. Altogether, these findings provide strong implications for managing front-end projects more proficiently.

  • 33.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Florén, Henrik
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Patterns of uncertainty and equivocality during predevelopment: findings from process-based firms2009In: IAMOT 2009: 18th International Conference on Management of Technology, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous literature suggests that innovation managers should prioritize uncertainty reduction in early phases of innovation projects. When uncertainty is high, the general prediction is negative consequences in the form of time-delays, waste of resources, unclear team vision and, ultimately, concept failure. There are strong reasons to believe, however, that simultaneous management of equivocality is equally important, but this concept has largely been neglected in previous research. By means of a case-study relying upon exploratory interviews addressing unique observations of 58 innovation projects, we notice that the perhaps most significant challenge for being successful or not is not the initial levels of uncertainty. Rather, it is managerial attempts to actively fight for reducing uncertainty but also addressing the equivocality dimension in the pre-development stages of the innovation process. We observe reduced patterns of uncertainty and equivocality in successful product innovation and process innovation projects in pre-development stages. This was not the case for unsuccessful projects. Similarly, we find significantly lower levels of equivocality for successful projects, which is a contribution to prior research suggesting that uncertainty is the major concern during predevelopment. Moreover, our results show that perceived patterns of uncertainty and equivocality differ between product innovation and process innovation projects in different sub-phases of pre-development. Key results are summarized as propositions which not only provide guidance for future research, but also provide direct managerial implications on how to address uncertainty and equivocality in different sub-phases of predevelopment.

  • 34. Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Hörte, Sven-Åke
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Managing external information in manufacturing firms: the impact on innovation performance2005In: The Journal of product innovation management, ISSN 0737-6782, E-ISSN 1540-5885, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 251-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing upon a sample of 206 medium-sized manufacturing firms, this article investigates the extent to which management of external information is associated with innovation performance. The overall purpose of the article is to examine whether or not those organizations that are better at managing external information are also those that are the better innovators. The research strategy used was a survey, and data were collected by means of mail questionnaires (with a 62.4% response rate). A multiple regression analysis was used for hypothesis testing. The results show that scanning the technological sector of the environment was positively associated with innovation performance, while scanning customers, suppliers, and competitors proved to be negatively correlated with innovation performance. Cross-functional integration in the form of collaboration also proved significantly correlated with innovation performance, while interaction showed no such relationship. Further, decision-making based on information from the industry environment correlated significantly with innovation performance. Research and managerial implications of these findings are presented and are discussed.

  • 35. Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Hörte, Sven-Åke
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    The influence of environmental scanning on innovation performance2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36. Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Hörte, Sven-Åke
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    The role of market- and entrepreneurial orientation for NPD performance in smaller firms2005In: Proceedings, 12th Product Development Management Conference: IPDMC 2005, 2005, p. 471-487Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Hörte, Sven-åke
    The role of market orientation and entrepreneurial orientation for new product development performance in manufacturing firms2007In: Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, ISSN 0953-7325, E-ISSN 1465-3990, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 765-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of this article is to examine the relationships between two strategic orientations and performance in new product development. The first orientation considered is market orientation; the second one considered is entrepreneurial orientation, which reflects a firm's propensity to innovate, to be proactive, as well as its willingness to take risks. Drawing upon a sample of 224 mid-sized manufacturing firms, multiple regressions with and without interaction terms were used for testing seven hypotheses. The results show that a market orientation and innovativeness were positively related to performance in new product development, while proactiveness and risk taking show no such relationship. The results also show that neither product characteristics nor environmental characteristics moderate these relationships. In terms of implications, our results suggest that contradictory and to some extent paradoxical capabilities are needed to increase performance in new product development, and that the different components of an entrepreneurial orientation do not impact new product development performance equally

  • 38.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Kurkkio, Monika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Lichtenthaler, Ulrich
    University of Mannheim.
    Antecedents and consequences of firms' process innovation capability: a literature review and a conceptual framework2012In: IEEE transactions on engineering management, ISSN 0018-9391, E-ISSN 1558-0040, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 519-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process innovation can allow both efficiency and effectiveness gains and is a key source of long-term competitive advantage in manufacturing firms. However, the literature on managing process innovation is broad and fragmented, and it has not yet been systematically reviewed in the scholarly literature. Drawing on a capability-based perspective, the aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the process innovation literature. We synthesize our findings into a conceptual framework displaying the antecedents and consequences of firms' process innovation capability. First, a parsimonious review of the process innovation literature is conducted. Second, a conceptual framework of firms' process innovation capability is developed to synthesize the literature and to advance knowledge about managing process innovation. A principal distinction between a firm's potential and realized process innovation capability is drawn, and it is argued that high-quality realization mechanisms are critical for achieving desired process innovation outcomes. Finally, implications for theory, management practice, and recommendations for future research are provided.

  • 39.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Lichtenthaler, Ulrich
    WHU—Otto Beisheim School of Management, Technology and Innovation Management.
    Success factors for managing the fuzzy front end in non-assembled product development: findings from process-based firms2009In: 16th International Product Development Management Conference: "Managing dualities in the innovation journey", University of Twente , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of the article is to empirically identify success factors for managing the fuzzy front end during the development of non‐assembled products, as well as ranking their relative importance. By means of an exploratory case study, we probe existing front‐end practices in three firms within the metal‐ and minerals industry. Such a study is justifiable, as the specific contingency characteristics of process‐based companies make previous research results difficult to transfer. As mutual interdependences exist between product innovation and process innovation in such firms, we ground our thesis not only in the fuzzy front end (FFE) literature but also in the literature on managing process innovation (MPI). Among other things, our findings show that (1) several factors relevant to managing process innovation apply to the FFE for product development as well, e.g. investment in and integration of new process technology, product‐ and process innovation integration, and adequate relationships between labor and management. Furthermore, some factors (i.e. cross‐functionality, project management, early customer involvement, and culture) are paramount to make other factors work, and virtually no factor can be ignored completely.Our findings have major implications for how R&D m

  • 40.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Lichtenthaler, Ulrich
    University of Mannheim.
    Kurkkio, Monika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The front end in non-assembled product development: a multiple case study of mineral- and metal firms2012In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 468-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conceptualize the front end in non-assembled product development to be iterative and experiment-based, consisting of three sub-phases: informal start-up, formal idea-study, and formal pre-study. Although some key activities are shared with the front end activities in assembled product development, literature reviews, anticipating requirements of customers’ production processes, analysis of raw materials, anticipation of scale-up problems, and tests in bench-, pilot plant-, and full scale production represent unique activities. In addition, product concepts were frequently developed in parallel, requiring specification of physical, chemical and structural properties. These findings have implications for increasing the success and quality of front end efforts

  • 41.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Lichtenthaler, Ulrich
    University of Mannheim.
    Richtnér, Anders
    Center for Innovation and Operations Management, Stockholm School of Economics.
    Managing process development: key issues and dimensions in the front end2013In: R &D Management, ISSN 0033-6807, E-ISSN 1467-9310, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 213-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beyond the traditional focus on product innovation, prior research and practical examples from a variety of industrial settings underscore the importance of the early phases of process development and process innovation. Despite the potential for large cost savings and efficiency gains, however, little is known about what firms actually do in the early design and concept creation phases of process development, and what guides their subsequent formal process development efforts. By means of a longitudinal multiple case study of four large companies, we bridge this gap by conceptualizing a ‘process definition’. This process definition includes a process concept and is the ‘process equivalent’ of a product definition. Our analysis shows that firms create such process definitions through iterative trial-and-error processes, in which experiments, environmental scanning, and administrative planning constitute key methods for uncertainty reduction. Mainstream theory on product definitions fails to account for the key dimensions of a process definition. On the contrary, dimensions such as the understanding of production needs, assessment of product consequences, a thorough implementation plan and early anticipation of intended outcomes, constitute key dimensions of a successful process definition. These findings are particularly relevant to process development managers, plant managers, and others interested in process development and management of production processes.

  • 42.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Lichtenthaler, Ulrich
    WHU—Otto Beisheim School of Management, Technology and Innovation Management.
    Rundquist, Jonas
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Identifying technology commercialization opportunities: the importance of integrating product development knowledge2012In: The Journal of product innovation management, ISSN 0737-6782, E-ISSN 1540-5885, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 573-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New product development (NPD) is a knowledge-intensive activity, perhaps even more so in recent years given the shift toward more open innovation processes, which involve active inward and outward technology transfer. While the extant literature has established that knowledge is critical for NPD performance, knowledge generated through NPD can have an additional impact on external technology exploitationas when firms go beyond pure internal application of knowledge to commercialize their technologies, for example, by means of technology outlicensing. Grounded in the knowledge-based view of the firm, this paper examines how the integration of domain-specific knowledge, procedural knowledge, and general knowledge generated through NPD affects a firm's proficiency in identifying technology commercialization opportunities. Additionally, analysis of how technology opportunity identification relates to technology commercialization performance is provided. Empirically, the paper draws on survey data from 193 Swedish medium-sized manufacturing firms in four industries active with NPD, and regression analyses and structural equation modeling were used to test the hypotheses. The results highlight the importance of integrating domain-specific and general NPD knowledge to proficiently identify technology licensing opportunities. The empirical findings also provide strong support for a subsequent link between technology opportunity identification and technology commercialization performance. Altogether, these results point to strong and previously unexplored complementarities between inward and outward technology exploitation, that is, between NPD and technology licensing. As such, the results provide important theoretical implications for research into the fields of knowledge integration, technology exploitation, opportunity identification, and technology markets. Moreover, the results have significant managerial implications concerning how knowledge generated through NPD can help firms to achieve both strategic and monetary benefits when trying to profit from technology. In particular, to set up proficient technology commercialization processes, it appears beneficial for firms to integrate knowledge that is gained through the ordinary activities of developing and commercializing products. Specifically, the integration of domain-specific knowledge and general knowledge helps firms to match their technologies with new applications and markets, which is often the critical barrier to successful technology commercialization activities. Managers are thus encouraged to integrate domain-specific knowledge and general knowledge from NPD to reap additional benefits in profiting from investments in innovation and technology

  • 43.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Circular business model transformation: A roadmap for incumbent firmsIn: California Management Review, ISSN 0008-1256, E-ISSN 2162-8564Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Framtidens Produktframtagning i Svenska Företag: Trender, Implikationer och Reflektioner2014Report (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Framtidens produktframtagningsprocess i svenska företag: Vilka trender påverkar mest och hur behöver företagen förändra sina utvecklingsprocesser?2013In: Management of Innovation and Technology, ISSN 2001-208X, no 3, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Richtner, Anders
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Editorial: Managing for making a difference: transactions on information and knowledge in new product development2008In: International Journal of Technology Intelligence and Planning (IJTIP), ISSN 1740-2832, E-ISSN 1740-2840, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 229-233Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Richtner, Anders
    Stockholm School of Economics, Department of Management & Organization.
    Brattström, Anna
    Sten K Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, Lund University.
    Magnusson, Mats
    IPD, School of Industrial Engineering and Management, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Björk, Jennie
    IPD, School of Industrial Engineering and Management, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Opportunities and Challenges in the New Innovation Landscape:: Implications for Innovation Auditing and Innovation Management2018In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation auditing is a well-established practice used by managers to identify strengths and weaknesses in innovation. Existing audit frameworks fall short, however, because they neglect three major trends that currently transform the innovation landscape. These trends are as follows: 1) a shift from closed to more open models of innovation (“openness”), 2) a shift from providing physical products to industrial product–services (“servitization”), and 3) a shift from an analog to a highly digitalized world (“digitalization”). This article identifies new innovation practices, opportunities, and challenges that arise for manufacturing firms along these trends. The article proposes a revised innovation audit framework, which acknowledges these trends and supports innovation management in increasingly dynamic and competitive environments.

  • 48.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Richtnér, Anders
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Innovation and Operations Management, Stockholm School of Economics.
    Brattström, Anna
    Lund University.
    Magnusson, Mats
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, KTH.
    Björk, Jennie
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, KTH.
    Auditing Innovation Capability in the new Innovation Landscape2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sjödin, David Rönnberg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Problem-Finding and Problem-Solving Challenges in Large Firms2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In open innovation processes, when partners actively transfer technology and knowledge across firm boundaries, effective and timely problem solving is the key to progress any given collaborative project. We propose that the problems a development team need to solve may be conceptualized as ambiguous, equivocal, uncertain or complex, or a combination of the four. By means of a multiple case study of new product and technology development at global manufacturing firms, we propose that efficient solution search is contingent on matching the nature of a problem with the appropriate solution search strategy. We identify four solution search strategies, so far tentatively referred to as: analytic search, interpretative search, restrictive search, and acquisition search. The article elaborates the key activities, effects and trade-offs of these strategies and provides managerial implications for improved problem solving in open and collaborative development.

  • 50.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sjödin, David Rönnberg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Processinnovation över företagsgränserna: Varför tidig brukarinvolvering och gemensam problemlösning skapar framgångsrika projekt2013In: Management of Innovation and Technology, ISSN 2001-208X, no 2, p. 4-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Processutvecklingsprojekt mellan företag är ofta komplexa och riskfyllda, och resulterar inte sällan i oönskade projektavvikelser i tid, kostnad och kvalitet. Vår studie av 52 sådana projekt visar att tidig brukarinvolvering och gemensam problemlösning är nyckelaktiviteterna som möjliggör för medverkande parter att reducera osäkerhet och tvetydighet, och därmed skapar bättre förutsättningar för framgångsrika projekt.

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