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  • 1.
    Handurukande, Sidath
    et al.
    Network Management Lab, LM Ericsson, Athlone, Ireland.
    Fedor, Szymon
    Network Management Lab, LM Ericsson, Athlone, Ireland.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Zach, Martin
    Siemens AG Austria, Vienna, Austria.
    Magneto approach to QoS monitoring2011In: Proceedings of the 12th IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on Integrated Network Management, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2011, p. 209-216Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality of Service (QoS) monitoring of end-user services is an integral and indispensable part of service management. However in large, heterogeneous and complex networks where there are many services, many types of end-user devices, and huge numbers of subscribers, it is not trivial to monitor QoS and estimate the status of Service Level Agreements (SLAs). Furthermore, the overwhelming majority of end-terminals do not provide precise information about QoS which aggravates the difficulty of keeping track of SLAs. In this paper, we describe a solution that combines a number of techniques in a novel and unique way to overcome the complexity and difficulty of QoS monitoring. Our solution uses a model driven approach to service modeling, data mining techniques on small sample sets of terminal QoS reports (from “smarter” end-user devices), and network level key performance indicators (N-KPIs) from probes to address this problem. Service modeling techniques empowered with a modeling engine and a purpose-built language hide the complexity of SLA status monitoring. The data mining technique uses its own engine and learnt data models to estimate QoS values based on N-KPIs, and feeds the estimated values to the modeling engine to calculate SLAs. We describe our solution, the prototype and experimental results in the paper.

  • 2.
    Handurukande, Sidath
    et al.
    Network Management Lab, LM Ericsson, Athlone, Ireland.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Data Ductus Nord AB, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Andreas
    Data Ductus Nord AB, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    IPTV service modeling in Magneto networks2010In: 2010 IEEE/IFIP Network Operations and Management Symposium workshops: NOMS 2010 workshops ; 19 - 23 April 2010, Osaka, Japan, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2010, p. 51-54Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main steps of service assurance is service monitoring using Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and Service Level Agreements (SLAs). We show an approach for service modeling, first starting with an abstract service model that depends on the network. And then, we show how a corresponding model can be realized using a domain specific language. This solution is able to condense various sources of service model requirements into a condense formal and executable model including service decomposition and KPI aggregation. We have described this solution in the context of Magneto project and uses IPTV as a service in our description

  • 3.
    Leijon, Viktor
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Ehnmark, Johan
    Data Ductus.
    SALmon: a Service Modeling Language and Monitoring Engine2008In: IEEE International Symposium on Service-Oriented System Engineering: SOSE '08 / [ed] Jonathan Lee; Deron Liang; Y.C. Cheng, Los Alamitos, Calif: IEEE Communications Society, 2008, p. 202-207Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To be able to monitor complex services and examine their properties we need a modeling language that can express them in an efficient manner. As telecom operators deploy and sell increasingly complex services the need to monitor these services increases. We propose a novel domain specific language called SALmon, which allows for efficient representation of service models, together with a computational engine for evaluation of service models. This working prototype allows us to perform  experiments with full scale service models, and proves to be a good trade-off between simplicity and expressive power.

  • 4.
    Moberg, Carl
    et al.
    Cisco.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    A two-layered data model approach for network services2016In: IEEE Communications Magazine, ISSN 0163-6804, E-ISSN 1558-1896, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 76-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Connectivity services are ubiquitous to enterprises, and many enterprises are looking to outsource basic networking services traditionally implemented using on-premise network equipment. The rising expectations on service providers to rapidly change the definition of services and the ability to introduce new types of network elements is leading to exploding complexity in the orchestration layer. The severity of this problem is such that the ability to introduce new services and new device vendors in the network is reduced due to thetime and cost associated with such changes.

  • 5.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    A hypertext knowledge based for primary care - LIMEDS in LINCKS1989In: SIGIR '89: proceedings of the Twelfth Annual International ACMSIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, June 25 - 28, 1989 / [ed] Nicholas J Belkin ; C. van Rijsbergen, New York: ACM Digital Library, 1989, p. 221-228Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In organized health care, primary care is the first level. It is characterized by the wide span of health problems managed as well as remote location from traditional medical information and knowledge sources. The LIMEDS project has formulated the special requirements for integrated knowledge and data base management in primary care. This paper presents Gösta's book, a hypertext knowledge base implemented in LINCKS, an object oriented, networked database system. Firstly, aspects which make integrated hypermedia systems particularly suitable for application in primary health care are explored. We then describe the hypertext knowledge base, consisting of 500 basic text objects and 3000 links, and current implementations using the NODE data model. NODE is implemented on a SUN III fileserver, and the user interface for the hypertext context on Apple Macintosh (TM). Combination of design methods towards a parallel means-ends strategy was found to be necessary to achieve Gösta's book. Design groups need to be composed of computer science, medical, psychological and organizational competences

  • 6.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Alarm and service monitoring of large scale multi-service mobile networks2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two of the most important challenges in network service assurance are * an overwhelming flow of low-quality alarms * to understand the structure and quality of the delivered services This thesis proposes solutions for alarm and service monitoring that addresses monitoring of large scale multi-service mobile networks. The work on alarms are based on statistical analysis of data collected from a real-world alarm flow and an associated trouble ticket database containing the network administrators expert knowledge. Using data from the trouble ticketing system as a reference, we examine the relationship between the original alarm severity and the human perception of the alarm priority. Using this knowledge, we suggest a neural network-based approach for alarm prioritization. Tests using live data show that our prototype assigns the same severity as a human expert in 50% of all cases, compared to 17% for a na¨ıve approach. In order to model and monitor the services this thesis propose a novel domain specific language called SALmon, which allows for efficient representation of service models, together with a computational engine for evaluation of service models. We show that the proposed system is a good match against real-world scenarios with special requirements around service modeling.

  • 7.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science. Erisoft, Sweden.
    Building Large O-O Systems1995In: Technology of object-oriented languages and systems, TOOLS 16: Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Conference TOOLS Europe '95 / [ed] Ian Graham, Prentice-Hall, 1995, p. 185-191Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science. Data Ductus Sweden, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    Chasing a definition of "alarm"2009In: Journal of Network and Systems Management, ISSN 1064-7570, E-ISSN 1573-7705, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 457-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alarm management has been around for decades in telecom solutions. We have seen various efforts to define standardised alarm interfaces. The research community has focused on various alarm correlation strategies. Still, after years of effort in industry and research alike, network administrators are flooded with alarms; alarms are suffering from poor information quality; and the costs of alarm integration have not decreased. In this paper, we explore the concept of 'alarm'. We define 'alarm' and alarm-type concepts by investigating the different definitions currently in use in standards and research efforts. Based on statistical alarm data from a mobile operator we argue that operational and capital expenditures would decrease if alarm sources would apply to our alarm model.

  • 9.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Erisoft AB, Sweden.
    Measuring the properties of an information model: the IM meter1996In: NOMS '96: 1996 IEEE Network Operations and Management Symposium, Kyoto, Japan, April 15 - 19, 1996, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 1996, p. 262-265Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important for us to measure the features of various information models (IMs), because it will give us the opportunity to distinguish which models that are more complicated than others. With this measure it is also possible to estimate for example, the lines of code in the implemented product and the cost and time effort needed to make the product. It is also possible to discover which parts of the model that are most complex and thereby know which part that will need the most time to implement. The IM Meter is able to measure the significant properties of various information models such as complexity and information content. The measures the IM Meter deals with are of various sorts. Some of them measure the features of minor details of the information models while other measure more general and extending properties. The present paper considers telecommunications management network (TMN) interface complexity in particular

  • 10.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Rethinking network management solutions: models, data-mining and self-learning2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Network service providers are struggling to reduce cost while at the same time improving customer satisfaction. This thesis addresses three relevant underlying challenges to achievieng these goals: - managing an overwhelming flow of low-quality alarms - understanding the structure and quality of the delivered services - automation of service configurationAll of the these add to an operator's operational costs since manual work is required in order to understand the alarm and service status as well as for configuring new services. We propose solutions based on domain-specific languages, data-mining and self-learning. We look at how domain-models can be used to capture explicit knowledge for alarms and services. In addition, we apply data-mining and self-learning techniques to understand the alarm semantics. The alarm solution is validated with a quantitative analysis based on real alarm documentation and an alarm database from a large mobile service provider. A qualitative analysis of the service management solutions is given based on prototypes and input from service providers.We present an approach to alarm interfaces by providing a formal alarm model together with a domain-specic language, BASS. This means that we can verify the consistency of an alarm interface and automatically generate artifacts such as alarm correlation rules or alarm documentation based directly on the model. From a baseline without any correlation, our alarm domain-model based on vendor documentation could automatically find the root-cause alarms in 40% of the cases. In the process of producing an alarm model from pre-existing alarm documentation for a commercial product, we found over 150 semantic warnings.We also propose a domain specific language called SALmon, which allows for efficient representation of service models, along with a computational engine for calculation of service status. Furthermore, this thesis illustrates how we can achieve automatic service configuration based on YANG, the domain-specific language standardized in the IETF. Prototypes show that the service domain-models can capture the semantics of service models, and automatically render parts of the service management solution. It is not always possible to capture expert knowledge in models. Therefore, we propose a data-mining and self-learning solution that learns alarm priorities from the decisions taken by the network administrators. The solution assigns the same severity as a human expert in 50% of the cases compared to 17% for the original alarm severity.

  • 11.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    UML visualization of YANG models2011In: Proceedings of the 12th IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on Integrated Network Management, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2011, p. 1129-1134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Formal data-models are one of the corner-stones of automatic network management. We need semantic models that can be automatically interpreted by management applications. At the same time, human domain-experts need to be able to understand the models. This dualistic requirement has lead standard organizations to pick modeling approaches that prioritize either humans or automatic software. YANG is a semantically rich data-modeling language. We have defined a mapping of YANG to UML and a tool that renders UML diagrams from YANG models. This enables the benefits of formal languages for defining interfaces and automatically maintained UML diagrams to involve domain experts.

  • 12.
    Wallin, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Landen, Leif
    Data Ductus Nord AB.
    Telecom alarm prioritization using neural networks2008In: 22nd International Conference on Advanced Information Networking and Applications - Workshops: AINAW 2008, Los Alamitos, Calif: IEEE Communications Society, 2008, p. 1468-1473Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telecom Service Providers are faced with an overwhelming flow of alarms. Network administrators need to judge which alarms to resolve in order to maintain the service quality. The problem is that it is hard to pick the most important alarms. Which alarms have the highest priority? A solution that automatically assigns priorities to alarms would increase the efficiency of Network Management Centers. We have prototyped a solution that uses neural networks to assign alarm priority. The neural network learns from network administrators by using the manually assigned priorities in trouble-tickets. Our tests are based on live-data from a large mobile service provider and we show that neural networks can learn to assign relevant priorities to 75% of the alarms.

  • 13.
    Wallin, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Leijon, Viktor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Multipurpose models for QoS monitoring2007In: 21st International Conference on Advanced Information Networking and Applications Workshops: Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, 21 - 23 May 2007 ; proceedings, Los Alamitos, Calif: IEEE Communications Society, 2007, Vol. 1, p. 900-905Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telecom operators face an increasing need for service quality management to cope with competition and complex service portfolios in the mobile sector. Improvements in this area can lead to significant market benefits for operators in highly competitive markets. We propose an architecture for a service monitoring tool, including a time aware formal language for model specification. Using these models allows for increased predictability and flexibility in a constantly changing environment.

  • 14.
    Wallin, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Leijon, Viktor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Rethinking network management solutions2006In: IT Professional Magazine, ISSN 1520-9202, E-ISSN 1941-045X, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 19-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telecommunication network management solutions need to shift perspective from one of network element management to service management. Operators need a service view of their network, with automatic service-impact correlation. This requires some major changes in the underlying solutions: equipment vendors must improve the supplied management interfaces and network management solutions must implement a higher degree of automation and correlation with a service focus. One obstacle is the lack of models and formalism to describe topology and service structures

  • 15.
    Wallin, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Leijon, Viktor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Telecom network and service management: an operator survey2009In: Wired-Wireless Multimedia Networks and Services Management: 12th IFIP/IEEE International Conference on Management of Multimedia and Mobile Networks and Services, MMNS 2009, Venice, Italy, October 26-27, 2009. Proceedings / [ed] Tom Pfeifer; Paolo Bellavista, Berlin: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2009, p. 15-26Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is hard to know which research problems in network management we should focus our attention on. To remedy this situation we have surveyed fifteen different telecom operators on four continents to gather some feedback on what they desire and expect from the network management research community. Their input forms a foundation for future directions in network management research, and provides us with valuable insight into what the most urgent problems are in industry.

  • 16.
    Wallin, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science. Data Ductus Nord AB, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    Leijon, Viktor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Landén, Leif
    Data Ductus Nord AB, Skellefteå, Sweden.
    Statistical analysis and prioritisation of alarms in mobile networks2009In: International Journal of Business Intelligence and Data Mining, ISSN 1743-8195, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 4-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telecom Service Providers are faced with an overwhelming flow of alarms, which makes good alarm classification and prioritization very important. This paper first provides statistical analysis of data collected from a real-world alarm flow and then presents a quantitative characterization of the alarm situation. Using data from the trouble ticketing system as a reference, we examine the relationship between mechanical classification of alarms and the human perception of them.Using this knowledge of alarm flow properties and trouble ticketing information, we suggest a neural network-based approach for alarm classification. Tests using live data show that our prototype assigns the same severity as a human expert in 50% of all cases, compared to 17% for a naive approach.

  • 17. Wallin, Stefan
    et al.
    Leijon, Viktor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Nordlander, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Bystedt, Niklas
    Yalt.
    The semantics of alarm definitions: enabling systematic reasoning about alarms2012In: International Journal of Network Management, ISSN 1055-7148, E-ISSN 1099-1190, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 181-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development and integration of an alarm interface between network elements and a network management system is a costly process, largely because of the informal way in which alarm interfaces are expressed and communicated. Low-quality alarm documentation and confusion around fundamental concepts like alarm states and alarm types are typical consequences of current practices. If alarm interfaces were expressed in a more formal manner, costs could be reduced and more advanced analysis and automation would be enabled. We present a novel approach to alarm interfaces by providing a formal alarm model together with a domain-specific language that allows us to specify both the alarm models and the constraints placed on the alarm models in a consistent manner. This means that we can verify the consistency of an alarm interface and automatically generate artifacts such as alarm correlation rules or alarm documentation based only on the model

  • 18.
    Wallin, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Nordlander, Johan
    Leijon, Viktor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Semantic Alarms2014In: 3rd ETSI Future Networks Workshop, 9-11 april 2013, Sophia Antipolis, France / [ed] Alex Galis; Gaby Lenhart, 2014, p. 145-153Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Functions Virtualisation (NFV) and Software Driven Networks (SDN) aggregate resources across multiple domains. This puts requirements on understanding the overall alarm status across these domains and dependencies between them. Current practice of low-quality alarm documentation and confusion around fundamental concepts like alarm states, alarm-types and the underlying protocols like syslog and SNMP traps makes it hard to create one unified alarm interface as part of the SDN API.If alarm interfaces for the various components were expressed in a more formal manner including dependencies and propagation between the alarms the NFV/SDN interface could automatically present an integrated alarm API as well as a synthesized alarm state across the virtualized functions.We present a novel approach to alarm interfaces by providing a formal alarm model together with a domain-specific language that allows us to specify both the alarm models and the constraints placed on the alarm models in a consistent manner. This means that we can verify the consistency of an alarm interfaces and automatically generate interfaces, multi-domain correlation and aggregated states.

  • 19.
    Wallin, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Nordlander, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Åhlund, Christer
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Rethinking network management: models, data-mining and self-learning2012In: Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE Network Operations and Management Symposium: Maui, HI 16- 20 April 2012, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2012, p. 880-886Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network Service Providers are struggling to re- duce cost and still improve customer satisfaction. We have looked at three underlying challenges to achieve these goals; an overwhelming flow of low-quality alarms, understanding the structure and quality of the delivered services, and automation of service configuration. This thesis proposes solutions in these areas based on domain-specific languages, data-mining and self- learning. Most of the solutions have been validated based on data from a large service provider.We look at how domain-models can be used to capture explicit knowledge for alarms and services. In addition, we apply data- mining and self-learning techniques to capture tacit knowledge. The validation shows that models improve the quality of alarm and service models, and automatically render functions like root cause correlation, service and SLA status, as well as service configuration automation.The data-mining and self-learning solutions show that we can learn from available decisions made by experts and automatically assign alarm priorities.

  • 20.
    Wallin, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Wikström, Claes
    Tail-f.
    Automating network and service configuration using NETCONF and YANG2011In: Proceedings of LISA 11: 25th Large Installation System Administration Conference, USENIX - The Advanced Computing Systems Association, 2011, p. 267-279Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network providers are challenged by new requirements for fast and error-free service turn-up. Existing approaches to configuration management such as CLI scripting, device-specific adapters, and entrenched commercial tools are an impediment to meeting these new requirements. Up until recently, there has been no standard way of configuring network devices other then SNMP and SNMP is not optimal for configuration management. The IETF has released NETCONF and YANG which are standards focusing on Configuration management. We have validated that NETCONF and YANG greatly simplify the configuration management of devices and services and still provide good performance. Our performance tests are run in a cloud managing 2000 devices. Our work can help existing vendors and service providers to validate a standardized way to build configuration management solutions.

  • 21.
    Åhlund, Christer
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Andersson, Karl
    Brännström, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    A service level model and Internet mobility monitor2008In: Telecommunications Systems, ISSN 1018-4864, E-ISSN 1572-9451, Vol. 37, no 1-3, p. 49-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobility is gaining a tremendous interest among Internet users and wireless access networks are increasingly being installed to enable mobile usage. Internet mobility requires solutions to move between access networks with maintained network connectivity. Seamless mobility in turn means that the experience of using a service is unaffected while being mobile. Communication in next generation networks will use multiple access technologies, creating a heterogeneous network environment. Further, roaming between network service providers may take place. To enable mobile nodes to move between access networks within as well as between network service providers with minimal disruption, nodes should be able to maintain multiple active network connections. With the usage of multihomed nodes, seamless mobility can be achieved in already installed infrastructures, not providing mobility support. Mobility in heterogeneous access networks also requires network selections that scale for services. In this article we propose an architecture where application service providers and network service providers define service levels to be used by a mobile node and its user. The user selects a service and the service level from an application service provider. When performing access network selection, information received as part of an application service level will be used to find a network that supports the service required. The performance of available access networks will be monitored and considered when making the decision. Our proposed architecture provides solutions to move flows between interfaces in real-time based on network performance, quality of service signalling to correspondent nodes, and cancellation of flows to give way for more important traffic.

  • 22.
    Ödling, Ola
    et al.
    Erisoft AB, Sweden.
    Wallin, Stefan
    Erisoft AB, Sweden.
    Building MIB Applications1994In: IEEE Network Operations and Management Symposium: Symposium Record : Wednesday, February 16: Sessions 11 - 20, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 1994, Vol. 2, p. 565-575Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 22 of 22
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