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  • 1.
    Garvare, Rickard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Business excellence models: purpose, intended recipients and deployment - reviewing the fundamentals2006In: Quality management and organization excellence: empty boxes, or significant contributions to management thought and practice?, Sydney: SAI Global , 2006, p. 292-316Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Garvare, Rickard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Business excellence models: scope and customisation - making best use of resources2007In: Quality management and organization excellence: oxymorons, empty boxes, or significant contributions to management thought and practice?, Sydney: SAI Global , 2007, p. 39-57Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Garvare, Rickard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Organisational sustainability management through minimised business excellence models2005In: Total Quality Management - Advanced and Intelligent Approaches: 3rd International Working Conference, Association Serbia and Montenegro for Quality and Standards , 2005, p. 33-40Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Garvare, Rickard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Sustainable development: extending the scope of business excellence models2001In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 11-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an example of how to integrate the values of sustainable development in a business excellence model. It discusses definitions and measures of sustainable development, integrating values of total quality management with global human and environmental stakeholder interests. Requirements, core values, main criteria and different concepts of measures for sustainable development are examined, discussed and defined. Existing methods and strategies for quality and business excellence are compared with definitions of sustainable development. Indicators for sustainable development in an organisational and business context are discussed and a rough framework is presented.

  • 5. Hallencreutz, Jacob
    et al.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Creaqte knowledge - not figures: the importance of measurement system management2006In: Performance measurement and management 2006: public and private : papers from the Fifth International Conference on Performance Measurement and Management - PMA 2006, London, New Connaught Rooms, UK, 25th-28th July 2006, Cranfield: School of Management, Centre for Business Performance , 2006, p. 963-970Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Visby, Sweden.
    A proposed preliminary maturity grid for assessing sustainability reporting based on quality management principles2019In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 451-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Sustainability reports (SRs) could be viewed as organisational measurements of sustainability performance. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how well SRs are measuring and communicating sustainability and how reporting could be assessed and improved by presenting a maturity grid based on quality management principles.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Quality management students have assessed publicly available SRs. A total of 55 student assessments have been analysed by the author and used to indicate how understandable reports are. Quality management principles and input from the student assessments have been used to propose a maturity grid for sustainability reporting quality.

    Findings

    The indication is that SRs are not easy to interpret. The word sustainability aspect used should be replaced with impact on vital stakeholder needs. Guidelines for analysing reports could be improved by using process focus to clearly describe scope of reporting as the entire value chain.

    Research limitations/implications

    Results are limited to assessing how sustainability is measured. How sustainable the organisations are is not assessed. The research is ongoing, and the proposed matrix is preliminary needing validation and further modification.

    Practical implications

    The proposed maturity grid for sustainability reporting forms a good basis for further development of SRs and the critical review of them.

    Social implications

    Results indicate a need to report sustainability in the entire value chain and to focus more on vital stakeholder needs such as poverty and climate change.

    Originality/value

    The paper discusses a field of synergies between quality and sustainability management, which is important but still sparingly researched.

  • 7.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Creating a sense of urgency for sustainable development: Testing two system models2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 227, p. 1173-1184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of good coverage of sustainability and sustainable development both in scientific journals and other publications, humanity is on a steady unsustainable track consuming more than is produced. Understanding of change needs, does not seem to convert into sufficient change action. Sustainability issues are often complex, interdependent and hard to comprehend, indicating that sustainable development, in addition to change willingness, requires a holistic perspective. Seeing and understanding systems - systems thinking - is important. This implies that sense-making of systems and of sustainable development is important as a prerequisite for change. Possibilities of realising synergies between quality management and sustainable development are often discussed but do often not seem to be fully realised. This paper tests two system models from Quality Management in the context of sustainability in cement manufacturing and building material production. The indicative results suggest that the proposed system models are able to describe and identify improvement opportunities that could be used to create interest for change.

  • 8.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Customised improvement with focus on emerging organisations2002In: Proceedings of the Sixth International Research Conference on Quality, Innovation and Knowledge Management: Kuala Lumpur, February 17-20, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Economic sustainability and the cost of poor quality2005In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 197-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development (SD) on the organizational level is often measured using the triple bottom line, which divides performance reporting into the economic, environmental and social dimensions. Since total quality management (TQM) over the years has proven to contribute to good economic performance, it is interesting to review synergies of the two concepts TQM and SD. Indicators commonly used in the triple bottom line are compared with quality related measurements and a synthesis is proposed. Focus is on the economic dimension and indicators in the form of cost of poor quality (CPQ). The CPQ as a sustainability indicator is discussed and exemplified. The results indicate that existing economic sustainability performance measurements based on distribution of surplus should be complemented with indicators for internal losses. A sound profit is in most cases necessary, but it is not the sole condition for economic sustainability.

  • 10.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Process based system models for detecting opportunities and threats: the case of World Cement Production2016In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 246-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Visualising change needs could be complex. One way of sense-making is to use process-based system models. Global warming requires major changes in many fields and especially for cement manufacturing, which represents a growing portion of man-made carbon emissions. The industry has proposed measures for change, but it is difficult to assess how good these are and more sense-making is needed to clarify the situation. The purpose of this paper is to visualise opportunities and threats for global cement manufacturing in the context of global warming, using a process-based system model.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Available data for cement manufacturing and for carbon emissions are combined both historically and as predictions based on chosen key performance indicators. These indicators are related to a chosen process-based system model.

    Findings

    The results indicate that the global cement industry does not have a viable plan to reduce carbon emissions sufficiently to comply with the objectives of maintaining global warming below 2°C. The application of the process-based system model indicates that it has the ability to visualise important opportunities and threats at the level of global processes.

    Practical implications

    The challenges of the world cement industry with reducing carbon emissions are highlighted. This information could be useful as a driver for change.

    Originality/value

    The paper provides insights into process-based improvement work related to cement industry carbon emissions.

  • 11.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Process improvement in a third world organisation: a study from Sub Saharan Africa2001Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    First World improvement theory has been tested in a Third World organisation. A First World improvement process has been defined as a tool for testing. The objective of this thesis is to answer the research question: How does a Third World environment influence the introduction and application of a First World improvement process? The proposed five-stage improvement process was applied in case studies, which examined the Companywide Process, Cement Packing and Quality Control. The conclusion is that a First World improvement process, with only minor changes, can operate successfully in a Third World environment, provided management is truly committed to the concept of improvement.

  • 12.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Total quality management for sustainable development: focus on processes2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to study how synergies of Total Quality Management (TQM) and Sustainable Development (SD) can be realized. Emphasis has been on increasing the focus on processes. A process based change model for SD has been developed. The model should be applicable for all types of organizations, but with a particular focus on organizations in the Third World. During the last decade SD has become an important topic on a global, national and organizational level, with examples being the Kyoto conference on climate change in 1997 and the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg 2002. On an organizational level the Triple Bottom Line, consisting of reporting in the economic, environmental and social dimensions, is often used to measure SD in organizations. The TBL is based on the common understanding that good economic performance is required to enable environmental and social concern. Since TQM has been proven to contribute to the economic performance it should therefore also contribute to SD. Synergies between TQM and SD have been discussed in the literature but further important synergies remain untapped. Process focus and process management are believed to be important for realizing these synergies. Even if process management has been shown to contribute to organizational performance, it seems that most organizations do not focus on processes. This seems specifically to apply to process management for SD. There is a need to facilitate the start-up of process based improvement work for SD. Descriptive and easy-to-use process models should be able to enhance the introduction of process management. The ability to identify, map and measure the organizational processes constitutes an important part of identifying opportunities for improvement. Clearly presented opportunities could lead to an increased interest for improvement. Process models could be used for both describing actual performance and the process to improve it. This thesis studies how a process based change model for SD could look and how it could be used. Different aspects of the model have been studied in action oriented research both in First and Third World organizations. Results show that the value "focus on processes" forms a useful basis for realizing synergies between TQM and SD. The proposed change model can be used to identify change elements and to assess the current level of SD- performance. The model is suitable for change on organizational and process levels. The change model can be seen as a system model with a number of independent sub-systems. Important sub-systems are, for example, a generic process chart, a generic indicator framework for TBL and a generic change process for SD. The change model needs to be further developed but should already in its current form support more effective and efficient improvement for SD.

  • 13. Isaksson, Raine
    Total quality management for sustainable development: process based system models2006In: Business Process Management Journal, ISSN 1463-7154, E-ISSN 1758-4116, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 632-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - To highlight possible synergies between total quality management (TQM) and sustainable development (SD). Design/methodology/approach - These synergies are viewed based on a management system framework consisting of values, methodologies and tools. Based on common values the methodology of process management is identified as a good base for describing organisational synergies of TQM and SD. Also, process management for improved sustainability is reviewed. Here, organisational sustainability is viewed as performance based on the triple bottom line (TBL) of economy, environment and social responsibility. Findings - Findings were that process models can be used to structure the large number of indicators used to describe the TBL. This should improve the system understanding. To integrate TQM and SD, quality indicators should be added to the economic dimension. The system-based process models can be used to describe synergies between TQM and SD. The proposed framework forms a basis for further research of the possible synergies of TQM and SD. Research limitations/implications - The research on synergies is limited on organisational sustainability. Practical implications - Important practical implications are to introduce the process view into sustainability reporting and to include quality indicators in the economic dimension. Originality/value - The paper highlights good possibilities for synergy in combining theory from TQM and SD which should have both a research and a practical interest.

  • 14.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Measuring sustainable development using process models2003In: Managerial Auditing Journal, ISSN 0268-6902, E-ISSN 1758-7735, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 649-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper presents a process model combining TQM values and indicators of sustainable development (SD). The intention is to find synergies in applying a process view on different systems for SD measurements. A global process is introduced and global sustainability is related to critical elements of production, resources and population growth. Indicators of organisational performance are classified into drivers, input, enablers, output and outcome. SD is described with the three dimensions of economy, environment and ethics, representing a modified version of the triple bottom line. Existing measurement systems for SD are categorised according to the proposed organisational process model and positioned within the 3E dimensions. The use of indicators for SD in different organisations, including small and medium-sized enterprises, is discussed.

  • 15.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Johnson, Mikael
    Karlstads Universitet.
    The crippled bottom line: measuring and managing sustainability2015In: International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, ISSN 1741-0401, E-ISSN 1758-6658, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 334-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeSustainability can be assessed in the dimensions Profit, Planet and People. A problem with the approach is that these dimensions cannot be added. Another problem is that performance seldom is related to global system boundaries. The purpose of this paper is to study the "what" of sustainability by linking this to global boundaries and proposing "how" we could manage change towards sustainability.Design/methodology/approachSustainability definitions are reviewed to identify main stakeholders. People value defined as utility is compared to Planet harm as carbon emissions and People harm as prices of products. This approach is examined in business studying the global processes of housing, transporting, providing food and cement manufacturing.FindingsThe relative indicators with focus on People utility compare to Planet and People harm seem to be relevant for measuring the level of sustainability. The Crippled Bottom Line of People value/Planet harm and People value/Planet harm is proposed as the “what” to measure and the change process of “understanding-defining-measuring-communicating-leading change” is proposed as the “how” to change.Research limitations/implicationsThe research is based on identifying the main stakeholders based on sustainability definitions and from that point mostly on deductive reasoning.Practical implicationsThe practical implications are that organizations could define sustainability indicators with objectives that are linked to global limits. Originality/valueThe paper contributes to the discussion of how to link global limits to organizational measurements and targets

  • 16.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Johnson, Mikael
    Karlstads Universitet.
    The crippled bottom line: measuring sustainability2014In: Performance Management: Designing the High-Performing Organization, Aarhus: University of Aarhus , 2014, p. 562-472Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Johnson, Mikael
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Kuttainen, Christer
    Pareis, Jörg
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Life Long Lean Learning: Case Sweden2014In: Performance Management: Designing the High Performing Organization : conferance proceedings, Aarhus: University of Aarhus , 2014, p. 242-253Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Johnson, Mikael
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Kuttainen, Christer
    Pareis, Jörg
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Sustaining Sweden's Competitive Position: Lean Lifelong Learning2015In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 92-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The questions in this paper are what options the adult learner has for continued learning and what role universities are playing in providing net-based education. Current options for lifelong learning and improvement opportunities in the educational process are described based on an assessment inspired by principles of Lean Management.Sweden is chosen as an example. The current level of net-based university education and the demand for it is assessed using official Swedish data. Lean Management principles are used as a starting point to define parameters for interest for the adult learner. These parameters are then converted into a five level scale for assessing current performance with focus on university courses. We also study how Swedish County Councils manage their employee education and carry out a check of courses offered by MOOC providers.Lean Management principles in combination with customer focus seem to present relevant parameters for assessing distance education. Preliminary results indicate that Lean Lifelong Learning has a considerable improvement potential. The main reasons for this potential seem to be more of a bureaucratic and political nature, whereas technology and resources appears to be less of an issue.The results have implications for both universities and organisations. The pressure on universities to become more customer focused while at the same time increase cost-effectiveness is likely to increase. Using the customer perspective for educational services and applying Lean principles to education.

  • 19.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    The measurement system resource as support for sustainable change2008In: International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, ISSN 1447-9524, E-ISSN 1447-9575, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 265-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The working hypothesis in this paper is that many organisations do not view measurement systems as resources and therefore miss out on opportunities. Here, organisational sustainability is interpreted with the dimensions of the Triple Bottom Line that monitors economic, environmental and social performance. The ideal measurement system should track performance and improvement potential in all dimensions. Most measurement systems today are functionally based and highly focused on the economic results. Even if approaches such as the Balanced Scorecard are used this still does not automatically mean that there is focus on the processes were value is created for customers and other stakeholders. With a low level of measurement system effectiveness the quality of facts used for decisions deteriorates and logically also the performance. This means that the maturity of the measurement system could be an indicator of organisational performance. A model for measurement system maturity is proposed and tested with case studies in chosen organisations and processes. The assessed maturity is then compared with the existing improvement potential as perceived by the organisation and as assessed by the researchers. The level of non detected potential is related to the maturity of the measurement system. Results indicate that there should be more focus on and ownership of a companywide measurement resource.

  • 20.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Process management and system thinking for sustainable development2008In: The Theories and Practices of Organization Excellence: New Perspectives, Sydney: SAI Global , 2008, p. 205-232Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Process management and system thinking for sustainable development2007In: New Perspectives on the Theories and Practices of Organizational Excellence: Proceedings of 6th MAAOE International Conference. The Multinational Alliance For The Advancement Of Organizational Excellence, University of Versailles Sain-Quentin-En-Yvelines , 2007, p. 390-411Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Turner, Dawn-Marie
    Turner Change Management, Winnipeg.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Change management from a stakeholder perspective2011In: Proceedings QMOD Conference on Quality and Service Sciences 2011: 14th QMOD Conference 29st – 31st August, 2011, San Sebastian, Spain : From LearnAbility & InnovAbility to SustainAbility / [ed] Carmen Jaca, Navarra: Servicios de Publicaciones Universidad de Navarra , 2011, p. 886-901Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23. Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Hansson, Jonas
    University West.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    National process of quality management education: the Swedish Example2006In: Conference proceedings: 9th International QMOD Quality Management and Organisational Development Conference, Liverpool John Moores University , 2006, p. 343-352Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of a process view as complement to the traditional functional division is a way to highlight organisational improvement potential. This paper examines the process of providing university level education in quality management, using Sweden as an example. The purpose is to assess the performance of university education as part of the supply chain of providing quality management to a society. This has been done by studying the actual offering compared to a notional benchmark of best performance. Preliminary results indicate that there is a significant improvement potential in both providing more education of the right type and in the right way. A lot of similar basic courses are given but with varying names, possibly reflecting difficulties in defining the area of quality management and its constituents. An important reason for the detected improvement potential seems to be the lack of ownership of the studied supply chain of providing university level quality education to the Swedish society.

  • 24.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Hansson, Jonas
    Garvare, Rickard
    National process of quality management education: the Swedish example2007In: Asian Journal on Quality, ISSN 1598-2688, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 88-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of a process view as complement to the traditional functional division is a way to highlight organisational improvement potential. This paper examines the process of providing university level education in quality management, using Sweden as an example. The purpose is to assess the performance of university education as part of the supply chain of providing quality management to a society. This has been done by studying the actual offering compared to a notional benchmark of best performance. Preliminary results indicate that there is a significant improvement potential in both providing more education of the right type and in the right way. A lot of similar basic courses are given but with varying names, possibly reflecting difficulties in defining the area of quality management and its constituents. An important reason for the detected improvement potential seems to be the lack of ownership of the studied supply chain of providing university level quality education to the Swedish society.

  • 25.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Johansson, Peter
    Fischer, Klaus
    University of Kaiserslautern.
    Detecting supply chain innovation potential for sustainable development2010In: EJBO. Electronic journal of business and organization ethics, ISSN 1239-2685, E-ISSN 1239-2685, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 425-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a world of limited resources, it could be argued that companies that aspire to be good corporate citizens need to focus on making best use of resources. User value and environmental harm are created in supply chains and it could therefore be argued that company business ethics should be extended from the company to the entire value chain from the first supplier to the last customer. Starting with a delineation of the linkages between business ethics, corporate sustainability, and the stakeholder concept, this article argues that supply chains generally have a great innovation potential for sustainable development. This potential could be highlighted with system thinking and the use of change management knowledge, promoting not only innovations within technology but also within organizational improvement. We propose process models and performance indicators as means of highlighting improvement potential and thus breaking down normative business ethics' requirements to an opertionalizable corporate level: Good business ethics should focus on maximizing stakeholder value in relation to harm done. Our results indicate that focusing on supply chains reveals previously unknown innovation potential that seems to be related to limited system understanding. The assumption is that increased visibility of opportunities will act as a driver for change. Results also highlight the importance of focusing on sustainability effects of the core business and clearly relating value created to harm done.

  • 26.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Department of Humanities & Social Sciences.
    A preliminary model for assessing university sustainability from the student perspective2013In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 3690-3701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper assesses university sustainability from the perspective of the interested student. A set of questions for a university website analysis is proposed and preliminary results for Swedish universities are presented. The university website analysis intends to emulate a student looking for a university working with sustainable development. University ranking is compared with the results from the sustainability assessment. Results from the study are based on university website analysis of 18 Swedish universities out of a total of 30. Universities are grouped in high ranked, low ranked and benchmark universities. For the majority of the studied universities it was possible to extract the information needed for a sustainability assessment from the website, which indicates that further development of the method is of interest. The average level of performance in the assessment was found to be less than 50% of the maximum of the proposed scale. With Sweden generally being a leading nation in sustainable development the results are below of what could be expected. Ranking, based on the Swedish ranking system does not seem to predict university sustainability performance. The indication is that Gothenburg University, while having further improvement potential, could be considered a benchmark in the Swedish context.

  • 27.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Johnsson, Mikael
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Towards a model for measuring university sustainability2013In: Proceedings of the 5th European Conference on Intellectual Capital / [ed] Lidia Garcia; Arturo Rodriguez-Castellanos; Jon Barrutia-Guenaga, Reading, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multitude of challenges related to sustainable development require, not only a shift in mind‐set but also high competence in most sectors of employment. But how could we know if a university education is going to provide necessary competence in sustainable development? A model being developed to measure university sustainability is the Assessment Instrument of Sustainability in Higher Education (AISHE). Using the logic of self‐assessment and based on the Triple Bottom Line this model deals with operations, education, research, interaction with society and core values with a so called identity module. The model makes an operationalization of sustainable development and its structure should be usable for constructing a quick assessment system similar to those of many business excellence models. Finding out the level of university sustainability is clearly not very easy for presumptive students. Furthermore, we can assume that since being sustainable is politically correct there is a risk of “sustainability washing” of information provided. Current university ranking systems do not seem to correspond well with how universities are working with sustainable development. The research question is if the AISHE‐model could be converted into a credible quick assessment tool by relying on information provided by the university web‐site. For this to work the university needs to have a culture that promotes transparency. With the rapid development of information technology it could be expected that more and more countries will have the conditions for using web‐sites for providing the necessary information. Swedish university web‐sites are used for testing the model. Sweden has a high level of transparency and is therefore thought to form a suitable example. This paper deals with conceptual development of the assessment model. Further studies will be carried out to validate the model. Results indicate that a structured web‐site analysis can be used to quantify information that is organised according to chosen partsof the AISHE‐model. The first results indicate that Swedish universities still have a long way to go in becoming sustainable.

  • 28.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Ramis-Pujol, Juan
    University Ramon Llull.
    Arenas, Daniel
    University Ramon Llull.
    Detecting supply chain innovation potential for sustainable development2008In: Proceedings of the 7th International conference of the Multinational Alliance on Advancement of Organizational Excellence, 2008, p. 87-96Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29. Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Steimle, Ulrich
    What does GRI-reporting tell us about corporate sustainability?2009In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 168-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss what the business contribution to sustainable development is (or should be) and to propose criteria for assessing corporate sustainability. These criteria are applied for the analysis of Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)-reports of five major cement manufacturers. This will result in a discussion if GRI-based sustainability reports really contain the information needed for judging corporate sustainability. Design/methodology/approach - Starting from a literature review of common definitions and principles, the main criteria of corporate sustainability were developed and a set of evaluation criteria for analyzing sustainability reports was proposed. Definitions and principles from concepts such as eco-efficiency, triple-bottom-line, the natural step and stakeholder value were considered. Using these criteria analysis was made of the GRI-based sustainability reports of five major cement manufacturers in order to find out to what extent the reports really address the sustainability performance of the companies. The companies were chosen because of their dominant position in the building material supply chain. The building industry has multiple impacts on the environment as well as on the social system. The decisions and actions of the cement manufacturers have influence on the entire supply chain, from raw material suppliers to the end customer. Findings - The findings lead to the conclusion that the current GRI guidelines are not sufficient to make sustainability reporting for the cement industry relevant and clear. In other words, the guidelines are not sufficient for assuring that a report answers the questions of how sustainable a company is and how quickly it is approaching sustainability. Within the GRI guidelines the needs of the customers are not considered sufficiently. This points at an important area where business excellence ideas can support sustainability reporting. This could be done, for instance, by including the concept of cost of poor quality into sustainability reporting guidelines. Originality/value - The most common framework for sustainability reporting on an empirical basis was critically analysed. The qualitative study delivers insights into sustainability reporting in an industry with large impacts on global climate change and living conditions.

  • 30.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Steimle, Ulrich
    What does GRI-reporting tell us about corporate sustainability?2008In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Quality Management and Organisational Development, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Assessing the level of management comittment for TQM core values: and introduction to more effective change2001In: Proceedings of the Sixth World Congress for Total Quality Management: Business Excellence - What is to be done, Saint Petersburg: Stockholm School of Economics , 2001, Vol. 1, p. 247-254Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Measuring quality with a process model2001In: Building people and organisational excellence: proceedings of the 4th International QMOD Conference : Linköpings universitet 12-14 September, 2001, Sweden / [ed] Su Mi Park Dahlgaard; Jens J. Dahlgaard, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2001, p. 200-205Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    On the development of customer oriented improvement processes2000In: Productivity and Quality Management Frontiers IX: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Productivity and Quality Research, 25-27 June, Jerusalem, Israel / [ed] E. Dar-El; A. Notea; A. Hari, MCB University Press , 2000, p. 27-34Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    On the use of process management in the Third World2002In: Total quality management (Print), ISSN 0954-4127, E-ISSN 1360-0613, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 419-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the use of Total Quality Management (TQM) in the Third World with a focus on Process Management. Existing examples from developing countries are mostly from emerging economies and very little is found from Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Looking into the strength of TQM-drivers as a function of national indicators highlights possible reasons for the lack of TQM. Generally, the drivers are found to be very weak, especially in SSA, and give a low probability for management commitment. In order to test whether process management in a TQM-framework would be feasible, provided there was management commitment, a process view has been overlaid on the functional organisation of a cement plant in SSA. The performance of a more process-focused management is described in a number of case studies. The conclusion is that, technically, First-World process management could function and give good results, but that in practice this will seldom take place due to a lack of management commitment.

  • 35.
    Isaksson, Raine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Spotlight on process measurement2002In: Quality World, ISSN 1352-8769, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 12-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Ljungblom, Mia
    et al.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Teaching leadership for improvement: a case study in distance learning effectiveness2008In: Proceedings of the 11th International conference on Quality Management and Organisational Development, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Siva, Vanajah
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Gremyr, Ida
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Bergquist, Bjarne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Zobel, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The Support of Quality Management for Sustainable Development: A Literature Review2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 148-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality Management is considered to be suitable as support forthe integration of sustainability considerations in areas such as productdevelopment. The purpose of this paper is to review research in whichQuality Management methods, tools or practices have been used inconjunction with sustainable development initiatives. We have identifiedfour themes that synthesize the research on Quality Management and itssupport to approaches for sustainable development: (1) supportingsustainability through integration of management systems, (2) QualityManagement as support to the implementation of Environmental ManagementSystems and to the management of sustainability, (3) supportingintegration of sustainability considerations in daily work, and (4)supporting stakeholder management and customer focus. By far the mostresearch has been conducted within the first two themes. This paper alsocontributes with proposals for future research, such as the need to movebeyond existing standards and management systems to enable more radicalimprovements, and the need for empirical evidence of the effect ofintegrated management systems on environmental performance. We alsohighlight the point that Quality Management practices and tools must bedeveloped and adapted in order to support sustainability considerations.

  • 38.
    Sugano, M.
    et al.
    KDDI R and D Laboratories Inc..
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Nakajima, Y.
    KDDI R and D Laboratories Inc..
    Yanagihara, H.
    KDDI R and D Laboratories Inc..
    Shot genre classification using compressed audio-visual features2003In: Proceedings / 2003 International Conference on Image Processing : September 14 - 17, 2003, Barcelona, Spain, IEEE Communications Society, 2003, p. 17-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes shot genre classification from MPEG compressed movies, as one of the high-level indexing methods for audio-visual contents. Through statistical analysis of low-level and mid-level audio-visual features on compressed domain, the proposed method can achieve subjectively accurate shot classification within the movies into predefined genre set, which can be applied to various content handling applications, such as summarization, navigation, editing, filtering, and so on. By feeding subjectively evaluated feature set for each shot genre into the Linear Machine Decision Tree classifier, each shot is classified at very low cost. The experimental results show that most of the shots in the movies can be classified into subjectively accurate genres, and also the dominant shot genre can correctly resolve each movie genre.

  • 39. Wiklund, Håkan
    et al.
    Wiklund, Pia Sandvik
    Isaksson, Raine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    TQM in higher education: lessons learned in Sweden2002In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on ISO 9000 and TQM: 7-ICIT, 2002, p. 331-332Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 39 of 39
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