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  • 1.
    Aryeetey, Majoreen
    et al.
    University of Ghana, Business School.
    Yeboah, Frank Yaw
    University of Ghana, Business School.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Learning towards enabling work-family life balance for female professionals in Ghanaian organizations2012In: Business and Management Quarterly Review, ISSN 2180-2777, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to identify the challenges inhibiting professional female employees from maintaining good work-life balances, and also to develop a framework that organizations can use to understand such gender-oriented challenges towards the design of alternative work arrangements to enhance the retention of professional female employees. An exploratory approach was used with data collected through a survey. The study revealed that conflicts between work and non-work obligations, such as family responsibilities, are sources of stress which could motivate professional female employees to quit their jobs. Flextime, compressed workweeks and telecommuting were also identified as the most preferred types of alternative work arrangements. It is concluded that many professional female employees in Ghana have knowledge of work flexibility initiatives, such as alternative work arrangements, but these are not practiced effectively in their organisations. It is recommended that organizations adopt appropriate alternative work arrangements as a motivational tool to help retain their professional female employees, not only to improve the quality of their work-life balance, but also to enhance their productivity in their organizations.

  • 2.
    Kilu, Rufai Haruna
    et al.
    Division of Human Work Science, Department of Business Administration, Social Science and Technology, LTU, Sweden.
    Andersson, Eira
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Examining Gender Equity Research in Ghanaian Mines: A Meta–Analytical Approach2014In: UGBS Conference on Business and Development 2014: conference proceedings, Accra: University of Ghana Business School (UGBS) , 2014, p. 264-271, article id 5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender-oriented persons constitute majority of the Ghanaian population yet underrepresented in mining exploration, underground mining and mineral processing. In Ghana, the 2010 population and housing census figures on gender participation proportion in mining stood at 0.6% for females as compared to 2.0% for males. The purpose of this study is to create understanding on the politics of employing gender oriented persons in mine work, as well as identifying the organizational and socio-cultural challenges facing them. The study employed a meta-analysis technique for data collection. The results showed that some mining companies advertised their mining jobs openly expressing preferences for male employees due to general physical hardness of the conditions under which the mineworkers operate. In addition, the work demonstrates prevalence of organizational and socio-cultural barriers affecting effective participation of gender oriented persons in the mines. It is, therefore recommended the need to promote gender mainstreaming and gender equality as part of development strategies in Ghanaian mines, a situation that might enable gender oriented persons to earn a decent living from a decent workplace, allowing escape from poverty and improvement in their standard of living.

  • 3.
    Kilu, Rufai Haruna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Andersson, Eira
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Uden, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Reflections on Organizational Barriers Vis-à-Vis Women Participation in Largescale Ghanaian Mines2017In: International Journal of Business and Social Science, ISSN 2219-1933, E-ISSN 2219-6021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Writing from gender and organizational perspectives, this article reflects consciously with nuances upon varied effort working towards resolving the long existing binary barriers in the world of work. Working towards this goal, this article raises questions as to which organizational practices, processes, and procedures function to create participatory barriers to women in Ghanaian mine jobs. Adopting a mixed method design, the paper points to the culture of male dominance, gender biases, role models and mentorship constraints, unfriendly family work policies, and the relationship among women in male-dominated settings. These outcomes, according to the study, constitute a considerable concern for organizational development, with practical implications for industry, employment, labor relation practices, and public policy in Ghana. Therefore affirmative action among others is recommended for gender deconstruction, and promotion of gender democracy, an agenda for inclusivity, and a safety valve for poverty escapes and a compact for achieving gender equality in multinational Ghanaian mines. 

  • 4.
    Kilu, Rufai Haruna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Engendering Science, Engineering and Mineral Resource Technology Education in Ghana: Implications for Gender–Equity Discourse in Multinational Mines2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Kilu, Rufai Haruna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Enrolment Regimes and Gender Differences in University of Mines and Technology: Implication for Gender– equity Discourse in Multi National Ghanaian Mines2016In: Gender and behaviour, ISSN 1596-9231, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 6983-6995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper assessed gender perceptions of science and engineering courses, gender differences in enrolment regimes in University of Mines and Technology; and how both translated to recruitment of females in the mines. Drawing from a mix methodological approach, it was evidenced that gendered perceptions and stereotypes on science and engineering courses accounted for few females pursuing science, engineering and technology courses in UMaT. These perceptions, the general dislike for engineering courses by most females for fear of mathematics and the knowledge of the fact that engineering is quite difficult, explain the phenomenon of female under-representation in the mines. Though the progressive feminine enrolment regimes, due to gender main streaming initiative in UMaT, whereby women are giving some leverage. The moment a woman gets aggregate 36, which is maximum aggregate or minimum point of qualification, and she chooses mining related course, she is admitted, whereas in some cases, their men counterparts with aggregate 10 or 14 may not be considered. This is gradually working towards achieving a 20 percent quota for women. Though this, of course, is translating into increased female recruitment into the mines, the pace still remains slow and relatively insignificant. By implication, female under-representation in mine work environment point to the fact that mines are missing such feminine values necessary for corporate sustainability, growth and development. Therefore affirmative action plan is recommended at all levels of mine work planning that will ensure inclusion of such feminine virtues to impact profitably and propel growth of the mining industry in Ghana.

  • 6.
    Kilu, Rufai Haruna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Udén, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Investigating the Non-Gendered Recruitment Characteristics of Mining Firms in Ghana: The Role of Sociocultural, Psychosocial and Organizational Design Factors2016In: Business and Management Quarterly Review, ISSN 2180-2777, Vol. 7, no 3/4, p. 38-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the influencing dynamics of psychosocial, cultural and organizational design factors on the non-gendered characteristics of employee recruitment in firms operating in the Ghanaian mining industry that constrains the employability of women. A conceptual framework linking psychosocial, cultural, and organizational design to recruitment processes was developed to guide the study. Quantitative data was collected in four mining firms in Ghana using a questionnaire. The collated data was firstly factor analyzed to establish the predictiveness of the conceptual model components’ indicators. This was followed by an analysis of the conceptual model for “model goodness fit” using the AMOS–based structural equation modeling approach. The results showed that the non-gendered characteristics of employees’ recruitment in mining firms in Ghana, constrains the employability of women, is influenced directly and positively by the firms organizational designs, which is in turn influenced directly by the firms’ psychosocial and sociocultural factors. The study also showed that the non-gendered recruitment characteristic of the firms is influenced indirectly, but positively by the firms’ psychosocial factors, and negatively by other sociocultural factors. By implication, the study provides knowledge that can be used to understand the rationale behind the non-gendered characteristics of employee recruitment in Ghanaian mines and the influencing roles of organizational design factors as well as psychosocial and cultural factors. Mining firms can use this knowledge in developing gendered recruitment policies to enhance future recruitment of all qualified human resource, irrespective of gender.

  • 7.
    Kokoroko, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Department of Organisation and Human Resource Management, University of Ghana Business School, Legon, Accra, Ghana.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology. Department of Organisation and Human Resource Management, University of Ghana Business School, Legon, Accra, Ghana.
    Effect of Workload on Job Stress of Ghanaian OPD Nurses: The Role of Coworker Support2019In: SH@W Safety and Health at Work, ISSN 2093-7911, E-ISSN 2093-7997, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 341-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Although the concept of workload is important to nursing practice, only a few nursing researchers have focused on the issue of workload within the nursing context. Knowledge of how the dynamics of workload affects the job stress of nurses working in a specific unit or department in a hospital setting, and the influence of coworker support on this relationship, still remains limited. This study, therefore examined the effect of workload on job stress of Ghanaian outpatient department nurses and the moderating effect of coworker support on this relationship.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional survey design was used, and questionnaire was used to collect data from a sample of 216 outpatient department nurses from four major hospitals in Ghana. The data collected measured workload, job stress, and coworker support using National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Task Load Index, job stress scale, and coworker support scale, respectively. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, correlation, and hierarchical regression.

    Results

    High levels of workload were associated with high levels of job stress of the nurses. Also, higher levels of workload were related to higher levels of job stress for nurses who received high levels of coworker support, but this was not the case for those who received low levels of coworker support (reserve buffering effect).

    Conclusion

    The finding reiterates the adverse effect of workloads on employees' health, and the reverse buffering effect implies that supporting a colleague at work should be conveyed in a positive manner devoid of negative appraisal.

  • 8.
    Sackey, Jocelyn
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Boahemaa, Priscilla
    Regis College.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Relational impact of job stress on gender based managerial effectiveness in Ghanaian organizations2011In: Proceedings of World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, ISSN 2010-376X, E-ISSN 2070-3740, no 60, p. 2074-2083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the relationship between occupational stress and the perceived effectiveness of men and women managers in Ghanaian organizations. The exploration is underlined by attempt to understand the degree to which male and female managers in Ghanaian organizations experience occupational stress at the workplace. The purpose is to examine the sources and extents of occupational stress experienced by male and female managers in Ghana. Data was collected using questionnaires and analyzed using both descriptive statistics and correlation analysis. The results showed that female managers in Ghana are more likely to report of more stress experiences in the workplace than their male counterparts. The female managers are more likely to perceive role conflict and alienation as job stressors while the male managers perceived blocked career as a major source of workplace stress. It is concluded that despite the female managers experiencing enormous level of occupational stress, there was no significant differences between their managerial effectiveness and that of the male.

  • 9.
    Sackey, Jocelyn
    et al.
    Department of Organization and Human Resource Management, University of Ghana Business School.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Influence of occupational stress on the mental health of Ghanaian professional women2009In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 876-887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managerial women experience a number of work-related stressors which roduce strain symptoms that function as predictors of their ill-health in organizations. This finding is made from a study that examined the existing relationships among job characteristics symptoms of stress, and the development of health outcomes (depression, anxiety and physical symptoms) among women in lower and middle management positions in some organizations in Ghana. The stratified and simple random sampling procedure was used to select the study participants which numbered 170 female managers. Data was collected using both questionnaires and interviews, and analyzed using the Occupational Stress Indicator, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, and the Beck's Anxiety Inventory. It is concluded that since work-related stressors are predictors of women managers' ill-health in the work environment, organizations should be aware of the stressors in order to be able to guard against the deterioration of job performances of their women managers.Relevance to Industry: This study highlights the high prices organizations pay for the work-related stresses their women managers experience at the workplace, which impact negatively on their mental health, and by implication their productivity. Recommendations made can be used to enhance the managerial capacity and productivity of female managers at the workplace.

  • 10.
    Sackey, Jocelyn
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Social support as mental health improver for managerial women in the organizational work environment2011In: Business Intelligence Journal, ISSN 1918-2325, E-ISSN 1918-2333, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 362-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assessed the relationship between social support and mental health (depression, anxiety and somatic anxiety) relative to its impact on managerial women in Ghana. The objective is to seek answers to the question as to whether the availability of social support in the work environment can help improve the mental health of women. This is because the lack of spousal support for working women is found to have a direct connection to diminished mental health. The findings show that spousal support provided women with a sense of security and stability at home and also reduced their possibility of being confronted with role conflict. It is thus, concluded that the career progression of women managers can be greatly enhanced when they receive spousal support, encouragement and guidance in addition to those from superiors and co-workers.

  • 11.
    Sackey, Jocelyn
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Sustenance of human capital: Social support as managerial stress reliever for women in developing economies2011In: Research and Practice in Human Resource Management, ISSN 0218-5180, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although women managers in Ghana represent a unique set of human capital, the adverse consequences of job stressors on their performances make their sustenance in organisations a key human resource challenge. Similar to many developing countries, the gender orientation of managerial employees in Ghana has changed in the last two decades with many women breaking through the hierarchical glass ceilings to occupy management positions in their organisations. This category of women employees, who also retain their sociocultural roles as wives and mothers, represents a unique set of sustainable human capital that needs to be socially supported in their organisations. The dual roles played by these women managers generate added stress to their organisational performances with detrimental consequences, not only to their physical and mental well-being, but also to their sustenance as resourceful human capital. This added stress to the work of managerial women in the organisation represents a human resources management problem for which the appropriate support coping mechanism must be found. This problem was explored by examining the relationship between the job characteristics symptoms of stress and the moderating effects of social support among managerial women in some organisations in Ghana. The findings of this study indicate that the exposure of managerial women to many job stressors have harmful effect on their health and impact negatively on their productivity. The stresses of the managerial women was reduced and their career progressions enhanced by the supportive relationship that existed between them and their superiors.

  • 12. Sackey, Jocelyn
    et al.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Human factors challenge in entrepreneurship development: an explorative study in a developing economy context2013In: Business and Management Quarterly Review, ISSN 2180-2777, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 40-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the barriers to entrepreneurial development in Ghana with the aim of building a knowledge base for successful entrepreneurship development initiatives in a developing economy context. An exploratory approach was used with both retrospective and qualitative data collected through a survey. The results showed that the functionalities of the numerous schemes initiated to support individual entrepreneurs‟ growth were constrained due to the inherent constraints in the design of the guiding frameworks for such schemes. The study also showed that the several policies and structures initiated differently by various governments since Ghana's independence in March 1959 could not help enhance entrepreneurial development, because the entrepreneurial environment created for entrepreneurship development was not very friendly to the individual entrepreneurs, By implication, the study provides learning on the need to bridge the distance that exist between the designers/implementers of entrepreneurship development policies/frameworks and the individual entrepreneurs (humans).

  • 13.
    Sanda, Mohammed Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    An organizational activity framework for effective business practices implementation in research-oriented organizations in developing economies2017In: Advances in Human Factors, Business Management, Training and Education: Proceedings of the AHFE 2016 International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, July 27-31, 2016, Walt Disney World®, Florida, USA / [ed] Jussi Ilari Kantola; Tibor Barath; Salman Nazir; Terence Andre, London: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2017, p. 993-1006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explored the constraints to business practices implementation by Research-Oriented Organizations in Developing Economies. Guided by organizational activity, sociotechnical and macroergonomic theories, data was collected from four research-oriented organizations in four developing countries, and analyzed using actions of identified groups in each organization’s activity system as the unit of analysis. It was found that the emergence of multivoicedness in the organizations’ activity systems created misfits among the organizations components which created systemic problems, ruptures, and breakdowns which constrained the effectiveness of the organizations’ business practices implementations. It is concluded that in the process of business practices implementation, an activity in the organization must be understood not as one activity with its peculiarities, but rather as a real aggregate of several activities and relations arising from the interacting components of the organization. A framework for understanding effective business practices implementation in research-oriented organizations is thus formulated.

  • 14.
    Sanda, Mohammed Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Charismatic influence and organizing capability as unique managerial self-efficacies for effective small firm performance in developing economy2017In: Advances in Human Factors, Business Management, Training and Education: Proceedings of the AHFE 2016 International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, July 27-31, 2016, Walt Disney World®, Florida, USA / [ed] Jussi Ilari Kantola; Tibor Barath; Salman Nazir; Terence Andre, London: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2017, p. 419-431Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past two decades, changes in the industrial environment of most developing countries and the increasing competition among firms has greatly influenced executives’ attitudes and behaviours in the effective management of their firms. There is evidence in the extant literature that the sustained superior performances of most firms is attributable to the unique capabilities used in managing their human resources, and which capabilities are rare, valuable, non-substitutable and imitable. This study therefore, explored the requisite self-efficacies that are exhibited by executives of small firms in Ghana in their day-to-day management of their businesses that leads to increase firm performance, since such self-efficacies are human-oriented capabilities that are rare, valuable, non-substitutable and imitable. This was necessitated by the observation that most executives of small firms in Ghana have not been able to achieve much for their firms, in terms of increasing their businesses productive efficiencies and effectiveness, because the requisite self-efficacies required of such executives for improved performances are unknown and unexplored. Guided by the self-efficacy theorization, data was collected from executives of seventy-two small firms in Ghana using a standardised questionnaire. Factor analysis was conducted to identify the plausible factors with the requisite weight to predict the executives’ self-efficacy, and the attribution of such factors. The factor analyses, with Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin as well as Bartlett’s tests, were initiated to measure the factorability of the data, using the statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) as the analytic tool. Principal Component Analysis was then used as a data reduction technique using the Rotation Method (Varimax with Kaiser Normalization). Indicator predictiveness was interpreted using Schumacker and Lomax’s (2004) recommendation that estimated factor loading must be 0.7 or higher. Based on the analysis, it is found that the executives of small firms in Ghana exhibit self-efficacies which they manifest variously as charismatic influences and organizing capabilities. The executives showed high levels of organizing capabilities and charismatic influences on the work they manage as a result of their self-efficacies. It is also found that the self-efficacy indicators reflecting the executives’ exertion of charismatic influences on their employees correlated significantly with their self-efficacy indicators reflecting their capabilities to organize their firms’ activities. It is concluded that the executives’ use of their charismatic influence-oriented and organizing capability-oriented self-efficacies has a positive influence on their abilities to manage their small firms. It is also concluded that, the executives ability to handle the time demands and the paper work required of their managerial jobs, on the one hand, and their ability to maintain control of their personal daily schedule, and cope with the stress aspect of their managerial job, on the other, had a direct positive impact on their abilities to carry out the following functions. The findings in this study contribute to knowledge in the management of small firms. Specifically, for Ghana, this research provides a platform for the development of a database that will help inform policy-makers on the requisite self-efficacies to be required of small firms’ executives in the daily management of their businesses.

  • 15.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Activities enhancing the productiveness of maintenance process for high technology equipment in deep mines2011In: MPMM 2011: Maintenance Performance Measurement & Management: Conference Proceedings / [ed] Diego Galar; Aditya Parida; Håkan Schunnesson; Uday Kumar, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2011, p. 213-218Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to find out whether in the course of task performances, miners engage in activities influenced by their tacit knowledge to enhance the quality of the maintenance process for high technology equipment in deep mines. Guided by an organizational activity theoretical framework, data was collected by observing and interviewing four different mineworkers engaged in rock drilling and roof bolting activities in an underground mine. An interpretive descriptive analysis was conducted to understand the mineworkers activities when engaged with their work. It is found that the miners use their acquired experiences to find ways of maintaining and managing the machines they use for optimum work performance. It is concluded that an employee’s tacit knowledge, when made visible, can help determine the horizon of possible actions that can influence either positively or otherwise on the maintenance process

  • 16.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Application of Systemic Structural Theory of Activity in Unearthing Employee Innovation in Mine Work2015In: Vol. 3, p. 5147-5154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which the possible formation of wildfire activities in an actor's subconsciousness and which goes unnoticed in the conduct of drilling/bolting activity in deep mines is we understand. It also sought to understand how the dynamics of this subconscious wildfire activity influences the mediation process between miners, as subjects of activity, and the objective for the drilling/bolting activity. The systemic structural activity theoretical approach is used to understand the different ways of knowing the world of mine work, in terms of the generation of new knowledge, and also in ways of helping stakeholders understand how to incorporate results or lessons learned from the systemic tasks entailed in drilling/bolting activity. Using qualitative data from interviews and video observations of bolting/drilling operations in a deep mine, parametric and morphological analyses were conducted to unearth miners’ innovation in the world of work. The paper concludes that the functional efficiency and effectiveness of drilling/bolting activities in deep mines could be enhanced by understanding the interrelationship between miners’ internal and external activities. That is, understanding miners’ practical-external activity and the corresponding external tools they might need to enhance their mental activities towards developing successful performance enhancing strategies for negotiating problematic task scenarios in rock drilling/bolting activity.

  • 17.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Cognitive and Emotional-Motivational Implications in the Job Design of Digitized Production Drilling in Deep Mines2017In: Advances in Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering: Proceedings of the AHFE 2016 International Conference on Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering, July 27-31, 2016, Walt Disney World®, Florida, USA / [ed] Kelly S. Hale; Kay M. Stanney, London: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2017, p. 211-222Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to understand the influence of cognitive and emotional-motivational aspects of task complexity on workers performances in high-technology driven drilling activity in a deep mine. Data was collected by observing and video recording miners’ engaged in two separate production drilling activities, using two Boomers simultaneously. Based on the analysis, it is found that the workers encounter cognitive challenges in their ability to process information marked on rock surfaces for the positioning of the boomers, resulting in added complexity to their drilling tasks. The workers’ were also found to have issues with the quality of their designed job environment, and which emotional-motivational challenge also added to their tasks complexity. It is concluded that by understanding the emerging cognitive and emotional-motivational aspects of task complexities, future design processes of a friendly and performance enhancing work environments and technologies could evolve for efficient and effective human work.

  • 18.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Conceptualization of actors’ emerging-object-of-activities as hidden exploitative resource for managing organizational change2011In: Global Journal of Strategies and Governance, ISSN 1923-6042, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 31-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the concept of an “actor’s emerging-object-of-activity” and its potential use towards increased understanding and learning of the complexity of organizational change management in organizations. The argument that organizations, as activity systems, offers managers of organizational change an antidote to simplistic interpretations of the nature of individual knowledge and action, and organizational cultures and competencies was critically appraised. Paths for understanding the hidden challenges posed by actors’ emerging objects of activities” in the management of new organizational practices are hypothesized. It is concluded that by recognizing the importance of human interpretive activity to organizational change, the role of organizational influences in conditioning such interpretive activity will be understood and managed.

  • 19.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Contradictions in organizational activity system as constraints to successful management benchmark implementation2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science. University of Ghana Business School, Legon, Accra.
    Dichotomy of Historicity and Subjective Perception of Complexity in Individuals’ Activity Goal Formation and Decision Outcomes2019In: Advances in Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering: Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering, July 21–25, 2018, Loews Sapphire Falls Resort at Universal Studios, Orlando, Florida USA / [ed] Hasan Ayaz, Lukasz Mazur, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 265-277Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined how the historicity of individuals’ organizational activity and subjective perception of task complexity influence individuals’ activity goal formations, strategies and decision outcomes considerations. The findings showed that conscious goal-directed processes of individuals are influenced by the dichotomy of historicity and their subjective perceptions of task complexity. It is concluded that; when “highest goal” is desired for an impending task, the dichotomous relationship of historicity of the individual’s self-regulation activity and his/her subjective perception of task complexity will have direct influence on both his/her Activity Goal Formation and decision outcome processes, while his/her activity strategies consideration will be directly influenced by only the historicity of his/her self-regulation activity. Also, when “best goal is desired, the dichotomous relationship will directly influence only the individual’s consideration of decision outcomes, while both his/her Activity Goal Formation and strategies consideration will be directly influenced by only the historicity of his/her self-regulation activity.

  • 21.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Dictating Impact of Systemic (Trans)formations on Management Re-engineering in R&D Firms2014In: World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology: International Journal of Social, Human Science and Engineering, ISSN 1307-6892, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 887-899, article id International Science Index 85, 2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines challenges to the implementation and internalization of benchmarked management practices by research organizations in developing economies as transformative tools towards commercialization. The purpose is to understand the contributing influence of internal organizational factors from both situational and historical perspectives towards the practice implementation constraints, and also to provide theoretical understanding on how systemic formations and transformations in the organizations’ activities influenced the level to which their desired needs are attained. The results showed that the variability in the outcomes of the organizations’ transformation processes was indicative of their (in)ability to deal with the impacts of cumulated tensions in the systemic interfaces of their organizational activity systems. It is concluded that the functionalities of the systemic interfaces influence the functionality of the organizational activity system.

  • 22.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science. University of Ghana Business School, Legon.
    Digitization of Industrial Work Environments and the Emerging Challenges of Human-Digitized System Collaborative Work Organization Design2019In: Advances in Human Factors and Systems Interaction: Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors and Systems Interaction, July 21-25, 2018, Loews Sapphire Falls Resort at Universal Studios, Orlando, Florida, USA / [ed] Isabel L. Nunes, Cham, 2019, p. 384-395Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discussed how the digitization of human work affect human performance of digitized work entailing both physical and mental activities, as well as the human’s social interaction entailing collaboration between the human’s and the digitized work system. It is posited that in the digitization process of the industrial work environment, the digitized system designer’s lack of knowledge about the external world of the embedded humans may result in the designer’s inability to accurately predict the outcomes of his/her decisions on work organization, especially the creation of positive collaboration and social harmony between digitized systems and humans towards enhanced productivity. It is concluded that analytic strategies for understanding the interactive work dynamics between humans and digitized systems, which can serve as key for identifying both the innovative and constraining characteristics of effective and efficient association between humans and digitized work systems towards collaborative work organization design should be developed.

  • 23.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology. Department of Organization and Human Resource Management, University of Ghana Business School, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana.
    Dynamics of goal characterization in students’ exams-preparation systemic activity transition processes2019In: Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, ISSN 1463-922X, E-ISSN 1464-536XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the influence of students ‘goal characterization on their goal-formation processes, as characterized by their goal-classification, the systemic consideration of their activity-strategies and decision-outcomes when preparing for an examination. Using the Structural Equation Modeling approach, a functional analysis underlined by systemic principles was conducted. Firstly, the issue of whether the influence of students’ considerations of activity strategies on their decision outcomes is truly moderated by their activity goal formations, if they set highest-goals, is determined. Secondly, the issue of whether the influence of students’ considerations of activity strategies on their decision outcomes is truly mediated by their activity goal formations, if they set best-goals, is also determined. Based on the findings, the conscious goal-directed processes associated to the emergence of an individual’s thoughtfully mastered learning activity and its consequence on future design of systemic structural activity of individuals will be established.

  • 24.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Dynamics of National Culture and Employee Characteristics on Organizational Commitment in Retail Banks in Ghana2017In: Advances in Cross-Cultural Decision Making: Proceedings of the AHFE 2016 International Conference on Cross-Cultural Decision Making (CCDM), July 27-31,2016, Walt Disney World®, Florida, USA / [ed] Sae Schatz; Mark Hoffman, London: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2017, p. 71-83Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms operating in high growth sectors are known to face the challenges of hiring and assimilating large numbers of new employees, providing new knowledge and skills to existing employees, and addressing the need for a rapid expansion of leadership capability. In the Ghanaian situation, such a challenge is known to prevail, since the country implemented major financial sector reforms starting in the late 1980s as part of its broad market reforms, key of which is the deregulation of the financial sub-sector. The banking sector in Ghana is therefore, faced with human resource management challenges, which includes the finding of the right caliber of employees to employ, and how to ensure that employees get committed to their organizations in order to reduce their desire to switch to competitor firms, due to apparent dissatisfaction with their jobs. This study therefore, examined a conceptual model that sought to hypothesize the impact of national culture and employee characteristics on employees’ organizational commitment in retail banks in Ghana. The purpose is to understand the extent to which Ghanaian national cultural values and employee characteristics impact on employee organizational commitment in Retail Banks operating in Ghana. Quantitative data was collected from 282 bank employee across nine different retail banks in Ghana, and analyzed stepwise, using the analysis of moment structures (AMOS) program. Firstly, path analysis was conducted to test the individual measurement models that constitute the various components of the conceptual structural model. In this analysis, the factor score weights and model fit estimates for the indicator variables in the various latent variables (i.e. national culture, employee characteristics, and organizational commitment,) were appraised. Results from the path analysis identified four measurable indicators for organizational commitment. The analysis showed that all the measurable indicators tested for national culture and employee characteristics did not have significant loads to serve as measurable indicators. It is concluded that employees’ organizational commitment in retail banks in Ghana is neither influenced by the Ghanaian national culture nor the employee’s characteristics.

  • 25.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Dynamics of organizational change and employee identity retention in R&D organizations2011In: International Journal of Information, Business and Management, ISSN 2076-9202, E-ISSN 2218-046X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 22-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to understand the dynamics of employee identity retention and its impact on organizational change in a Research and Development organization. The role played by social embeddedness in enhancing employees’ retention of self-identities and shaping their attitudes in resisting an orientation shift of organizational values and norms from that of civil services to distorting new public management orientation was assessed. The findings showed that the employees’ resistance was influenced by their personal core values which were distrustful towards the organizations change process. Senior staff members were reluctant to forego their independence of working as individuals by adopting a teamwork culture. It is concluded that as a result of the employees holding tight to their self-identities and failing to relate to new organizational norms, the production that emerged from the commercialisation process was not in consonance to the organization’s transformation needs.

  • 26.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Four case studies on commercialisation of government R&D agencies: an organizational activity theoretical approach2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, it was established that internal environment factors that seemed to have constrained the attempts by most Research and Technology Organizations (RTOs) in the developing countries to implement and internalise a best management practices (BMP) model (i.e. as an instrument of change) towards commercialisation were rather unidentified contradictions caused by conflicts and disturbances which served, not only as sources of troubles, but also sources of innovation in the RTOs' organizational activity systems. This observation provided an insight into the phenomenon that; despite the successful use of the BMP model by companies in the developed countries, especially in Europe, the efforts of most RTOs in the developing countries to implement and internalise the model were constrained by some undetermined environmental factors. The question of how factors internal to the RTOs' operating environments impacted on their attempts to implement and internalise the BMP model was explored, based on the proposition that; existing tensions in the RTOs activity system serve as internal environment constraints which influence the extent to which external environment factors negatively affect their efforts to implement and internalise the BMP model in their attempts to commercialise. Thus the goal of the study was to create an understanding with both practical and academic values (i.e. from the perspectives of organizational learning) on how the RTOs in developing countries can learn to deal with factors constraining the attempts by most of them to implement and internalise the BMP model (i.e. as an instrument of change) in their efforts to commercialise. The aim was to use organizational activity theory as a platform to provide an understanding of the possible internal factors preventing the RTOs from being successful in their implementation and internalisation efforts, with the objective of developing the requisite tools to guide future remedial actions. A multiple-case study was carried out with four RTOs in four countries (i.e. South Africa, Trinidad, and Botswana) as cases. Qualitative data on how each case's commercialisation process impacted on the sub-activity systems of its agents and/or groups (i.e. either as management teams or staff members, or collectively as workforce) were collected through structured interviews with key actors, problem-identification workshops, and surveys (using closed-ended self-completion questionnaires). Both historical and actual-empirical analyses were carried out for each case using the "analysis of contradiction" approach, with the actions of identified groups in each case (i.e. management team, senior staff, and junior staff) as the sub-unit of analysis, and the actions of the collective group (i.e. workforce) as the main unit of analysis. The contradictions that existed within the organizational activity system of each case were identified, and the findings interpreted at the single-case level. Results from these analyses showed that the case in South Africa was able to manage the contradictions that emerged in its organizational activity system, and hence was successful with its implementation efforts. The case in Trinidad was found to have experienced some constraints in its institutional rules and communities which generated some contradictions in its activity. Though not significant, the inability of the organization to fully manage it affected its implementation efforts, resulting in a moderate success. The case in Ghana was found to have been constrained in its institutional rule, community and division of labour. Due to its inability to manage the contradictions that emerged in its activity system, its commercialisation effort yielded a relatively poor outcome. The case in Botswana was found to have been highly constrained in its institutional rule, community and division of labour. Contradiction was thus high in its activity system, resulting in relatively failed implementation efforts. These analytic outcomes from the individual cases (i.e. analysis of contradiction) were then crossed analysed using the pattern-matching approach. Based on the analyses outcome, an understanding was made on factors internal to the organizations' operating environments which impacted on their implementation of the best management practices. This understanding provided the premise upon which the conclusion stated in the opening paragraph was derived.

  • 27.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Guest editorial: leadership and organizational development in Africa2017In: African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, ISSN 2040-0705, E-ISSN 2040-0713, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 254-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to preview contributions on leadership and organizational development in the African context, covered in this special issue of the African Journal of Business and Economic Studies.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Summaries of the underlying theoretical/conceptual and/or empirical frameworks, as well as key findings for each paper, were outlined in order to provide insights of each paper’s thematic contribution.

    Findings

    Paper 1 identified four basic modes of understanding organizational culture which provides a unique and expanded view on pursuing research in the field. Paper 2 found that managers use authentic and transactional leadership skills to cultivate and nurture the creativities of employees toward increased performances. Paper 3 found the interaction between authentic leaders and followers as inducing high levels of moral and ethical behaviors in followers. Paper 4 found that employee engagement and affective commitment minimize employees’ attrition, irrespective of leadership styles. Paper 5 found that, managers can enhance organizational development by creating an atmosphere for innovation development, and being involved in its implementation. Paper 6 found that leaders who are emotionally intelligent positively evoke subordinates’ citizenship behaviors. Paper 7 identified three distinct and interrelated archetypes of managerial role preferences (i.e. change agents, affective leaders, and result-oriented realists) needed by leaders in their administrative practices.

    Originality/value

    The papers provide new insights, in terms of thematic learning and knowledge, which add to the understanding of the contemporary Afrocentric perspective on leadership and organizational development, especially, the dialogue of management activities that promote the relational, critical and constructionist perspectives on leadership and organizational development

  • 28.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Impact of value-based transformational leadership in privatizing government institutions in a developing economy: a case study2010In: Business and Management Quarterly Review, ISSN 2180-2777, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore the kind of leadership that could infect positive changes in the work environments of government research organizations undergoing privatization in most developing countries in order to enhance the commercialisation of their production activities. An interpretive analytic framework was used as an appropriate platform to build a qualitative design. Qualitative data was collected through taped-recorded interviews with seventeen senior staff members identified as key actors in the organization's privatization processes, and analysed using an interpretive description qualitative approach. The results showed that the organization's managers used charismatic and values-based leadership approaches during the transition period of commercialisation process and was viewed by their subordinates as leaders who were true to their own values and who also went on to help those they led to articulate what they valued. It was concluded that an amalgamation of transformational and value-based styles of leadership approach could be used by managers of government agencies in most developing countries to infect positive changes in their work environments when managing the privatization of their organizations. The study has shown that value-based transformational leadership could be used by managers of challenged government research and development organizations in most developed countries to infect positive changes in their work environments and which could help facilitate their efforts towards the privatization of their organizations' activities.

  • 29.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Leadership and ‘tipping’ in workplace transformation: a critical review2011In: International Journal of Business and Social Science, ISSN 2219-1933, E-ISSN 2219-6021, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 18-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this is to critically appraise the idea of the “tipping point” from the perspectives of leadership in workplace transformation. It is argued that the desirability of any workplace transformations requires that we clearly understand the nature of the expected changes and the relationship between leadership and change. It is also argued that the sustenance of the regressive character of such transformation might be attributed to its “tipping” in the negative sense in contrast to Gladwell’s positive prescription of the “tipping point” in workplace transformation. It is concluded that the “tipping point” in workplace transformation should be a reflection of the performance indices based on the set objectives for the changes and the timescales and output measures ascribed to them. Keywords: Workplace transformation; Leadership; Transformation process; Tipping point.

  • 30. Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Learning from employee perceptions of human-work and work-organization in digitized production-drilling activity in mines2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Managerial self-efficacy and discretionary behavior improving work environment for small firm performance2011In: Information Management and Business Review, ISSN 2220-3796, E-ISSN 2220-3796, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 259-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the self-efficacies and discretionary behaviours exhibited by managers of small Ghanaian firms with the purpose of understanding how the interplay of these two attributes impacted on employee motivation and performances. The selection of participants was guided by the snowballing technique. Data was collected by distributing self-completion questionnaires entailing managerial self-efficacy and discretionary behavior items to 100 study participants who were managers of small firms in two Ghanaian metropolises. The collected data were analyzed descriptively and inferentially using the statistical package for the Social Sciences software. The results show that the managers had strong senses of affective attachment to their firms due to the use of their self-efficacies to generate dynamic influences on their firms’ performances. They also exhibit discretionary behaviours that motivate their employees to work together to achieve organizational goals. The study concludes that the absence of interplay between the managers’ self-efficacies and their discretionary behaviours constrains the efficient and effective performances of their firms.

  • 32.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Mediating Subjective Task Complexity in Job Design: A Critical Reflection of Historicity in Self-regulatory Activity2017In: Advances in Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering: Proceedings of the AHFE 2017 International Conference on Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering, July 17–21, 2017, The Westin Bonaventure Hotel, Los Angeles, California, USA / [ed] Carryl Baldwin, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 340-350Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper critically reflects on the influence of historicity in self-regulatory activity towards mediating subjective task complexity in job design. This is based on the growing interest of using the ‘practice’ approach in overcoming the gap between the theoretical understanding of what people do and the realistic understanding of what people actually do at the workplace. The paper argued that since an objective analysis of the number of alternatives presented in any given situation will not always coincide with subjective perceptions, and the individual’s lack of knowledge about the external world may result in his/her inability to accurately predict the outcomes of his/her decisions, then it is important to understand how an individual acquire knowledge about his/her external world of work, and also if its consequential effect on the routine is acquired through the recollections of the subconscious mind’s daily encounters at the work situations.

  • 33.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Modeling Managerial Competences for Effective Small Firm Performance in a Developing Economy2014In: World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, International Science Index 89, International Journal of Social, Management, Economics and Business Engineering, ISSN 1307-6892, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 1584-1591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores competencies that managers of small firms in Ghana use to enhance operational flexibility towards the attainment of higher productivity. This is because the requisite competence required of such managers to be effective performers continues to be a challenge. Data was collected from managers of three hundred small firms using a standardized self-completion questionnaire and analyzed using the Amos-based structural equation model approach. Findings from factor and confirmatory factor analyses showed that the only competence exhibited by managers toward effective performance is realistic practices evident at the workplace. It is concluded that a manager’s self-confidence andinvolvement in areas that he/she is good at, and his/her possession of skills that enables performance at high capacity are indications of the manger’s effectiveness. The study outcome provides a knowledge base helpful to policy-makers, especially in Ghana, in determining the requisite managerial competences required by small firm managers for effective performance

  • 34.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Modeling Structural Activity System of R&D Firms in a Developing Economy to Enhance new Practices Implementation2015In: Vol. 3, p. 660-667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the middle and late 1960's, large numbers of Research and Development (R&D) firms were established in many developing countries to provide effective services to small and medium scale enterprises. But over the years, the ability of these R&D-oriented firms to provide such effective assistances was constrained due to management challenges. In this regard efforts were made by most of these firms to implement new management practices derived from successful business principles and practices of firms in the EU and elsewhere, in order to help strengthened their capability to provide effective client services. Yet, there was the realisation that the efforts of most of these R&D firms to implement and internalise the new management practices were constrained and as such not successful. The purpose of this study therefore, was to identify and understand the factors that constrained the R&Ds’ practices implementation and internalization efforts. Using a systemic structural activity theoretical framework and a qualitative approach, the implementation effort of an R&D firm in Trinidad was explored. The results showed that during the firm's practice implementation, the quality of its internal environment was diffused as a result of employees and management seeing things in different perspectives. This resulted in the emergence of a fuzzy understanding of the firm's corporate culture by employees, with individual interpretations and understandings of the firm's organizational values and norms. It is concluded that the R&D's effort to implement and internalize new management practices was not only constrained by factors relating to its external environment, but also by the prevalence of activity contradictions within its structural and activity system

  • 35.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Relevance of air-traffic controllers' tacit knowledge in enhancing air-traffic control and safety in Ghanaian airspace2018In: International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation, ISSN 1742-5549, Vol. 6, no 2-3, p. 103-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the cognitive and workload demands of air-traffic control activity and the tacit knowledge used by air-traffic controllers to cope with the stress associated with such demands in ensuring air-traffic safety in Ghana. Guided by the systemic structural theory of activity, it was found that the air-traffic control activity entailed several challenges, whereby variety of tasks demand significant cognitive efforts, requiring use of tacit knowledge by the air-traffic controllers to augment their operational performances in order to enhance air-traffic safety. It is concluded that the functional efficiency and effectiveness of human work in the air-traffic control activity can be enhanced by understanding and integrating air-traffic controllers' tacit knowledge in the job design. By implication, this understanding can be incorporated in designing an operator-efficient and effective work system for air-traffic controllers in order to enhance management capacity of air-traffic safety in Ghana.

  • 36.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Using activity analysis to identify individual and group behavioral constraints to organizational change management2011In: Journal of Management and Sustainability, ISSN 1925-4725, E-ISSN 1925-4733, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 111-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article looks at the constraining influence of internal organizational factors on the management of organizational change. The purpose of the study was to determine the individual and group behavioral-induced situational problems, conflicts and tensions that change managers can identify and also use as innovative tools to enhance their capacity to manage organizational change. Individual and group behavioral factors that constrained the implementation and internalization of a best management practice model in an organization were examined. It is argued that in the organizational change process, the inability of change managers to simultaneously identify the development of situational problems, such as conflicts and tensions induced by individual and group basedbehaviours, and exploiting them as tools to enhance management innovation, is a significant constraint. It is concluded that; by continuously examining individual and group based mediated actions, managers can understand, identify, isolate and manage situational problems in future implementation and internalization of new practices models in their organizations

  • 37.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Galar, Diego
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Sandin, Fredrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Delsing, Jerker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Lean instrumentation framework for sensor pruning and optimization in condition monitoring2011In: The Eighth International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Machinery Failure Prevention Technologies: St. David's Hotel, Cardiff, Wales, 20 - 22 June 2011 ; CM2011/MFPT2011, Longborough, Glos: Coxmoor Publishing Co. , 2011, Vol. 1, p. 202-215Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses a lean instrumentation framework for guiding the introduction of the lean concept in condition monitoring in order to enhance the organizational capability (i.e. human, technical and management trichotomy) and reduce the complexity in the maintenance management systems of industrial companies. Additionally, decision-making, based on severity diagnosis and prognosis in condition monitoring, is a complex maintenance function which is based on large data-set of sensors measurements. Yet, the entirety of such decision-making is not dependent on only the sensors measurements, but also on other important indices, such as the human factors, organizational aspects and knowledge management. This is because, the ability to identify significant features from large amount of measured data is a major challenge for automated defect diagnosis, a situation that necessitate the need to identify signal transformations and features in new domains. The need for the lean instrumentation framework is justified by the desire to have a modern condition monitoring system with the capability of pruning to the optimal level the number of sensors required for efficient and effective serviceability of the maintenance process. It is concluded that there are methodologies that can be developed to enable more efficient condition monitoring systems, with benefits for many processes along the value chain.

  • 38.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Enhancing social collaboration between humans and technology in the digitization of deep mining activity2011In: Proceedings: ISCAR International Conference 2011, Rome September 5-10, 2011, International society for cultural and activity research , 2011, p. 106-108Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discuses the use of organizational activity theory to address concerns on the best way to digitized human work that can lead to the creation of a harmony between the human, technical and the social system, towards increased productivity in the deep mine industry. The aim is to develop the requisite knowledge on the use of social networking technologies (new communication models) to design highly digitised work activity in which open collaboration can be enhanced between the human and the technological functions of the work that will make cross value chain optimisation a reality. Data is collected using observation and video-recording of miners’ activities, as well as recorded interviews techniques. The systemic-structural activity theory (Bedny and Karwowski, 2007), which focus on both the sociocultural approach to activity study and the individual-psychological approaches to activity study, which are basic to the study of human work is used. The main unit of analysis is the mine production activity. The sub-unit of analysis is carried out at two levels. These are the “object oriented” activity level, and the “subject-oriented” activity level. The object-oriented activity is analyzed from the perspectives of individual miners using technological tools (highly mechanized equipments) in breaking the rocks (material objects). The subject-oriented activity is also analyzed from the perspectives of the individual miner and his subjective interaction with the communication models and the technological tools as social objects. It is argued that since organizations possess technologies for accomplishing work, organizational activity then emphasizes a work system design in which technology affects social relations in organizations by structuring collaborative processes which are important components of an organization. It is then concluded that the systemic-structural activity theory can help understand how to optimize a work system’s design, such as the digitized mine activity, in terms of its sociotechnical system characteristics.

  • 39.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Adjei-Benin, Pearl
    University of Ghana, Business School.
    How is the firm dealing with the merger?: a study of employee satisfaction with the change process2011In: Journal of Management and Strategy, ISSN 1923-3965, E-ISSN 1923-3973, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 28-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to understand the degree to which employees’ satisfaction with merger-inducedorganizational changes impact on their productivity and the merged-firm performance. This is because, the introductionof market-driven business reforms in many developing economies has seen the emergence of growth-drivers that includesthe search for new markets, increasing competition in local markets, new investors’ interest in emerging markets, andhence the desire for firms to merge. The results showed that human resource issues are important aspects of mergerswhich, if it is not well handled, may impact negatively on employee satisfaction with consequent repercussions onproductivity and the success of the merger. It is concluded that employee satisfaction to a merger-induced organizationalchanges could be enhanced by instituting effective two way communication system and using participatory approachesin job redesign processes. By implication, merger-induced change has human factor challenges that merging firms needto understand.

  • 40.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Arhin, Eric
    University of Ghana, Business School.
    Using ATMs as workload relievers for Ghanaian bank tellers: the customer behavioral challenge2011In: Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, ISSN 2220-6140, E-ISSN 2220-6140, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 13-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the issue of whether the use of the Automated Teller Machines (ATM) as a service delivery tool in the banking industry of many developing countries has achieved its intended objective of increasing the effectiveness of customer service provision and reducing the workload of bank tellers. The purpose is to understand customers’ behaviour towards the use of ATM as a banking service delivery tool, and the influence of such customer-usage behaviour on the banks’ human resource capacity building, in terms of employee workload relief and performance. This is because most banks in sub-Saharan African countries have introduced the ATM in bids to satisfying customers’ service needs and making the work of employees easier. Data was collected using questionnaires that were administered to bank customers who use the ATM facility, as well as bank managers. The findings showed that though most bank customers who use the ATM services perceive the ATM as a convenient, reliable, accurate and suitable service delivery tool for their banking transactions; they still underutilize the ATM’s service capacity by choosing to go to the banking halls to make cash withdrawals of amounts that could be obtained from the ATMs. It is also found that by virtue of this customer behaviour of not using the ATM’s to their full potential, the relief that it is expected to provide bank tellers is not realized. It is concluded that because of customer behavioral challenges to the effective utilization of the ATM technology, banks in developing economies not benefiting from its full potential as a customer service delivery tool, and also as a strategic workload reliever for tellers who service customers inside the banking halls.

  • 41.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Cudjoe, Elikplim
    University of Ghana Business School, Accra.
    Identification of Factors Predictive of Nurses’ Time Pressure, Workload and Job Satisfaction in Ghanaian Public Hospitals2018In: Advances in Human Factors, Business Management and Leadership: Proceedings of the AHFE 2017 International Conferences on Human Factors in Management and Leadership, and Business Management and Society, July 17−21, 2017, The Westin Bonaventure Hotel, Los Angeles, California, USA / [ed] Jussi Ilari Kantola, Tibor Barath, Salman Nazir, Cham, 2018, p. 65-76Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors that constitute time pressure, mental stress and job satisfaction among Ghanaian nurses working in public hospitals. Factor analysis of the collated data showed that not all the standardized factors of time pressure, mental stress and job satisfaction could be used to predict nurses’ work in the Ghanaian public hospital work environment. Based on correlation analysis, it was found that by ameliorating the time pressure associated with the nursing work, nurses will experience improved relationship with both superiors and among themselves. It is concluded that by eliminating the time pressure, moderating the task pace and eliminating the emotional strain and mental stress associated with the nursing work, the mental stress associated with the nursing work will also be reduced. By implication, this understanding can be used in designing, convulsive and friendly nursing work environments in Ghanaian public hospitals.

  • 42.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Ewontumah, Kennedy
    University of Ghana, Business School.
    Organizational Involvement and Employees’ Consumption of New Work Practices in State-owned Enterprises: The Ghanaian Case2015In: World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology: International Journal of Social, Human Science and Engineering, ISSN 1307-6892, Vol. 9, no 10, p. 3140-3149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The existence of a favourable organizational involvement, persistence and adaptability in transforming a state enterprise will lead to positive employees’ consumption of new work practices. This observation was made from a study that explored the challenges faced by the management of a Ghanaian state enterprise in managing conflicts and disturbances associated with its attempt to implement new work practices to enhance its capabilities of operating as a commercial entity. The purpose was to understand the extent to which organizational involvement, consistency and adaptability influences employees’ consumption of new work practices in transforming the organization’s organizational activity system. Using self-administered questionnaires, data was collected from one hundred and eighty (180) employees and analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. The results showed that constraints in organizational involvement and adaptability prevented the positive consumption of new work practices by employees in the organization. It is also found that the organization’s employees failed to consume the new practices being implemented, because they perceived the process as non-involving, and as such, did not encourage the development of employee capability, empowerment, and teamwork. The study concluded that the failure of the organization’s management to create opportunities for organizational learning constrained its ability to get employees consume the new work practices, which situation could have facilitated the organization’s capabilities of operating as a commercial entity.

  • 43. Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    An understanding of internal organizational factors constraining best management practices implementation2004In: Program and abstracts: third nordic conference on cultural and activity research / [ed] Seth Chaiklin, Copenhagen: Danish University of Education Press , 2004, p. 107-109Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44. Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    An understanding of international organizational factors constraining best management practices implementation2004In: Third Nordic conference on cultural and activity research: program and abstracts : 3-5 September 2004, Copenhagen Denmark / [ed] Seth Chaiklin., Copenhagen: Danish University of Education Press , 2004, p. 107-109Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Engeström's "analysis of contradiction" as an evaluation tool for management practice implementation in organizations2005In: Abstracts - acting in changing worlds: learning, communication, and minds in intercultural activities / [ed] S. Chaiklin; D.A. Rubio; J.A. Sánchea Medina, International society for cultural and activity research , 2005, p. 574-575Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46. Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Engström's triangular model as a representation of an organization's activity system: a framework for the study practice in organizations2005In: Abstracts - acting in changing worlds: learning, communication, and minds in intercultural activities / [ed] S. Chaiklin; D.A. Rubio; J.A. Sánchez Medina, International society for cultural and activity research , 2005, p. 739-741Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47. Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    How leadership actions benefited the commercialisation of a government research and technology organization in South Africa2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, leadership roles in organizations are becoming increasingly challenging and stressful. Performance and productivity are paramount issues for all leaders with their success also depending more and more on the impact of their actions on the people they lead. Our paper discusses such phenomena with the objective of contributing to the growing literature by providing an insight into how the actions of leaders and managers in one R&D organization impacted positively on the lives of its staff and contributed to the success of its commercialisation. The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research is a government research and technology agency in South Africa. It started a commercialisation processes in the year 1988 with the objective of re-orienting its operation from that of a pure scientific research entity into that of a contract-oriented research organization with the capability to self-generate seventy percent of its income. As at the year 2003, the organization is perceived by its peers as a success story with the leadership and management credited for accelerating its evolution to a knowledge-intensive technology organization which is contributing to the African renaissance, aside being both internationally competitive and regionally relevant. In our study, we explored the dynamics of leadership in the organization with the objective of understanding how they contributed to its success. We generated qualitative data from the perspectives of the implicit leadership theories held by individuals by interviewing seventeen senior staff members made up of Directors of Divisions, Programme Managers, and Senior Corporate Officers whom we identified as key actors in the implementation of the best management practices for the commercialisation process. A historical data analysis based on the transformational leadership theory, show that the leadership was able to ensure the new values and norms it introduced in the organization impacted positively on the organization’s internal operating environment. We realised that these values were underlined by the introduction of new staff performance review and reward systems in line with its new business culture. Also, the ability of the management to improve quickly the quality of its human resources contributed significantly in alleviating initial feelings of resentment, caused by the fear of future uncertainties among staff members towards the leadership’s decision to commercialise the organization’s operations. It also came out that the leaders encouraged participation at all levels in its decision-making process and thus made it easier for managers to continue taking actions on organisational problems and tensions as they emerge in the organization. Our analysis also established that the leaders had a clear strategic direction as well as a clear managing process during the commercialisation process, and hence were able to imbibe a sense of empowerment among the staff members. We conclude that the organization’s president and members of the management board collectively provided a charismatic/value-based style of leadership in the organization, and thus were able to make significant contributions to the upliftment of the staff members morale and the consequent success of the organization’s capacity to operate as a commercial entity capable of fully generating its own income today.

  • 48. Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Influence of an organization's internal environment on its implementation of best management practices: an activity theory perspective2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Significance of dialectic tensions in transforming the activity systems of R&D organizations across cultures2011In: International Journal of Contemporary Business Studies, ISSN 2156-7506, E-ISSN 2156-7506, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 6-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research and Development (R&D) Organizations in developing countries have sought to enhance their income generation capabilities by implementing best management practices collated from similar organizations in developed countries. Yet, the efforts of most were found to have been constrained. Using an organizational activity theory framework and a qualitative approach, based on interviews and workshops, an attempt is made to offer an understanding to this phenomenon. Historical analyses on the efforts of three R&D organizations in three countries are carried out from the perspectives of organizational climate and culture re-orientation in their activity systems. The outcome showed that the constraints are reflective of the organizations’ inabilities to identify and successfully manage new developments arising simultaneously in their activity systems during their best management practices implementation processes. Emergence of such new developments are a result of dialectic tension between the institutional and cultural elements in the management practices being implemented and those shaped by past history and engraved in the R&Ds organizational activity systems. By this understanding, effective strategies can be designed to facilitate the cross-cultural implementation of best management practices in R&D organizations. Keywords: Practice implementation; Organizational activity; Transforming activity system; Activity contradictions; R&D organizations.

  • 50.
    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Understanding the dictating impact of systemic (trans)formations in organizational change outcomes2011In: Proceedings ISCAR International Conference 2011: Rome September 5-10, 2011, 2011, p. 94-96Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses CHAT to examine and explain the varying outcomes of organizational transformation in four research and technology organizations in four developing countries. The purpose is to provide theoretical understanding on how systemic (trans)formations in the organizations’ activities influenced the level to which their desired needs are attained. The transformation process is underlined by the implementation of a best management practices model (Mengu and Grier, 1997). By implication, the organizations sought to use the model to replace their prevailed-object of activity (i.e., carrying out research under full government funding) with a new object of activity (i.e., to carry out commercial-oriented research activity under reduced government funding, but with the capability to self-generate income). After six years of organizational activity transformation in each of these organizations, their leaps towards the attainment of this new object measured differently and which phenomenon is studied. Data is collected from identifiable groups (agents) such as the management team and staff members by triggering the conflictual questioning of the existing standard practices in the organizations. Comprehensive reading of the internal and public discussion concerning the activities in the organizations are undertaken through participant on-site observations and discussions (interviews) with employees involved in specific activities or having expertise about it, and the conduction of problem-identification workshop (Junk and Mullert, 1987; Sanda, 2006). The historic developments (Engeström, 2001) associated with the transformation that occurred in the organizational activity systems of the four organizations is analyzed. The result shows that the dictating factor in the variable outcomes in the organizations’ transformation processes is the (in)ability to deal with the systemic interfaces in their organizational activity systems. The functionalities of these interfaces are found to influence the functionality of the organizational activity system and the corresponding output that emerges from it.

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