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  • 1.
    Andersson, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Berglund, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    Alias: ytmodellering, animering & visualisering2005Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Tretten, Phillip
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Development of the systematic grading procedure2011In: Design education for creativity and business innovation: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education / [ed] Ahmed Kovacevic, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2011, p. 293-298Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A challenge in design education is the grading of students work when the task is based upon the student’s ability to show applied knowledge. Due to this difficulty the grading criteria needs to be and is most often subjectively focused. As previous research has shown the assessments can vary between teachers, thus, increasing the chance for varied and possibly improper scores. Much has to do with the level of experience and knowledge a particular teacher has and the individual preferences to which parameters make a good picture or animation. The Systematic Grading Procedure (SGP) is a method in which an assignment is broken down and the task is graded depending upon the assessment areas. The aim of this paper is to validate the SGP as a grading method for teachers in 3D modeling and 3D-visualisation and further develop the SGP as an assessment tool for lesser-experienced teachers. The SGP has previously shown to be helpful in giving and receiving feedback. Previous work did not show significant differences between SGP and the commonly used methods but this more extensive study did show that the SGP did significantly help reduce the variation in grading for both experienced 3D teachers and inexperienced 3D teachers but not for non-teachers. There seems to be a good potential for the SGP method to help teachers give more consistent grades and at the same time help students through feedback which helps both by helping them with a better understanding of the grading methods and measures.

  • 3.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Tretten, Phillip
    Systematic grading procedure based on subjective values2010In: When design education and design research meet-: proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) Trondheim, Norway, 2nd-3rd September 2010 / [ed] Casper Boks, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Design education there can be a challenge in grading students when the task is based upon the student's ability to learn new knowledge and apply it. Thus the grading criteria needs to be and is most often subjectively focused. For example, one requirement is that, "the object should have realistic lighting". Since there is no way to, with absolute values, measure whether an image has realistic lighting, the teacher's subjective values are the base for assessment and the student's score. An observed result is that these types of assessments can vary between teachers, thus, increasing the chance for varied and possibly improper scores. Much has to do with the level of experience and knowledge a particular teacher has and the individual differences to which parameters make a good picture or animation. It is also true that two different teachers can find separate items in student's work that are praiseworthy. This paper proposes that it is possible to systematize the evaluation process with a weighting method. A Systematic Grading Procedure (SGP) can be used in design projects to separate and weigh design criteria against each other without losing the overall picture of the work. This method will be tested to see if it can help teachers in grading students more accurately.In Design education there can be a challenge in grading students when the task is based upon the student's ability to learn new knowledge and apply it. Thus the grading criteria needs to be and is most often subjectively focused. For example, one requirement is that, "the object should have realistic lighting". Since there is no way to, with absolute values, measure whether an image has realistic lighting, the teacher's subjective values are the base for assessment and the student's score. An observed result is that these types of assessments can vary between teachers, thus, increasing the chance for varied and possibly improper scores. Much has to do with the level of experience and knowledge a particular teacher has and the individual differences to which parameters make a good picture or animation. It is also true that two different teachers can find separate items in student's work that are praiseworthy. This paper proposes that it is possible to systematize the evaluation process with a weighting method. A Systematic Grading Procedure (SGP) can be used in design projects to separate and weigh design criteria against each other without losing the overall picture of the work. This method will be tested to see if it can help teachers in grading students more accurately.

  • 4.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Tretten, Phillip
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Who wins from academic consulting2013In: Design Education-Growing Our Future: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education (E&pde13, Glasgow: The Design Society Institution of Engineering Designers , 2013, p. 82-87Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    University teachers who start teaching right after graduation have not used and developed their knowledge professionally thus they have never had the opportunity to test their acquired knowledge in practice. This results in teaching that tends to be heavily theoretical because the teacher teaches what he/she has learned in studies, instead of teaching the knowledge gained through professional experience. Unfortunately a teacher can feel insecure when not knowing if their teaching reflects currently used methods and/or appropriate tools. An effect of this can be that teachers who feel insufficient in their role as teachers. The aim of this paper is to see if academic consulting not only increases the practical experience of the teacher, but also helps the teacher in their role and gives them a better understanding of what the state of the art is. While some schools have some cooperation with the business community, both in student projects and research projects, although it is not common with external non-research consultation projects, which are conducted by the university teachers. A questionnaire was sent to both teachers and students’ asking them of their experience of academic consulting’s benefits to the classroom experience. As a follow-up were several interviewed, along with clients to gain more insight. The results showed that teachers, students and the clients benefited from these types of projects.

  • 5.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Tretten, Phillip
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A systematic self-assessment tool2012In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education for Future Wellbeing, EPDE 2012, 2012, p. 311-316Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bologna Process has led to fundamental changes in the way students are taught. This in turn has led to new quality assurance systems for teaching. For good outcomes to occur both the teachers and students need to be aware of the intended learning outcome (ILO) and this is made clearer by well defined Teacher/Learner Activities (TLAs). The Systematic Grading Procedure (SGP) has been shown to assist teachers grading student’s 3D-image work, fulfilling a need for assistance in subjects requiring grading of subjective nature. With the application of this method have both teachers and students been given a tool that helps them better understand the grading process and the level of importance of different parts of the 3D work. The aim of this study was to assess students’ learning outcomes. The SGP was used and compared by both teachers and students in assessing their own work. This study used four students who were introduced to the SGP at the introduction of the course. This was done to give then an idea how they are to understand the ILOs. After one of their assignments was graded the students were given an opportunity to improve their work using the SPG. Three of the four choose to improve their work. The ensuing interview and results showed that the SGP could be used as a tool to help students and teachers with the ILO and TLAs. In addition to that the SGP should further be tested for verification.

  • 6.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Tretten, Phillip
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Högström, Per
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Is video feedback in higher education worth a byte?2015In: Great Expectations: Design Teaching, Research & Enterprise: Design Teaching, Research & Enterprise - Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education (E&PDE15) / [ed] Ahmed Kovacevic ; Guy Bingham; Brian Parkinsson, Glasgow: The Design Society Institution of Engineering Designers , 2015, p. 258-263Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feedback can be given in various situations, like after examinations, project work, and course completion. It is widely accepted that feedback is important for students’ learning, and it can be used in various ways, such as, written, face-to-face, and with the assistance of video recordings. This study focuses on the use of video recorded feedback to gather knowledge on how video recorded feedback can enhance the students learning. Since feedback in the study was given in video recordings, an alternate way was introduced, which add further insights for teaching and learning at university levels. The results showed that 94% preferred video recorded feedback over written feedback and they, in general, preferred face to face feedback (59%). Although, follow-up questions showed that the students found the recorded option beneficial since they could review the video several times in order to see and hear exactly what was stated and what part of their work it related to. In conclusion, video feedback of student work was perceived to be beneficial and the students and the teacher positively accepted it.

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