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  • 1.
    Bergquist, Bjarne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    Linköpings universitet.
    Vanhatalo, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Zobel, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Alive and kicking – but will Quality Management be around tomorrow?: A Swedish academia perspective2012In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to describe how Quality Management (QM) is perceived today by scholars at three Swedish universities, and into what QM is expected to develop into in twenty years. Data were collected through structured workshops using affinity diagrams with scholars teaching and performing research in the QM field. The results show that QM currently is perceived as consisting of a set of core of principles, methods and tools. The future outlook includes three possible development directions for QM are seen: [1] searching for a “discipline X” where QM can contribute while keeping its toolbox, [2] focus on a core based on the traditional quality technology toolbox with methods and tools, and [3] a risk that QM, as it is today, may seize to exist and be diffused into other disciplines.

  • 2.
    Bergquist, Bjarne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Teknikens ekonomi och organisation.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Avdelningen för Kvalitetsteknik.
    Vanhatalo, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Zobel, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Alive and kicking–but will Quality Management be around tomorrow?: A Swedish academia perspective2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: There is a lack of a recognized conception of quality management (QM) comprises of, as well as a clear roadmap of where QM is heading. The purpose of this article is to investigate how QM is perceived today by scholars at three Swedish universities, but also how and into what QM is expected to develop into in twenty years.Methodology: Data have been collected through three structured workshops using affinity diagrams with scholars teaching and performing research in the QM field affiliated with three different Swedish universities.Findings: The results indicate that current QM is perceived similarly among the universities today, although the taxonomy differs slightly. QM is described as a fairly wide discipline consisting of a set of core of principles that in turn guide which methods and tools that currently by many are perceived as the core of the discipline. The outlook for the future differs more where three possible development directions for QM are seen: [1] searching for a “discipline X” where QM can contribute while keeping its toolbox, [2] focus on a core based on the traditional quality technology toolbox with methods and tools, and [3] a risk that QM, as it is today, may seize to exist and be diffused into other disciplines. Originality/value: This article contributes with a viewpoint on QM today and its future development from the academicians’ perspective.

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  • 3.
    Garvare, Rickard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Business excellence models: purpose, intended recipients and deployment - reviewing the fundamentals2006In: Quality management and organization excellence: empty boxes, or significant contributions to management thought and practice?, Sydney: SAI Global , 2006, p. 292-316Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Garvare, Rickard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Business excellence models: scope and customisation - making best use of resources2007In: Quality management and organization excellence: oxymorons, empty boxes, or significant contributions to management thought and practice?, Sydney: SAI Global , 2007, p. 39-57Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 5.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Models and meaning: on management models and systems of meaning when implementing change2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Change has become a vital business partner for many organizations. Survival of most organizations depends on their ability to implement adequate changes to support the organization. This thesis deals with questions about measurement systems, process based system models and organizational change with a specific focus on implementation challenges.The purpose of this research is to explore the relationship between management models and systems of meaning in change implementation processes and hopefully contribute to the understanding of organizational change through empirical research based on practical experience. To be able to accomplish the purpose, the following research questions have been formulated:1. How can a measurement system act as a driver for organizational change?2. How can business excellence models be designed to focus on stakeholder demands and organizational sustainability?3. How can the implementation of a process based system model help organizations to accelerate change?4. What is the role of management models when implementing change?The theoretical frame of reference is focusing on aspects of organizational change and systems thinking. Three papers, based on three case studies, are appended to the thesis. The first study deals with performance management systems, the second study is assessing the use of business excellence models and the third study is tracking the implementation of a process based system model in three organizations. The indications are that there could be easy gains to be realized in focusing on the measurement system and by adopting a process based approach focused on stakeholder satisfaction. Study 2 indicates that successful use of business excellence models requires effective deployment of basic quality-related values within the organization. However, organizations considering the use of BEMs need to have strong long-term commitment. The results from study 3 indicate that implementation of a system model focusing on processes, resources and a multiple stakeholder perspective aids management to accelerate change. The results also indicate that there are other more crucial success factors than the model as such. Key success factors seem to be: Strategic clarity, management decisiveness and perseverance. Finally, the network of gaps between change theory (meaning different theoretical and methodological considerations written in textbooks and articles) and change practice (meaning organizations trying to accomplish things based on interpreting textbooks and articles) is discussed.

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  • 6.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Process based system models for accelerating change: results from an explanatory multiple case study2008In: International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, ISSN 1447-9524, E-ISSN 1447-9575, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 119-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The working hypothesis in this paper is that systems thinking captured in a process based system model can help organisations to accelerate change. To test this hypothesis I have conducted a case study looking at three cases from different areas: a state authority case, a case from the construction industry and a case from the food industry. This work is a result of an academic follow up of several years of consultancy work in the organisations studied.The results indicate that implementation of a system model focusing on processes, resources and a multiple stakeholder perspective aids management to accelerate change. However, the results also indicate that there are other more crucial success factors than the model as such. Key success factors seem to be: Strategic clarity, management decisiveness and perseverance.

  • 7.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Under the skin of change: meanings, models and management2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For society at large, and organizations in particular, the magnitude, speed, impact, and unpredictability of change, are greater than ever before. But despite the need for unceasing transformation, there seems to be a general consensus between practitioners and scholars that few are successful when trying to lead organizational change. Different surveys also indicate that managers identify the ordeal of leading change as one of the key obstacles to increased competitiveness. Although debated, it is estimated that around 70 percent of all organizational change initiatives fail to reach intended objectives.Organizations deal with management of change, by means of models. But there is no obvious way forward and many fail along the way in their effort to contextualize models and construct meaning. This boils down to the specific research focus in this thesis: the use of change management models, their influence on management decision making and the meaning they make in practice for the organizations adopting the models when planning and executing change initiatives. To be able to accomplish the purpose, the following overarching research question has been formulated: How does management use models to manage change?The problem addressed is both complex and complicated. Therefore, the research question is supported by the sub questions: What does the literature say about models for organizational change best practice? How do organizations organize change management? How can a process based system model create meaning?The theoretical frame of reference is focusing on aspects of organizational change and systems thinking. Six papers; a literature review, a web survey, two case studies, an organizational ethnography and a conceptual paper are appended. Based on the studies, the following conclusions could be made:1)There seems to be no evidence based change management best practice.2)Organizations are beginning to organize change based on change management models.3)Management does not seem to make much use of change management models in practice, some consultants do.4)Organizational change can be described as a process comprising important elements outlined in a logical sequence.The answer to the overarching research question is: Managers apply change management models to a relatively small extent – the theory-practice gap is for real. Managers are often informed of the benefits of change management models through business publications promoting certain models or “gurus”. But in an effort to just get it done there is a tendency to dismiss theoretical aspects of organizational change in favor of using a set of quick prescriptive steps, or no structure at all. It could well be that most change management models actually are fit for use, but the root cause is in fact a knowledge transfer problem. Managers simply do not have time, focus and ability to apply theoretical models in practice.

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  • 8. Hallencreutz, Jacob
    et al.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Creaqte knowledge - not figures: the importance of measurement system management2006In: Performance measurement and management 2006: public and private : papers from the Fifth International Conference on Performance Measurement and Management - PMA 2006, London, New Connaught Rooms, UK, 25th-28th July 2006, Cranfield: School of Management, Centre for Business Performance , 2006, p. 963-970Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Sweden Implement MP AB, Stockholm.
    Turner, Dawn-Marie
    Turner Change Management, Winnipeg.
    Exploring organizational change best practice: are there any clear-cut models and definitions?2011In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 60-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore whether there are some existing widespread and common models and definitions for organizational change best practice in the literature. Design/methodology/approach – This paper builds on previous research to define a model of evidence-based change management base practice. A structured literature review is used to search for contemporary models and definitions of organizational change best practice. Findings – No consistent definitions of organizational change best practice are to be found in the literature. Originality/value – The paper provides a snapshot of the current literature on organizational change best practice. Implications of the findings on organizational change best practice are discussed and further research suggested.

  • 10.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    The measurement system resource as support for sustainable change2008In: International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, ISSN 1447-9524, E-ISSN 1447-9575, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 265-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The working hypothesis in this paper is that many organisations do not view measurement systems as resources and therefore miss out on opportunities. Here, organisational sustainability is interpreted with the dimensions of the Triple Bottom Line that monitors economic, environmental and social performance. The ideal measurement system should track performance and improvement potential in all dimensions. Most measurement systems today are functionally based and highly focused on the economic results. Even if approaches such as the Balanced Scorecard are used this still does not automatically mean that there is focus on the processes were value is created for customers and other stakeholders. With a low level of measurement system effectiveness the quality of facts used for decisions deteriorates and logically also the performance. This means that the maturity of the measurement system could be an indicator of organisational performance. A model for measurement system maturity is proposed and tested with case studies in chosen organisations and processes. The assessed maturity is then compared with the existing improvement potential as perceived by the organisation and as assessed by the researchers. The level of non detected potential is related to the maturity of the measurement system. Results indicate that there should be more focus on and ownership of a companywide measurement resource.

  • 11.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Process management and system thinking for sustainable development2008In: The Theories and Practices of Organization Excellence: New Perspectives, Sydney: SAI Global , 2008, p. 205-232Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Process management and system thinking for sustainable development2007In: New Perspectives on the Theories and Practices of Organizational Excellence: Proceedings of 6th MAAOE International Conference. The Multinational Alliance For The Advancement Of Organizational Excellence, University of Versailles Sain-Quentin-En-Yvelines , 2007, p. 390-411Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Turner, Dawn-Marie
    Turner Change Management, Winnipeg.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Change management from a stakeholder perspective2011In: Proceedings QMOD Conference on Quality and Service Sciences 2011: 14th QMOD Conference 29st – 31st August, 2011, San Sebastian, Spain : From LearnAbility & InnovAbility to SustainAbility / [ed] Carmen Jaca, Navarra: Servicios de Publicaciones Universidad de Navarra , 2011, p. 886-901Conference paper (Refereed)
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1 - 13 of 13
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