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  • 1. Andersson, Linda
    et al.
    Ulander, Helene
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Betydelsen av verbal uppmuntran vid utförande av handstyrketest2004In: Nordisk fysioterapi, ISSN 1402-3024, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 145-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if verbal encouragement had any influence on hand strength measurements. Twenty subjects participated in the study, all women aged between 20 and 62 years. A standardization of testing conditions and verbal encouragement was designed. Three measurements were conducted during 2 days using T.K.K 5401 Grip D. First there was a trial set, and then Test 1 (without verbal encouragement) and Test 2 (with verbal encouragement) were con-ducted. The results showed a significant improvement regarding the test results from Test 1 to Test 2. The subjects also answered a questionnaire about their feelings towards the two test occasions. A majority of the subjects felt that verbal encouragement had an influence on their performance. In conclusion, it could be said that verbal encouragement both had a subjective and objective influence on a subject's performance. In earlier studies, verbal encouragement has shown to influence different personalities in different ways. Thus, this would be an interesting field of study for future research

  • 2.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Westerberg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Moving From Idea to Action: Promoting Physical Activity by Empowering Adolescents2014In: Health Promotion Practice, ISSN 1524-8399, E-ISSN 1552-6372, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 812-818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Physical activity provides fundamental health benefits for children and youth. The aim of the study was to explore the possibility of conducting an empowerment-inspired intervention and examine the impact of the intervention in promoting moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among adolescents. Method. A nonrandomized trial with a concurrent control group was carried out. Physical activity data were collected before and after the intervention with daily questions by short message service. Self-efficacy, social support, and attitude were also measured before and after the intervention since they were possible mediators. Results. The intervention was created by the students, the researchers, and the teachers using an empowerment-based approach. Students in the intervention group (n = 21) increased their MVPA on average by 4.9 (SD = 28.9) minutes per day, and students in the control group (n = 25) reduced their MVPA on average by 25.4 (SD = 23.0) minutes per day (p = .000). Conclusions. The intervention might have contributed to a promotion of physical activity among students in the intervention group. The most valuable contribution this study provides is the knowledge that it is possible to develop and conduct an empowerment-inspired intervention to promote adolescent physical activity.

  • 3.
    Lischner, Katherine
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Fysiskt aktiv livsstil i unga år förebygger insjuknande i typ 2 diabetes: en litteraturstudie2006In: Svensk rehabilitering, ISSN 1403-4468, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 10-14Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Aktivitet: Tankar och resonemang kring fysisk aktivitet och hälsa bland fysiskt inaktiva gymnasieungdomar2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Fysisk aktivitet, inaktivitet och kapacitet hos gymnasieungdomar2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A change in behaviour with reduced physical activity and an increased sedentary behaviour among children and adolescents may be a threat to their future health. The literature shows that physical activity decreases through adolescence and the habits from childhood and adolescence have a tendency to become manifest. It is therefore particularly important to investigate the physical activity of adolescents and its effect on physical capacity, in conjunction with underlying factors that might have an impact on how active adolescents are. The overall aim of this thesis was to describe physical activity and its relation to physical capacity of adolescents from upper secondary schools and to highlight the reasoning about physical activity and health among physically inactive adolescents’.Paper I was a survey in which 884 adolescents from Northern Sweden participated. The adolescents were asked questions about their physical activity together with questions with a relation to physical activity. To put the physical activity in relation to physical capacity the adolescents were at the same time asked if they could participate in future studies concerning physical capacity (Paper II and III) and participation in an interview study (Paper IV). In paper IIIII physical capacity was assessed by aerobic capacity, muscle strength and balance (n = 99). In Paper II physical capacity was compared between physically active and physically inactive men and women. In paper III, the relation between physical capacity and self-rated physical activity and time spent sitting were investigated. In paper IV adolescents who did not meet the WHO recommendation of physical activity were interviewed and asked to describe their experience about physical activity and health.The results from paper I - III show that there was a group of adolescents who did not meet the recommendations for physical activity and that it affected their physical capacity. There was a clear gender difference; the men were physically active at higher intensity levels than the women. The men and women who estimated themselves to be physically active had significantly greater aerobic capacity, muscle strength (men) as compared to those who estimated themselves as physically inactive (according to WHO recommendations). The correlation between time spent sitting and physical activity was weak but still statistically significant for both sexes, and time spent sitting time did not appear to affect physical capacity. The results of the interviews in paper IV showed that physical inactive adolescents are aware of the health benefits of physical activity, yet they priorities performing other interests in leisure time. They described how both external and internal factors motivated them to be physically active. Further, the importance of the social context and that the activity had to be fun was considered reinforcing factor for performing physical activity. In summary, the results of the thesis show that there is a wide spread among adolescents in the level of physical activity and that there is a group of adolescents who do not meet the recommended levels. Also, there is a gender difference, where women are physically active at a lower intensity level. There was a weak correlation between sitting time and physical activity or physical capacity. Therefore it is important to both increase physical activity and reducing sitting time to prevent health related diseases. Factors that is important for influencing physical activity is the social context as parents, friends and environment.

  • 6.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Eliasson, Kristina
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Lysholm, Jack
    Department of Orthopaedics, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Michaelson, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Physical capacity in physically active and non-active adolescents2011In: Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1741-3842, E-ISSN 1741-3850, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 131-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate differences in physical capacity between physically active and non-active men and women among graduates from upper secondary school. Subject and methods: Research participants were graduates (38 women and 61 men) from upper secondary school. Physical activity was determined using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and participants were dichotomously characterized as being physically active or physically non-active according to the recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO). Aerobic capacity was measured using the Åstrand cycle ergometer test. Participants also underwent tests of muscular strength and balance. Results: Maximum oxygen uptake differed significantly between physically active and non-active men (mean ± SD 3.6 ± 0.7 vs 3.0 ± 0.6 l/kg, p = 0.002) and women (3.0 ± 0.6 vs 2.5 ± 0.3 l/kg, p = 0.016). There was a difference among physically active and non-active men regarding push-ups (37.1 ± 9.0 vs 28.5 ± 7.0, p < 0.001) and sit-ups (59.2 ± 30.2 vs 39.6 ± 19.4, p = 0.010). No significant differences were found regarding vertical jump or grip strength among men, any of the muscle strength measurements among women, and balance (in any sex). Conclusion: Activity levels had impact on aerobic capacity in both sexes, but did not seem to have the same impact on muscular strength and balance, especially in women

  • 7.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lysholm, Jack
    Nyberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Michaelson, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    The relationship between the physical capacity and physical activity of adolescents2012In: Gazzetta Medica Italiana, ISSN 0393-3660, E-ISSN 1827-1812, Vol. 171, no 5, p. 639-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. Physical activity and physical capacity are important health related parameters for all age-groups. Yet, little is known about the relationship between physical activity and physical capacity amongst adolescents about to leave compulsory education. The aim of the study was to investigate how physical capacities are related to self-reported energy expenditure on physical activities at different levels of physical activity and amount of time spent sitting among graduates of upper secondary school. Methods. In total, 99 third grade students participated from upper secondary school. Levels of physical activity and the amount of time spent sitting were assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). The energy expenditure was calculated based on the activity determined by the IPAQ. The participants’ physical capacity was tested using VO2max, muscle strength and balance measures. The relationship between physical activity and physical capacity was addressed using linear regression models. Results. There was significant relationship between Total METs and aerobic capacity (R2 = 0.15), push-ups (R2 = 0.08) and sit-ups (R2 = 0.07). A stronger significant relationship was revealed for activity performed on Vigorous activity METs for aerobic capacity (R2 = 0.23), push-ups (R2 = 0.18) and sit-ups (R2 = 0.10). The regression analyses for Moderate activity METs, Walking activity METs and time spent Sitting showed no significant relationship to any measures of physical capacity. Conclusion. For adolescents, the intensity of physical activity is of importance for achieving high aerobic capacity, and the amount of time spent sitting does not influence physical capacity.

  • 8.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Michaelson, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Aktivitet: Fysisk aktivitet och sittande hos gymnasieungdomar i Norrbotten2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Michaelson, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab. peter.michaelson@ltu.se .
    Inactivity in adolescents, what are the effects on physical capacity?2011In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 97, no Suppl. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of physical activity on physical capacity among graduates from upper secondary school.Relevance: Physical activity and physical fitness are important health related parameters, which both have declined the last decades. Adolescents who are about to leave compulsory school and physical education are supposed to peak regarding physical capacity. Therefore it is interesting to investigate the effect physical inactivity (according to WHO-recommendation) have on physical performance.Participants: The participants where third grade students (38 female and 61 male) from upper secondary school (18 - 20 years).Methods: International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was used to estimate the level of physical activity. The participants were divided, in accordance with World Health Organizations recommendations for physical activity, to A) physically inactive or B) physically active. Physical fitness was tested using the Åstrand bicycle test and functional tests of muscular strength and balance.Analysis: By Student's independent t-test, separate for females and males, differences in aerobic capacity, push-ups, grip strength, vertical jump height, sit-ups and balance, between physically inactive and active were tested.Results: Maximum oxygen uptake differed significantly between physically inactive and active males (mean ± SD: 3.0 ± 0.6 l/kg, vs. 3.6 ± 0.7 p = 0.002) and females (2.5± 0.3 l/kg, vs. 3.0 ± 0.6 p = 0.016). There was a difference among physically inactive and active males regarding push-ups (28.5 ± 7.0 vs. 37.1 ± 9.0, p < 0.001) and sit-ups (39.6 ± 19.4 vs. 59.2 ± 30.2, p = 0.010). No significant differences were found regarding vertical jump or grip strength among males, any of the muscle strength measurements among females, and balance (in any sex).Conclusions: The level of physical activity was related to aerobic capacity in both sexes, but did not seem to have the same impact on muscular fitness and balance, especially concerning the females. Since aerobic capacity is an important parameter in preventing future health problems, it is crucial to engage all adolescents in physical activity.Implications: According to this study physical activity have positive effects on aerobic capacity, without similar trend in muscle strength. Addressing strength training, as complement to aerobic training should be recommended regardless of level of physical activity performed. Therefore we see a future need for promoting and designing detailed guidelines regarding strength training for children and adolescents.

  • 10.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Michaelson, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab. peter.michaelson@ltu.se .
    Is self-rated physical activity a good indicator of physical capacity and is time spent sitting negative for physical capacity?2011In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 97, no Suppl. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to relate levels of physical activity to physical capacity and to study whether time sitting influences physical capacity among students in upper secondary school.Relevance: Physical activity and physical fitness are important health related parameters. Modern living habits with increased time spent on sedentary behaviors like watching TV and computer gaming have a potential for a negative influence. This calls for reliable and cost-effective measures of physical activities as indicators of physical capacity as tools for identifying people with an inactive lifestyle.Participants: Research participants where 99 third grade students (38 female, 61 male) from upper secondary school in Sweden (18-20 years).Methods: Levels of physical activity was established using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and determined for both 1) Level of activity (Total, Vigorous, Moderate, Walking), 2) IPAQ-classification Amount of activity (High, Medium, Low) and 3) Time sitting. Physical fitness was measured using the Åstrand bicycle test and functional tests of muscular strength.Analysis: The relation between 1) Level of activity, 2) IPAQ- amount of activity and 3) Time sitting and physical capacity was investigated by separate linear regression analyses.Results: There were a relation between Total level of activity and A) aerobic capacity (l/min2) (R2 = 0.1, p = 0.001), B) push-ups (R2 = 0.05, p = 0.011), and C) sit-ups (R2 = 0.046, p = 0.016), while other measure of physical capacity was non significant. An identical pattern was reveled for activity performed on Vigorous level with A) aerobic capacity (l/min2) (R2 = 0.2, p < 0.000), B) push-ups (R2 = 0.16, p < 0.000) and C) sit-ups (R2 = 0.082, p = 0.023). For activity on Moderate level the only significant relation was with aerobic capacity (R2 = 0.033, p = 0.033). For Walking no relation was significant. Regarding the IPAQ-classification of High-, Medium, and Low physical activity, no relation with any measures of physical capacity was found. Further, surprisingly, no relation was found between Time sitting and any measures of physical capacity.Conclusions: The results imply that the intensity of physical activity is of importance for achieving high aerobic capacity, while the amount of activity is not. Further, our results indicate that time sitting is not related to physical capacity.Implications: The self-rated questionnaire IPAQ can be questioned for use as a direct indicator of health parameters as physical capacity. Further, it seems that the intensity of activity is of importance for physical performance.

  • 11.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Rutberg, Stina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Michaelson, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Physically inactive adolescents’ experiences of engaging in physical activity2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aimed to describe physically inactive adolescents’ experiences and reflections about engaging in physical activity. Methods: Nine graduate students from the third year of upper secondary school (six women and three men) participated in this study. Narrative interviews were used for data collection and qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. Results: The analysis revealed three themes ‘Acknowledging resistance and barriers to performing physical activity’, ‘Knowing that it is good is not enough’, and ‘Feeling included and accepted is fun and motivating’. These themes show that the adolescent’s experienced barriers, acknowledged pros and cons and identified possibilities to be physically active. Conclusions: Identifying experiences that impact on inactive adolescents’ attitude and willingness to perform physical activity can be useful to understand the needs of the individual. By relating these experiences to the different stages of the transtheoretical model, this study could provide valuable knowledge for designing future interventions to enhance physical activity in this target group.

  • 12.
    Rutberg, Stina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Mikaelsson, Katarina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Calner, Tommy
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Massage: ett kompendium2004Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 12 of 12
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