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  • 1.
    Ferm, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Hentschel, Linn
    Umeå universitet.
    Mars, Annette
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Nyberg, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Wachenfeldt, Thomas von
    Umeå universitet.
    Collaborative learning as Common Sense: Structure, Roles and Participation Amongst Doctoral Students and Teachers in Music Education – Beyond Communities of Practice2017In: Visions of Research in Music Education, ISSN 1938-2065, Vol. 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article communicates an investigation of how collaborative learning is constituted in a PhD-course, namely Collaborative learning in music educational settings. The course was organized and run in a way that aimed to investigate, develop and encourage collaborative learning among students and teachers in the third circle. Material produced and analysed included log-books, assignments, peer-response, after-thoughts, and a Facebook discussion-thread. The results are presented as descriptions of the constituent parts of collaborative learning occurring in the “rooms” of the course. The results show the importance of structure as well as awareness when it comes to roles and kinds of participation.

  • 2.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Boom town music education: a co-creating way to learn music within formal music education2006In: 9th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition: Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna, August 22-26 2006, proceedings / [ed] Mario Baroni, Society for Music Perception , 2006, p. 1622-1627Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The general purpose of this presentation is to discuss how alternative forms of learning strategies in exclusively designed contexts may strengthen the development of musical, social and personal competences. Research in music education has confirmed that how knowledge in music is created is highly correlated with context qualities, as for example the organization of musical learning and social interaction. Still, it is difficult to free the practice of learning in music from conservatoire tradition and didactic "hidden curricula's". Formal learning situations means benefiting from experienced teachers and mentors, but music institutions all too often suffer by institutionalization and a levelling of cultures. On the other hand informal music learning is largely characterised by co-creating and peer learning. By not paying sufficient attention to learning processes within smaller groups, the great opportunities for powerful growth in personal and social skills, are also passed over.In the autumn of 2005, a completely new curriculum in music education - BoomTown Music Education (BTME) - was born within the School of Music in Piteå but as a branch of the municipal music project BoomTown in Borlänge. The educational baseline is resting on scientific theories and previous research dealing with informal learning strategies. Peer learning and playing by the ear is here acknowledged and strongly supported. The philosophy of BTME opens up to a wider musical, social and ethnic variety and is supported by a mixture of guest musicians, artists, innovators etc. Several research projects are started, and data is already collected by observations during rehearsals and concerts. An interesting body of knowledge will also come from student's diaries and written reflections, collected since the start. Research results will in time contribute with important knowledge about how learning in music is affected by the organisation and design of learning contexts.

  • 3.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    BoomTown Music Education: an introduction2010In: Music, education and innovation: Festschrift for Sture Brändström, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2010, p. 123-143Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Conforming Spheres: Limitations in Higher Music Education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presentation wants to visualize and create an interactive discussion about the legitimation of higher music education within popular music – its obstacle and potentials as an institution of plurality within a university context.There are some well-known conditions that are more or less tabooed and sometimes act as sources for the noncompliance in institutional flexibility. The schools of music are traditionally constructed by three; at least, “biotopes” of definable thinking and acting from which students, personnel and management have experience of and are recruited from. These fields are the conservatoire tradition, the Free Church’s organizations (perhaps mainly in Sweden), and the recycling system of musicians/teachers inside music institutions on different levels of education. This trinity of spheres brings on shared experiences of expertise, social training and familiarity but also exclusion, non-equality, self-righteousness, anti-intellectual preferences and conventional preferences. This is not by any sense exclusive for higher music education but in a faculty that could facilitate innovative expressions, self-independence and global engagement – why not go for it!Circumstances above results in the fact that even if popular music (in a broad sense) is the essence of music activities in the conservatories in Sweden, the learning contexts are still predictable bosoms for music students all the way from voluntary music school (during elementary school years), through aesthetic gymnasia, pre-educations like folk high schools, straight forward to the School of music to, perhaps, a teacher education for elementary school and voluntary music school. As a consequence of this recycling situation the plurality and differences that e.g. Biesta, 2006 highlights as necessary, can perhaps be linked more to genre expansion than to democratic and existential content.

  • 5.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Formspråk och spelregler: en studie i rockmusicerande inom och utanför musikhögskolan1999Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Music Teachers as Conscious Cosmopolites2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A music teacher student 2013 will meet children born 2040, during their career. Scandinavian as well as the rest of the worlds university curriculum have an elusive picture of what kind of learning contexts they will have to design when meeting the “Millennium children” and who can blame them? What we can do is to facilitate an institutional consciousness expansion in how to assist student music teachers developing sustainable skills for acting flexible in future, unfamiliar and multicultural contexts. This collaboration with “the other” has to go beyond music genre and subcultural identities and interact with societal changes and needs. Institutions are not in its essence flexible and new or alternative music styles will probably always be “pedagogizied” to fit in educational settings. The informal and socialising “rules of the conservatoire game” is still stronger than the millennium voice of internationalisation and collaboration in global communities. Globalization can become a kind of new renaissance. It is a paradigm shift that directs toward a circulatory worldview. “The others” will be in our lives no matter what. The question is – how do we want to respond to that. With fear or dialogue?The university as a whole is also in an era of “paradigmatic transition” (Santos, 2012, p8). It is ”confronted with strong questions for which it has so far provided only weak answers”. Or as Kemp resonates, “The great theme in political debate and within political movements, national as well as international, have since the end of 90th been the phenomena globalization. It is this globalisation that gives the idea of a cosmopolitan new actuality. But, as earlier said, it has not reached our institutions of learning and education. Many of our teachers within compulsory school are still blind for the fact” (Kemp, 2005 p29). When discussing the position of the university in the new world order, Santos (2012) raises the question whether the university can successfully reinvent itself as a centre of knowledge in a globalizing society with many other centres. The question of legitimation of university educations in future society is of great importance when it comes to global artistic expressions like music.

  • 7.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Skolvägen eller garagevägen: studier av musikalisk socialisation2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this dissertation project, three studies of socialisation in music are presented. In study one, two groups of musicians, one from a University College of Music and the other, a rock group from the non- university music scene, were asked to arrange and record a finished version of a ‘rock song’, especially created for this project. The second study treated how music students in teacher training programs, and students without formal music education experienced and interpreted the diverse versions of the songs created. The third, a interview study, focused more exclusively on the informants early musical socialisation and how their different learning strategies and experiences of music correlated with their wish to start and maintain studies in music education programmes. The theoretical background for the project as a whole reached across several research fields, for example Music pedagogy, Psychology and Social psychology. In study one, information concerning thinking and acting before and during the studio recordings was collected. Results showed that the final versions of the songs created, belonged to stylistically different genres of composition. The College Group made a jazzy pop song and the Rock Group’s version was within the style of hardcore music. The two versions not only sounded completely different, they were also within a musical province, which the other group felt strong antipathy for. The observation data and information from the interviews showed very separate attitudes to music making and to learning strategies when playing in an ensemble. Listeners’ comments in study two, clearly showed that the populations differed in experience of tempos, intensity, variation and focus on the lyrical material. The students with formal training in music preferred other styles of music than other undergraduates, and showed more diffuse knowledge of music styles within the rock genre. Study three indicated that students at music colleges are socialised with a specific set of values, which exclusively prevail within colleges of music. The final stage in a long process of development is their time at the music college. The study also shed light on the relationship between formal and non-formal learning amongst pop- and rock musicians. Results would suggest that in the way one is performing music and which genre that is to be favoured, is motivated by the way one has played and learned music. Early musical influences, formal musical training and musical preferences – the musical socialisation – is influencing people’s interpretation of both institutional and non- institutional learning environments. The students are educated within a school context with its associated set of values and norms regarding musical, tastes in music, musical form and performance, as well as gaining musical competence. Future music teachers must be prepared for meeting an audience with a broad range of different music experiences and expectations. It is reasonable to expect that what is to be demanded of music teachers, is to be open minded and have understanding which is to be emphasized in multicultural societies. Music teachers, and the music teacher education in music colleges, must thus learn to understand and cope with many different learning situations. The question is whether music colleges have the “right stuff” for providing this competence during the student’s years at school?

  • 8.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Brändström, Sture
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Formal and non-formal music learning amongst rock musicians2004In: The music practitioner: Research for the music performer, teacher and listener, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing , 2004, p. 161-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Brändström, Sture
    Performance anxiety and coping strategies for musicians1997In: Engineering psychology and cognitive ergonomics / [ed] Don Harris, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing , 1997, Vol. 2 : Job design and product design, p. 309-314Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to help musicians with performance anxiety or stage fright and improve the education as a whole at a school of music by implementing mental training program. Ss were 19 high school and music teacher students. Besides the question about the effect of a mental training program on music students' performance anxiety, another question raised by this project is: Are there any other positive or negative effects?

  • 10.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Johansson, KG
    Arno Gullberg - Musikern, myterna, människan2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Arno Gullberg (1930-2002) var en av Sveriges ledande jazzmusiker när han flyttade till Piteå i slutet av 1950-talet. 1971 började han undervisa i gehörsspel vid Framnäs folkhögskola, vilket kan ha varit den allra första gången jazzmusik förekom på en svensk musikutbildning. Berättelsen om Arno Gullbergs liv speglar vad som hände med jazzen när rockmusiken tog över. Dessutom visar den något om hur svensk musikutbildning förändrades när både jazz och rock kom på schemat. Den innehåller dessutom myterna om musikern och ett nära porträtt av människan Arno Gullberg

  • 11.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Researching Transformative Technology and its affordance for students within Higher Music Education2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the autumn 2018 a research project concerning Transformative Technology (TT) for the increase of wellbeing and the reduction of mental dissonance has been launched at the School of Music in Piteå. Seed money has enabled a pilot project where students within higher music education can use different types of TT. This poster will show the different types of TT used in the pilot project and some preliminary result from the user experiences. The technology in use are (i) the Heart Rate Variability (HRV) sensors and Heart Math application, (ii) the Muse headband and meditation app, (iii) the Soma Mat and Breathing Light developed at SICS and KTH, as well as the (iv) ARK-crystal developed at the Torus Tech lab. The purpose of the pilot study is to investigate how students respond to different kinds of sensors and actuators used in this TT and most importantly how the students find the technology transformable in regard to amplifying their well-being, empowering and refining their aesthetic resonance and diminishing stress and anxiety blocking them in their musical performance and development.

1 - 11 of 11
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