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  • 1.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Modelling and validation of flow over a wall with large surface roughness2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    CFD-modelling and validation of free surface flow during spilling of reservoir in down-scale model2013In: Engineering Applications of Computational Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 1994-2060, E-ISSN 1997-003X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 159-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Modellering av avbördning med fri vattenyta och validering i en skalmodell2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Effect of spatial resolution of rough surfaces on numerically computed flow fields with application to hydraulic engineering2014In: Engineering Applications of Computational Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 1994-2060, E-ISSN 1997-003X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 373-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In numerical simulations of flow over rough surfaces, the roughness is often not resolved but represented by a numerical model. The validity of such an assumption is investigated in this paper by Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of flow over a surface with a large roughness. The surface was created from a high-resolution laser scanning of a real rock blasted tunnel. By reducing the geometrical resolution of the roughness in two steps, the importance of an appropriate surface description could be examined. The flow fields obtained were compared to a set-up with a geometrical flat surface where the roughness was represented by a modified form of the Launder and Spalding wall-function. The flow field over the surface with the lowest resolution was substantially different from those of the two finer resolutions and rather close to the results from the set-up with the wall-function. The results also yield that the finer the resolution is the more vorticity is formed close to the rough surface and more turbulence is generated.

  • 5. Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Lindberg, Dan-Erik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies.
    Lindmark, Elianne
    Leonardsson, Kjell
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    A numerical study of the location and function of the entrance of a fishway in a regulated river2010In: 8th International Symposium on ECOHYDRAULICS: Bridging between Ecology and Hydraulics and Leading the Society's New Need - Living with Nature, 2010, p. 277-284Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation driven design with Computational Fluid Dynamics has been used to evaluate the flow downstream a hydropower plant with regards to upstream migrating fish. Field measurements with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler were performed and the measurements were used to validate the simulations. The measurements indicate a more unstable flow than the simulations and the tailrace jet from the turbines is stronger in the simulations. The simulations are however considered to capture the important features of the flow in a way that makes them viable for attraction water simulations. A fishway entrance was included in the simulations and the subsequent attraction water was evaluated for two positions and two angles of the entrance at different turbine discharges. Results show that both positions are viable and that a position where the flow from the fishway does not have to compete with the flow from the power plant will generate superior attraction water. Simulations were also performed further downstream where the flow from the turbines meets the old river bed which is the current fish passage for upstream migrating fish. A modification of the old river bed was made in the model as one scenario to generate better attraction water. This considerably increases the attraction water although it cannot compete with the flow from the tailrace tunnel.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lindberg, Dan-Erik
    SLU.
    Lindmark, Elianne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics.
    Leonardsson, Kjell
    SLU.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    SLU.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    A study of the location of the entrance of a fishway in a regulated river with CFD and ADCP2012In: Modelling and Simulation in Engineering, ISSN 1687-5591, E-ISSN 1687-5605, Vol. 2012, article id 327929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation-driven design with computational fluid dynamics has been used to evaluate the flow downstream of a hydropower plant with regards to upstream migrating fish. Field measurements with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler were performed, and the measurements were used to validate the simulations. The measurements indicate a more unstable flow than the simulations, and the tailrace jet from the turbines is stronger in the simulations. A fishway entrance was included in the simulations, and the subsequent attraction water was evaluated for two positions and two angles of the entrance at different turbine discharges. Results show that both positions are viable and that a position where the flow from the fishway does not have to compete with the flow from the power plant will generate superior attraction water. Simulations were also performed for further downstream where the flow from the turbines meets the old river bed which is the current fish passage for upstream migrating fish. A modification of the old river bed was made in the model as one scenario to generate better attraction water. This considerably increases the attraction water although it cannot compete with the flow from the tailrace tunnel.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, Kristoffer
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Lundström, Staffan
    Simulation of free surface flow in a spillway with the rigid lid and volume of fluid methods and validation in a scale model2010In: Proceedings, Fifth European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics / [ed] Jose C. F. Pereira; Adelia Sequeira; Jose M. C. Pereira, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulations on the spilling from a dam were performed and compared to experimental results from a physical scale model. Both mechanical and acoustic methods to measure the velocity were used. The model has three gates leading into the spillway that can be maneuvered separately. At first two of the gates were closed and the inlet flow was high enough to get a fully wetted outlet at the third gate. This case was simulated with a rigid lid approximation since the water surface was considered to be plane. The water surface level was taken from the scale model. In the second case, all three gates were open resulting in a free water surface through all the gates to the spillway. This case was simulated with the Volume of Fluids method were both water and air phase were considered. Water levels, velocities and the shape of the water surface were compared between simulations and experiments. The simulations capture both qualitative features such as a vortex near the outlet and show good quantitative agreement with the experiments.

  • 8.
    Andersson, L. Robin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Larsson, Sofia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics. Vattenfall Research and Development, Älvkarleby.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Characterization of Flow Structures Induced by Highly Rough Surface Using Particle Image Velocimetry, Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and Velocity Correlations2018In: Engineering, ISSN 1947-3931, Vol. 10, p. 399-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High Reynolds number flow inside a channel of rectangular cross section is examined using Particle Image Velocimetry. One wall of the channel has been replaced with a surface of a roughness representative to that of real hydropower tunnels, i.e. a random terrain with roughness dimensions typically in the range of ≈10% - 20% of the channels hydraulic radius. The rest of the channel walls can be considered smooth. The rough surface was captured from an existing blasted rock tunnel using high resolution laser scanning and scaled to 1:10. For quantification of the size of the largest flow structures, integral length scales are derived from the auto-correlation functions of the temporally averaged velocity. Additionally, Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and higher-order statistics are applied to the instantaneous snapshots of the velocity fluctuations. The results show a high spatial heterogeneity of the velocity and other flow characteristics in vicinity of the rough surface, putting outer similarity treatment into jeopardy. Roughness effects are not confined to the vicinity of the rough surface but can be seen in the outer flow throughout the channel, indicating a different behavior than postulated by Townsend’s similarity hypothesis. The effects on the flow structures vary depending on the shape and size of the roughness elements leading to a high spatial dependence of the flow above the rough surface. Hence, any spatial averaging, e.g. assuming a characteristic sand grain roughness factor, for determining local flow parameters becomes less applicable in this case.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Robin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Vattenfall Research & Development.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Grade of geometric resolution of a rough surface required for accurate prediction of pressure and velocities in water tunnels2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Robin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Burman, Anton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics. Vattenfall Research and Development, Älvkarleby.
    Inlet Blockage Effects in a Free Surface Channel With Artificially Generated Rough Walls2018In: Proceedings of the 7th IAHR International Symposium on Hydraulic Structures / [ed] Daniel Bung ; Blake Tullis, 2018, p. 723-732Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When considering free surface flow in channels, it is essential to have in-depth knowledge about the inlet flow conditions and the effect of surface roughness on the overall flow field. Hence, we hereby investigate flow inside an 18m long channel by using Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) and Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV). The roughness of the channel walls is generated using a diamond-square fractal algorithm and is designed to resemble the actual geometry of hydropower tunnels. Four different water levels ranging from 20 to 50cm are investigated. For each depth, the inlet is blocked by 25 and 50% at three positions each, at the centre, to the right and to the left in the flow-direction. The flow is altered for each depth to keep the flow velocity even throughout the measurements. PTV is applied to measure the velocity of the free water surface; four cameras are placed above the setup to capture the entirety of the channel. The results show a clear correlation between roughness-height and velocity distribution at depths 20-30 cm. The surface roughness proved effective in dispersing the subsequent perturbations following the inlet blockage. At 50cm, perturbations from the 50% blockage could be observed throughout the channel. However, at 20cm, most perturbations had subsided by a third of the channel length. The ADV was used to capture the velocity in a total of 375 points throughout the channel, at a depth of 50 cm with no inlet perturbations.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Robin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Gävunda case studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Andersson, Robin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics. Vattenfall AB Research and Development, Älvkarleby Laboratory, Älvkarleby.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Numerical investigation of a hydropower tunnel: Estimating localised head-loss using the manning equation2019In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 1562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fluid dynamics within a water tunnel is investigated numerically using a RANS approach with the k-ε turbulence model. The computational model is based on a laser scan of a hydropower tunnel located in Gävunda, Sweden. The tunnel has a typical height of 6.9 m and a width of 7.2 m. While the average cross-sectional shape of the tunnel is smooth the local deviations are significant, where some roughness elements may be in the size of 5 m implying a large variation of the hydraulic radius. The results indicate that the Manning equation can successfully be used to study the localised pressure variations by taking into account the varying hydraulic radius and cross-sectional area of the tunnel. This indicates a dominant effect of the tunnel roughness in connection with the flow, which has the potential to be used in the future evaluation of tunnel durability. ANSYS-CFX was used for the simulations along with ICEM-CFD for building the mesh. 

  • 13.
    Andersson, Robin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Larsson, Sofia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, Gunnar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andersson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Experimental Study of Head Loss over Laser Scanned Rock Tunnel2016In: Experimental Study of Head Loss over Laser Scanned Rock Tunnel: Hydraulic Structures and Water System Management, ISHS 2016, Portland, United States, 27 - 30 June 2016, Portland: Utah State University , 2016, p. 22-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow in hydropower tunnels is characterized by a high Reynolds number and often very rough rock walls. Due to the roughness of the walls, the flow in the tunnel is highly disturbed, resulting in large fluctuations of velocity and pressure in both time and space. Erosion problems and even partial collapse of tunnel walls are in some cases believed to be caused by hydraulic jacking from large flow induced pressure fluctuations. The objective of this work is to investigate the effects of the rough walls on the pressure variations in time and space over the rock surfaces. Pressure measurement experiments were performed in a 10 m long Plexiglas tunnel where one of the smooth walls was replaced with a rough surface. The rough surface was created from a down-scaled (1:10) laser scanned wall of a hydraulic tunnel. The differential pressure was measured at the smooth surface between points placed at the start and end of the first four 2 m sections of the channel. 10 gauge pressure sensors where flush mounted on the rough surface; these sensors measure the magnitude and the fluctuations of the pressure on the rough surface. The measurements showed significant spatial variation of the pressure on the surface. For example, sensors placed on protruding roughness elements showed low gauge pressure but high fluctuations. The differential pressure indicated a head loss through the tunnel that was almost four times higher than a theoretical smooth channel.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Robin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Larsson, Sofia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Burman, Anton
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics. Vattenfall Research and Development, Älvkarleby.
    Localised roughness effects in non-uniform hydraulic waterwaysIn: Journal of Hydraulic Research, ISSN 0022-1686, E-ISSN 1814-2079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydropower tunnels are generally subject to a degree of rock falls. Studies explaining this are scarce and the current industrial standards offer little insight. To simulate tunnel conditions, high Reynolds number flow inside a channel with a rectangular cross-section is investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry and pressure measurements. For validation, the flow is modelled using LES and a RANS approach with k - ε turbulence model. One wall of the channel has been replaced with a rough surface captured using laser scanning. The results indicate flow-roughness effects deviating from the standard non-asymmetric channel flow and hence, can not be properly predicted using spatially averaged relations. These effects manifest as localized bursts of velocity connected to individual roughness elements. The bursts are large enough to affect both temporally and spatially averaged quantities. Both turbulence models show satisfactory agreement for the overall flow behaviour, where LES also provided information for in-depth analysis.

  • 15.
    Jonsson, Patrick
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, Gunnar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Jonsén, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mechanics of Solid Materials.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulation of Hydraulic Jump using Periodic Open Boundaries2016In: Applied Mathematical Modelling, ISSN 0307-904X, E-ISSN 1872-8480, Vol. 40, no 19-20, p. 8391-8405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The natural phenomena hydraulic jump that is commonly used in spillways as an energy dissipater coupled to hydropower applications has been investigated with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. A new approach was applied based on a periodic open boundary condition. The model consisted of a tank, a gate, a stilling basin and periodic open boundaries at each end of the computational domain. The tank provided a hydraulic head and in turn a specific flow through the gate, and a downstream condition in terms of a depth for the jump. The gate elevation had a major impact and was calibrated to ensure a correct and stable flow rate, when compared to experiments. With the proper flow rate, the position of the jump toe was significantly improved. The jump toe oscillated with a frequency in good agreement with experimental findings found in the literature and the oscillation amplitude increased with Froude number. However, for high Froude number cases the position was still too close to the gate but could be improved by including a correction based on the length of the jump. The depths in both the super- and subcritical zones was in good agreement with experiments and previous numerical studies. Furthermore, the Froude number was in-line with the definition of super- and subcritical flows.

  • 16.
    Jonsson, Patrick
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Jonsén, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mechanics of Solid Materials.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics modellering av hydrauliska språng2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Jonsson, Patrick
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Jonsén, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mechanics of Solid Materials.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, Gunnar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Modelling Dam Break Evolution over a Wet Bed with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics: A Parameter Study2015In: Engineering, ISSN 1947-3931, E-ISSN 1947-394X, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 248-260Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Jonsson, Patrick
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Jonsén, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mechanics of Solid Materials.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Modeling of a Hydraulic Jump2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Jonsson, Patrick
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Jonsén, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mechanics of Solid Materials.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics modeling of hydraulic jumps2011In: Particle-based Methods – Fundamentals and Applications / [ed] E. Oñate; D.R.J. Owen, Barcelona: International Center for Numerical Methods in Engineering (CIMNE), 2011, p. 490-501Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focus on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) modeling of twodimensional hydraulic jumps in horizontal open channel flows. Insights to the complex dynamics of hydraulic jumps in a generalized test case serves as a knowledgebase for real world applications such as spillway channel flows in hydropower systems. In spillways, the strong energy dissipative mechanism associated with hydraulic jumps is a utilized feature to reduce negative effects of erosion to spillway channel banks and in the old river bed. The SPH-method with its mesh-free Lagrangian formulation and adaptive nature results in a method that handles extremely large deformations and numerous publications using the SPH-method for free-surface flow computations can be found in the literature. Hence, the main objectives with this work are to explore the SPH-methods capabilities to accurately capture the main features of a hydraulic jump and to investigate the influence of the number of particles that represent the system. The geometrical setup consists of an inlet which discharges to a horizontal plane with an attached weir close to the outlet. To investigate the influence of the number of particles that represents the system, three initial interparticle distances were studied, coarse, mid and fine. For all cases it is shown that the SPH-method accurately captures the main features of a hydraulic jump such as the transition between supercritical- and subcritical flow and the dynamics of the highly turbulent roller and the air entrapment process. The latter was captured even though a single phase was modeled only. Comparison of theoretically derived values and numerical results show good agreement for the coarse and mid cases. However, the fine case show oscillating tendencies which might be due to inherent numerical instabilities of the SPH-method or it might show a more physically correct solution. Further validation with experimental results is needed to clarify these issues.

  • 20.
    Mill, O.
    et al.
    Svenska Kraftnät.
    Dahlbäck, N.
    Vattenfall.
    Worman, A
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, KTH.
    Knutsson, Sven
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Johansson, F.
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, KTH.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Yang, J.
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, KTH.
    Lundin, U.
    UU.
    Aidanpää, Jan-Olov
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mechanics of Solid Materials.
    Nilsson, H.
    CTH.
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Glavatskih, Sergei
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Analysis and development of hydro power research: synthesis within Swedish Hydro Power Centre2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The market for hydropower re-investments in Sweden is approx 2.5 billion SEK/yr the coming decade. Large investments will also be carried out in Swedish tailing dams. This will result in challenging projects and need of experts. A crucial factor for a successful management of these challenges is the supply of engineers and researchers with hydro power and dam skills and knowledge. Swedish Hydro Power Centre (Svenskt vattenkraftcentrum, SVC) is a competence centre for university education and research environments within hydro power and mining dams. SVC comprises of two knowledge areas: Hydraulic Engineering and Hydro Turbines and Generators, respectively. SVC builds high-quality and long term sustainable knowledge at selected universities...

  • 21.
    Yang, J.
    et al.
    Vattenfall R and D, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Headword erosion in embankment dams caused by spillway flood discharge2012In: International journal on hydropower and dams, ISSN 1352-2523, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 68-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An embankment dam with conventional stability requirements should be able to withstand so- called design seepage flow, which is often turbulent. To meet this requirement, many dams in the country have been reinforced with stabilizing measures. Another type of instability issue for embankment dams is headward erosion, which is less common and subsequently receives less attention in the design. The bedrock elevation downstream of the energy dissipator and in its immediate vicinity is another important factor in erosion studies, and should be identified in advance. The bedrock elevation determines how deep the erosion down-cut will develop. Hydraulic model tests prove to be an easy means of evaluating issues of this type. All the models are based on Froude scaling laws without vertical scale distortion. Based on the prototype data, sand and gravel of appropriate sizes are chosen as erodible material.

  • 22.
    Yang, James
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics. Vattenfall AB, R and D, Alvkarleby.
    Bending the spillway flow for safety upgrades2016In: International Water Power and Dam Construction, ISSN 0306-400X, E-ISSN 1538-6414, Vol. 68, no 11, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Yang, James
    et al.
    Vattenfall AB Research and Development, Älvkarleby Laboratory.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics. Vattenfall AB Research and Development, Älvkarleby Laboratory.
    Högström, Carl-Maikel
    Vattenfall AB Research and Development, Älvkarleby Laboratory.
    Teng, Penghua
    Division of Resources, Energy and Infrastructure, Royal Institute of Technology.
    The tale of an intake vortex and its mitigation countermeasure: A case study from akkats hydropower station2018In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The upgrade of Akkats power station in Sweden included a new, separate waterway for the addition of a 75 MW generating unit. The vertical intake of its headrace was formed by means of lake tapping. A physical model was used to help understand the blasting process involving fragmented rock, water, air, and gas. Upon commissioning of the unit, swirling flows occurred unexpectedly at the intake, which gave rise to negative consequences including limitations in power output. Echo-sounding showed that the blasted piercing resulted in an irregular intake. A hydraulic model, as part of the design process, was built to examine potential countermeasures for vortex suppression. The final solution was a segmented barrier between the intake and the dam. It effectively suppressed the intake flow circulations; only minor intermittent vortices were left. The fabricated steel segments were anchored into the bedrock, stretching to 1.0 m below the lowest legal reservoir level. The local intake headloss was also reduced. The implemented solution was tested under full turbine loading and the result was satisfactory. Even during winter seasons with ice cover above the wall, the power station ran normally. The case study is expected to provide guidance for solving similar problems with vortex formation.

  • 24.
    Yang, James
    et al.
    Vattenfall AB, Research & Development (R & D), Hydraulic Laboratory, Älvkarleby, Sweden;Division of Resources, Energy & Infrastructure, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics. Vattenfall AB, Research & Development (R & D), Hydraulic Laboratory, Älvkarleby, Sweden.
    Teng, Penghua
    Division of Resources, Energy & Infrastructure, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Xie, Qiancheng
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    The Past and Present of Discharge Capacity Modeling for Spillways: A Swedish Perspective2019In: Fluids, ISSN 2311-5521, Vol. 4, no 10, article id 4010010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the hydropower dams in Sweden were built before 1980. The present dam-safety guidelines have resulted in higher design floods than their spillway discharge capacity and the need for structural upgrades. This has led to renewed laboratory model tests. For some dams, even computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are performed. This provides the possibility to compare the spillway discharge data between the model tests performed a few decades apart. The paper presents the hydropower development, the needs for the ongoing dam rehabilitations and the history of physical hydraulic modeling in Sweden. More than 20 spillways, both surface and bottom types, are analyzed to evaluate their discharge modeling accuracy. The past and present model tests are compared with each other and with the CFD results if available. Discrepancies do exist in the discharges between the model tests made a few decades apart. The differences fall within the range −8.3%–+11.2%. The reasons for the discrepancies are sought from several aspects. The primary source of the errors is seemingly the model construction quality and flow measurement method. The machine milling technique and 3D printing reduce the source of construction errors and improve the model quality. Results of the CFD simulations differ, at the maximum, by 3.8% from the physical tests. They are conducted without knowledge of the physical model results in advance. Following the best practice guidelines, CFD should generate results of decent accuracy for discharge prediction.

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