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  • 1. Axelsson, Karin
    et al.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Iranmanesh, Sedigheh
    Project: Caring for dying and meeting death. The views of Iranian and Swedish nurses and nurse students2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Härnösands sjukhus.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Midwives' lived experiences of being supportive to prospective mothers/parents during pregnancy1999In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To elucidate midwives' narrated experiences of being supportive to prospective mothers or parents during pregnancy. DESIGN: Phenomenological hermeneutic analysis of transcribed text from seven tape-recorded interviews. SETTING: Midwifery clinics in five health centres in the context of Swedish primary health care. PARTICIPANTS: Seven midwives working in antenatal care. FINDINGS: The interpretation of the text showed that through perception and intuition the midwives seemed to become aware that some women needed increased support. The situations of these prospective mothers were often characterised by difficult social problems or fears. The prospective fathers were mostly absent in the narratives. The midwives acted on both a personal and a professional level with ethical perspectives in mind, when they were advocating their clients' rights to receive proper care. The comprehensive understanding of the interpretation revealed that the midwife sometimes perceived herself as being metaphorically 'The Good Mother'. KEY CONCLUSIONS: Having the role of 'The Good Mother' could be understood as a way for the midwife to establish a fruitful relationship with prospective mothers/parents. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The findings provide a basis for reflection on the mothering and supportive function of midwives when providing antenatal care.

  • 3. Häggström, Terttu
    Formal carers' understanding of residents with moderate and severe dementia in group dwelling1999Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Life story perspective on caring in different cultural context2004In: Workgroup of European nurse researchers. Biennial conference (12 : Lisboa : 2004), WENR , 2004, p. 25-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Life-story perspective on caring within cultural contexts: experiences of severe illness and of caring2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    People are afflicted by severe illnesses and adversities in life and they practice care privately and professionally in different cultural contexts from the view of their own life-story perspective. Five studies with a qualitative approach were linked together with the overall aim of disclosing the experience of severe illness and caring with a life-story perspective in different cultural contexts. Audio-recorded, transcribed narrative and reflective interviews were analysed with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Data were from 34 people living with a stroke in Sweden and Vietnam, five Vietnamese relatives and 29 professional carers caring for people with a stroke in Vietnam, with dementia in Sweden and girls living on the streets in East Africa. In this study, living with a stroke meant living with a sudden, adverse event that had interrupted the past of the life story from continuing in a similar fashion in the future. Apparently, some interviewees had not integrated the stroke event with their narrative identity and their life stories. They seemed to be confused about what had happened to them. The sensed feelings of living with a stroke in the study from Sweden were conveyed with the use of a metaphoric language. Living with a stroke in Vietnam meant feeling as a weakened thread in the family net. Caring professionally in this context meant collective narrative identity with a view of being assistants, advisers and supporters of a ‘family network’. Carers identified as good at achieving an understanding of people with dementia used maternal thinking emanating from personal experience together with knowledge about each resident’s life stories and the course of the disease. These carers used affect attunement and personal talents. The carers tuned into a resident’s affective state, noticed signs, put these into sentences and stories that corresponded with the narrative identity and the life story of the resident in the caring situation. Professional carers working among girls living on the streets in East Africa felt that they became committed to caring and had motherly feelings when they met with the girls. Caring for these girls meant fighting against the grip of street life, but also experience of satisfaction and hope. It meant experiencing powerlessness and frustration, and the carers felt squeezed between integrated values and the perceived demands from the girls in their meeting with them, whilst conveying visions to the girls of a better future. Inspired by Ricoeur’s philosophy on language and personal identity, the findings from the five papers indicate that a life-story perspective can serve as a framework for bringing human experience in various cultural contexts and different ages into comprehensible language. This perspective should be useful in professional nursing when caring for people who encounter adversities in life as an afflicted person or relative. It is suggested that a life-story perspective can serve as a framework for professional nursing care that aims at a good quality of care.

  • 6. Häggström, Terttu
    et al.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Norberg, Astrid
    University of Umeå, Department of Advanced Nursing.
    The experience of living with stroke sequelae illuminated by means of stories and metaphors1994In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 321-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty-nine persons 60 to 91 years old participated in a study concerning living with stroke sequelae. They narrated stories about two different photographs showing a person of the same age and gender as themselves being fed or eating independently. The stories were analyzed and interpreted by means of a phenomenological hermeneutic method. Some interviewees identified themselves with the actor and the action that took place in the photograph and others did not. Four themes were found: uncertainty; sadness and mourning; gratefulness, hope, and satisfaction; and isolation. The stories varied regarding completeness and expressed optimistic or pessimistic future expectations. The stories were condensed into four core stories. The emotional content of each core story was expressed by a metaphor. The tacit knowledge embedded in the interview texts, expressed through core stories and metaphors, is essential to nursing care.

  • 7.
    Häggström, Terttu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Jansson, Lilian
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Skilled carers' ways of understanding people with Alzheimer's disease1998In: Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing Practice, ISSN 0889-7182, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 239-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five carers in a group dwelling for people with dementia were observed and interviewed concerning their interactions with five residents with Alzheimer's disease. The tape-recorded and transcribed data were analyzed as text. The carers' personal ways of achieving understanding were defined as: affect attunement; affect attunement and completing a puzzle through explanatory connections of observation, knowledge about the residents' life histories and behavior at the group dwelling; and affect attunement within the context of caring as an intrinsic end. Personal experience from childhood and motherhood, knowledge about the residents' life history and the nature of the disease, and personal talent seemed to form these carers' ways of achieving understanding

  • 8. Häggström, Terttu
    et al.
    Johansson, Eva
    Referat från konferens anordnad av SIDA för utvärdering av vårdlärarprogrammet i Zambia1982In: Omvårdaren, ISSN 0280-4123, Vol. 29, no 5/6, p. 9-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9. Häggström, Terttu
    et al.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Maternal thinking in dementia care1996In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 431-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carers of demented people living in a group dwelling were interviewed and observed individually and together. The aim of the study was to illuminate the thinking of pre-identified good dementia carers and to make explicit their means of understanding demented people. The tape-recorded and transcribed interviews were interpreted using a phenomenological hermeneutic method. The findings showed that these carers explicitly referred to the concept of mother, used when explaining their ability to understand demented people. They created a home-like atmosphere together with the inhabitants. The findings were interpreted metaphorically as maternal love, thinking and practice in creating an understanding relationship with the demented people they cared for. This metaphorical aptitude considered the fulfilment of life for these demented people and included partly unconscious tools that the carers used to compensate for the loss of abilities suffered by the demented people. The carers' attitudes towards the inhabitants of the ward and each other were based on respect as in a functioning family. Their ambition was interpreted as an attempt to create an atmosphere that functioned not only as an institution, but as an incubator for human lives, which had become dependent on others for their survival and the preservation of their human dignity throughout their physical existence

  • 10. Häggström, Terttu
    et al.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Huy, Tran Quang
    Patients', relatives' and nurses' experience of stroke in norhern Vietnam1995In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing, ISSN 1043-6596, E-ISSN 1552-7832, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transcriptions were made of interviews held in Vietnam with five nurses, five people affected by stroke (aged 28-60), and with one relative each. Their stories were analysed as texts by means of a phenomenological hermeneutic method. The role of the nurses in Vietnam appeared to differ from that usually ascribed to nurses in Western institutionalized care. In the former a relative was expected to carry out basic care during the acute stage and to assist socioeconomically thereafter. The interviewees spoke of family bonds in the past, present, and future tenses when narrating their experiences of stroke as nurses, patients, and relatives. This was interpreted as an indication of a consciousness of an essential relatedness. Nurses were aware of playing a temporary and secondary role mainly as assistants: firstly to the doctor by carrying out orders and reporting, secondly to the stroke patient and his or her family by carrying out advanced nursing procedures and giving support The advantages and disadvantages of involving the family in nursing care can be revealed by obtaining views from a different culture, which can provide a contrast against which constructive criticism of the Western nursing tradition can be made.

  • 11.
    Häggström, Terttu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Guiding for re-direction of life-stories: narrated experience of female professionals working among girls living on the streets in East Africa2004In: Workgroup of European nurse researchers. Biennial conference (12 : Lisboa : 2004), WENR , 2004, p. 83-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12. Iranmanesh, Sedigheh
    et al.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Caring for dying and meeting death: experiences of Iranian and Swedish nurses2010In: Indian Journal of Palliative Care, ISSN 0973-1075, E-ISSN 1998-3735, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 90-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Our world is rapidly becoming a global community, which creates a need to further understand the universal phenomena of death and professional caring for dying persons This study thus was conducted to describe the meaning of nurses' experiences of caring for dying people in the cultural contexts of Iran and Sweden. Materials and Methods: Using a phenomenological approach, phenomenon of caring for dying people was studied.Eight registered nurses who were working in oncology units in Tehran, Iran and eight registered nurses working in hospital and home care in North part of Sweden were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using the principles of phenomenological hermeneutics. Results: The findings were formulated based on two themes included: (1) "Sharing space and time to be lost", and (2) "Caring is a learning process Conclusions: The results showed that being with dying people raise an ethical demand that calls for personal and professional response, regardless of sex, culture or context The physical and organizational context must be supportive and enable nurses to stand up to the demands of close relationships Specific units and teamwork across various personnel seem to be a solution that is missing in Iran.

  • 13.
    Iranmanesh, Sedigheh
    et al.
    Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery.
    Ghazanfari, Zahra
    Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Narvik University College, 8505 Narvik, Norway.
    Professional development: Iranian and Swedish nurses' experiences of caring for dying people2011In: Journal of Palliative Care, ISSN 0825-8597, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 202-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our world is rapidly becoming a global community. This creates a need for us to further understand the universal phenomena of death and professional care for dying persons. A transcultural study was undertaken using a phenomenological approach to illuminate the meaning of nurses' experiences of professional development in the contexts of Iran and Sweden. Eight registered nurses working in oncology units in Tehran, Iran, and eight working in the context of a hospital and private homes in northern Sweden were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using the principles of phenomenological hermeneutics inspired by Paul Ricoeur. A naive reading guided a structural analysis, which yielded four main themes: coping with existential, organizational, and cultural contexts; sharing knowledge, experiences, and responsibilities; using embodied knowledge; and developing personal competence. The interpreted comprehensive understanding revealed that the meaning of professional development is that it actualizes other-oriented values and self-oriented values. Caring professionally for dying people was a learning process that could help nurses to develop their personal and professional lives when they were supported by teamwork, reflective practice, and counselling.

  • 14.
    Iranmanesh, Sedigheh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Caring for dying people: attitudes among Iranian and Swedish nursing students2010In: Indian Journal of Palliative Care, ISSN 0973-1075, E-ISSN 1998-3735, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 147-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To compare the attitudes of Iranian and Swedish nursing students toward caring for dying persons. Materials and Methods: Their attitudes were measured with the Frommelt′s Attitude Toward Caring of the Dying and the Death Attitude Profile Revised. Results: The results indicated that the participating Iranian students were more afraid of death and less likely to give care to dying persons than the Swedish participants. Conclusion: It is suggested that theoretical education should be individualized and culturally sensitive in order to positively influence the students′ attitudes, and promote professional development.

  • 15. Iranmanesh, Sedigheh
    et al.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Axelsson, Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    Swedish nurses' experiences of caring for dying people: a holistic approach2009In: Holistic Nursing Practice, ISSN 0887-9311, E-ISSN 1550-5138, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 243-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most people need to be cared for at the end of their lives by professionals. This study aimed to elucidate the meaning of nurses' experiences of caring for dying persons at home and in a special unit in a hospital. Four registered nurses working in private homes and 4 registered nurses working in a specific unit in a hospital setting were interviewed. The study was planned and carried out with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. A naive reading guided a structural analysis, which resulted in 3 main themes: meeting patients and family members as unique persons, learning in a challenging environment, and gaining personal strength. The interpreted comprehensive understanding conveyed a meaning that caring for families with a member awaiting the end of life created a situation where the presence of an inevitable death demanded nurses to create close relationships with each unique person involved.

  • 16. Johansson, Eva
    et al.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Vårdlärarprogrammet i Zambia ar ett bra biståndsprojekt1982In: Vårdfacket, ISSN 0347-0911, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 34-36Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17. Sävenstedt, Stefan
    et al.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Distansöverbryggande teknik i hembaserad vård av äldre människor/människor med multidiagnosproblem i glesbygd1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Working with girls living on the streets in East Africa: professionals' experiences2005In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 489-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports a study elucidating the meaning of caring for girls of the street, as experienced by female staff members working with street children in Eastern Africa. BACKGROUND: The phenomenon of children living on the streets is a global and escalating problem, and girls are presumed to be especially vulnerable. In East Africa, the traditional extended family system is rapidly breaking down and traditional gender values seem to remain. This was the context for investigating female carers' experience of caring for girls. METHOD: Interviews were conducted with 37 project staff members working with children living on the streets in the framework of non-governmental organizations in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania between 1997 and 1998. Transcribed text from female interviewees (n = 13) working with girls of the street was analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. FINDINGS: The meaning of caring for girls of the street for female professional carers in East Africa was comprehensively understood as counselling the girls to integrate the past of their adverse life stories with their present identity. Counselling meant conveying visions for a possible re-direction of the life stories, from being a girl of the street into being an accepted family girl. Caring in this context meant being squeezed between ethical demands and gender values. Experiencing frustration and powerlessness was related to gender structures in society, having to fight the grip of street culture, and a lack of professional tools. Hope and satisfaction were related to success in changing the course of life stories of girls and to seeing possibilities for contributing to empowerment of girls and community members. CONCLUSIONS: Gender issues are critical to care provided to girls of the street. Carers felt that they lacked relevant knowledge and support. ical aspects and gender issues in relation to professional care for vulnerable girls ought to be addressed in nursing education and practice, not only for developing countries, but also as a matter of global interest.

  • 19.
    Sävenstedt, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Sävenstedt, Gerd
    Häggström, Terttu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    East African children of the streets: a question of health2000Book (Other academic)
1 - 19 of 19
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