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  • 1.
    Aitken, Leanne M.
    et al.
    School of Nursing & Midwifery & NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Nursing (NCREN), Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University.
    Castillo, Maria I.
    School of Nursing & Midwifery & NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Nursing (NCREN), Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University.
    Ullman, Amanda
    School of Nursing & Midwifery & NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Nursing (NCREN), Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Cunningham, Kathryn
    Population Health Sciences, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee.
    Rattray, Janice
    Population Health Sciences, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee.
    What is the relationship between elements of ICU treatment and memories after discharge in adult ICU survivors?2016In: Australian Critical Care, ISSN 1036-7314, E-ISSN 1878-1721, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 5-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesPatients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) often experience distressing memories during recovery that have been associated with poor psychological and cognitive outcomes. The aim of this literature review was to synthesise the literature reporting on relationships between elements of ICU treatment and memories after discharge in adult ICU survivors.Review method usedIntegrative review methods were used to systematically search, select, extract, appraise and summarise current knowledge from the available research and identify gaps in the literature.Data sourcesThe following electronic databases were systematically searched: PubMed, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCOhost CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Additional studies were identified through searches of bibliographies. Original quantitative research articles written in English that were published in peer-review journals were included.Review methodsData extracted from studies included authors, study aims, population, sample size and characteristics, methods, ICU treatments, ICU memory definitions, data collection strategies and findings. Study quality assessment was based on elements of the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme using the checklists developed for randomised controlled trials and cohort studies.ResultsFourteen articles containing data from 13 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. The relatively limited evidence about the association between elements of ICU treatment and memories after ICU discharge suggest that deep sedation, corticoids and administration of glucose 50% due to hypoglycaemia contribute to the development of delusional memories and amnesia of ICU stay.ConclusionsThe body of literature on the relationship between elements of ICU treatment and memories after ICU discharge is small and at its early stages. Larger studies using rigorous study design are needed in order to evaluate the effects of different elements of ICU treatment on the development of memories of the ICU during recovery.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Gun
    et al.
    Enterostomal-therapist, Division of Surgery, Sunderby Hospital.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    A chance to live: women's experiences of living with a colostomy after rectal cancer surgery2010In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 603-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe women's experience of living with a colostomy after rectal cancer surgery. Interviews with five women about their experiences were subjected to thematic content analysis. The findings showed that receiving a cancer diagnosis gave rise to thoughts about life and death. For the women to feel comfortable, the information and health-care measures need to focus on supporting them through the entire process, also when the treatment is completed. After the surgery, the women adjusted to living with colostomy and carried on as before the cancer diagnosis, but they constantly worried about leakage or flatulence. The women were happy to have survived the cancer and this realization helped them to accept and have a good life with colostomy. In conclusion, women with colostomy because of rectal surgery need specific rehabilitation and nursing care that focuses on adjustment to temporary or permanent changes in life.

  • 3.
    Backman, Tess
    et al.
    Ambulance Care, Mora, Sweden.
    Juuso, Päivi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Borg, Ronja
    Västerås Hospital, Region of Västmanland, Västerås, Sweden.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Ambulance nurses' experiences of deciding a patient does not require ambulance care2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 783-789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe ambulance nurses’ experience of deciding a patient does not require ambulance care.

    Design:An inductive, empirical study with a qualitative approach.Methods: Data collection was conducted through semi‐structured interviews, and collected data were analysed with qualitative manifest content analysis. Data were collected during the spring 2017, and eight ambulance nurses participated.Results:The findings are presented in one main category, which is “Not very ill but a difficult decision” with totally three subcategories. The ambulance nurse's experi‐ence of making the assessment when the patient has no need for ambulance care is like walking the balance of slack line. This means that the assessment can be both easy and very difficult but something that definitely requires experience, knowledge and dedication.

  • 4.
    Bergman, Maria
    et al.
    Division of Surgery, Sunderby Hospital.
    Stenudd, Monica
    Division of Surgery, Sunderby Hospital.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    The experience of being awake during orthopaedic surgery under regional anaesthesia2012In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 88-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To undergo orthopaedic surgery and then return home the same day is becoming more common. People feel there are benefits with day surgery as it affects their daily life less than having to spend several days in hospital. The aim of this study was to describe people’s experience of being awake while undergoing orthopaedic surgery under regional anaesthesia. Ten people who had orthopaedic day surgery under regional anaesthesia participated; eight women and two men. Data were collected in personal, qualitative interviews and analysed using qualitative thematic content analysis. The analysis resulted in two themes and seven categories. The findings show that the staffs’ consideration and professionalism were significant for the participants’ wellbeing during surgery. The environment in the operating theatre ward is described as inspiring safety, calm and warmth. A good exchange of information between the person who will undergo orthopaedic surgery and the nurse does not depend primarily on how long they spend together; it is more about how they make contact with each other and how the nurse’s presence is experienced by the person.

  • 5.
    Boström, Madelene
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Magnusson, Klara
    ICU, Northern Älvsborgs County Hospital.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Nursing patients suffering from trauma: critical care nurses narrate their experiences2012In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 21-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe critical care nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering from trauma. Eight critical care nurses were interviewed. Qualitative thematic content analysis was applied to the data and resulted in one theme; 'Needing to feel in control and part of a team', with six categories; 'different ways of dealing with uncertainty', 'feelings of responsibility and security', 'wanting to relieve the pain', 'supporting the relatives', 'suppressing one's own feelings', and 'reflecting over one's work'. The findings show the importance of preparation for caring for a patient suffering from trauma. Standardized care of the patient according to Advanced Trauma Life Support was described as a good basis, but for the quality of care to be good this always had to be complemented with personal nursing care for the patient and care for their relatives. This study contributes knowledge about meeting critically ill patients suffering from trauma and suggestions about how to cope with thoughts that might arise after a serious situation in nursing care

  • 6.
    Dabija, Marius
    et al.
    Division of Surgery, Sollefteå Hospital.
    Fedog, Fredrik
    Division of Surgery-Anaesthesia, Stavanger University Hospital.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Gustafsson, Silje
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Difficult airways: key factors for sucessful management2019In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 151-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe anesthetic nurses’ experiences of key factors for thesuccessful management of difficult airways in adult patients.Design: This study had a qualitative observational and descriptive designfollowing the critical incident technique.Methods: Twelve experienced anesthetic nurses were interviewed.Findings: We identified five key factors for the successful management ofdifficult airways: identification of the difficult airway, creating a plan ofaction, remaining calm and focusing on the task, technical skills, and usingthe equipment. Identification of the difficult airway implies preassessmentwith standardized methods and actively observing for signsindicative of a difficult airway. Having all equipment available atbedside during induction and creating a backup plan increases the actionforce in unexpected situations. A calm and methodical work procedurefacilitates the management of the difficult airway as well as selectingtechniques and equipment according to the patient and situation.Conclusions: Reflective practice can aid the anesthetic nurse in drawingon experience and remaining calm in acute situations.

  • 7.
    Ednell, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Intensive Care Unit, Gällivare Hospital.
    Siljegren, Sara
    Intensive Care Unit, Kiruna Hospital.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    The ICU Patient Diary: a Nursing Intervention that is Complicated in its Simplicity : a Qualitative Study2017In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 40, p. 70-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Writing a diary for intensive care patients has been shown to facilitate patientrecovery and prevent post-traumatic stress following hospitalisation.

    Aim

    This study aimed to describe the experiences of critical care nurses’ (CCNs’) in writing personal diaries for ICU patients.

    Method

    The study was conducted with a qualitative design. Ten CCNs from two hospitals participated. Data were collected with semi-structured interviews and analysed using a qualitative thematic content analysis.

    Findings

    The result consists of a theme: Patient diary: a complex nursing intervention in all its simplicity, as well as four categories: Writing informatively and with awareness shows respect and consideration; The diary is important for both patient and CCN; To jointly create an organisation that facilitates and develops the writing; Relatives’ involvement in the diary is a matter of course.

    Conclusion

    CCNs are aware of the diary’s importance for the patient and relatives, but experience difficulties in deciding which patients should get this intervention and how to prioritize it. Writing a personal diary for an ICU patient is a nursing intervention that is complicated in its simplicity.

  • 8.
    Ejneborn-Looi, Git-Marie
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    A self-destructive care: Self-reports of people who experienced coercive measures and their suggestions for alternatives2015In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coercive measures are commonly used as a method of intervention, despite insufficient evidence for their effectiveness and benefits. The aim of this study was to describe how people who self-harm perceive alternatives to coercive measures in relation to actual experiences of psychiatric care. A total of 19 self-reports have been analysed with qualitative content analysis, resulting in three categories: a wish for understanding instead of neglect; a wish for mutual relation instead of distrust; a wish for professionalism instead of a counterproductive care. In conclusion, if the caregivers can understand and collaborate with the patient, there is seldom any need for coercive measures

  • 9.
    Ejneborn-Looi, Git-Marie
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Easy but not simple: Nursing students’ descriptions of the process of care in a psychiatric context2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 34-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nurse-patient interaction is the cornerstone of psychiatric care, yet the concept “mental health nursing” is difficult to describe. This article aims to address this problem through the experiences of nursing students. Online journals from 14 nursing students were analyzed using qualitative content analysis, resulting in three categories: Trusting the Trusting Relationship, Voicing the Unspoken Needs, and Balancing the Dynamics of Doing and Being. This study demonstrates that providing nursing care based on trusting relationships is not a demanding task, but it takes place in a complex environment that has a tendency to make easy things complicated.

  • 10.
    Ekholm, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Patienters upplevelse av högteknologisk vårdmiljö2002In: Röret, ISSN 0283-9202, no 4, p. 12-15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11. Ekholm, Maria
    et al.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Patienters upplevelser av högteknologisk vårdmiljö2002In: Ventilen, ISSN 0348-6257, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 27-31Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12. Ekholm, Maria
    et al.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Patienters upplevelser av högteknologisk vårdmiljö: en litteraturstudie2003In: Ventilen, ISSN 0348-6257, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 8-13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Engström, Birgitta
    et al.
    Ambulance Care, Department of Health Care Centre, Pajala.
    Uusitalo, Anders
    Ambulance Care, Department of Health Care Centre, Pajala.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Relatives' involvement in nursing care: a qualitative study describing critical care nurses' experiences2011In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesWhen patients become critically ill it also affects their relatives. The aim of this study was to describe critical care nurses’ experience of relatives’ involvement in the nursing care of patients in an intensive care unitMethodSemi-structured personal interviews with eight critical care nurses in an intensive care unit in the northern part of Sweden were conducted during 2010. The interview texts were subjected to qualitative content analysis which resulted in the formulation of two main categories and five sub-categories.FindingsThe findings showed that relatives’ involvement was appreciated and seen as great resource for both patients and critical care nurses. Protecting the integrity of patients was one reason for limiting their involvement. The environment and lack of time were experienced as other obstacles to the involvement of relatives.ConclusionAligning the needs of the relatives to be involved in the care with the needs of the patient and the work situation of the nurses requires open communication between all three parties.

  • 14.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    3 frågor till...2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    A wish to be near: experiences of close relatives within intensive care from the perspective of close relatives, formerly critically ill people and critical care nurses2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this doctoral thesis was to describe the experiences of close relatives within intensive care, from the perspective of close relatives, formerly critically ill people and critical care nurses. Data were collected by means of qualitative research interviews with close relatives of people who had been critically ill and cared for in an intensive care unit (ICU) and with the people themselves. Data were also collected by means of focus-group discussions with critical care nurses. Collected data were analysed using qualitative thematic content analysis and phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation. This thesis reveals that it was a frightening experience for close relatives to see the person critically ill in an unknown environment. It was important to be able to be near the ill person. Showing respect for and confirming the dignity of the ill person were essential. The uncertainty concerning the outcome for the ill person was hard to manage. Close relatives wanted to feel hope, even though the prognosis was poor. The presence of close relatives was taken for granted by critical care nurses. Information from close relatives made it possible for critical care nurses to provide personal care for the critically ill person. Critical care nurses supported close relatives by giving them information and being near. Close relatives were described as an important but demanding part of the critical care nurses' work. People who had been critically ill had felt their close relatives' presence. Through the help of close relatives they felt they were understood and safe. Close relatives made it possible for them to do various things, which were appreciated, but they also engendered feelings of guilt. They realized their own, and the close relatives' significance, which gave them the power to continue the struggle. The possibility for people who had been critically ill, and their close relatives, to return together to the ICU for a follow-up visit after discharge and talk about what happened during and after their stay in the ICU was appreciated. Receiving explanations and being able to discuss one's experience were valuable. Meeting the ICU staff again enabled them to express their gratitude for their work, to give opinions about the care and to suggest improvements. This thesis shows that the critically ill person is the focus of close relatives' existence. The uncertainty of the time causes close relatives' suffering and they felt vulnerable. To be able to be close to the critically ill person, to be allowed to participate in and receive explanations about what was happening and why, to be met by dignity and to be able to keep hope alive are all prerequisites for enduring a radically changed everyday life which close relatives experience when someone they love is, or has been, critically ill. The crucial challenge is how these needs can be met by the staff of the ICU.

  • 16.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Activity: Cardiovascular nursing on the front line of care, ambulance nurses' experiences2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Activity: Close relatives’ experiences of transitions when living with a person with traumatic brain injury2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Activity: Follow up visits to an ICU: Critical care nurses’ experiences2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Activity: Life Style Health Coaching2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Life Style Health Coaching is an eHealth project using telecare to motivate and inspire overweight people withrisk factors to improve their lifestyle and increase their well-being. About 230 people are in the project andthey have all received individual programs. With the help of a personal health diary their progress can be followedand discussed with their health coach who contacts them regularly. Tips and reminders are sent by emailand sms. The project will continue for one year and includes measurements of the effects and experiences.

  • 20.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Activity: Nursing mothers in an ICU after complicated childbirth2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Activity: Patient-Nurse relationship in ICU pain management2013Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Activity: Relatives’ experiences of ICU care2013Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Activity: Spouses' experiences of their partners being cared for in an intensive care unit2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Activity: What is the relationship between elements of ICU treatment and memories after discharge in adult ICU survivors?2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Allt kretsar kring den som är sjuk: Åsa Engström forskar som hur det är att vara närstående2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Att vara närstående till en person som vårdats på en intensivvårdsavdelning2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Dagboken: en hjälp för IVA-patienten2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: De anhöriga: länken mellan personalen och de svårt sjuka2004Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Få kraft genom bekräftelse: närståendes betydelse för personer inom intensivvård2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Intensivvårdssjuksköterskors upplevelser av närstående inom intensivvård2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Livsstil och livsstilsförändringar2013Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad är ett hälsosamt liv och vad krävs för att förbättra sin livsstil?Åsa Engström, biträdande professor i omvårdnad vid Luleå tekniska universitetoch Anna-Maria Ek, projektledare vid Health Solution, berättar om ett gemensamtprojekt. Syftet har varit att testa om om livscoachning via telefon, kombineratmed stöd via webb, kan bidra till förbättrade levnadsvanor hos personer medförhöjt BMI. Vilka resultat visar projektet och vilka erfarenheter har deltagarnaav att genomföra en livsstilsförändring?

  • 32.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Member on International Advisory Board of Intensive & Critical Care Nursing2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Närstående inom intensivvård2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Närstående inom intensivvård: Att få styrka genom bekräftelse: innebörden av närstående för personer som varit svårt sjuka2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Närstående inom intensivvård från intensivvårdssjuksköterskors perspektiv2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Närstående till svårt sjuka personer inom intensivvård2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Aktivitet: Ständig information dämpar närståendes ångest2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Close relatives of critically ill persons in intensive and critical care: the experiences of close relatives and critical care nurses2006Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the licentiate thesis was to describe close relatives of critically ill persons within intensive and critical care from the perspective of close relatives and of critical care nurses. The data were collected by means of qualitaive research interviews with seven partners of persons who had been critically ill and cared for in an intensive care unit, and with focus groups discussions with 24 critical care nurses. The data were then analysed using a qualitative thematic content analysis.This study shows it was a frightening experience to see the person critically ill in an unknown environment. It was important to be able to be present; nothing else mattered. Showing respect, confirming the integrity and dignity of the ill person were also essential. recieving support from family and friends was important, as were understanding what had happened, obtaining information and the way in which this was given. The uncertainty concerning the outcome of the ill person was hard to cope with. Close relatives wanted to feel hope, even though the prognosis was poor.The presence of close relatives was taken for granted by critical care nurses and ut was frustrating if the ill person did not have any. Information from close relatives made it possible for critical care nurses to create personal care for the critically ill person. Critical care nurses supported clsoe relatives by giving them information, being near and trying to establish good relationships with them.Close relatives were described as an important and demanding part of the critical care nurses' work something that took time and enegy to deal with, and the critical care nurses missed forums for discussions about the care given.The discussion of this study show the importance for close relatives to be near and advocate for the ill person. Feeling that staff care about the ill person and close relatives make close relatives to feel safe. Recieving explanations to understand what as happening is significant.

  • 39.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Innebörden av närstående för personer som varit svårt sjuka och vårdats på en intensivvårdsavdelning2007In: NOKIAS : Nordisk kongress för anestesi- och intensivvårdssjuksköterskor: sjukvård i ett föränderligt samhälle : Stockholm, Sverige 22-23 november 2007, Riksföreningen för anestesi och intensivvård , 2007, p. 4-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Närstående inom intensivvård2009In: Temadag NOFI i Borås, 20-21 april 2009, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Närstående till personer som drabbats av akut, svår sjukdom2009In: Att leva med sjukdom, Stockholm: Norstedts akademiska förlag , 2009, p. 120-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Närstående till personer som drabbats av akut, svår sjukdom2014In: Att leva med sjukdom, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2, p. 121-131Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Närståendes situation, delaktighet och betydelse när en svårt sjuk person vårdas på IVA2013In: Omvårdnad på avancerad nivå: kärnkompetenser inom sjuksköterskans specialistområden, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Upplevelser vid akut, svår sjukdom2009In: Att leva med sjukdom, Stockholm: Norstedts akademiska förlag , 2009, p. 51-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Engström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Upplevelser vid akut,svår sjukdom2014In: Att leva med sjukdom, Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2, p. 45-60Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Engström, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Andersson, Staffan
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Experiences of a follow-up visit to an ICU2008In: 3rd EfCCNa Congress and the 27th Aniarti congress: Influencing Critical Care Nursing in Europe 9-11 October 2008, Florence, Italy, European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations , 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Engström, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Andersson, Staffan
    Söderberg, Siv
    Re-visiting the ICU Experiences of follow-up visits to an ICU after discharge: a qualitative study2008In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to describe how people who have been critically ill, and their close relatives experience a post-discharge, follow-up visit to the intensive care unit (ICU) that provided the care. There is a lack of studies from such a standpoint. The study design is qualitative. A total of 18 adults participated; nine had been critically ill and nine were close relatives, all made a post-discharge follow-up visit to an ICU in the northern part of Sweden. The study data was collected through personal interviews, conducted after the follow-up visit, using a narrative approach. The data were then subjected to qualitative thematic content analysis which resulted in four themes: receiving strength from returning together; making sense of the critical-illness experience; feeling grateful to have survived and the possibility of improving the care. People who had been critically ill and close relatives felt that returning together was valuable. Meeting the staff, with whom participants felt they had developed a relationship, made it possible for them to express their gratitude for the treatment and nursing care received, and to suggest improvements. The interviews revealed that the follow-up visit was seen as an important way of learning what had happened and why during the period of critical illness.

  • 48.
    Engström, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Boström, Jonas
    Division of Surgery, Skellefteå Hospital, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Ann-Christin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Women's experiences of undergoing total knee joint replacement surgery2017In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 86-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of the study was to describe women's experiences of undergoing total knee joint replacement surgery.

    Design

    A qualitative approach was used.

    Method

    A content analysis of the text from interviews with five women was conducted.

    Findings

    The time before surgery was marked by the experience of constant pain, which affected the women negatively in their everyday lives. During surgery, the information provided by the staff gave each woman a sense of security; the women handed over responsibility to the staff and experienced a sensation of relief. The postoperative period was characterized by a feeling of joy when the surgery was over, although a rough and tedious rehabilitation phase then began. Challenges in everyday life were a factor for motivation and confidence, although postoperative pain was experienced as discouraging.

    Conclusion

    Support from health care staff is an important factor for coping with everyday life during the preoperative, perioperative and postoperative phases of undergoing knee joint replacement.

  • 49.
    Engström, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Dicksson, Eric
    Intensive Care Unit, Kalmar Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care.
    Contreras, Pernilla
    Intensive Care Unit, Piteå River Valley Hospital.
    The desire of parents to be involved and present2015In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 322-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIntensive care of children means not only caring for a child; it means care for the whole family.AimThe aim of the study was to describe parents' experiences of having a critically ill child in an intensive care unit (ICU).ParticipantsA purposive sample of seven parents who had their child treated in an ICU during 2012 in Sweden.DesignThe design uses an inductive, qualitative approach with data collected by means of qualitative interviews.MethodsThe interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to qualitative content analysis.ResultsThe analysis resulted in one theme: the desire of parents to be involved and present, with four categories such as wanting to understand and know what is happening, feeling frustration about their child's care and treatment, a health care environment that arouses emotions, and needs for support and processing.ConclusionIt is of great importance to parents to be informed continuously about their child's condition and the care and treatment that are planned. This may increase parents' sense of ownership, control and security.Relevance to clinical practiceProviding answers to those questions that can be answered and being available to parents when they have questions about their critically ill child, the meaning of it all, and what the future will hold are suggested in clinical practice.

  • 50.
    Engström, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Forsberg, Angelica
    Sunderby sjukhus.
    Patients’ perceptions of short-term recovery after a gastric bypass2018In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 681-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To explore gastric bypass patients' perceptions of their postoperative recovery over 1 month.

    Design

    A standardized questionnaire, the postoperative recovery profile, was used.

    Methods

    Postoperative recovery profile is a multi-item questionnaire for self-assessment of general postoperative recovery. Participants were patients who had undergone gastric bypass surgery (n = 39). The changes in recovery between 1 day and 1 month postsurgery were evaluated by a statistical method developed specifically for analyzing changes in paired ordered data over time.

    Findings

    Most of the symptoms and/or functions were significantly improved on a group level. The most marked improvement was to pain and sleeping difficulties followed by mobilization. In terms of the psychological items, the proportion of patients who indicated no problems was high at both endpoints. The items that deviated from the improvement pattern were appetite changes and gastrointestinal function which demonstrated a relatively high proportion of deterioration, and the individual variability was prominent.

    Conclusions

    There is a need for interventions to improve recovery on a group as well as an individual level.

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