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  • 1.
    Elustondo, Diego
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sandberg, Dick
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Development of method for surface modification of wood.2015In: Proceedings of the Eighth European Conference on Wood Modification: ECWM8 / [ed] Mark Huges; Lauri Rautkari; Tuuli Uimonen; Holger Militz; Brigitte Junge, Helsinki: Aalto University, School of Chemical Engineering , 2015, p. 137-140Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Karlsson, Olov
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Influence of heat transferring media on durability of thermally modified wood2011In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 356-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on the durability and dimensional stability of a series of hardwoods and softwoods after thermal modification in vegetable oils and in steam atmospheres have been performed. Mass loss after exposure to Coniophora puteana (BAM Ebw. 15) for 16 weeks was very low for European birch, European aspen, Norway spruce, and Scots pine thermally modified in a linseed oil product with preservative (for 1 hour at 200 degrees C). Fairly low mass losses were obtained for wood thermally modified in linseed-, tung-and rapeseed oil, and losses were related to the wood species. Low mass loss during rot test was also found for Norway spruce and Scots pine modified in saturated steam at 180 degrees C. Water absorption of pine and aspen was reduced by the thermal treatments and the extent of reduction was dependent on wood species and thermal modification method. Thermally modified aspen was stable during cycling climate tests, whereas pine showed considerable cracking when modified under superheated steam conditions (Thermo D). At lower modification temperature (180 degrees C) an increase in mass after modification in rapeseed oil of spruce, aspen and sapwood as well as heartwood of pine was observed, whereas at high temperature (240 degrees C) a mass loss could be found. Oil absorption in room tempered oil after thermal modification in oil was high for the more permeable aspen and pine (sapwood).

  • 3.
    Myronycheva, Olena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Hagman, Olle
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Sandberg, Dick
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Hyperspectral Imaging Surface Analysis for Dried and Thermally Modified Wood: An Exploratory Study2018In: Journal of Spectroscopy, ISSN 2314-4920, E-ISSN 2314-4939, article id 7423501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Naturally seasoned, kiln-dried, and thermally modified wood has been studied by hyperspectral near-infrared imaging between 980 and 2500 nm in order to obtain spatial chemical information. Evince software was used to explore, preprocess, and analyse spectral data from image pixels and link these data to chemical information via spectral wavelength assignment. A PCA model showed that regions with high absorbance were related to extractives with phenolic groups and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The sharp wavelength band at 2135 nm was found by multivariate analysis to be useful for multivariate calibration. This peak represents the largest variation that characterizes the knot area and can be related to areas in wood rich in hydrocarbons and phenol, and it can perhaps be used for future calibration of other wood surfaces. The discriminant analysis of thermally treated wood showed the strongest differentiation between the planed and rip-cut wood surfaces and a fairly clear discrimination between the two thermal processes. The wavelength band at 2100 nm showed the greatest difference and may correspond to stretching of C=O-O of polymeric acetyl groups, but this requires confirmation by chemical analysis.

  • 4.
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Combination of heating and preservative impregnation of wood for outdoor exposure2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The research is presented as a composite thesis containing a theoretical explanatory review based on four scientific articles. The thesis covers the investigation of wood modification methods, which in the future could possibly be developed further to enhance the performance of wood products in an efficient and economical way. The target applications for the studied methods were non-structural wooden materials for outdoor exposure, such as cladding, facades and decking. Therefore, weather resistance, appearance and durability were the qualities to be studied.The methods were based on the combination of heat and impregnation with liquid preservatives. The following methods were included in the study: heat treatment in steam, heat treatment in oil with subsequent oil impregnation of heat treated wood and impregnation with artificial chemicals (copper, furfuryl alcohol and phenol formaldehyde) enhanced by preheating the wood. All the treatments were performed mainly on Scots pine, but also on Norwegian spruce and European varieties of ash, aspen, birch and beech. The first article covers the investigation of methods for oil heat treatment and oil impregnation of wood. The oil treatments were designed and performed at laboratory scale. The second and third articles cover studies concerning the behaviour of steam heat treated, oil heat treated and oil impregnated wood boards in terms of their resistance to cyclical climate conditions and brown rot fungi. The climate conditions were recreated in laboratory by letting the samples to soak in water, freeze in a freezer and absorb heat from an infrared lamp. The fourth article covers the study of impregnation of preheated wood with copper-based, furfuryl alcohol and phenol formaldehyde solutions; phenol formaldehyde treated wood was tested in the accelerated weathering test in order to find out if the treatment blocks wood resin coming out from the knots.The results showed that degradation processes within wood during oil heat treatment were similar to the degradation processes during heat treatment in steam, but with the difference of a small oil uptake when heat treating in oil. When heated wood is directly placed to cool down in oil at room temperature, then it absorbs significantly more oil than during the process of heat treatment in oil; similarly, impregnation with copper-based preservative after preheating was deeper compared to impregnation without preheating. However, oil seems to be rather unstable inside wood. After the samples were impregnated with oil in the experiments, the oil migrated throughout the wood and leached out when exposed to water and heat. By visual observation it was found that colour degraded to a certain extent in all untreated and treated species exposed to the cyclical weather conditions used in the study. It could also be noticed that the method used to create the cyclical weather conditions (mentioned above), in which the wood was exposed to periods of soaking, freezing and warming, showed to be an effective method to test the wood for outdoor applications. It was observed that both heat treatment and oil impregnation improved durability of wood against brown rot fungi. However, the oil impregnation method needs, probably, to be further developed to protect wood in the long term due to oil leakage from the wood. It was found that the phenol formaldehyde treatment using hot-and-cold bath process significantly reduced the migration of resin and extractives through knot in painted wood panels.

  • 5.
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Oil heat treatment of wood2008In: Proceedings of the 4th Meeting of the Nordic-Baltic Network in Wood Material Science and Engineering (WSE), November 13 - 14, 2008, Riga, Latvia / [ed] Bruno Andersons, Riga, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The investigation of thermal treatment of wood has led to the improvement of heat treatment with vegetable oils. The aim of this work has been to study the oil absorption of wood during the process of oil heat treatment. This work has included the heat treatment of spruce, pine (heartwood and sapwood) and aspen in rape seed oil. The heat treatment was performed in the deep fryer at 180, 210 and 240°C during 30, 60 and 120 minutes. Two sets of samples were run, the first one was heat treated and left to cool in the air, the second one was heat treated and directly cooled in the oil bath for 1 hour. At 180°C there was a trend of increasing oil absorption during the heat treatment with the increasing the treatment time for all species. At 210°C the percentage of mass growth was reducing with increasing the time of the process. At 240°C all species lost the weight and the percentage of weight loss was increasing proportionally with increasing heat treatment time. During the heat treatment aspen had the highest mass increase and pine heartwood had the lowest. Results showed that wood absorbed significantly more oil in the stage of cooling in oil than during heat treatment. All species had a tendency to have approximately the same oil pick up during storing in the oil bath after the heat treatment at one temperature, so the heat treatment time did not have an effect on the oil absorption in the stage of cooling. The oil pick up during the stage of cooling had the lowest values for all species treated at 240°, because all the species lost the mass during the heat treatment at 240°. The colour changed during heat treatment and depended mainly on the heat treatment temperature. The darkness was increasing proportionally with increasing the thermal treatment temperature. The colour varied among the species.

  • 6.
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Elustondo, Diego
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Wood thermal-modification at Luleå University of Technology2014In: Final Cost Action FP0904 Conference: “Recent Advances in the Field of TH and THM Wood Treatment” : May 19-21, 2014, Skellefteå, Sweden : book of abstracts / [ed] Mojgan Vaziri; Dick Sandberg, Skellefteå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2014, p. 75-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    The Behaviour of Heat Treated Wooden Cladding Exposed to Extreme Climate Changes2010In: Proceedings of the 6th meeting of the Nordic-Baltic Network in Wood Material Science and Engineering (WSE): October 21-22, 2010, Tallinn, Estonia / [ed] Pille Meier, Tallinn: Tallinn University of Technology , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The heat treated (HT) ThermoD and oil heat treated (OHT) samples were prepared for the test. ThermoD samples were prepared by treating wood with superheated steam and saturated steam. Oil heat treated samples were heat treated in oil under 180ºC and cooled directly in clean oil at the room temperature. During cooling the samples absorbed some oil. Untreated samples of pine, spruce and aspen were prepared as the reference samples.The material was tested for 5 cycles. Each cycle contained: soaking in water for 24 hours, direct freezing for 6 days and direct warming for 30 minutes. The tested species were pine, spruce and aspen. Water absorption depended on type of species and treatment. Pine had higher water absorption but after oil heat treatment had the lowest water absorption due to high oil contain. Spruce and aspen had approximately the same water absorption. Heat treatment reduced water absorption as it was expected. Samples degraded in colour more or less and some started to crack. Almost all untreated and ThermoD treated pine samples cracked. Spruce had the highest visible change of the colour after the test. Aspen showed the best results because the colour did not change significantly and the material did not crack. Oil heat treated samples of pine lost some oil after the test

  • 8.
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Wooden material under extreme climate changes2010In: Proceedings, 11th International IUFRO Wood Drying Conference: [... in Skellefteå, Sweden, January 18 - 22, 2010 ... the theme of the conference was "Recent Advances in the Field of Wood Drying"] / [ed] Tom Morén; Lena Antti; Margot Sehlstedt-Persson, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2010, p. 269-271Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The heat treated (HT) ThermoD and untreated species were tested for the extreme climate changes. The experimental contained five cycles of soaking in water, freezing and warming. After experimental all samples degraded in colour more or less and some started to crack. ThermoD beech showed the best results. The colour did not change significantly and the material did not crack.

  • 9.
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Trey, Stacy
    Englund, Finn
    Modification of wood with an anti-oxidant tannin derivative: preliminary study2011In: Proceedings of the 7th meeting of the Nordic-Baltic Network in Wood Material Science & Engineering: October 27-28, 2011, Oslo, Norway / [ed] Erik Larnøy, Ås: Norsk institutt for skog og landskap , 2011, p. 161-166Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
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  • apa
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  • ieee
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
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