Change search
Refine search result
1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Byström, Pär
    et al.
    Michanek, Gabriel
    Leonardsson, Kjell
    Näslund, Ingemar
    Rova, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Catch and release: populär men ifrågasatt metod2008In: Vilt och fisk fakta, ISSN 1654-0115, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2. Christensen, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Hovgaard, Gestur
    Karlsson, Geir Runar
    Rova, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Nordisk kystfiskeri i det nye århundrede?2005Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Lundmark, Carina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Rova, Carl
    Rönnbäck, Peder
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Structuring social complexities in natural resource governance: exploring a new model for adaptive co-management2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Rova, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Adaptiva fiskevårdsområden2009In: Vilt och fisk fakta, ISSN 1654-0115, no 7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Rova, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Flipping the pyramid: lessons from converting top-down management of bleak-roe fishing2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fishing of vendace (Coregonus albula), in the northern part of the Gulf of Bothnia, is a good illustration of the presumption that institutional arrangements which are too inflexible to cope with changing ecological conditions are unlikely to prosper. The aim of this thesis is to contribute to the development of a better understanding of governance in a relatively small and clearly defined, but complex common-pool resource system. It also aims at providing insights into how different governance strategies affect individual users’ incentives, as well as the adaptive capacity in such systems. Since the beginning of the 1960s, the trawl fishery for vendace has been top-down regulated by the State. At the beginning of the 1990s, catches started to decrease dramatically. This happened despite extensive state regulation and despite the fact that the resource is fairly non-migratory and concentrated in a limited area. In the thesis, the institutional framework that contributed to this crisis is analysed in terms of provision of incentives and the capability to adapt to changing ecological circumstances. It was found that despite deliberate state regulation, the existing governance system worsened the resource crisis. In response to the poor performance of the fishery, a co-management system, with sharing of power and responsibilities between the National Board of Fisheries and the trawl fishermen, was implemented. An extensive survey among trawl fishermen showed that, after three years of co-management, a change in individual behaviour has occurred. The fishermen had, to some extent, redirected their individual catch-maximising strategies towards long-term collective rationality. With regulations implemented through bottom-up, instead of top-down processes, the legitimacy for regulations had also increased considerably. The management system became more adaptive and created users who had the capability to react to changes in the ecosystem. As a result, catches have increased extensively since co-management was implemented. In the thesis, it is demonstrated how and with what mechanisms this change, from top-down to bottom-up approaches in management, has affected the incentives for individual fishermen and, how this has affected collective action and, thus, the long-term ecological survival of the vendace resource. It is concluded that, managing fisheries with unexpected changes and complexity in linked social-ecological systems requires actors (both fishermen and authorities), who learn from failures and, when necessary, initiate and achieve institutional change. The creation of social- ecological resilience can be looked upon as a process – a socially generated collective good – which is likely to result in better governance systems. In this context, the role of institutions in building adaptive capacity and supporting collective rationality is important.

  • 6.
    Rova, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Flipping the pyramid: lessons from converting top-down management of bleak-roe fishing2004In: The Commons in an Age of Global Transition: Challenges, Risks and Opportunities, International Association for the Study of the Commons, IASCP , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Rova, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Ingredienser för adaptiva fiskevårdsområden2011In: Ekologi för fiskevård, Stockholm: Sveriges Sportfiske- och Fiskevårdsförbund, Sportfiskarna , 2011, p. 284-298Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Rova, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Natural resources and institutional performance: linking social and ecological systems in fisheries1999Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In times of resource scarcity, the management system should be able to adjust, thus enabling it to respond and reorganise when changes in the ecosystem occur. For a successful resource management, ecological resilience must be combined with institutional resilience. The fishing of vendace (Coregonus albula)in the northern part of the Gulf of Bothnia provides a good example of this type of problem. The resource system seems to have all the features that characterise a so-called "common-pool resource dilemma". Short-term individual rationality lead to an outcome that is not rational for the fishers as a goup. In addition, the centralised management system seems unable to change even when ecological circumstances obvious call for this. This thesis argues that a small and well-defined local management system, which avoid free-rider problems, is better able to recieve and respond to signals from the ecosystem. With recourse to "short" implementation structures, bottom-up processes for the construction of rules, and fishers own monitoring of the resource system, the incentive to follow rules will most likely be higher. If incentives to follow rules are high, it will also be easier to adjust rules when disturbances in the ecosystem occur, thus enhancing resilience in the management system. A possible way to implement co-operation between fishers and officials is through co-management.

  • 9.
    Rova, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Report from Baltic Sea case study2008In: Detailed study of social robustness in four cases: Baltic Sea, Northe Sea, Western Shelf, and the Faroe Islands, 2008, p. 29-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Rova, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    The importance of trust and legitimacy in management of Common Pool Resources: Lessons learned from implementation of a fishery co-management system in a complex society2006In: Social Sciences in Resource Management: Global Challenges & Local Responses: Book of Abstracts, 12th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management, ISSRM 2006 / [ed] Ben Beardmore; Krista Englund ; Wolfgang Haider, Burnaby, BC: Simon Fraser University , 2006, p. 274-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to provide insights into how implementation of co-management systems can be a way in building trust between authorities and the users of a CPR. It is shown that a new co-management system can be developed and "triggered" by an ecological crisis and that trust and social networks are crucial factors for successful institutional development.The trawl fishery for vendus (Coregonus albula) in the northern part of the Gulf of Bothnia, has been top-down regulated by the State. At the beginning of the 1990s, catches started to decrease dramatically. In response to the poor performance of the fishery, a co-management system, with sharing of power and responsibilities between the authorities and the trawl fishermen, was implemented.It is concluded that managing fisheries with unexpected changes and complexity in linked social-ecological systems requires actors who learn from failures and, when necessary, initiate and achieve institutional change. The creation of social-ecological resilience can be looked upon as a process - a socially generated collective good - which is likely to result in better governance systems. In this context, the role of institutions in building adaptive capacity and supporting collective rationality is important.

  • 11.
    Rova, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    The importance of trust and legitimacy in the management of common-pool resources (CPR): lessons learned from implementation of a fishery co-management system in a complex society2006In: IASCP 2006 Conference Papers, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to provide insights into how the implementation of co-management systems can be a way of building trust between authorities and the users of a common-pool resource (CPR). In this paper, it is shown that a new co-management system can be triggered by an ecological crisis, and that trust and social factors are crucial for successful institutional development. This paper also discusses the definition of the concept of 'co-management' and the importance of scale and horizontal/vertical linkages in the management of CPRs. "It is concluded that managing fisheries with unexpected changes and complexity in linked social-ecological systems require actors (both fishermen and authorities) who learn from failures and, when necessary, initiate and achieve institutional change. The creation of social- ecological resilience can be looked upon as a process - a socially-generated collective good - which is likely to result in better governance systems. In this context, the role of institutions in building adaptive capacity and supporting collective rationality is important. To the extent that the conclusions derived from this case study are applicable to society in general, this would indicate that, in order to restore the legitimacy of and trust in policy making and governing institutions in society, more bottom-up processes with user participation and engaged citizens are needed

  • 12.
    Rova, Carl
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Carlsson, Lars
    When regulation fails: vendace fishery in the Gulf of Bothnia2001In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 323-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fishing of vendace (Coregonus albula), in the Gulf of Bothnia, is a good illustration of the presumption that institutional arrangements that are too inflexible to cope with changing ecological conditions, are unlikely to prosper. Although the vendace fishing is regulated by the State, catches have decreased dramatically, and there is a considerable fear that the resource is about to be depleted. This article discusses how the present institutional arrangement affects collective action and why political solutions seem to have failed. The vendace case illustrates that even a rather limited resource concentrated in a limited area is unlikely to be sustainably managed by top-down regulation performed by the State. It is concluded that changes in management practices that are obvious from the perspective of ecosystem management might turn out to be unfeasible, given the multi-stakeholder character of the, gi management system. From this article it can also be concluded that resilience theory and experiences from long-enduring CPRs correspond very well with each other. Finally, it is discussed whether it is meaningful to talk about institutional, or managerial, resilience uncoupled from the ecosystem it is supposed to be managed. If an ecosystem, like the vendace, that is subject to human activity loses its resilience this would automatically indicate the socio-economic system, as manifested in management practices, has already lost its ability to adapt. Thus, social and ecological resilience are communicating vessels but not perhaps as the concept might be understood according to a popular call for increased institutional resilience in natural resource management.

  • 13.
    Rova, Carl
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Carlsson, Lars
    Norrby, Thomas
    Tivell, Anders
    Westerberg, Lotten
    "Från ett läge till ett annat...": några perspektiv på samförvaltningsintiativet2009Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Rova, Carl
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Christensen, Anne-Sofie
    Aranda, Martin
    McCay, Bonnie
    McLay, Anne
    Wolff, Franziska
    Understanding social robustness in selected in European fisheries management systems2009In: Comparative Evaluations of Innovative Fisheries Management: Global Experiences and European Prospects, Dordrecht: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2009, p. 163-189Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Sandström, Annica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Rova, Carl
    Adaptive co-management networks: a comparative analysis of two fishery conservation areas in Sweden2010In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 15, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-management constitutes a certain type of institutional arrangement that has gained increased attention among both policy makers and researchers involved in the field of natural resource management. Yet the concept of co-management is broad, and our knowledge about how different kinds of management structures affect the ability to deal with challenges pertinent to the commons is limited. One of these challenges is to foster an adaptive management process, i.e., a process in which rules are continuously revised and changed according to what is known about the ecological system. We aim to address the relationship between different kinds of co-management structures and adaptive management. To this end, we conducted a comparative case study of two Fishery Conservation Areas in Sweden. The concept of networks and the formal method of social network analysis are applied as theoretical and methodological devices. Building on previous research, we propose that adaptive management processes occur in co-management networks consisting of a heterogeneous set of actors that are centrally and densely integrated. Networks of this kind are believed to promote a management process in which actors with disparate perspectives and resources formulate a common view regarding the condition of the ecosystem, the basic problem to be solved, and what measures to adopt. The empirical findings support the existence of such a relationship. Nonetheless, the restricted empirical material, an inability to control for hidden variables, and a lack of success in determining causality among variables are all factors that call for more research.

  • 16.
    Sandström, Annica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Rova, Carl
    The network structure of adaptive governance: a single case study of a fish managment area2010In: International Journal of the Commons, ISSN 1875-0281, E-ISSN 1875-0281, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 528-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge of establishing adaptive management systems is a widely discussed topic in the literature on natural resource management. Adaptive management essentially focuses on achieving a governance process that is both sensitive to and has the capacity to continuously react to changes within the ecosystem being managed. The adoption of a network approach that perceives governance structures as social networks, searching for the kind of network features promoting this important feature, has been requested by researchers in the field. In particular, the possibilities associated with the application of a formal network approach, using the tools and concepts of social network analysis (SNA), have been identified as having significant potential for advancing this branch of research. This paper aims to address the relation between network structure and adaptability using an empirical approach. With the point of departure in a previously generated theoretical framework as well as related hypotheses, this paper presents a case study of a governance process within a fish management area in Sweden. The hypotheses state that, although higher levels of network density and centralisation promote the rule-forming process, the level of network heterogeneity is important for the existence and spread of ecological knowledge among the actors involved. According to the empirical results, restricted by the single-case study design, this assumption is still a well-working hypothesis. However, in order to advance our knowledge concerning these issues and test the validity of the hypotheses, more empirical work using a similar approach in multiple case study designs is needed.

1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf