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  • 1.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Accelerate ageing of refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) fly ashes2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ashes have properties that can be exploited in various applications, e.g. some ashes can be used in the construction of barriers in a landfill final top cover. A landfill top cover is a multilayer construction that protects the environment in several ways, for instance hindering gas emissions from the landfill body and water infiltration into the waste.Impervious natural materials like clay, synthetic materials like geomembranes or bentonite carpets, geosynthetic clay liners or combinations of such materials are commonly used in landfill top cover constructions. Since differential settlement may occur and the lifetimes of the synthetic materials are uncertain, it is advantageous to use thick mineral constructions. There is a great need for these materials, and substantial savings of resources can be made if alternative waste materials, like ashes, are used. Currently, ashes are either landfilled or used as construction materials. They are subject to weathering processes, including physical, chemical and mineralogical changes caused (inter alia) by fluctuations of temperature and humidity, atmospheric gases or acid rain. Ashes contain various potentially hazardous and non-hazardous chemical compounds. Therefore, precautions must be taken to avoid leaching of substances such as heavy metals into the surrounding environment. Mineral phases that are initially present and/or that form during the ageing are primarily responsible for the immobilization or leaching of diverse metals and salts. Newly formed mineral phases like clay minerals are of main interest, because of their very high cation exchange capacity, swelling and expansion properties.The conditions found in a landfill environment are likely to favour clay mineral formation. This thesis is based on studies on the effects of accelerated ageing on refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) fly ashes, in experiments under controlled laboratory conditions, intended to derive models to predict the stability of RDF fly ashes used in a landfill liner and the mineralogical changes that occur in them. A reduced factorial design was applied, followed by multivariate data analysis, to evaluate the effects of five factors - carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, temperature, relative air humidity (RH), time and the quality of added water - on mineral transformations within the ashes, and their acid neutralization capacity (ANC) and leaching behaviour.Minerals (ettringite and hydrocalumite) promoting the immobilization of hazardous compounds were found in both fresh ash and ash aged under atmospheric conditions, but these minerals disappeared upon carbonation. The main phases in ash at 20% and 100% CO2 were calcite, gypsum/anhydrite and vaterite. The abundance of gypsum and anhydrite was directly related to the temperature at which ashes were aged. The major mineral phases detected in ashes aged under 20% CO2, 65% RH and 30°C (corresponding to conditions generally found in a landfill cover) were calcite and gypsum/bassanite. The pH values of these ash specimens ranged from 7.2 to 7.6, indicating advanced carbonation. Ageing decreased pH values from 12.4 to 7.2, consequently affecting the leaching behaviour of most chemicals measured in the leachates. Levels of Ba, Ca, Cl, Cr, Cu, Pb, K and Na decreased over the study period while those of Mg, Zn and SO4 increased. No clay minerals were detected by XRD and SEM analysis in either fresh or aged ashes. However, geochemical modelling indicated that such minerals may precipitate. The modelling also indicated that clay minerals like saponite, vermiculite, chrysotile and hydrotalcite were likely to precipitate in most leachates from ash aged for 3, 10 and 22 months. Smectite, montmorillonite and illite may precipitate in leachates of ash aged for 31 months. The formation of smectite, montmorillonite and vermiculite would be advantageous due to their very high cation exchange capacities, which would favour the stabilization/immobilization of heavy metals in the mineral phases.

  • 2.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Suitability of fly ash for construction and land applications2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Municipal solid waste incineration fly ash is often landfilled or sent abroad for stabilization because it is considered a hazardous waste. These approaches to fly ash are both costly, and highlight the need for alternative and sustainable ash recycling. Both the needs of waste recycling and preservation of natural resources can be solved by using fly ashes as a secondary construction material and as soil fertilizer.Three types of fly ashes have been investigated in the laboratory experiments. Namely municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI), refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) and biofuel fly ashes. Factors influencing changes in chemical properties and mineralogical composition of RDF fly ash exposed to environmental conditions close to those that are found in a landfill top cover were evaluated in the accelerated ageing experiment. Element availability to leaching and plant uptake in soil amended with MSWI, biofuel fly ashes and biosolids was also evaluated.RDF fly ash exposed to the conditions found in a landfill top cover (20% CO2, 65% RH, 30°C T) lead to the chemical and mineralogical transformations that resulted in reduced leaching of most of the elements studied here. Only concentrations of Cl- in the leachates were an issue, because they still exceeded the leaching limit values; nevertheless the leaching of this element in aged ash decreased by 50% compared to fresh ash.Application of pelletized MSWI fly ash with biosolids on soil resulted in elevated total concentrations of As, Cd and Pb in soil (by 29%, 100% and 300%), but dissolved concentrations of these elements in soil pore water, except the As, were low as in the range of drinking water concentrations (98/83/EC). Furthermore, the concentrations of Cd and Pb in plant biomass were negligible regardless of the type of ash used.Based on the observations, RDF fly ash is considered as a suitable material to be used in a landfill liner. Whereas MSWI and biofuel fly ashes based on element availability for plants studies, could be considered suitable for land applications. But doses to be applied on soil should be adjusted to the type of ashes used to avoid accumulation of potentially toxic elements in soil over time.

  • 3. Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Andreas, Lale
    Diener, Silvia
    Tham, Gustav
    Telge AB, Södertälje.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Influence of accelerated ageing on acid neutralization capacity and mineralogical transformations in refuse derived-fuel fly ashes2009In: SARDINIA 2009: Twelfth International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium ; [5 - 9 October 2009, S. Margherita di Pula, Cagliari, Sardinia, Italy] / [ed] Raffaello Cossu, Cagliari: CISA, Environmental Sanitary Engineering Centre , 2009, Vol. 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a part of a long-term collaboration between Telge Återvinning AB at Södertälje in South Sweden and Lulea University of Technology (LTU) in the Northern part of Sweden. Ashes and other industrial wastes used for landfill cover construction have been studied for several years. However, there is a need for further investigations with regard to the long-term mechanical and chemical stability of ash liners in landfill cover constructions. Long-term changes of ashes are investigated by laboratory studies on accelerated weathering (ageing) using experimental design. With regard to weathering, several stages can be identified: hydration and carbonation are well known processes while the processes surrounding the conversion of ash to clay minerals are less well known. There are a number of studies showing that the process of mineral transformation during the ageing of coal or MSWI ashes is quite similar to that of volcanic ashes in nature. Yet, the time frames are quite different: while volcanic ashes need several thousands of years for clay mineral development, there are evidences as well that e.g. clay illite is formed from glass phases in MSWI bottom ash after only 12 y or that clay like amorphous material can be formed in micro-scale throughout the surfaces of coal ash particles after 8 y of natural weathering (Zevenbergen et al., 1999; Zevenbergen et al., 1998). There are a lot of studies performed on rapid fly ash conversion into zeolites by hydrothermal alkaline treatment, the success of which strongly depends on alkaline conditions and the silica-alumina composition of the fly ash source (Inada et al., 2005). These results provide further support to the hypothesis that the observed rapid clay like mineral formation arose as a result of the initially high pH of ash, which promotes rapid dissolution of certain components of aluminosilicate glasses. Furthermore, in a long term perspective these aluminosilicates can transform into zeolites, smectites or halloysites dependent on the solution pH and leaching rate. Based on these studies on volcanic, coal or MSWI ashes we presume that refuse derived fuel (RDF) ashes, like those that are used in the Tveta landfill cover, will be subject to analogical weathering and mineral transformation processes.In order to investigate the mineral transformation in RDF fly ashes, a designed laboratory experiment was performed. A reduced factorial experimental design for accelerated ageing has been applied to evaluate the influence of five factors: carbon dioxide (CO2), temperature, relative air humidity, time and, quality of added water (Table 1). Table 1 Factors and levels tested in the reduced multivariate factorial design for the study of accelerated ageing of RFD fly ashesFactorLowMiddleHighCarbon dioxide, CO2 (%)Atmosphere (0.038)20*100Temperature, ºC5 3060Relative air humidity, Rh (%)3065100Time, months31022Water qualityDistilled -LeachateThe influence of these factors on mineralogical composition, leaching behaviour and acid neutralization capacity (ANC) is analysed and evaluated with the aid of multivariate data analysis. The MVDA modelling was performed with SIMCA-P+ 11.5 version program developed by Umetrics AB (Eriksson and Umetrics Academy, 2006). Principle component analysis (PCA) technique was used and presented in this paper. PCA is an interdependence model where all variables are analysed simultaneously as a single set in a data matrix X. Triplicates were tested for each factor combination. Sampling was performed after 3, 10 and 22 months of accelerated ageing. Mineral composition was analysed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Acid neutralisation capacity was performed at 8.3 and 4.5 pH with 0.1 M HCl solution. The experimental set-up of accelerated ageing of RDF fly ashes is showed in Fig. 1. Preliminary evaluation of the mineral transformations in aged RDF fly ashes revealed that the carbonation process was not yet completed in the some of the specimens (Fig.2). This still caused high pH (pH=12.7) in the solution even though a calcite phase was found in all aged fly ashes. Multivariate data analysis confirmed that carbon dioxide affects the pH and ANC of fly ashes during ageing of RDF fly ashes. The specimens prepared with leachate water had higher ANC than the specimens with distilled water. The ANC8.3 was most influenced by 30 ºC temperature and 65 % relative humidity (ANC8.3 = 0.05 mmol/g) and this well corresponds to the results found in the literature. The ageing time factor has the highest influence on ANC4.5. A more detailed analysis of other mineral phases including clay-like minerals in aged fly ashes will be performed later.The results of this study will contribute to the better understanding of ash formation processes and improved possibilities to make beneficial use of ashes as an alternative to landfilling.Figure 1. Experimental set-up for investigations of the long-term behaviour of the ashes under different environmental conditions. Figure 2. XRD patterns of RDF fly ashes at different ageing conditions. a) N33, b) N71, c) N15, d) N85, and e) N51. The peaks are labelled A (anhydrite), C (calcite), E (ettringite), F (Friedel's Salt), Ge (gehlenite), H (halite), He (hematite), P (portlandite), Q (quartz), S (sylvite), V (vaterite).

  • 4. Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Andreas, Lale
    Diener, Silvia
    Tham, Gustav
    Telge AB.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Formation of secondary mineral phases during the ageing of RDF fly ashes2010In: The 6th Intercontinental Landfill Research Symposium, 2010, p. 110-112Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Andreas, Lale
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Diener, Silvia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Factors influencing chemical and mineralogical changes in RDF fly ashes during aging2014In: Journal of environmental engineering, ISSN 0733-9372, E-ISSN 1943-7870, Vol. 140, no 3, article id 4013014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of aging should be considered for reliable long-term assessments of the environmental risks of the use of refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) fly ash as landfill top cover liner material. Mineral transformations that occur in RDF fly ash, and the effects of selected factors on these transformations, were studied on compacted fly ash specimens in an accelerated aging experiment using a reduced factorial design. Carbon dioxide concentration, temperature, relative air humidity, time, and the quality of added water were varied in six factor combinations. Acid neutralization capacity and leaching behavior were analyzed after four different periods of time. The results were evaluated with multivariate data analysis. A significant change in the acid neutralization capacity, a decrease in leaching of Ba, Ca, Cl − , Cr, Cu, Pb, K, and Na, and an increase in solubility of Mg, Si, Zn, and SO 2− 4 could be attributed to different aging conditions

  • 6.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Andreas, Lale
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Changes of fly ash properties during the ageing2015In: Journal of environmental engineering, ISSN 0733-9372, E-ISSN 1943-7870, Vol. 141, no 5, article id 4014083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aging of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) fly ashes was investigated in a long-term laboratory experiment. Aging affected the chemical stability of RDF fly ash in terms of leaching behavior, ANC, and mineralogical transformations. The design of experiment model evaluation showed that the use of RDF ashes in a top cover liner construction has the following advantages: most of the investigated hazardous elements like Pb, Cl, Cr, Cu, etc., will not be released from the ashes, and their buffer capacity will increase with time. However, aging has the disadvantage that leaching of Zn and SO 4 is likely to increase. The multivariate data analysis of the coefficients of variation did not reveal any systematic errors in the performance of the experiment. However, batch leaching test not always reflect the real situation in the landfill top cover environment.

  • 7.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Andreas, Lale
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Travar, Igor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ageing of ashes in a landfill top cover2011In: SARDINIA 2011: Thirteenth International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, S. Margherita di Pula, Cagliari, Italy; 3 - 7 October 2011 / [ed] Raffaello Cossu, Cagliari: CISA Publisher, Italy , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on studies on the effects of accelerated ageing on refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) fly ashes, in experiments under controlled laboratory conditions, intended to derive models to predict the stability of RDF fly ashes used in a landfill liner and the mineralogi-cal changes that occur in them. A reduced factorial design was applied, followed by multivariate data analysis, to evaluate the effects of five factors — carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, temperature, relative air humidity (RH), time and the quality of added water — on mineral transformations within the ashes, and leaching behaviour. The pH values of these ash specimens ranged from 7.2 to 7.6, indicating advanced carbonation. Ageing decreased pH values from 12.4 to 7.2, conse-quently affecting the leaching behaviour of most chemicals measured in the leachates. Levels of Ba, Ca, Cl, Cr, Cu, Pb, K and Na decreased over the study period while those of Mg, Zn and SO4 increased. Clay minerals could not be detected neither in fresh nor in aged ashes. However, geo-chemical modelling indicated that such minerals may precipitate.

  • 8.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Belmonte, Carles
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Characterisation of waste material mixtures for landfill top cover application2012In: Abstract proceedings of 7th Intercontinental Landfill Research Symposium: Södra Sunderbyn, June 25th to 27th, 2012 / [ed] Anders Lagerkvist, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2012, p. 54-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Changes in Element Solubility in Fly Ash and Biosolid Mixtures Used for Soil Fertilization2013In: 12th International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements, Athens, Georgia, USA, June 16-20, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Fly ash in landfill top covers: a review2016In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increase of energy recovery from municipal solid waste by incineration results in the increased amounts of incineration residues, such as fly ash, that have to be taken care of. Material properties should define whether fly ash is a waste or a viable resource to be used for various applications. Here, two areas of potential fly ash application are reviewed: the use of fly ash in a landfill top cover either as a liner material or as a soil amendment in vegetation layer. Fly ashes from incineration of three types of fuel are considered: refuse derived fuel (RDF), municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and biofuel. Based on the observations, RDF and MSWI fly ash is considered as suitable materials to be used in a landfill top cover liner. Whereas MSWI and biofuel fly ashes based on element availability for plant studies, could be considered suitable for the vegetation layer of the top cover. Responsible application of MSWI ashes is, however, warranted in order to avoid element accumulation in soil and elevation of background values over time.

  • 11.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Potential mobility of trace elements in soil as affected by organic matter and redox conditions2011In: 11th International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements, Florence, Italy July 3-7, 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Taraškevičius, Ricardas
    Institute of Geology and Geography.
    Zinkutė, Rimante
    Institute of Geology and Geography.
    Spatial variability of topsoil contamination by trace elements on the territories of kindergartens in Vilnius, Lithuania2009In: 10th International Conference on Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements: Frontiers in Trace Elements Research and Education, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Professional Support, Externfinansiering. Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology.
    Nilsson, Malin
    Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology.
    Skoglund, Nils
    Umeå University. Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology.
    Effect of residue combinations on plant uptake of nutrients and potentially toxic elements2014In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 132, p. 287-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the plant pot experiment was to evaluate potential environmental impacts of combined industrial residues to be used as soil fertilisers by analysing i) element availability in fly ash and biosolids mixed with soil both individual and in combination, ii) changes in element phytoavailability in soil fertilised with these materials and iii) impact of the fertilisers on plant growth and element uptake.Plant pot experiments were carried out, using soil to which fresh residue mixtures had been added. The results showed that element availability did not correlate with plant growth in the fertilised soil with. The largest concentrations of K (3534mg/l), Mg (184mg/l), P (1.8mg/l), S (760mg/l), Cu (0.39mg/l) and Zn (0.58mg/l) in soil pore water were found in the soil mixture with biosolids and MSWI fly ashes; however plants did not grow at all in mixtures containing the latter, most likely due to the high concentration of chlorides (82g/kg in the leachate) in this ash. It is known that high salinity of soil can reduce germination by e.g. limiting water absorption by the seeds. The concentrations of As, Cd and Pb in grown plants were negligible in most of the soils and were below the instrument detection limit values.The proportions of biofuel fly ash and biosolids can be adjusted in order to balance the amount and availability of macronutrients, while the possible increase of potentially toxic elements in biomass is negligible seeing as the plant uptake of such elements was low. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 14. Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Wolters, Martin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. Tekedo AB, Nyköping, Sweden.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Elements availability in soil fertilized with pelletized fly ash and biosolids2015In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 159, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of combined and pelletized industrial residues on availability and mobility of nutrients and potentially toxic elements in soil, plant growth and element uptake. Plant pot experiments were carried out using soil to which 2% of pelletized residue containing biosolids mixed with either municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MFA) or biofuel fly ash (BFA) was added. The tests showed that the plant growth did not correspond to the content of available nutrients in fertilised soil. MFA application to soil resulted in elevated concentrations of P (506 mg/kg), As (2.7 mg/kg), Cd (0.8 mg/kg) and Pb (12.1 mg/kg) in soil, lower plant uptake of Al (25 mg/kg) and Ba (51 mg/kg), but higher accumulation of As (4.3 mg/kg) and Cd (0.3 mg/kg) in plants compared to the unamended soil and soil amended with BFA. On average, the biomass of the plants grown in the soil containing MFA was larger than in other soils.Considering the use of industrial residue mixtures as soil amendments or fertilizers, the amount of added elements should not exceed those taken up by plants, by this preventing the increase of soil background concentrations.

  • 15.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Zamora, Carles Belmonte
    LTU.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Effect of industrial residue combinations on availability of elements2014In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 276, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial residues, such as fly ashes and biosolids, contain elements (e.g. N, P, K, S, Ca and Zn) that make them a viable alternative for synthetic fertilizers in forestry and agriculture. However, the use of these materials is often limited due to the presence of potentially toxic substances. It is therefore necessary to assess and, when warranted, modify the chemical and physical form of these and similar waste materials before any advantages are taken of their beneficial properties. Biofuel fly ash, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash, biosolids, peat, peat residues and gypsum board waste were combined in various proportions, and this resulted in increased leaching of N, P, S, Cu and Mn, but decreased leaching of Ca, K, Mg, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Al, As and Pb. Chemical fractionation revealed that elements Ca, K, Mg, S and Mn were predominantly exchangeable, while the rest of the elements were less mobile. Cadmium was mostly exchangeable in MSWI fly ash, but less mobile in biofuel fly ash mixtures. Recycling of MSWI fly ash in the mixtures with fertilizers is considerably less attractive, due to the high levels of salts and exchangeable Cd.

  • 16. Diener, Silvia
    et al.
    Andreas, Lale
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Evaluation and discussion of steel slag mineralogy after ageing under laboratory and field conditions2010In: The 6th Intercontinental Landfill research Symposium, 2010, p. 107-109Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Diener, Silvia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Andreas, Lale
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Leaching properties of steel slags after ageing under laboratory and field conditions2010In: Third International Conference on Accelerated Carbonation for Environmental and Materials Engineering: ACEME10 : November 29 - December 1, 2010, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo/Turku, Finland : proceedings / [ed] Ron Zevenhoven., Åbo: Åbo Akademi University Press, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Professional Support. EXTfinansiering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Andreas, Lale
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Project: North Waste Infrastructure2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Taraškevičius, Ričardas
    Institute of Geology and Geography, Nature Research Centre.
    Aksamitauskas, Česlovas
    Vilnius Gediminas Technical University.
    Zinkutė, Rimantė
    Institute of Geology and Geography, Nature Research Centre.
    Spatial variability of topsoil contamination with trace elements in Preschools in Vilnius, Lithuania2011In: Journal of Geochemical Exploration, ISSN 0375-6742, E-ISSN 1879-1689, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 15-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An investigation of the spatial variability of topsoil contamination level was performed in 49 preschool playgrounds located in Vilnius city and correlated with urban (height and age of the preschools and height of surrounding buildings) and natural (altitude) factors. Composite samples, consisting of 20-30 sub-samples, were collected from 10 cm topsoil layer with a 3-5 m distance from each other. Sieved fraction (< 0.63 mm) was ashed at 400 °C, ground to < 1.0 μm and analysed for the real total concentrations of 22 trace elements (Ag, B, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Ga, Li, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Pb, Sc, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, Y, Yb, Zn and Zr) using optical atomic emission spectrophotometry. Information on construction year and height (number of building stories) of preschool and surrounding buildings was acquired from the Centre of Registers of Lithuania. Out of 22 analysed elements, 13 to a greater extent exceeded the background values in several areas and were used to calculate the total contamination index (Zs13). Out of 49 analysed areas, 21 had moderately hazardous to hazardous levels of contamination as indicated by Zs13. The main contaminating elements, exceeding the permissible concentrations were Ag, Cu, Mo, Pb, Sn and Zn, the origins of which coincide with city industry and traffic. Topsoil around the newer preschool buildings, despite their location, contained lower concentrations of contaminants, while areas at higher altitudes were more contaminated than those located at lower altitudes. The latter causality is biased, as the city industry, and hence the highest contamination, is in districts located higher above sea level than the remaining studied sites.

  • 20.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Wolters, Martin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Skoglund, Nils
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Cirba, Stasys
    Department of Mathematical Modelling, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University.
    Aksamitauskas, Vladislovas Ceslovas
    Department of Geodesy and Cadastre, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University.
    Phosphorus and cadmium availability in soil fertilized with biosolids and ashes2016In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 151, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recycling of hygienized municipal sewage sludge (biosolids) to soil as the source of phosphorus (P) is generally encouraged. The use of biosolids, however, has some concerns, such as the presence of elevated concentrations of potentially toxic trace elements, and the possible presence of pathogens, hormones and antibiotics. Organic substances are destroyed during combustion whereas trace elements could partly be separated from P in different ash fractions. Biomass combustion waste (ash) can instead be considered as an alternative P source. This study evaluates and compares the impact of biosolids and their combustion residues (ashes), when used as fertilizers, on P and Cd solubility in soil, plant growth and plant uptake of these elements. Biosolids were also amended with K and Ca to improve the composition and properties of P in ashes, and incinerated at either 800 °C or 950 °C. Combustion of biosolids improved the Cd/P ratio in ashes by 2-5 times, compared with the initial biosolids. The low Cd content in ashes (4-9 mg Cd (kg P)-1) makes this material a particularly attractive alternative to mineral fertilizers. Significantly higher pore water P (as well as total N) was measured in soils containing biosolids, but plants produced a higher biomass in soil fertilized with ashes. The K and Ca amendments prior to biosolids combustion generally decreased the total Cd in ash, but had little effect on P and Cd uptake and biomass growth. Similarly, the combustion temperature had negligible effect on these factors as well

  • 21.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Desogus, Paolo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Schulenburg, Sven
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Arenella, Mariarita
    Department of Plant, Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Florence.
    Renella, Giancarlo
    Department of Plant, Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Florence.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Andreas, Lale
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Utilisation of chemically stabilized arsenic-contaminated soil in a landfill cover2013In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 8649-8662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to determine if an As-contaminated soil, stabilized using zerovalent iron (Fe0) and its combination with gypsum waste, coal fly ash, peat, or sewage sludge, could be used as a construction material at the top layer of the landfill cover. A reproduction of 2 m thick protection/vegetation layer of a landfill cover using a column setup was used to determine the ability of the amendments to reduce As solubility and stimulate soil functionality along the soil profile. Soil amendment with Fe0 was highly efficient in reducing As in soil porewater reaching 99 % reduction, but only at the soil surface. In the deeper soil layers (below 0.5 m), the Fe treatment had a reverse effect, As solubility increased dramatically exceeding that of the untreated soil or any other treatment by one to two orders of magnitude. A slight bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri was detected in the Fe0 treatment. Soil amendment with iron and peat showed no toxicity to bacteria and was the most efficient in reducing dissolved As in soil porewater throughout the 2 m soil profile followed by iron and gypsum treatment, most likely resulting from a low soil density and a good air diffusion to the soil. The least suitable combination of soil amendments for As immobilization was a mixture of iron with coal fly ash. An increase in all measured enzyme activities was observed in all treatments, particularly those receiving organic matter. For As to be stable in soil, a combination of amendments that can keep the soil porous and ensure the air diffusion through the entire soil layer of the landfill cover is required.

  • 22.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Robinson, Ryan
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Nordmark, Desiree
    Bjurstöm, Henrik
    ÅF-Engineering AB.
    Andreas, Lale
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Ecke, Holger
    Carbon speciation in ash, residual waste and contaminated soil by thermal and chemical analyses2011In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon in waste can occur as inorganic (IC), organic (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) each having distinct chemical properties and possible environmental effects. In this study, carbon speciation was performed using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), chemical degradation tests and the standard total organic carbon (TOC) measurement procedures in three types of waste materials (bottom ash, residual waste and contaminated soil). Over 50% of the total carbon (TC) in all studied materials (72% in ash and residual waste, and 59% in soil) was biologically non-reactive or EC as determined by thermogravimetric analyses. The speciation of TOC by chemical degradation also showed a presence of a non-degradable C fraction in all materials (60% of TOC in ash, 30% in residual waste and 13% in soil), though in smaller amounts than those determined by TGA. In principle, chemical degradation method can give an indication of the presence of potentially inert C in various waste materials, while TGA is a more precise technique for C speciation, given that waste-specific method adjustments are made. The standard TOC measurement yields exaggerated estimates of organic carbon and may therefore overestimate the potential environmental impacts (e.g. landfill gas generation) of waste materials in a landfill environment.

  • 23.
    Nordmark, Desiree
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Mobility of redox sensitive elements due to organic matter in contaminated soil: bottom ash and residual waste fraction2012In: Abstract proceedings of 7th Intercontinental Landfill Research Symposium: Södra Sunderbyn, June 25th to 27th, 2012 / [ed] Anders Lagerkvist, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2012, p. 100-101Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ecke, Holger
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    On the possibility of using vitrified forts as anthropogenic analogues for assessment of long-term behaviour of vitrified waste2012In: Waste Management and the Environment VI / [ed] V. Popov; H. Itoh; C.A. Brebbia, WIT Press, 2012, p. 225-236Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An information survey was conducted in the areas of natural analogues, vitrified forts, combustion technology and vitrified waste.The main purpose was to identify if vitrified stone material in hillforts might be used as anthropogenic analogues for glass containing waste.Such comparisons are needed in order for predictions to be made regarding the long-term integrity of the waste forms.The scope was to compare the chemistry as well as the processes used for the generation of the glasses. It was found that the vitrified forts contain glass material with wide variations in composition of the major elements.They cover and exceed those in the glasses made of waste with only the exception of phosphorus.Natural glasses as well as archaeological glasses show much narrower ranges of compositions, and they do not coincide with those of the glasses containing waste. Quality of heat analyses indicated that it is likely that the stone material in the forts was melted for the purpose of obtaining long-lasting structures.This narrows the range of possible processes used, and facilitates reconstruction of the ancient methods by means of testing.This, in turn, provides possibilities of comparison between ancient and modern methods, which can then be used as a basis for validation of the use of the analogue.

  • 25.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ecke, Holger
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Vitrified forts as anthropogenic analogues for assessment of long-term stability of vitrified waste in natural environments2013In: International Journal of Sustainable Development and Planning, ISSN 1743-7601, E-ISSN 1743-761X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 380-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The area’s natural analogues, vitrifi ed forts, combustion technology, and vitrifi ed waste have been reviewed.The purpose was to identify if investigations of vitrifi ed rock in hill forts might be warranted for assessing thelong-term integrity of vitrifi ed waste in natural environments. Wastes that are being vitrifi ed include ash fromincineration of domestic waste, contaminated soil and fi ssion products from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel.It was found that vitrifi ed materials in at least 200 hill forts constitute good anthropogenic analogues to vitrified waste. The compositions vary considerably from site to site and even within one site and may correspondrelatively well to the spans of parameters in the various vitrifi ed wastes. Glasses in vitrifi ed forts comparefavourably to archaeological artefacts which are soda- and potash-based and consequently have different corrosionbehaviours and may weather too quickly. Natural glasses might be too limited in composition variationand are perhaps also too durable. Combustion technology considerations based on quality of heat analysesindicate that at least some of the vitrifi cations of hill forts were carried out with the specifi c purpose of achievingstrong and durable constructions. This makes it considerably easier to envisage how the vitrifi cations mighthave been carried out, and this, in turn, facilitates comparisons between anthropogenic analogues and modernvitrifi ed wastes.

  • 26.
    Skoglund, Nils
    et al.
    Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Boström, Dan
    Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Grimm, Alejandro
    Öhman, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Återvinning av fosfor och energi ur avloppsslam genom termisk behandling i fluidiserad bädd; Slutrapport NWI Dp 4, Januari 20132013Report (Other academic)
1 - 26 of 26
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