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  • 1.
    Ahlén, Gustaf
    et al.
    Recopharma AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strindelius, Lena
    Recopharma AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Tomas
    Recopharma AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Anki
    Recopharma AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chatzissavidou, Nathalie
    Recopharma AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöblom, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Holgersson, Jan
    Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mannosylated mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion proteins enhance antigen-specific antibody and T lymphocyte responses2012In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 10, article id e46959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APC) improve their immunogenicity and capacity to induce Th1 responses and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). We have generated a mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion protein (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), which upon expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris became multivalently substituted with O-linked oligomannose structures and bound the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR) and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) with high affinity in vitro. Here, its effects on the humoral and cellular anti-ovalbumin (OVA) responses in C57BL/6 mice are presented.

    OVA antibody class and subclass responses were determined by ELISA, the generation of anti-OVA CTLs was assessed in 51Cr release assays using in vitro-stimulated immune spleen cells from the different groups of mice as effector cells and OVA peptide-fed RMA-S cells as targets, and evaluation of the type of Th cell response was done by IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 ELISpot assays.

    Immunizations with the OVA − mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG2b conjugate, especially when combined with the AbISCO®-100 adjuvant, lead to faster, stronger and broader (with regard to IgG subclass) OVA IgG responses, a stronger OVA-specific CTL response and stronger Th1 and Th2 responses than if OVA was used alone or together with AbISCO®-100. Also non-covalent mixing of mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG2b, OVA and AbISCO®-100 lead to relatively stronger humoral and cellular responses. The O-glycan oligomannoses were necessary because PSGL-1/mIgG2b with mono- and disialyl core 1 structures did not have this effect.

    Mannosylated mucin-type fusion proteins can be used as versatile APC-targeting molecules for vaccines and as such enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses.

  • 2. Andersson, Christian
    et al.
    Helmerius, Jonas
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Effects of neutralising agent, organic acids, and osmolarity on succinic acid production by Escherichia coli AFP1842008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a low-cost medium Escherichia coli AFP184 has previously been reported to produce succinic acid with volumetric productivities close to 3 g L-1 h-1. At a total organic acid concentration of 30 g L-1 the productivity decreased drastically resulting in final succinate concentrations of 40 g L-1. The economical viability of biochemical succinic acid production would benefit from higher final succinic acid concentrations and volumetric productivities maintained at >2.5 g L-1 h-1 for an extended period of time. In the present work the effects of osmolarity and neutralising agent (NH4OH, KOH, NaOH, K2CO3, and Na2CO3) on succinic acid production by AFP184 were investigated. Highest concentration of succinic acid was obtained with Na2CO3, 75 g L-1. It was also found that the osmolarity resulting from succinate production and subsequent base addition, only marginally affected the productivity per viable cell. Organic acid inhibition due to the produced succinic acid on the other hand significantly reduced succinic acid productivity per viable cell. When using NH4OH productivity completely ceased at approximately 40 g L-1. Volumetric productivities remained at 2.5 g L-1 h-1 for 5 to 10 hours longer when using K- or Na-bases than when using NH4OH. However, loss of cell viability occurred, and together with the acid inhibition decreased the volumetric productivities. In this study it was demonstrated that by altering the neutralising agent it was possible to increase the period of high volumetric productivity in the anaerobic phase and improve the final succinic acid concentration by almost 100 %

  • 3.
    Andersson, Christian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Helmerius, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Hodge, David
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Inhibition of succinic acid production in metabolically engineered Escherichia Coli by neutralizing agent, organic acids, and osmolarity2009In: Biotechnology progress (Print), ISSN 8756-7938, E-ISSN 1520-6033, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 116-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The economical viability of biochemical succinic acid production is a result of many processing parameters including final succinic acid concentration, recovery of succinate, and the volumetric productivity. Maintaining volumetric productivities >2.5 g L-1 h(-1) is important if production of succinic acid from. renewable resources should be competitive. In this work, the effects of organic acids, osmolarity, and neutralizing agent (NH4OH, KOH, NaOH, K2CO3, and Na2CO3) on the fermentative succinic acid production by Escherichia coli AFP184 were investigated. The highest concentration of succinic acid, 77 g L-1. was obtained with Na2O3. In general, irrespective of the base used, succinic acid productivity per viable cell was significantly reduced as the concentration of the produced acid increased. Increased osmolarity resulting from base addition during succinate production only marginally affected the productivity per viable cell. Addition of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine to cultures resulted in an increased aerobic growth rate and anaerobic glucose consumption rate, but decreased succinic acid yield. When using NH4OH productivity completely ceased at a succinic acid concentration of similar to 40 g L-1. Volumetric productivities remained at 2.5 g L-1 h(-1) for tip to 10 h longer when K- or Na-bases where used instead of NH4OH. The decrease in cellular succinic acid productivity observed during the anaerobic phase was found to be due to increased organic acid concentrations rather than medium osmolarity.

  • 4. Andersson, Christian
    et al.
    Hodge, David
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Effect of different carbon sources on the production of succinic acid using metabolically engineered Escherichia coli2007In: Biotechnology progress (Print), ISSN 8756-7938, E-ISSN 1520-6033, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 381-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Succinic acid (SA) is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a number of commodity and specialty chemicals. In the present work, dual-phase batch fermentations with the E. coli strain AFP184 were performed using a medium suited for large-scale industrial production of SA. The ability of the strain to ferment different sugars was investigated. The sugars studied were sucrose, glucose, fructose, xylose, and equal mixtures of glucose and fructose and glucose and xylose at a total initial sugar concentration of 100 g L-1. AFP184 was able to utilize all sugars and sugar combinations except sucrose for biomass generation and succinate production. For sucrose as a substrate no succinic acid was produced and none of the sucrose was metabolized. The succinic acid yield from glucose (0.83 g succinic acid per gram glucose consumed anaerobically) was higher than the yield from fructose (0.66 g g-1). When using xylose as a carbon source, a yield of 0.50 g g-1 was obtained. In the mixed-sugar fermentations no catabolite repression was detected. Mixtures of glucose and xylose resulted in higher yields (0.60 g g-1) than use of xylose alone. Fermenting glucose mixed with fructose gave a lower yield (0.58 g g-1) than fructose used as the sole carbon source. The reason is an increased pyruvate production. The pyruvate concentration decreased later in the fermentation. Final succinic acid concentrations were in the range of 25-40 g L-1. Acetic and pyruvic acid were the only other products detected and accumulated to concentrations of 2.7-6.7 and 0-2.7 g L-1. Production of succinic acid decreased when organic acid concentrations reached approximately 30 g L-1. This study demonstrates that E. coli strain AFP184 is able to produce succinic acid in a low cost medium from a variety of sugars with only small amounts of byproducts formed.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Christian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Petrova, Ekaterina
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology. Departments of Forestry and Chemical Engineering, Michigan State University, Michigan, USA.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Maintaining high anaerobic succinic acid productivity by product removal2010In: Bioprocess and biosystems engineering (Print), ISSN 1615-7591, E-ISSN 1615-7605, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 711-718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During dual-phase fermentations using Escherichia coli engineered for succinic acid production, the productivity and viable cell concentration decrease as the concentration of succinic acid increases. The effects of succinic acid on the fermentation kinetics, yield, and cell viability were investigated by resuspending cells in fresh media after selected fermentation times. The cellular succinic acid productivity could be restored, but cell viability continuously decreased throughout the fermentations by up to 80% and subsequently the volumetric productivity was reduced. Omitting complex nutrients in the resuspension media had no significant effect on cellular succinate productivity and yield, although the viable cell concentration and thus the volumetric productivity was reduced by approximately 20%. By resuspending the cells, the amount of succinate produced during a 100-h fermentation was increased by more than 60%. The results demonstrate that by product removal succinic acid productivity can be maintained at high levels for extended periods of time.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Christian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Process for producing succinic acid from sucrose2005Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A process for hydrolyzing sucrose to glucose and fructose using succinic acid is described. The hydrolysate can be used to produce purified glucose and/or fructose or can be used as a carbon source for fermentations to produce various chemicals including succinic acid.

  • 7.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Dilokpimol, Adiphol
    Fungal Physiology, Westerdijk Fungal Biodiversity Institute & Fungal Molecular Physiology, Utrecht University.
    Iancu, Laura
    Dupont Industrial Biosciences.
    Mäkelä, Miia R.
    Department of Microbiology, University of Helsink.
    Varriale, Simona
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”.
    Cerullo, Gabriella
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”.
    Hüttner, Silvia
    Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Industrial Biotechnology, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Uthoff, Stefan
    Institut für Molekulare Mikrobiologie und Biotechnologie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster.
    Jütten, Peter
    Taros Chemicals GmbH & Co KG.
    Piechot, Alexander
    Taros Chemicals GmbH & Co KG.
    Steinbüchel, Alexander
    nstitut für Molekulare Mikrobiologie und Biotechnologie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster.
    Olsson, Lisbeth
    Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Industrial Biotechnology, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Faraco, Vincenza
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”.
    Hildén, Kristiina
    Department of Microbiology, University of Helsinki.
    de Vries, Ronald
    Fungal Physiology, Westerdijk Fungal Biodiversity Institute & Fungal Molecular Physiology, Utrecht University.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    The Synthetic Potential of Fungal Feruloyl Esterases: A Correlation with Current Classification Systems and Predicted Structural Properties2018In: Catalysts, E-ISSN 2073-4344, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty-eight fungal feruloyl esterases (FAEs) were evaluated for their synthetic abilities in a ternary system of n-hexane: t-butanol: 100 mM MOPS-NaOH pH 6.0 forming detergentless microemulsions. Five main derivatives were synthesized, namely prenyl ferulate, prenyl caffeate, butyl ferulate, glyceryl ferulate, and l-arabinose ferulate, offering, in general, higher yields when more hydrophilic alcohol substitutions were used. Acetyl xylan esterase-related FAEs belonging to phylogenetic subfamilies (SF) 5 and 6 showed increased synthetic yields among tested enzymes. In particular, it was shown that FAEs belonging to SF6 generally transesterified aliphatic alcohols more efficiently while SF5 members preferred bulkier l-arabinose. Predicted surface properties and structural characteristics were correlated with the synthetic potential of selected tannase-related, acetyl-xylan-related, and lipase-related FAEs (SF1-2, -6, -7 members) based on homology modeling and small molecular docking simulations.

  • 8.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Hunt, Cameron
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Cerullo, Gabriella
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples "Federico II".
    Varriale, Simona
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”.
    Gerogianni, Alexandra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Faraco, Vincenza
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples "Federico II".
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Tailoring the specificity of the type C feruloyl esterase FoFaeC from Fusarium oxysporum towards methyl sinapate by rational redesign based on small molecule docking simulations2018In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 5, article id e0198127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The type C feruloyl esterase FoFaeC from Fusarium oxysporum is a newly discovered enzyme with high potential for use in the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass but it shows low activity towards sinapates. In this work, small molecule docking simulations were employed in order to identify important residues for the binding of the four model methyl esters of hydroxycinnamic acids, methyl ferulate/caffeate/sinapate/p-coumarate, to the predicted structure of FoFaeC. Subsequently rational redesign was applied to the enzyme’ active site in order to improve its specificity towards methyl sinapate. A double mutation (F230H/T202V) was considered to provide hydrophobic environment for stabilization of the methoxy substitution on sinapate and a larger binding pocket. Five mutant clones and the wild type were produced in Pichia pastoris and biochemically characterized. All clones showed improved activity, substrate affinity, catalytic efficiency and turnover rate compared to the wild type against methyl sinapate, with clone P13 showing a 5-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency. Although the affinity of all mutant clones was improved against the four model substrates, the catalytic efficiency and turnover rate decreased for the substrates containing a hydroxyl substitution.

  • 9.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Iancu, Laura
    Dupont Industrial Biosciences, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
    Jütten, Peter
    Taros Chemicals GmbH & Co KG, Dortmund, Germany.
    Piechot, Alexander
    Taros Chemicals GmbH & Co KG, Dortmund, Germany.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Optimized Enzymatic Synthesis of Feruloyl Derivatives Catalyzed by Three Novel Feruloyl Esterases from Talaromyces wortmannii in Detergentless Microemulsions2018In: Computational and Structural Biotechnology Journal, E-ISSN 2001-0370, p. 361-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three novel feruloyl esterases (Fae125, Fae7262 and Fae68) from Talaromyces wortmanniioverexpressed in the C1 platform were evaluated for the transesterification of vinyl ferulatewith two acceptors of different size and lipophilicity (prenol and L-arabinose) in detergentless microemulsions. The effect of reaction conditions such as the microemulsion composition, the substrate concentration, the enzyme load, the pH, the temperature and the agitation were investigated. The type A Fae125 belonging to the subfamily 5 (SF5) of phylogenetic classification showed highest yields for the synthesis of both products after optimization of reaction conditions: 81.8% for prenyl ferulate and 33.0% for L-arabinose ferulate. After optimization, an 8-fold increase in the yield and a 12-fold increase in selectivity were achieved for the synthesis of prenyl ferulate.

  • 10.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Iancu, Laura
    Dupont Industrial Biosciences.
    Jütten, Peter
    Taros Chemicals GmbH & Co KG.
    Piechot, Alexander
    Taros Chemicals GmbH & Co KG.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Screening of novel feruloyl esterases from Talaromyces wortmannii for the development of efficient and sustainable syntheses of feruloyl derivatives2019In: Enzyme and microbial technology, ISSN 0141-0229, E-ISSN 1879-0909, Vol. 120, p. 124-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The feruloyl esterases Fae125, Fae7262 and Fae68 from Talaromyces wortmannii were screened in 10 different solvent: buffer systems in terms of residual hydrolytic activity and of the ability for the transesterification of vinyl ferulate with prenol or L-arabinose. Among the tested enzymes, the acetyl xylan-related Fae125 belonging to the phylogenetic subfamily 5 showed highest yield and selectivity for both products in alkane: buffer systems (n-hexane or n-octane). Response surface methodology, based on a 5-level and 6-factor central composite design, revealed that the substrate molar ratio and the water content were the most significant variables for the bioconversion yield and selectivity. The effect of agitation, the possibility of DMSO addition and the increase of donor concentration were investigated. After optimization, competitive transesterification yields were obtained for prenyl ferulate (87.5-92.6%) and L-arabinose ferulate (56.2-61.7%) at reduced reaction times (≤ 24 h) resulting in good productivities (> 1 g/L/h, >300 kg product/kg FAE). The enzyme could be recycled for six consecutive cycles retaining 66.6% of the synthetic activity and 100% of the selectivity.

  • 11.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Leonov, Laura
    DuPont Industrial Biosciences.
    Jûtten, Peter
    Taros Chemicals GmbH & Co.
    Cerullo, Gabriella
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples "Federico II".
    Faraco, Vincenza
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples "Federico II".
    Papadopoulou, Adamantia
    Institute of Biosciences and Applications NCSR "Demokritos," Laboratory of Cell Proliferation and Aging.
    Kletsas, Dimitris
    Institute of Biosciences and Applications NCSR "Demokritos," Laboratory of Cell Proliferation and Aging.
    Ralli, Marianna
    Korres Natural Products.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Optimized synthesis of novel prenyl ferulate performed by feruloyl esterases from Myceliophthora thermophila in microemulsions2017In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, ISSN 0175-7598, E-ISSN 1432-0614, Vol. 101, no 8, p. 3213-3226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five feruloyl esterases (FAEs; EC 3.1.1.73), FaeA1, FaeA2, FaeB1, and FaeB2 from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 and MtFae1a from M. thermophila ATCC 42464, were tested for their ability to catalyze the transesterification of vinyl ferulate (VFA) with prenol in detergentless microemulsions. Reaction conditions were optimized investigating parameters such as the medium composition, the substrate concentration, the enzyme load, the pH, the temperature, and agitation. FaeB2 offered the highest transesterification yield (71.5 ± 0.2%) after 24 h of incubation at 30 °C using 60 mM VFA, 1 M prenol, and 0.02 mg FAE/mL in a mixture comprising of 53.4:43.4:3.2 v/v/v n-hexane:t-butanol:100 mM MOPS-NaOH, pH 6.0. At these conditions, the competitive side hydrolysis of VFA was 4.7-fold minimized. The ability of prenyl ferulate (PFA) and its corresponding ferulic acid (FA) to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals was significant and similar (IC50 423.39 μM for PFA, 329.9 μM for FA). PFA was not cytotoxic at 0.8–100 μM (IC50 220.23 μM) and reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human skin fibroblasts at concentrations ranging between 4 and 20 μM as determined with the dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay.

  • 12.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Papadopoulou, Adamantia
    Laboratory of Cell Proliferation & Ageing, Institute of Biosciences & Applications NCSR “Demokritos”, T. Patriarchou Grigoriou & Neapoleos.
    Iancu, Laura
    DuPont Industrial Biosciences.
    Cerullo, Gabriella
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples "Federico II".
    Ralli, Marianna
    Korres Natural Products.
    Jûtten, Peter
    Taros Chemicals GmbH & Co.
    Piechot, Alexander
    Taros Chemicals GmbH & Co.
    Faraco, Vincenza
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples "Federico II".
    Kletsas, Dimitris
    Institute of Biosciences and Applications NCSR "Demokritos," Laboratory of Cell Proliferation and Aging.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Optimization of enzymatic synthesis of l-arabinose ferulate catalyzed by feruloyl esterases from Myceliophthora thermophila in detergentless microemulsions and assessment of its antioxidant and cytotoxicity activities2018In: Process Biochemistry, ISSN 1359-5113, E-ISSN 1873-3298, Vol. 65, p. 100-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The feruloyl esterases FaeA1, FaeA2, FaeB1, FaeB2 from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 and MtFae1a from M. thermophila ATCC 42464 were used as biocatalysts for the transesterification of vinyl ferulate (VFA) with l-arabinose in detergentless microemulsions. The effect of parameters such as the microemulsion composition, the substrate concentration, the enzyme load, the pH, the temperature and the agitation was investigated. FaeA1 offered the highest transesterification yield (52.2 ± 4.3%) after 8 h of incubation at 50 °C using 80 mM VFA, 55 mM l-arabinose and 0.02 mg FAE mL−1 in a mixture comprising of 19.8: 74.7: 5.5 v/v/v n-hexane: t-butanol: 100 mM MOPS-NaOH pH 8.0. The ability of l-arabinose ferulate (AFA) to scavenge 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals was significant (IC50 386.5 μM). AFA was not cytotoxic even at high concentrations (1 mM) however was found to be pro-oxidant at concentrations higher than 20 μM when the antioxidant activity was determined with the dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay in human skin fibroblasts.

  • 13.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    CO2 to Methanol: A Highly Efficient Enzyme Cascade2022In: Multienzymatic Assemblies: Methods and Protocols / [ed] Haralambos Stamatis, Springer Nature, 2022, 1, p. 317-344Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been increasingly regarded not only as a greenhouse gas but also as a valuable feedstock for carbon-based chemicals. In particular, biological approaches have drawn attention as models for the production of value-added products, as CO2 conversion serves many natural processes. Enzymatic CO2 reduction in vitro is a very promising route to produce fossil free and bio-based fuel alternatives, such as methanol. In this chapter, the advances in constructing competitive multi-enzymatic systems for the reduction of CO2 to methanol are discussed. Different integrated methods are presented, aiming to address technological challenges, such as the cost effectiveness, need for material regeneration and reuse and improving product yields of the process.

  • 14.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Sapountzaki, Eleftheria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Ferulic Acid From Plant Biomass: A Phytochemical With Promising Antiviral Properties2022In: Frontiers in Nutrition, E-ISSN 2296-861X, Vol. 8, article id 777576Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant biomass is a magnificent renewable resource for phytochemicals that carry bioactive properties. Ferulic acid (FA) is a hydroxycinnamic acid that is found widespread in plant cell walls, mainly esterified to polysaccharides. It is well known of its strong antioxidant activity, together with numerous properties, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. This review article provides insights into the potential for valorization of FA as a potent antiviral agent. Its pharmacokinetic properties (absorption, metabolism, distribution and excretion) and the proposed mechanisms that are purported to provide antiviral activity are presented. Novel strategies on extraction and derivatization routes, for enhancing even further the antiviral activity of FA and potentially favor its metabolism, distribution and residence time in the human body, are discussed. These routes may lead to novel high-added value biorefinery pathways to utilize plant biomass toward the production of nutraceuticals as functional foods with attractive bioactive properties, such as enhancing immunity toward viral infections.

  • 15.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Sapountzaki, Eleftheria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Inhibition of the main protease of SARS-CoV-2 (Mpro) by repurposing/designing drug-like substances and utilizing nature’s toolbox of bioactive compounds2022In: Computational and Structural Biotechnology Journal, ISSN 2001-0370, Vol. 20, p. 1306-1344Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in a long pandemic, with numerous cases and victims worldwide and enormous consequences on social and economic life. Although vaccinations have proceeded and provide a valuable shield against the virus, the approved drugs are limited and it is crucial that further ways to combat infection are developed, that can also act against potential mutations. The main protease (Mpro) of the virus is an appealing target for the development of inhibitors, due to its importance in the viral life cycle and its high conservation among different coronaviruses. Several compounds have shown inhibitory potential against Mpro, both in silico and in vitro, with few of them also having entered clinical trials. These candidates include: known drugs that have been repurposed, molecules specifically designed based on the natural substrate of the protease or on structural moieties that have shown high binding affinity to the protease active site, as well as naturally derived compounds, either isolated or in plant extracts. The aim of this work is to collectively present the results of research regarding Mpro inhibitors to date, focusing on the function of the compounds founded by in silico simulations and further explored by in vitro and in vivo assays. Creating an extended portfolio of promising compounds that may block viral replication by inhibiting Mpro and by understanding involved structure–activity relationships, could provide a basis for the development of effective solutions against SARS-CoV-2 and future related outbreaks.

  • 16.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Sapountzaki, Eleftheria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    The Inhibitory Potential of Ferulic Acid Derivatives against the SARS-CoV-2 Main Protease: Molecular Docking, Molecular Dynamics, and ADMET Evaluation2022In: Biomedicines, E-ISSN 2227-9059, Vol. 10, no 8, article id 1787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main protease (Mpro) of SARS-CoV-2 is an appealing target for the development of antiviral compounds, due to its critical role in the viral life cycle and its high conservation among different coronaviruses and the continuously emerging mutants of SARS-CoV-2. Ferulic acid (FA) is a phytochemical with several health benefits that is abundant in plant biomass and has been used as a basis for the enzymatic or chemical synthesis of derivatives with improved properties, including antiviral activity against a range of viruses. This study tested 54 reported FA derivatives for their inhibitory potential against Mpro by in silico simulations. Molecular docking was performed using Autodock Vina, resulting in comparable or better binding affinities for 14 compounds compared to the known inhibitors N3 and GC376. ADMET analysis showed limited bioavailability but significantly improved the solubility for the enzymatically synthesized hits while better bioavailability and druglikeness properties but higher toxicity were observed for the chemically synthesized ones. MD simulations confirmed the stability of the complexes of the most promising compounds with Mpro, highlighting FA rutinoside and compound e27 as the best candidates from each derivative category. View Full-TextKeywords: SARS-CoV-2; Mpro; enzyme inhibition; ferulic acid; molecular docking; molecular dynamics; ADMET

  • 17.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Varriale, Simona
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples "Federico II".
    Topakas, Evangelos
    National Technical University of Athens, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Faraco, Voncenza
    Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples "Federico II".
    Enzymatic synthesis of bioactive compounds with high potential for cosmeceutical application2016In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, ISSN 0175-7598, E-ISSN 1432-0614, Vol. 100, no 15, p. 6519-6543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cosmeceuticals are cosmetic products containing biologically active ingredients purporting to offer a pharmaceutical therapeutic benefit. The active ingredients can be extracted and purified from natural sources (botanicals, herbal extracts, or animals) but can also be obtained biotechnologically by fermentation and cell cultures or by enzymatic synthesis and modification of natural compounds. A cosmeceutical ingredient should possess an attractive property such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, skin whitening, anti-aging, anti-wrinkling, or photoprotective activity, among others. During the past years, there has been an increased interest on the enzymatic synthesis of bioactive esters and glycosides based on (trans)esterification, (trans)glycosylation, or oxidation reactions. Natural bioactive compounds with exceptional theurapeutic properties and low toxicity may offer a new insight into the design and development of potent and beneficial cosmetics. This review gives an overview of the enzymatic modifications which are performed currently for the synthesis of products with attractive properties for the cosmeceutical industry

  • 18.
    Bajracharya, Suman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Krige, Adolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Advances in cathode designs and reactor configurations of microbial electrosynthesis systems to facilitate gas electro-fermentation2022In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 354, article id 127178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In gas fermentation, a range of chemolithoautotrophs fix single-carbon (C1) gases (CO2 and CO) when H2 or other reductants are available. Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) enables CO2 reduction by generating H2 or reducing equivalents with the sole input of renewable electricity. A combined approach as gas electro-fermentation is attractive for the sustainable production of biofuels and biochemicals utilizing C1 gases. Various platform compounds such as acetate, butyrate, caproate, ethanol, butanol and bioplastics can be produced. However, technological challenges pertaining to the microbe-material interactions such as poor gas-liquid mass transfer, low biomass and biofilm coverage on cathode, low productivities still exist. We are presenting a review on latest developments in MES focusing on the configuration and design of cathodes that can address the challenges and support the gas electro-fermentation. Overall, the opportunities for advancing CO and CO2-based biochemicals and biofuels production in MES with suitable cathode/reactor design are prospected.

  • 19.
    Bajracharya, Suman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Krige, Adolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Dual cathode configuration and headspace gas recirculation for enhancing microbial electrosynthesis using Sporomusa ovata2022In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 287, Part 3, article id 132188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-rate production of acetate and other value-added products from the reduction of CO2 in microbial electrosynthesis (MES) using acetogens can be achieved with high reducing power where H2 appears as a key electron mediator. H2 evolution using metal cathodes can enhance the availability of H2 to support high-rate microbial reduction of CO2. Due to the low solubility of H2, the availability of H2 remains limited to the bacteria. In this study, we investigated the performances of Sporomusa ovata for CO2 reduction when dual cathodes were used together in an MES, one was regular carbon cathode, and the other was a titanium mesh that allows higher hydrogen evolution. The dual cathode configuration was investigated in two sets of MES, one set had the usual S. ovata inoculated graphite rod, and another set had a synthetic biofilm-imprinted carbon cloth. Additionally, the headspace gas in MES was recirculated to increase the H2 availability to the bacteria in suspension. High-rate CO2 reduction was observed at −0.9 V vs Ag/AgCl with dual cathode configuration as compared to single cathodes. High titers of acetate (up to ∼11 g/L) with maximum instantaneous rates of 0.68–0.7 g/L/d at −0.9 V vs Ag/AgCl were observed, which are higher than the production rates reported in literatures for S. ovata using MES with surface modified cathodes. A high H2 availability supported the high-rate acetate production from CO2 with diminished electricity input.

  • 20.
    Bajracharya, Suman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Krige, Adolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Microbial Electrosynthesis Using 3D Bioprinting of Sporomusa ovata on Copper, Stainless-Steel, and Titanium Cathodes for CO2 Reduction2023In: Fermentation, E-ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acetate can be produced from carbon dioxide (CO2) and electricity using bacteria at the cathode of microbial electrosynthesis (MES). This process relies on electrolytically-produced hydrogen (H2). However, the low solubility of H2 can limit the process. Using metal cathodes to generate H2 at a high rate can improve MES. Immobilizing bacteria on the metal cathode can further proliferate the H2 availability to the bacteria. In this study, we investigated the performances of 3D bioprinting of Sporomusa ovata on three metal meshes—copper (Cu), stainless steel (SS), and titanium (Ti), when used individually as a cathode in MES. Bacterial cells were immobilized on the metal using a 3D bioprinter with alginate hydrogel ink. The bioprinted Ti mesh exhibited higher acetate production (53 ± 19 g/m2/d) at −0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl as compared to other metal cathodes. More than 9 g/L of acetate was achieved with bioprinted Ti, and the least amount was obtained with bioprinted Cu. Although all three metals are known for catalyzing H2 evolution, the lower biocompatibility and chemical stability of Cu hampered its performance. Stable and biocompatible Ti supported the bioprinted S. ovata effectively. Bioprinting of synthetic biofilm on H2-evolving metal cathodes can provide high-performing and robust biocathodes for further application of MES.

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  • 21.
    Bajracharya, Suman
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Sarkar, Omprakash
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Krige, Adolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Chapter 12 - Advances in gas fermentation processes2022In: Current Developments in Biotechnology and Bioengineering: Advances in Bioprocess Engineering / [ed] Sirohi, Ranjna; Pandey, Ashok; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.; Larroche, Christian, Elsevier, 2022, p. 321-351Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial metabolism enables the sustainable synthesis of fuels and chemicals from gaseous substrates (H2, CO, and CO2), thus drastically diminishing the carbon load in the atmosphere. Various value-added biochemicals and biofuels, such as acetate, methane, ethanol, butanol, butyrate, caproate, and bioplastics, have been produced during the conversion of syngas or H2/CO2, using a variety of microorganisms as biocatalysts. Gas fermentation processes using acetogenic and methanogenic organisms are being extensively investigated. This chapter provides an overview of microbial CO and CO2 conversion technology, with an emphasis on recent developments and integration with renewable electricity for the generation of H2 or other forms of electron donors. A discussion on technological challenges in gas fermentation addresses issues, such as poor mass transfer, low microbial biomass, and low productivity. It also presents possible solutions based on the latest advances in bioelectrochemical processes including microbial gas electrofermentation. Finally, the chapter includes a sustainability analysis of the process and includes a brief update on commercially established companies operating gas fermentation systems. Overall, an integrated approach combining gas fermentation and renewable electricity offers an opportunity for the development of CO and CO2- based biochemical and biofuel production at commercial scale.

  • 22.
    Bauer, Fredric
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Hulteberg, Christian
    Lund University.
    Lundgren, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Mesfun, Sennai
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Nilsson, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Wännström, Sune
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Comparative system analysis of carbon preserving fermentations for biofuels production2013Report (Refereed)
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  • 23.
    Behravan, Gity
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Sen, Srikanta
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Thelander, Lars
    Umeå universitet.
    Eckstein, Fritz
    Max-Planck-Institut fur Experimentelle Medizin.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Formation of a free radical of the sulfenylimine type in the mouse ribonucleotide reductase reaction with 2'-azido-2'-deoxycytidine 5'-diphosphate1995In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, Gene Structure and Expression, ISSN 0167-4781, E-ISSN 1879-2634, Vol. 1264, no 3, p. 323-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mouse and Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductases (RR) both belong to the same class of RR, where the enzyme consists of two non-identical subunits, proteins R1 and R2. A transient free radical was observed by EPR spectroscopy in the mouse RR reaction with the suicidal inhibitor 2′-azido-2′-deoxycytidine 5′-diphosphate. The detailed hyperfine structure of the EPR spectrum of the transient radical is somewhat different for the mouse and previously studied E. coli enzymes. When the positive allosteric effector ATP was replaced by the negative effector dATP, no transient radical was observed, showing that ‘normal' binding of the inhibitor to the substrate binding site is required. Using the mouse protein R2 mutants W 103Y and D266A, where the mutations have been shown to specifically block long range electron transfer between the active site of the R1 protein to the iron/radical site in protein R2, no evidence of transient radical was found. Taken together, the data suggest that the radical is located at the active site in protein R1, and is probably of the sulfenylimine type

  • 24.
    Berglund, Kris
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Andersson, Christian
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Process for the production of succinic acid2006Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A process for the production of succinic acid can comprise supplying a media with E. coli AFP 184 and a high sugar concentration under aerobic conditions, then converting the media to aerobic conditions. Such a process can be useful when performed in conjunction with the production of ethanol in a biorefmery .

  • 25.
    Berglund, Kris
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Fermentative Upgrading of Xylose2009In: NWBC-2009: The 2nd Nordic wood biorefinery conference : Finlandia Hall, Helsinki, Finland, September 2-4, 2009 : Proceedings-Posters / [ed] Annemari Kuokka-Ihalainen., Helsinki: KCL Re-inventing paper , 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical pulp mills such as Kraft, soda, or sulfite mills are current examples of biorefineries that can convert lignocellulosic biomass into energy, pulp or cellulose derivatives, and tall oil.  While existing viscose pulps use a hemicellulose extraction to generate soluble sugars for ethanol production, in general there still exists a large potential for other more profitable applications of the biomass (Fig. 1), i.e. the mill needs to present a widespread product portfolio.  The biofuels under development from fermentation that will be discussed are the diesel fuel oxygenates dibutyl succinate and diethyl succinate to be used for reduced particulate emissions and fossil fuel replacement for diesel engines and butanol for Otto engines.  It's important to stress that succinic acid, butanol and ethanol, needed for the production of the diesel additives and gasoline replacement will be produced from renewable resources and hence replacing products currently produced from non-renewable fossil sources.  Since wood will be used, there will be no issue of competing with raw material used for food production.  Besides biofuel production, succinic acid and butanol, can be used directly or further refined into numerous different products classified as green chemicals.

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  • 26.
    Berglund, Kris
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Hodge, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Fermentation-Based Building Blocks for Renewable Resource-Based Surfactants2010In: Surfactants from renewable resources, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd , 2010, p. 127-141Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    'new' top-ranked building blocks; Citric acid recovery from fermentation broths and CaCO3 precipitation; Citric, acetic and lactic acid - top three industrial carboxylic acids; Fermentation-based building blocks for renewable resource-based surfactants; Fermentation-based building blocks for surfactants; Filamentous fungi, Aspergillus niger and Candida yeast strains; New fermentation-based building blocks; Organic acid metabolites - as hydrophilic moiety; Sulfonates - largest market share of anionic surfactants; Sulfosuccinate class of surfactants

  • 27.
    Bhattacharyya, Shubhankar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Melt Stable Functionalized Organosolv and Kraft Lignin Thermoplastic2020In: Processes, ISSN 2227-9717, Vol. 8, no 9, article id 1108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A shift towards an economically viable biomass biorefinery concept requires the use of all biomass fractions (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) for the production of high added-value products. As lignin is often underutilized, the establishment of lignin valorization routes is highly important. In-house produced organosolv as well as commercial Kraft lignin were used in this study. The aim of the current work was to make a comparative study of thermoplastic biomaterials from two different types of lignins. Native lignins were alkylate with two different alkyl iodides to produce ether-functionalized lignins. Successful etherification was verified by FT-IR spectroscopy, changes in the molecular weight of lignin, as well as 13C and 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The thermal stability of etherified lignin samples was considerably improved with the T2% of organosolv to increase from 143 °C to up to 213 °C and of Kraft lignin from 133 °C to up to 168 °C, and glass transition temperature was observed. The present study shows that etherification of both organosolv and Kraft lignin with alkyl halides can produce lignin thermoplastic biomaterials with low glass transition temperature. The length of the alkyl chain affects thermal stability as well as other thermal properties.

  • 28.
    Bonturi, Nemailla
    et al.
    Department of Materials and Bioprocess Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Miranda, Everson Alves
    Department of Materials and Bioprocess Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas.
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Single Cell Oil Producing Yeasts Lipomyces starkeyi and Rhodosporidium toruloides: Selection of Extraction Strategies and Biodiesel Property Prediction2015In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 5040-5052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single cell oils (SCOs) are considered potential raw material for the production of biodiesel. Rhodosporidium sp. and Lipomyces sp. are good candidates for SCO production. Lipid extractability differs according to yeast species and literature on the most suitable method for each oleaginous yeast species is scarce. This work aimed to investigate the efficiency of the most cited strategies for extracting lipids from intact and pretreated cells of Rhodosporidium toruloides and Lipomyces starkeyi. Lipid extractions were conducted using hexane or combinations of chloroform and methanol. The Folch method resulted in the highest lipid yields for both yeasts (42% for R. toruloides and 48% for L. starkeyi). Also, this method eliminates the cell pretreatment step. The Bligh and Dyer method underestimated the lipid content in the tested strains (25% for R. toruloides and 34% for L. starkeyi). Lipid extractability increased after acid pretreatment for the Pedersen, hexane, and Bligh and Dyer methods. For R. toruloides unexpected fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) composition were found for some lipid extraction strategies tested. Therefore, this work provides useful information for analytical and process development aiming at biodiesel production from the SCO of these two yeast species.

  • 29.
    Cerullo, Gabriella
    et al.
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy.
    Varriale, Simona
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy.
    Bozonnet, Sophie
    Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Gherbovet, Olga
    Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
    Fauré, Régis
    Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
    Piechot, Alexander
    Taros Chemicals GmbH & Co. KG, Dortmund, Germany.
    Jütten, Peter
    Taros Chemicals GmbH & Co. KG, Dortmund, Germany.
    Brás, Joana L.A.
    NzyTech LDA, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Fontes, Carlos M.G.A.
    NzyTech LDA, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Faraco, Vincenza
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy.
    Directed evolution of the type C feruloyl esterase from Fusarium oxysporum FoFaeC and molecular docking analysis of its improved variants2019In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 51, p. 14-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need to develop competitive and eco-friendly processes in the cosmetic industry leads to the search for new enzymes with improved properties for industrial bioconversions in this sector. In the present study, a complete methodology to generate, express and screen diversity for the type C feruloyl esterase from Fusarium oxysporium FoFaeC was set up in a high-throughput fashion. A library of around 30,000 random mutants of FoFaeC was generated by error prone PCR of fofaec cDNA and expressed in Yarrowia lipolytica. Screening for enzymatic activity towards the substrates 5-bromo-4-chloroindol-3-yl and 4-nitrocatechol-1-yl ferulates allowed the selection of 96 enzyme variants endowed with improved enzymatic activity that were then characterized for thermo- and solvent- tolerance. The five best mutants in terms of higher activity, thermo- and solvent- tolerance were selected for analysis of substrate specificity. Variant L432I was shown to be able to hydrolyze all the tested substrates, except methyl sinapate, with higher activity than wild type FoFaeC towards methyl p-coumarate, methyl ferulate and methyl caffeate. Moreover, the E455D variant was found to maintain completely its hydrolytic activity after two hour incubation at 55 °C, whereas the L284Q/V405I variant showed both higher thermo- and solvent- tolerance than wild type FoFaeC. Small molecule docking simulations were applied to the five novel selected variants in order to examine the binding pattern of substrates used for enzyme characterization of wild type FoFaeC and the evolved variants.

  • 30.
    Charisteidis, Ioannis
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Lazaridis, Polykarpos
    Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Fotopoulos, Apostolos
    Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Pachatouridou, Eleni
    Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute, Centre for Research and Technology-Hellas (CPERI/CERTH), Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Triantafyllidis, Konstantinos
    Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin Isolated by Hybrid Organosolv—Steam Explosion Pretreatment of Hardwood and Softwood Biomass for the Production of Phenolics and Aromatics2019In: Catalysts, E-ISSN 2073-4344, Vol. 9, no 11, article id 935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin, one of the three main structural biopolymers of lignocellulosic biomass, is the most abundant natural source of aromatics with a great valorization potential towards the production of fuels, chemicals, and polymers. Although kraft lignin and lignosulphonates, as byproducts of the pulp/paper industry, are available in vast amounts, other types of lignins, such as the organosolv or the hydrolysis lignin, are becoming increasingly important, as they are side-streams of new biorefinery processes aiming at the (bio)catalytic valorization of biomass sugars. Within this context, in this work, we studied the thermal (non-catalytic) and catalytic fast pyrolysis of softwood (spruce) and hardwood (birch) lignins, isolated by a hybrid organosolv–steam explosion biomass pretreatment method in order to investigate the effect of lignin origin/composition on product yields and lignin bio-oil composition. The catalysts studied were conventional microporous ZSM-5 (Zeolite Socony Mobil–5) zeolites and hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolites with intracrystal mesopores (i.e., 9 and 45 nm) or nano-sized ZSM-5 with a high external surface. All ZSM-5 zeolites were active in converting the initially produced via thermal pyrolysis alkoxy-phenols (i.e., of guaiacyl and syringyl/guaiacyl type for spruce and birch lignin, respectively) towards BTX (benzene, toluene, xylene) aromatics, alkyl-phenols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, mainly naphthalenes), with the mesoporous ZSM-5 exhibiting higher dealkoxylation reactivity and being significantly more selective towards mono-aromatics compared to the conventional ZSM-5, for both spruce and birch lignin.

  • 31.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Project: Organosolv Biomass Pretreatment for Flexible Fuel Production (Swedish Energy Agency)2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Sjöblom, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Topakas, Evangelos
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Project: BIOcatalytic Carbon Capture and Conversion of steel flue gas to liquid hydrocarbons (FORMAS)2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    de Oliveira Maciel, Ayanne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Carbonic anhydrase to boost CO2 sequestration: Improving carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS)2022In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 299, article id 134419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CO2 Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) is a fundamental strategy to mitigate climate change, and carbon sequestration, through absorption, can be one of the solutions to achieving this goal. In nature, carbonic anhydrase (CA) catalyzes the CO2 hydration to bicarbonates. Targeting the development of novel biotechnological routes which can compete with traditional CO2 absorption methods, CA utilization has presented a potential to expand as a promising catalyst for CCUS applications. Driven by this feature, the search for novel CAs as biocatalysts and the utilization of enzyme improvement techniques, such as protein engineering and immobilization methods, has resulted in suitable variants able to catalyze CO2 absorption at relevant industrial conditions. Limitations related to enzyme recovery and recyclability are still a concern in the field, affecting cost efficiency. Under different absorption approaches, CA enhances both kinetics and CO2 absorption yields, besides reduced energy consumption. However, efforts directed to process optimization and demonstrative plants are still limited. A recent topic with great potential for development is the CA utilization in accelerated weathering, where industrial residues could be re-purposed towards becoming carbon sequestrating agents. Furthermore, research of new solvents has identified potential candidates for integration with CA in CO2 capture, and through techno-economic assessments, CA can be a path to increase the competitiveness of alternative CO2 absorption systems, offering lower environmental costs. This review provides a favorable scenario combining the enzyme and CO2 capture, with possibilities in reaching an industrial-like stage in the future.

  • 34.
    Díaz, Sara
    et al.
    Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. Edificio de Fabricación Integrada, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Parque Científico – Tecnológico de la ULPGC, Campus universitario de Tafira Baja, 35017, Las Palmas, Spain.
    Ortega, Zaida
    Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. Edificio de Fabricación Integrada, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Parque Científico – Tecnológico de la ULPGC, Campus universitario de Tafira Baja, 35017, Las Palmas, Spain.
    Benítez, Antonio N.
    Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. Edificio de Fabricación Integrada, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Parque Científico – Tecnológico de la ULPGC, Campus universitario de Tafira Baja, 35017, Las Palmas, Spain.
    Marrero, María D.
    Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. Edificio de Fabricación Integrada, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Parque Científico – Tecnológico de la ULPGC, Campus universitario de Tafira Baja, 35017, Las Palmas, Spain.
    Carvalheiro, Florbela
    LNEG– Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Unidade de Bioenergia, Estrada Do Paço Do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Duarte, Luís C.
    LNEG– Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Unidade de Bioenergia, Estrada Do Paço Do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Krikigianni, Eleni
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Fernandes, Maria C.
    Centro de Biotecnologia Agrícola E Agro-Alimentar Do Alentejo (CEBAL)/Instituto Politécnico de Beja (IPBeja), Apartado 6158, 7801-908, Beja, Portugal; MED-Mediterranean Institute for Agriculture, Environment and Development, CEBAL—Centro de Biotecnologia Agrícola e Agro-Alimentar do Alentejo, Apartado 6158, 7801-908, Beja, Portugal.
    Oligosaccharides production by enzymatic hydrolysis of banana pseudostem pulp2023In: Biomass Conversion and Biorefinery, ISSN 2190-6815, E-ISSN 2190-6823, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 10677-10688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Banana production generates significant amounts of agricultural wastes, being fiber extraction one of the most relevant alternatives for their valorization. This process produces banana’s pseudostem pulp (BPP) as a byproduct, which shows an interesting composition for the biorefinery’s biochemical platform, with high polysaccharides (68%) and low lignin contents. This work deals with the enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) of raw and hydrothermally pre-treated BPP, focusing on the production of oligosaccharides (OS). Raw BPP hydrolysis with cellulase at different dosages rendered only 3.2% OS yields (OSY). Pectinase addition has not affected EH performance. On the other hand, EH of hydrothermally pre-treated BPP at 150 °C and 170 °C (P150 and P170) allowed to increase OSY up to 28% (P150, 1 FPU of cellulase/g dry biomass, 12 h), being 72% of the solubilized sugars in the form of cello-oligosaccharides. This last condition was subjected to a multi-stage EH strategy without improvements in OSY. An endo-glucanase was also tested, but obtained OSY were lower than cellulase results. Finally, obtained OS demonstrated to stimulate the growth of two Lactobacilli strains. The results show that BPP pre-treated under mild operational conditions is a good candidate for cello-oligosaccharides production by EH using 1 FPU/g DB of cellulase with a simple strategy.

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  • 35.
    Enman, Josefine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Hodge, David
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Growth promotive conditions for enhanced eritadenine production during submerged cultivation of Lentinus edodes2012In: Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology (1986), ISSN 0268-2575, E-ISSN 1097-4660, Vol. 87, no 7, p. 903-907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mycelium of the medicinal mushroom shiitake, Lentinus edodes, is a potential source for production of the blood cholesterol reducing compound eritadenine. To increase the mycelial biomass and in turn the production of eritadenine, a potential growth promoting substance in the form of a water extract of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) was added to the culture media. Results: The hot water extract of DDGS was shown to considerably increase the growth of shiitake mycelia in bioreactor cultivations; the mycelial yield was 2-3 times higher than in the control, and the highest final biomass concentration obtained was 3.4 g L -1. Further, by using shake flask cultures as inoculums the bioreactor cultivation time could be reduced by 1 week for some of the experiments. The highest final titer of eritadenine in the present study was 25.1 mg L -1, which was about 2 times higher than in the control, and was also obtained when a water extract of DDGS was added to the culture medium. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that a water extract of DDGS promoted the growth of shiitake mycelia in bioreactor cultivations, along with enhanced eritadenine production

  • 36.
    Enman, Josefine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Hodge, David
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Production of the bioactive compound eritadenine by submerged cultivation of shiitake (Lentinus edodes) mycelia2008In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 56, no 8, p. 2609-2612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fruit bodies and mycelia of shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) have been shown to contain the cholesterol-reducing compound eritadenine, 2(R),3(R)-dihydroxy-4-(9-adenyl)butyric acid. In the search for a production method for eritadenine, shiitake mycelia were investigated in the present study. The mycelia were cultivated both in shake flasks and in bioreactors, to investigate the effects of pH, stirring rate, and reactor type on the production and distribution of eritadenine. Both the biomass and the culture broth were examined for their eritadenine content. In the shake flasks, the final concentration of eritadenine was 1.76 mg/L and eritadenine was equally distributed between the mycelia and the growth media. In the bioreactors, the shiitake mycelia were found to contain eritadenine in relatively low levels, whereas the majority, 90.6-98.9%, was detected in the growth media. Applying a stirring rate of 250 rpm during bioreactor cultivation resulted in the highest eritadenine concentrations: 10.23 mg/L when the pH was uncontrolled and 9.59 mg/L when the pH was controlled at 5.7. Reducing the stirring rate to 50 rpm resulted in a decreased eritadenine concentration, both at pH 5.7 (5.25 mg/L) and when pH was not controlled (5.50 mg/L). The mycelia in the shake flask cultures appeared as macroscopic aggregates, whereas mycelia cultivated in bioreactors grew more as freely dispersed filaments. This study demonstrates for the first time the extra- and intracellular distribution of eritadenine produced by shiitake mycelial culture and the influence of reactor conditions on the mycelial morphology and eritadenine concentrations.

  • 37.
    Enman, Josefine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Patra, Anuttam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Ramser, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Solid state characterization of sodium eritadenate2011In: American Journal of Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 2156-8251, E-ISSN 2156-8278, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 164-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of the solid state is of great importance in the development of a new active pharmaceutical ingredient, since the solid form often dictates the properties and performance of the drug. In the present study, solid state characteristics of the sodium salt of the candidate cholesterol reducing compound eritadenine, 2(R), 3(R))-dihydroxy-4-(9-adenyl)-butanoic acid, were investigated. The compound was crystallized by slow cooling from water and various aqueous ethanol solutions, at different temperatures. Further, the compound solution was subjected to lyophilization and to high vacuum drying. The resulting solids were screened for polymorphism by micro Raman spectroscopy (λex = 830 nm) and the crystallinity was investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. Further, thermal analysis was applied to study possible occurrence of solvates or hydrates. Solids obtained from slow cooling showed crystallinity, whereas rapid cooling gave rise to more amorphous solids. Analysis of difference spectra of the Raman data for solids obtained from slow cooling of solution revealed subtle differences in the structures between crystals derived from pure water and crystals derived from aqueous ethanol solutions. Finally, from the thermal analysis it was deduced that crystals obtained from pure water were stoichiometrically dihydrates whereas crystals obtained from aqueous ethanol solutions were 2.5 hydrates; this formation of different hydrates were supported by the Raman difference analysis.

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  • 38.
    Enman, Josefine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Ramser, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Raman analysis of synthetic eritadenine2008In: Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, ISSN 0377-0486, E-ISSN 1097-4555, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 1464-1468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eritadenine, 2(R),3(R)-dihydroxy-4-(9-adenyl)-butyric acid, is a cholesterol-reducing compound naturally occurring in the shitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes). To identify the unknown Raman spectrum of this compound, pure synthetic eritadenine was examined and the vibrational modes were assigned by following the synthesis pathway. This was accomplished by comparing the known spectra of the starting compounds adenine and D-ribose with the spectra of a synthesis intermediate, methyl 5-(6-Aminopurin-9H-9-yl)-2,3-O-isopropylidene-5-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranoside (MAIR) and eritadenine. In the Raman spectrum of eritadenine, a distinctive vibrational mode at 773 cm-1 was detected and ascribed to vibrations in the carbon chain, ν(C--C). A Raman line that arose at 1212 cm-1, both in the Raman spectrum of MAIR and eritadenine, was also assigned to ν(C--C). Additional Raman lines detected at 1526 and at 1583 cm-1 in the Raman spectrum of MAIR and eritadenine were assigned to ν(N--C) and a deformation of the purine ring structure. In these cases the vibrational modes are due to the linkage between adenine and the ribofuranoside moiety for MAIR, and between adenine and the carbon chain for eritadenine. This link is also the cause for the disappearance of adenine specific Raman lines in the spectrum of both MAIR and eritadenine. Several vibrations observed in the spectrum of D-ribose were not observed in the Raman spectrum of eritadenine due to the absence of the ribose ring structure. In the Raman spectrum of MAIR some of the D-ribose specific Raman lines disappeared due to the introduction of methyl and isopropylidene moieties to the ribose unit. With the approach presented in this study the so far unknown Raman spectrum of eritadenine could be successfully identified and is presented here for the first time.

  • 39.
    Enman, Josefine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Berglund, Kris A.
    Quantification of the bioactive compound eritadenine in selected strains of shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes)2007In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 1177-1180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most common causes of death in the Western world, and a high level of blood cholesterol is considered a risk factor. The edible fungus, shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes), contains the hypocholesterolemic agent eritadenine, 2(R),3(R)-dihydroxy-4-(9-adenyl)-butyric acid. This study was conducted to quantify the amount of the cholesterol reducing agent eritadenine in shiitake mushrooms, in search of a potential natural medicine against blood cholesterol. The amounts of eritadenine in the fruit bodies of four different shiitake mushrooms, Le-1, Le-2, Le-A, and Le-B, were investigated in this study. To achieve this goal, methanol extraction was used to recover as much as possible of the hypocholesterolemic agent from the fungal cells. In addition, enzymes that degrade the fungal cell walls were also used to elucidate if the extraction could be further enhanced. To analyze the target compound, a reliable and reproducible HPLC method for separation, identification, and quantification of eritadenine was developed. The shiitake strains under investigation exhibit up to 10 times higher levels of eritadenine than previously reported for other shiitake strains. Further, pretreating the mushrooms with hydrolytic enzymes before methanol extraction resulted in an insignificant increase in the amount of eritadenine released. These results indicate the potential for delivery of therapeutic amounts of eritadenine from the ingestion of extracts or dried concentrates of shiitake mushroom strains.

  • 40.
    Faisal, Abrar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Zarebska, Agata
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Saremi, Pardis
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Korelskiy, Danil
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Ohlin, Lindsay
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    MFI zeolite as adsorbent for selective recovery of hydrocarbons from ABE fermentation broths2014In: Adsorption, ISSN 0929-5607, E-ISSN 1572-8757, Vol. 20, no 2-3, p. 465-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1-Butanol and butyric acid are two interesting compounds that may be produced by acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation using e.g. Clostridium acetobutylicum. The main drawback, restricting the commercialization potential of this process, is the toxicity of butanol for the cell culture resulting in low concentrations of this compound in the broth. To make this process economically viable, an efficient recovery process has to be developed. In this work, a hydrophobic MFI type zeolite with high silica to alumina ratio was evaluated as adsorbent for the recovery of butanol and butyric acid from model solutions. Dual component adsorption experiments revealed that both butanol and butyric acid showed a high affinity for the hydrophobic MFI zeolite when adsorbed from aqueous model solutions. Multicomponent adsorption experiments using model solutions, mimicking real fermentation broths, revealed that the adsorbent was very selective to the target compounds. Further, the adsorption of butyric and acetic acid was found to be pH dependent with high adsorption below, and low adsorption above, the respective pKa values of the acids. Thermal desorption of butanol from MFI type zeolite was also studied and a suitable desorption temperature was identified.

  • 41.
    Filatov, D.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Ingemarson, R.
    Umeå universitet.
    Johansson, E.
    Umeå universitet.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Thelander, L.
    Umeå universitet.
    Mouse ribonucleotide reductase: from genes to proteins1995In: Biochemical Society Transactions, ISSN 0300-5127, E-ISSN 1470-8752, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 903-905Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Ginesy, Mireille
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Belotserkovsky, Jaroslav
    Department of Molecular Biosciences Wenner-Gren institute, Stockholm University.
    Enman, Josefine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Isaksson, Leif
    Department of Molecular Biosciences Wenner-Gren institute, Stockholm University.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for enhanced arginine biosynthesis2015In: Microbial Cell Factories, ISSN 1475-2859, E-ISSN 1475-2859, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundArginine is a high-value product, especially for the pharmaceutical industry. Growing demand for environmental-friendly and traceable products have stressed the need for microbial production of this amino acid. Therefore, the aim of this study was to improve arginine production in Escherichia coli by metabolic engineering and to establish a fermentation process in 1-L bioreactor scale to evaluate the different mutants. ResultsFirstly, argR (encoding an arginine responsive repressor protein), speC, speF (encoding ornithine decarboxylases) and adiA (encoding an arginine decarboxylase) were knocked out and the feedback-resistant argA214 or argA215 were introduced into the strain. Three glutamate independent mutants were assessed in bioreactors. Unlike the parent strain, which did not excrete any arginine during glucose fermentation, the constructs produced between 1.94 and 3.03 g/L arginine. Next, wild type argA was deleted and the gene copy number of argA214 was raised, resulting in a slight increase in arginine production (4.11 g/L) but causing most of the carbon flow to be redirected toward acetate. The V216A mutation in argP (transcriptional regulator of argO, which encodes for an arginine exporter) was identified as a potential candidate for improved arginine production. The combination of multicopy of argP216 or argO and argA214 led to nearly 2-fold and 3-fold increase in arginine production, respectively, and a reduction of acetate formation. ConclusionsIn this study, E. coli was successfully engineered for enhanced arginine production. The ∆adiA, ∆speC, ∆speF, ∆argR, ∆argA mutant with high gene copy number of argA214 and argO produced 11.64 g/L of arginine in batch fermentation, thereby demonstrating the potential of E. coli as an industrial producer of arginine.

  • 43.
    Ginesy, Mireille
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Enman, Josefine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rusanova-Naydenova, Daniela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Simultaneous Quantification of L-Arginine and Monosaccharides during Fermentation: An Advanced Chromatography Approach2019In: Molecules, ISSN 1431-5157, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 24, no 4, article id 802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing demand for L-arginine by the food and pharmaceutical industries has sparked the search for sustainable ways of producing it. Microbial fermentation offers a suitable alternative; however, monitoring of arginine production and carbon source uptake during fermentation, requires simple and reliable quantitative methods compatible with the fermentation medium. Two methods for the simultaneous quantification of arginine and glucose or xylose are described here: high-performance anion-exchange chromatography coupled to integrated pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-IPAD) and reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography combined with charged aerosol detection (RP-UHPLC-CAD). Both were thoroughly validated in a lysogeny broth, a minimal medium, and a complex medium containing corn steep liquor. HPAEC-IPAD displayed an excellent specificity, accuracy, and precision for arginine, glucose, and xylose in minimal medium and lysogeny broth, whereas specificity and accuracy for arginine were somewhat lower in medium containing corn steep liquor. RP-UHPLC-CAD exhibited high accuracy and precision, and enabled successful monitoring of arginine and glucose or xylose in all media. The present study describes the first successful application of the above chromatographic methods for the determination and monitoring of L-arginine amounts during its fermentative production by a genetically modified Escherichia coli strain cultivated in various growth media.

  • 44.
    Ginesy, Mireille
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rusanova-Naydenova, Daniela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Tuning of the Carbon-to-Nitrogen Ratio for the Production of L-Arginine by Escherichia coli2017In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 3, no 4, article id 60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    L-arginine, an amino acid with a growing range of applications within the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, food, and agricultural industries, can be produced by microbial fermentation. Although it is the most nitrogen-rich amino acid, reports on the nitrogen supply for its fermentation are scarce. In this study, the nitrogen supply for the production of l-arginine by a genetically modified Escherichia coli strain was optimised in bioreactors. Different nitrogen sources were screened and ammonia solution, ammonium sulphate, ammonium phosphate dibasic, and ammonium chloride were the most favourable nitrogen sources for l-arginine synthesis. The key role of the C/N ratio for l-arginine production was demonstrated for the first time. The optimal C/N molar ratio to maximise l-arginine production while minimising nitrogen waste was found to be 6, yielding approximately 2.25 g/L of l-arginine from 15 g/L glucose with a productivity of around 0.11 g/L/h. Glucose and ammonium ion were simultaneously utilized, showing that this ratio provided a well-balanced equilibrium between carbon and nitrogen metabolisms.

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  • 45.
    Gustafsson, Anki
    et al.
    Recopharma AB, Huddinge.
    Sjöblom, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Strindelius, Lena
    Recopharma AB, Huddinge.
    Johansson, Thomas
    Recopharma AB, Huddinge.
    Fleckenstein, Tilly
    Recopharma AB, Huddinge.
    Chatzissavidou, Nathalie
    Recopharma AB, Huddinge.
    Lindberg, Linda
    Absorber AB, Stockholm.
    Ångström, Jonas
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Holgersson, Jan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Pichia pastoris-produced mucin-type fusion proteins with multivalent O-glycan substitution as targeting molecules for mannose-specific receptors of the immune system2011In: Glycobiology, ISSN 0959-6658, E-ISSN 1460-2423, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 1071-1086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mannose-binding proteins like the macrophage mannose receptor (MR), the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Immunoglobulin fusion proteins of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1/mIgG2b) carrying mostly O-glycans and, as a control, the a1-acid glycoprotein (AGP/mIgG2b) carrying mainly N-linked glycans were stably expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. P. pastoris-produced PSGL-1/mIgG2b was shown to carry O-glycans that mediated strong binding to mannose-specific lectins in a lectin array and were susceptible to cleavage by a-mannosidases including an a1,2- but not an a1,6-mannosidase. Electrospray ionization - ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) confirmed the presence of O-glycans containing up to 9 hexoses with the penta- and hexasaccharides being the predominant ones. a1,2- and a1,3-linked, but not a1,6-linked, mannose residues were detected by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy confirming the results of the mannosidase cleavage. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constants for binding of PNGase F-treated mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG2b to MR, DC-SIGN and MBL were shown by surface plasmon resonance to be 126, 56 and 16 nM, respectively. In conclusion, PSGL-1/mIgG2b expressed in P. pastoris carried O-glycans mainly comprised of a-linked mannoses and with up to nine residues. It bound mannose-specific receptors with high apparent affinity and may become a potent targeting molecule for these receptors in vivo.

  • 46.
    Helmerius, Jonas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Vinblad von Walter, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Berglund, Kris A.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Hodge, David B.
    Department of Chemical and Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, Michigan, USA.
    Impact of hemicellulose pre-extraction for bioconversion on birch Kraft pulp properties2010In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 101, no 15, p. 5996-6005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of hemicellulose extraction with chemical pulping processes is one approach to generate a sugar feedstock amenable to biochemical transformation to fuels and chemicals. Extractions of hemicellulose from silver birch (Betula pendula) wood chips using either water or Kraft white liquor (NaOH, Na2S, and Na2CO3) were performed under conditions compatible with Kraft pulping, using times ranging between 20 and 90 min, temperatures of 130-160 °C, and effective alkali (EA) charges of 0-7%. The chips from select extractions were subjected to subsequent Kraft pulping and the refined pulps were made into handsheets. Several metrics for handsheet strength properties were compared with a reference pulp made without an extraction step. This study demonstrated that white liquor can be utilized to extract xylan from birch wood chips prior to Kraft cooking without decreasing the pulp yield and paper strength properties, while simultaneously impregnating cooking alkali into the wood chips. However, for the alkaline conditions tested extractions above pH 10 resulted in low concentrations of xylan. Water extractions resulted in the highest final concentrations of xylan; yielding a liquor without the presence of toxic or inhibitory inorganics and minimal soluble aromatics that we demonstrate can be successfully enzymatically hydrolyzed to monomeric xylose and fermented to succinic acid. However, water extractions were found to negatively impact some pulp properties including decreases in compression strength, bursting strength, tensile strength, and tensile stiffness while exhibiting minimal impact on elongation and slight improvement in tearing strength index.

  • 47. Helmerius, Jonas
    et al.
    Vinblad von Walter, Jonas
    Smurfit Kappa Kraftliner AB.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Hodge, David
    Production of value added chemicals from xylan extraction in a Kraft pulp mill and the effect on pulp quality2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Kraft process hemicelluloses are lost in the cooking procedure to the black liquor stream, which is subsequently burnt in the recovery boiler to recover cooking chemicals and to produce steam and energy. Hemicelluloses have a low heating value compared to lignin and therefore recovery of hemicelluloses at an earlier stage of the Kraft process followed by biochemical conversion into high value-added products might offer a much better economic opportunity. In collaboration with the research and development department of Smurfit Kappa Kraftliner AB, Piteå, Sweden, alkali and water extractions of birch wood were performed under conditions compatible with the Kraft process, at different times, temperatures and alkali charges. The extraction conditions were set in a range suitable with the current pulp process at Smurfit Kappa Kraftliner. The requirements for process configurations, based on either hot water or alkali extraction were also explored. The xylan yields from different extraction trials were measured and the chips from those extraction trials were cooked, refined and turned into sheets of paper. The effects on paper quality were compared with a reference pulp made from the same wooden chips. Recovered xylans from water extracted birch wood chips were subjected to secondary hydrolysis, enzymatic or sulphuric acid. Detoxification of the hydrolysate with active carbon and regulation of pH were performed before fermentation. Fermentation of the xylose hydrolysate to succinic acid was demonstrated by the use of the succinic acid producer Escherichia coli AFP184.

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    fulltext
  • 48.
    Helmerius, Jonas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Vinblad von Walter, Jonas
    Smurfit Kappa Kraftliner AB, Piteå, 941 86, Sweden.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Berglund, Kris K. A.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Hodge, David
    Production of value added chemicals from xylan extraction in a Kraft pulp mill and the effect on pulp quality2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Kraft process hemicelluloses are lost in the cooking procedure to the black liquor stream, which is subsequently burnt in the recovery boiler to recover cooking chemicals and to produce steam and energy. Hemicelluloses have a low heating value compared to lignin and therefore recovery of hemicelluloses at an earlier stage of the Kraft process followed by biochemical conversionintohighvalue-conversion intohighvalue-into high value-added products might offer a muchbettereconomicopportunity.much better economic opportunityIn collaboration with the research and development department of Smurfit Kappa Kraftliner AB, Piteå, Sweden, alkali and water extractions of birch wood were performed under conditions compatible with the Kraft process, at different times, temperatures and alkali charges. The extraction conditions were set in a range suitable with the current pulp process at Smurfit Kappa Kraftliner. TherequirementsforprocessThe requirements for process configurations, based on either hot water or alkali extraction were also explored. ThexylanyieldsfromdifferentextractiontrialswereThe xylan yields from different extraction trials were measured and the chips from those extraction trials were cooked, refined and turned into sheets of paper. The effects on paper quality were compared with a reference pulp made from the same wooden chips. Recovered xylans from water extracted birch wood chips were subjected to secondary hydrolysis, enzymatic or sulphuricacid.sulphuric acidDetoxification of the hydrolysate with active carbon and regulation of pH were performed before fermentation. FermentationofthexyloseFermentation of the xylose hydrolysate to succinic acid was demonstrated by the use of thethe succinic acid producer Escherichia coli AFP184.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49. Hodge, David
    et al.
    Andersson, Christian
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Detoxification requirements for bioconversion of softwood dilute acid hydrolyzates to succinic acid2009In: Enzyme and microbial technology, ISSN 0141-0229, E-ISSN 1879-0909, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 309-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work an Escherichia coli metabolically engineered to ferment lignocellulosic biomass sugars to succinic acid was tested for growth and fermentation of detoxified softwood dilute sulfuric acid hydrolyzates, and the minimum detoxification requirements were investigated with activated carbon and/or overliming treatments. Detoxified hydrolyzates supported fast growth and complete fermentation of all hydrolyzate sugars to succinate at yields comparable to pure sugar, while untreated hydrolyzates were unable to support either growth or fermentation. Activated carbon treatment was able to remove significantly more HMF and phenolics than overliming. However, in some cases, overliming treatment was capable of generating a fermentable hydrolyzate where activated carbon treatment was not. The implications of this are that in addition to the known organic inhibitors, the changes in the inorganic content and/or composition due to overliming are significant to the hydrolyzate toxicity. It was also found that any HMF remaining after detoxification was completely metabolized during aerobic cell growth on the hydrolyzates that were capable of supporting growth.

  • 50. Hodge, David
    et al.
    Andersson, Christian
    Helmerius, Jonas
    Vinblad von Walter, J.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Succinic acid production from forest based raw materials2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignocellulosic biomass and particularly hemicellulose from the forest products industry represents a large reservoir of sugars with the potential to be converted to higher value products through bioprocessing. This presentation will cover several projects regarding the fractionation and conversion of lignocellulose to succinic acid, a potentially important platform molecule in the synthesis of a number of commodity and specialty chemicals. The first of these investigates the feasibility of integrating a hardwood hemicellulose sugar extraction step into a Kraft pulping process with the intention of utilizing the hemicellulose as a fermentation feedstock. The requirements on processing configurations for hemicellulose extraction and recovery are compared, and a number of experimental parameters affecting the extraction (alkali, temperature, time) are investigated. Pulp quality is an important property and hemicellulose extraction can result in negatively affect the strength of the paper, which is also investigated. The second portion of the work deals with the fermentation requirements for microbial conversion of dilute acid hydrolyzed softwood to succinic acid. In particular, activated carbon and overliming detoxifications were tested for the ability to remove fermentation inhibitors and improve the fermentability of the hydrolyzates.

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