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  • 1.
    Botha, E.
    et al.
    University of Cape Town.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Pitt, Leyland
    Segal Graduate School of Business, Simon Fraser University.
    How sociable?: An exploratory study of university brand visibility in social media2011In: South African Journal of Business Management, ISSN 0378-9098, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 43-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media has changed both the way in which organizations and their brands interact with their customers and the way in which business gets done. Brands are attempting to utilize social media to reach existing customers, gain new ones and build or maintain credibility and reputation. More importantly, brands need to measure their visibility in the most popular social media relative to that of competitors. This study describes a tool for collecting brand visibility information by looking at the visibility of various South African university brands and their relative positioning from a social media perspective. Correspondence analysis is then used to portray the various university brands in a multi-dimensional space so that they can be contrasted with each other in terms of their visibility in social media. The findings indicate that South African university brands are not distinctly positioned in social media and that none of them seems to currently have a concerted strategy for engaging its stakeholders in a particular social media. This means that there are both opportunities for those who manage these brands, and also threats to these institutions for taking a laissez fair attitude to social media in these times when social media are coming to dominate the Internet in particular and media in general.

  • 2.
    Ek Styvén, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wallström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Foster, Tim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Projekt: Attraktiva varumärken i besöksnäringen - Från image till position2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Electronic consumer communication, word of mouth and brand image: insights from computer-aided content analysis2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media has changed how organizations and their brands interact with their customers and how business gets done. Not only can organizations reach their customers online and interact with them but they can even become part of their customers’ conversations. As a result, brands are now attempting to utilize social media to reach existing customers, capture new ones, and build or maintain their credibility and reputation. Although the incidence of social media is magnifying the marketplace through its impact on consumer-to-consumer conversations, methods for shaping such conversations have yet to be articulated.The biggest challenge lies in the fact that the growth of social media has reduced organizations’ control over their brand image and reputation. Consumer communications have the potential to considerably impact word-of-mouth branding, which can in turn affect brand image, which is the key element of a company’s success and its customer relationships. With the advent of social media, brand management has become not only more difficult but also increasingly critical to the credibility and reputation of firms. Moreover, consumer-generated content and its rapid diffusion take control over advertising-intended messages away from brand managers.The aim of this thesis is to contribute to the understanding of how managers can analyze electronic word of mouth and consumer conversations in order to manage brand image in social media with the use of computer-aided content analysis tools and techniques. Clearly, it is important for those who manage brands to have a good idea of what is being said about the brands in social media. Regarding the investigation of the impact, this thesis will review five studies. The first article briefly describes a study of the relative positioning of several South African university brands based on brand visibility information from How Sociable. The second study examines the relative positioning of some large financial service brands and their brand reputation according to their assessment in Social Mention. The third article addresses the relative positioning of Sauternes brands and their brand image. In the fourth, consumer conversations posted on YouTube regarding viral advertisements have been studied in order to identify the most appealing elements and to clarify ways in which managers can decide their strategies by using these elements. The final article is a case study that illustrates how consumer conversations and content generation can pose some challenges to the brand image.Textual analysis is an effective method for studying consumer communication in regard to online word of mouth. Content analysis, and more specifically computer-aided content analysis, was used to capture and evaluate these conversations. Brand managers need a better tool to gauge the changes of mood in social media conversations based on social conversation measurements. This thesis describes and suggests powerful analytical tools and techniques, which can be added to the brand managers’ arsenal. It is important to find the best way to portray and communicate this data so that marketing decision makers can quickly and easily compare changes in brand images. This thesis concludes by discussing insights gained from these five papers, acknowledging the limitations, describing managerial implications, and suggesting avenues for further research.

  • 4.
    Farshid, Mana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Ashrafi, Leila
    Wallström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Engström, Anne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Role of anti-brand websites on brand image2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Farshid, Mana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Ashrafi, Leila
    Wallström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Engström, Anne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Role of anti-brand websites on brand image2015In: Ideas in Marketing: Finding the New and Polishing the Old : Proceedings of the 2013 Academy of Marketing Science (AMS) Annual Conference / [ed] Krzysztof Kubacki, Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2015, p. 51-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since customers are facilitated through the internet and many-to-many communication, they can easily and conveniently share their opinions with others. Anti-brand websites operate as forums for high-level empowered electronic word-of-mouth exchanges. This study has investigated the role of anti-brand websites on brand image. The scripted data of focus group discussions have been analyzed using Leximancer, a textual analysis tool, because it can recognize themes and concepts that show customers’ perspectives and determine the core concepts that are most highlighted or criticized by complainers and activists.

  • 6.
    Farshid, Mana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Chan, Anthony
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Nel, Deon
    Flinders Business School, Flinders University, Adelaide.
    A sweet face man: using Chernoff faces to portray social media wine brand images2012In: International Journal of Wine Business Research, ISSN 1751-1062, E-ISSN 1751-1070, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 183-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rise of social media and its resultant impact on brand management has become a critical factor in guarding the reputation of the firm. Consumer-generated content has the potential to spread rapidly over social networks and the implications are that advertising as traditionally used by brand managers, now offers little control over the communication message. Brand managers need a better tool to gauge the changing mood in social media conversations. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a powerful method, Chernoff Faces, to compare six Sauternes wine brands based on social conversation measurement. Design/methodology/approach – This study describes a source of data relating to wine brand visibility in social media, and then presents a simple yet powerful graphical tool for portraying this information. This tool facilitates the communication, understanding, and assimilation of the relevant information. Findings – The findings of this paper are presented in six social media wine faces. Facial features are allocated to eyes, facial line, hair density and others to reflect “Social Mention” data measuring brand strength, positive and negative sentiment and related elements such passion for the brand. A brief subjective interpretation of the differences between the wine brands offers a match between Chernoff faces representation and historical data on the brands being compared. Research limitations/implications – The paper has some limitations related to the dynamic nature of social media. This study provides more of a snapshot in time rather than an ultimate set of results. Future research could be done by closely monitoring the results for a set of brands over a period. A new option to overcome this by using longitudinal data is offered as a option in future research. Originality/value – Since social media are multi-dimensional and attempts to understand conversations it requires tracking different measures simultaneously. It is important to find the best way to portray and communicate this data so that wine marketing decision makers can quickly and easily compare changes in brand images. Using faces to accomplish this is an easy and novel way compared to more demanding multidimensional scaling techniques.

  • 7.
    Farshid, Mana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Plangger, Kirk
    Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Nel, Deon
    Flinders University, Adelaide.
    The social media faces of major global financial service brands2011In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 16, no 3-4, p. 220-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the advent of social media, brand management has become not only more difficult, but also increasingly critical to the credibility and reputation of firms. Moreover, consumer-generated content and its rapid diffusion takes control over advertising-intended messages away from brand managers. Financial services brand managers will not fully be able to control the destinies of their brands, but at the very least they need to be involved in the conversations that speak about their brand. This article suggests a powerful analytical tool Chernoff Faces, which can add to financial service brand managers’ arsenal.

  • 8.
    Foster, Tim
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Juena, Sadia
    Wallström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The use of social media in higher education2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9. Gillberg, Rebecka
    et al.
    Bucht, Ellinor
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Mobile marketing and its effects on the online impulsive purchasing tendency2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Keramati, Abbas
    et al.
    University of Teheran.
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Zavareh, Javad Toufighi
    University of Bath.
    Customer relationship management activities in e-banking: the case of Iranain banks2009In: International Journal of Electronic Customer Relationship Management, ISSN 1750-0664, E-ISSN 1750-0672, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 207-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research is to investigate customer relationship management (CRM) activities in e-banking among Iranian banks. These banks are already adopting CRM and approaching it differently, and achieving different rates of success in terms of customer satisfaction and CRM. A comparative approach of their attitudes toward CRM, therefore, will reveal important insights. Following similar approaches researchers have employed in Europe, Pakistan, Malaysia, the UK and Ireland, we investigated the touch points and services that connect banks to their customers. According to these researches in other countries, we have developed a theoretical framework to investigate CRM activities in public and private Iranian banks by interviewing with qualitative approach case study. The main components of our research framework are: communicational/collaborative CRM, operational CRM and analytical CRM. We also consider the relationship among the components. This research will reveal Iranian banks' positioning with regard to their view, concept and the benefits of CRM, with a cross-case comparison between Iranian banks' CRM activities and also some conclusions for practitioners.

  • 11.
    Näppä, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Professional Support, Studentservice.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Foster, Tim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Employer branding: Attracting and retaining talent in financial services2014In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 132-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study develops and investigates a framework for better understanding employer branding. More specifically, the overall purpose is to provide a deeper understanding on how employer branding is used to attract and retain talent. An extensive literature review leads to a proposed conceptual framework focusing on two key research questions: How can the relationship between corporate branding, internal branding and employer branding in service industries be described? And, How can the role of corporate values in delivering the brand promise be described? A qualitative, case study approach is used to collect data from a financial services company in Sweden. The data collected and analyzed reveals that the areas of employer, internal and corporate branding are not mutually exclusive, but instead an intertwined collection of branding issues that together form the corporation's core values. All of this together is what allows the corporation to in turn deliver its brand(s) promise to several stakeholder groups

  • 12.
    Paschen, Jeannette
    et al.
    Kungliga Tekniska Hogskolan, Stockholm.
    Pitt, Leyland F.
    Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Kietzmann, Jan
    Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Dabirian, Amir
    Department of Marketing, Kungliga Tekniska Hogskolan, Stockholm.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The brand personalities of brand communities: an analysis of online communication2017In: Online information review (Print), ISSN 1468-4527, E-ISSN 1468-4535, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 1064-1075Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Online brand communities provide a wealth of insights about how consumers perceive and talk about a brand, rather than what the firm communicates about the brand. The purpose of this paper is to understand whether the brand personality of an online brand community, rather than of the brand itself, can be deduced from the online communication within that brand community.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper is empirical in nature. The authors use community-generated content from eight online brand communities and perform content analysis using the text analysis software Diction. The authors employ the five brand personality dictionaries (competence, excitement, ruggedness, sincerity and sophistication) from the Pitt et al. (2007) dictionary source as the basis for the authors’ analysis.

    Findings

    The paper offers two main contributions. First, it identifies two types of communities: those focusing on solving functional problems that consumers might encounter with a firm’s offering and those focusing on broader engagement with the brand. Second, the study serves as a blueprint that marketers can adopt to analyze online brand communities using a computerized approach. Such a blueprint is beneficial not only to analyze a firm’s own online brand community but also that of competitors, thus providing insights into how their brand stacks up against competitor brands.

    Originality/value

    This is the first paper examining the nature of online brand communities by means of computerized content analysis. The authors outline a number of areas that marketing scholars could explore further based on the authors analysis. The paper also highlights implications for marketers when establishing, managing, monitoring and analyzing online brand communities

  • 13.
    Peighambari, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Kordestani, Arash
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Reciprocity toward the Internet2011In: Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Conference 2011: Marketing Field Forever, Academy of Marketing, Liverpool, The Academy of Marketing Science, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Peighambari, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sattari, Setayesh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Bäckström, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Salesperson's personality and the relationship quality: Differences Between Customers and Friends2011In: The Sustainable Global Marketplace: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing Science, Coral Gables, FL USA May 24-27, 2011 / [ed] Mary Conway, The Academy of Marketing Science, 2011, p. 102-104Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sheds light on the quality of relationships between salespeople and their customers and friends as well as how their personality traits affect these relationships. The findings revealed that salespeople’s personality traits do not influence relationship quality with customers in the same way as with friends, and significant differences exist

  • 15.
    Peighambari, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sattari, Setayesh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Bäckström, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Salesperson's personality and the relationship quality: Differences Between Customers and Friends2015In: The Sustainable Global Marketplace: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing Science, Coral Gables, FL USA May 24-27, 2011 / [ed] Mary Conway, Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2015, p. 102-104Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sheds light on the quality of relationships between salespeople and their customers and friends as well as how their personality traits affect these relationships. The findings revealed that salespeople’s personality traits do not influence relationship quality with customers in the same way as with friends, and significant differences exist

  • 16.
    Perzon, Håkan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Engström, Anne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Uppsatsskrivande med kickstart2014In: NU 2014: Umeå 8-10 oktober : abstracts, Umeå: Umeå universitet. Pedagogiska institutionen , 2014, p. 153-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17. Robson, Karen
    et al.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Bredican, John
    Humphrey, Stephen
    Making sense of online consumer reviews: a methodology2013In: International Journal of Market Research, ISSN 1470-7853, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 521-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online consumer reviews have become an increasingly important source of information for both consumers (i.e. about whether to buy) and marketers (i.e. about product strengths and weaknesses). However, online consumer reviews are unstructured and unsystematic in nature, making interpretation of these reviews an enormous challenge. The current paper sheds light on a particular methodology that can be used to investigate what consumers say about companies, brands or products. Consumer reviews of the four best-selling games available on Apple’s App Store were compiled. Leximancer, a content analysis package, was used to compare comments from users who provided games with a five-star rating versus a one-star rating. Results from the Leximancer analysis reveal the most common themes and concepts that consumers use to describe their experience with these games. Specifically, five-star reviewers describe games as fun, awesome, amazing and addictive; one-star reviewers describe games as boring, easy and stupid. Additionally, negative reviews include themes regarding the presence of ads, technological difficulties and value. Future research should explore how consumers and marketers use this information.

  • 18. Sattari, Setayesh
    et al.
    Blomgren, Henrik
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, KTH.
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Evolution of consumer behavior literature2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Styvén, Maria Ek
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Engström, Anne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Kungliga tekniska högskolan, KTH.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    There's a silver lining: Information quality, trust and positive meaning after a crisis2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Styvén, Maria Ek
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Engström, Anne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    SPECIAL SESSION: Difficult Destinations: Attracting People and Organizations to Peripheral Places2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Styvén, Maria Ek
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wallström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Engström, Anne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Northern lights and darkness: Benefits and barriers for e-tourism in Swedish Lapland2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Treen, Emily
    et al.
    Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University.
    Pitt, Leyland F.
    Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Bredican, John
    Division of Industrial Marketing, INDEK, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    App service: How do consumers perceive the quality of financial service apps on smart devices?2017In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 119-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apps on smart devices such as phones and tablets have enabled financial services firms not only to provide greater convenience and flexibility to customers, but also to get them to do a lot of the work entailed in these services. This has changed the character of service in many ways, including the nature of service quality where service is no longer delivered by people, but by means of technology. The study reported here used an amended version of the SERVQUAL instrument to assess consumers’ perception of the quality of the service delivered by the apps of their financial services providers. Three dimensions of app service quality emerge: reliability, personal and visibles. Generally, consumers are reasonable satisfied with the quality of service provided by their financial apps and prefer them to visits to service providers physical locations and rate them as highly as online service provision on PCs or laptops. Limitations are acknowledged, managerial implications drawn and avenues for future research are identified

  • 23.
    Tsao, Hsiu-Yuan
    et al.
    Takming University of Science and Technology.
    Campbell, Coline
    Simon Fraser University, Marketing Department, Vancouver.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Chakrabarti, Ronika
    Lancaster University.
    Lemon-aid: brand as a signal for quality - a classroom game2009In: Proceedings: ANZMAC Annual Conference, Australian & New Zealand Marketing Academy , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lemon markets occur in situations when prior to purchase buyers are unable to observe the product and sellers consequently skim on quality. This phenomenon is potentially exacerbated when buyers and sellers trade in electronically mediated environments, where the product quality often cannot be assessed in advance of purchase. While economists explain the use of brands by firms in terms of monopolistic competition, marketers justify brands for performing various important value added functions. We describe a classroom exercise that tests whether the brand can serve as an effective signal of quality where asymmetric information prevails. Based on past experiments and games in economics it proposes a design for an online simulated posted-offer market institution to identify a lemons market.

  • 24.
    Vella, Joseph
    et al.
    Department of Corporate Communication, University of Malta.
    Wallström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Division of Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Financial services Apps: What makes the difference between a great and a ghastly review?2017In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 132-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet as we know it, has entered a spiral of decline while mobile Apps are gradually taking over and are steadily changing the way we go about our individual daily lives. This study examines the fact that certain financial services Apps are far more successful than others, specifically by looking at what makes a user think that an App may be great, and give it a favorable review, or that it is rather ghastly, and give it an unfavorable review. Next, we describe a study of six of the most popular financial services Apps on the iTunes App Store, for which reviews were analyzed using DICTION software. Employing Diction variables, ambivalence and temporal terms were prevalent in negative reviews while accomplishment, motion, optimism and certainty, were predominantly expressed in positive reviews. Human interest, on the other hand, seemed to be uniformly distributed between both types of reviews.

  • 25.
    Wallström, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Ek Styvén, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Engström, Anne
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Projekt: Digitala strategier för tillväxt i besöksnäringen2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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