Change search
Refine search result
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bulota, Mindaugas
    et al.
    Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, School of Materials, University of Manchester.
    Hughes, Mark R.
    Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University.
    Eichhorn, Stephen J.
    College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter.
    Micromechanics of TEMPO-oxidized fibrillated cellulose composites2012In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 331-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composites of poly(lactic) acid (PLA) reinforced with TEMPO-oxidized fibrillated cellulose (TOFC) were prepared to 15, 20, 25, and 30% fiber weight fractions. To aid dispersion and to improve stress transfer, we acetylated the TOFC prior to the fabrication of TOFC-PLA composite films. Raman spectroscopy was employed to study the deformation micromechanics in these systems. Microtensile specimens were prepared from the films and deformed in tension with Raman spectra being collected simultaneously during deformation. A shift in a Raman peak initially located at ∼1095 cm -1, assigned to C-O-C stretching of the cellulose backbone, was observed upon deformation, indicating stress transfer from the matrix to the TOFC reinforcement. The highest band shift rate, with respect to strain, was observed in composites having a 30% weight fraction of TOFC. These composites also displayed a significantly higher strain to failure compared to pure acetylated TOFC film, and to the composites having lower weight fractions of TOFC. The stress-transfer processes that occur in microfibrillated cellulose composites are discussed with reference to the micromechanical data presented. It is shown that these TOFC-based composite materials are progressively dominated by the mechanics of the networks, and a shear-lag type stress transfer between fibers.

  • 2.
    Isarankura Na Ayutthaya, Siriorn
    et al.
    Division of Materials Technology, School of Energy, Environment and Materials, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology (KMUTT)Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Sangkhun, Weradesh
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy (HyNAE), School of Energy, Environment and Materials, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok.
    Wootthikanokkhan, Jatuphorn
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology (KMUTT)Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Effect of clay content on morphology and processability of electrospun keratin/poly(lactic acid) nanofiber2016In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 85, p. 585-595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research work has concerned the development of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) removal filters from biomaterials, based on keratin extracted from chicken feather waste and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) (50/50%w/w) blend. Clay (Na-montmorillonite) was also added to the blend solution prior to carrying out an electro-spinning process. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of clay content on viscosity, conductivity, and morphology of the electrospun fibers. Scanning electron micrographs showed that smooth and bead-free fibers were obtained when clay content used was below 2 pph. XRD patterns of the electrospun fibers indicated that the clay was intercalated and exfoliated within the polymers matrix. Percentage crystallinity of keratin in the blend increased after adding the clay, as evidenced from FTIR spectra and DSC thermograms. Transmission electron micrographs revealed a kind of core-shell structure with clay being predominately resided within the keratin rich shell and at the interfacial region. Filtration performance of the electrospun keratin/PLA fibers, described in terms of pressure drop and its capability of removing methylene blue, were also explored. Overall, our results demonstrated that it was possible to improve process-ability, morphology and filtration efficiency of the electrospun keratin fibers by adding a suitable amount of clay.

  • 3.
    Isarankura Na Ayutthaya, Siriorn
    et al.
    Division of Materials Technology, School of Energy, Environment and Materials, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Learning Institute, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, .
    Wootthikanokkhan, Jatuphorn
    Division of Materials Technology, School of Energy, Environment and Materials, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok.
    Keratin Extracted from Chicken Feather Waste: Extraction, Preparation, and Structural Characterization of the Keratin and Keratin/Biopolymer Films and Electrospuns2015In: Journal of polymers and the environment, ISSN 1064-7546, E-ISSN 1572-8900, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 506-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, keratin was extracted from chicken feather waste via an environment-friendly method, sulphitolysis method, by using various sodium metabisulphite contents (0.0–0.5 M). Percentage yield and molecular weight of the extracted keratin were characterized by gravimetry and gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), respectively. It was found that the yield increased, with the increase of sodium meta-bisulphite content, to the maximum value of 87.6 % yield, by using sodium meta-bisulphite content at 0.2 M. Molecular weight range of the product also decreased with the increase of the sodium meta-bisulphite content. The extracted keratin, with highest molecular weight ranged between 12 and 20 kDa, was further used for fabricating into fibers by using the electrospinning process. It was found that pure keratin solution could not be electrospun into fiber. However, by blending keratin with more than 10 wt% PLA, the fibers can be prepared. Results from FTIR and DSC also reveal that the crystal structure of the keratin changed from the β-sheet structure (rigid and small displacement characteristic) to the α-helix structure (elastic and large displacement characteristic) after keratin/PLA blends (10–50 wt% keratin) were prepared by the electrospinning method.

  • 4.
    Jaruttrakool, R.
    et al.
    Center of Excellence in Textiles, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Center of Excellence in Textiles, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok.
    Pentrakoon, Duanghathai
    Center of Excellence in Textiles, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok .
    Potiyaraj, Pranut
    Center of Excellence in Textiles, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok.
    Reactive blending of thermoplastic polyurethane and polypropylene2010In: International polymer processing, ISSN 0930-777X, E-ISSN 2195-8602, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 327-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research, reactive blending of thermoplastic polyurethane(TPU) and polypropylene (PP) was studied. Grafting of maleic anhydride (MAH) onto TPU/PP blends was performed by a twin-screw extruder in the presence of dicumyl peroxide (DCP). Mechanical properties and morphology of the blends were investigated by tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Thermal properties of the blends were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The obtained results were compared with those of the uncompatibilized blends and the blends compatibilized with a commercial maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (PP-g-MA). The results from the uncompatibilized blends clearly indicate that the TPU and PP are immiscible resulting in undesirable properties of the blends. These properties were improved significantly when TPU and PP were reactive-blended in the presence of MAH and DCP. When comparing with the blends compatibilized with PP-g-MA, the blends prepared by the reactive blending technique possessed better mechanical properties.

  • 5.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Siquiera, Gilberto
    Applied Wood Materials Laboratory, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA), CH-8600 Dübendorf.
    Zhou, Qi
    School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), AlbaNova University Centre, Stockholm.
    Butylina, Svetlana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Zhou, Xiaojian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Hooshmand, Saleh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Review of the recent developments in cellulose nanocomposite processing2016In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 83, p. 2-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review addresses the recent developments of the processing of cellulose nanocomposites, focusing on the most used techniques, including solution casting, melt-processing of thermoplastic cellulose nanocomposites and resin impregnation of cellulose nanopapers using thermoset resins. Important techniques, such as partially dissolved cellulose nanocomposites, nanocomposite foams reinforced with nanocellulose, as well as long continuous fibers or filaments, are also addressed. It is shown how the research on cellulose nanocomposites has rapidly increased during the last 10 years, and manufacturing techniques have been developed from simple casting to these more sophisticated methods. To produce cellulose nanocomposites for commercial use, the processing of these materials must be developed from laboratory to industrially viable methods.

  • 6.
    Phanwiroj, Prompoom
    et al.
    Center of Excellence in Textiles, Department of Materials Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    cLearning institute, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok.
    Potiyaraj, Pranut
    Center of Excellence in Textiles, Department of Materials Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok.
    Effects of preparation parameters on morphology of cellulose nanowhiskers2014In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 1044-1045, p. 35-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research was to study the parameters on the properties of cellulose nanowhiskers. Cellulose nanowhiskers were prepared from two different cellulose sources (filter paper and alpha cellulose), and their morphology were further investigated. Cellulose nanowhiskers were firstly extracted from two commercial cellulose sources (paper filter and alpha cellulose) using sulfuric treatement with treatment times of 20, 45, 70, 95 and 120 min respectively and temperature of 37, 45 and 60 °C respectively. The hydrolyzed cellulose was then neutralized with two different techniques, dialysis and titration. The samples were subsequently sonicated, and freezed dried. The effect of preparation conditions on the morphology of cellulose nanowhiskers was investigated. Cellulose nanowhiskers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that 9 nm diameter cellulose nanowhiskers can be prepared. A possible correlation between the preparation conditions and cellulose particle sizes could not be observed, but the titration process used to neutralize cellulose can shorten the length of the preparation time from 168 h to only 50 h.

  • 7.
    Potiyaraj, Pranut
    et al.
    Department of Materials Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok .
    Phanwiroj, Prompoom
    Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok .
    Physical properties of PP/recycled PET blends prepared by pulverization technique2012In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 488-489, p. 109-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer blends between pristine polypropylene (PP) and post-consumer soft-drink PET bottles (rPET) were prepared using pulverization technique. The polymer mixtures were pulverized, at the amounts of rPET in PP of 0, 10, 15, 20 and 30 phr (parts per hundred of resin) by weight, into powder. In an extruder, the polymer powders were mixed with maleic anhydride-grafted polypropylene (MAPP) and polyethylene wax (PE wax) as a compatibilizer and a processing aid, respectively. The extrudates were prepared into test specimens by injection molding. Physical properties of PP/rPET blends were subsequently investigated. The results pointed out that, for the pulverized blends without compatibilizer, tensile and flexural strength were improved at the lower amount of rPET. The compatibilizing effect of MAPP was exhibited at the higher amount of rPET. The reduction of melt flow index (MFI) may cause difficulties for some processing techniques which required polymers with high MFI. The addition of PE wax successfully brought up the MFI as well as elongation at break while other mechanical properties decreased.

  • 8.
    Song, Tao
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Cross-linked cellulose nanocrystal poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels: Mechanical properties and creep recovery2017In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Song, Tao
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. University of Oulu.
    Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) foams reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs)2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 1925-1938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) foams reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were prepared with formaldehyde as a crosslinking agent. Two initial reaction times (10, 120 s) and the addition of CNCs (0–2 wt% based on total reaction suspension) were found to affect the foam density, water uptake, morphology and mechanical properties. A longer initial reaction time resulted in higher mechanical properties and density, due to the small pore size. The addition of CNCs induced a progressive decrease in the pore diameter and an increase in the foam density, as well as improved mechanical properties. With 1.5 wt% CNC content, the compressive strength of the PVA foams was significantly improved from 7 to 58 kPa for 10 s-initial reaction time and from 65 to 115 kPa for 120 s-initial reaction time. Results showed that the cross-linked PVA foams with CNC had promising properties for use in biomedical applications.

  • 10.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    et al.
    Learning Institute, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok.
    Kaew-In, K.
    Department of Materials Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok.
    Potiyaraj, Pranut
    Department of Materials Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok.
    Effect of the plain-woven fabrics on mechanical properties of composites2016In: Advanced Materials, Structures and Mechanical Engineering: Proceedings of the International Conference on Advanced Materials, Structures and Mechanical Engineering2016 / [ed] Kaloop M., CRC Press/Balkema , 2016, p. 337-340Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The plan-woven cotton fabric was used as reinforcement to prepare all-cellulose composites. Microcrystalline Crystalline (MCC) was firstly dissolved in a solution of lithium chloride and N, N-dimethylacetamide (LiCl/DMAc) to prepare a clear transparent solution. The plain-woven fabric was then immersed in the solution, and the all-cellulose composite was finally formed. Mechanical properties and morphology of the composites were investigated using tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Results of mechanical properties reveal the presence of the plain-woven fabrics improves mechanical properties of the cellulose films. This is because of the good interaction between the matrix and reinforcement

  • 11.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Cross-linked nanocomposite hydrogels based on cellulose nanocrystals and PVA: Mechanical properties and creep recovery2016In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 88, p. 226-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels with a water content of ∼92% were successfully prepared with glutaraldehyde (GA) as a cross-linker. The effects of the CNC content on the thermal stability, swelling ratio and mechanical and viscoelastic properties of the cross-linked hydrogels were investigated. The compressive strength at 60% strain for the hydrogels with 1 wt% CNCs increased by 303%, from 17.5 kPa to 53 kPa. The creep results showed that the addition of CNCs decreased the creep elasticity due to molecular chain restriction. The almost complete strain recovery (∼97%) after fixed load removal for 15 min was observed from the hydrogels with CNCs, compared with 92% strain recovery of the neat cross-linked PVA hydrogels. The incorporation of CNCs did not affect the swelling ratio and thermal stability of the hydrogels. These results suggest the cross-linked CNC-PVA hydrogels have potential for use in biomedical and tissue engineering applications.

  • 12.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Learning Institute, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok; Nanotec–KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Fibre and Particle Engineering, University of Oulu.
    Crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) composite films with cellulose nanocrystals: Mechanical and thermal properties2017In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 135, no 3, article id 45710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were crosslinked using sodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax) to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of the neat PVA. The results showed that the CNCs affected the crystallization behavior of the crosslinked PVA. The crystallization temperature of the crosslinked PVA with CNCs increased considerably from ∼152 to ∼187 °C. The continuous improvement of the thermal stability was observed with the increasing content of CNCs in the crosslinked PVA films. Additionally, the strong interaction between the CNCs and PVA was theoretically estimated from the Young's modulus values of the composites. Thermodynamic mechanical testing revealed that the crosslinked PVA composite films with CNCs could bear higher loads at high temperature compared to the films without the CNCs. At 60 °C, 2.7 GPa was reported for the storage modulus of the crosslinked composites with 3 wt % of CNCs, twice as high as that for the crosslinked films without CNCs. Moreover, creep results were improved when CNCs were added in the crosslinked nanocomposites. The materials prepared in this work could broaden the opportunities for applications in a wide range of temperatures.

  • 13.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    et al.
    Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester.
    Quero, Franck
    Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester.
    Nogi, Masaya
    cInstitute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University.
    Yano, Hiroyuki
    Research Institute for the Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University.
    Young, Robert J.
    Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester.
    Lindström, Tom
    Innventia AB.
    Sampson, William W.
    Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester.
    Eichhorn, Stephen J.
    Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester.
    Effective young's modulus of bacterial and microfibrillated cellulose fibrils in fibrous networks2012In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 1340-1349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The deformation micromechanics of bacterial cellulose (BC) and microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) networks have been investigated using Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of both BC and MFC networks exhibit a band initially located at ∼1095 cm-1. We have used the intensity of this band as a function of rotation angle of the specimens to study the cellulose fibril orientation in BC and MFC networks. We have also used the change in this peak's wavenumber position with applied tensile deformation to probe the stress-transfer behavior of these cellulosic materials. The intensity of this Raman band did not change significantly with rotation angle, indicating an in-plane 2D network of fibrils with uniform random orientation; conversely, a highly oriented flax fiber exhibited a marked change in intensity with rotation angle. Experimental data and theoretical analysis shows that the Raman band shift rate arising from deformation of networks under tension is dependent on the angles between the axis of fibrils, the strain axis, the incident laser polarization direction, and the back scattered polarization configurations. From this analysis, the effective moduli of single fibrils of BC and MFC in the networks were estimated to be in the ranges of 79-88 and 29-36 GPa, respectively. It is shown also that for the model to fit the data it is necessary to use a negative Poisson's ratio for MFC networks and BC networks. Discussion of this in-plane "auxetic" behavior is given.

  • 14.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    et al.
    Learning Institute, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi.
    Sampson, William W.
    School of Materials, University of Manchester.
    Eichhorn, Stephen J.
    College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter.
    Microfibrillated cellulose reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) composites2013In: Advanced Materials Research, ISSN 1022-6680, E-ISSN 1662-8985, Vol. 747, p. 359-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) was successfully prepared from lyocell fibers using combined homogenization and sonication treatments. MFC fibrils with a mean diameter of ~365 nm were observed, after the lyocell fibers with diameters of ~10 μm were mechanically treated for 60 min. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composites reinforced with MFC were then fabricated using a solvent casting method. Physical and mechanical properties of the MFC reinforced PVA composites were investigated. An increase of ~13 and ~34% of tensile strength and Young's modulus was observed for the 3 wt% MFC reinforced composites, compared to those of the pure PVA. Raman spectroscopy was also employed to study the deformation micromechanics of the MFC reinforced PVA composites. The position of the Raman peak initially located at ~1095 cm-1, corresponding to the C-O ring stretching and C-O-C glycosidic bond stretching modes, was recorded. During tensile deformation, this peak was observed to shift towards a lower wavenumber position, indicating stress-transfer between the resin and the fibrils.

  • 15.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    et al.
    Learning Institute, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi.
    Sampson, William W.
    School of Materials, University of Manchester.
    Eichhorn, Stephen J.
    College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter.
    Stress transfer in microfibrillated cellulose reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) composites2014In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 65, p. 186-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combined homogenisation and sonication treatments of micron-sized lyocell fibres were used to generate microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) with fibril diameters of ∼350 nm. No further reduction in fibril diameter was observed after 30 min treatment. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composites reinforced with these fibrils were fabricated using solvent casting and physical and mechanical properties were investigated. The presence of MFC in PVA increased the thermal degradation of the polymer. An increase in both the tensile strength and modulus of the composites was observed for up to 3 wt.% of fibrils; beyond this point no significant increases were observed. An estimate of ∼39 GPa is made for the fibril modulus based on this increase. Stress-transfer between the polymer resin and the fibrils was investigated using Raman spectroscopy. Stress transfer in the composite is shown to be greater than that of a pure network of fibres, indicating a good fibre-matrix bond

  • 16.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    et al.
    School of Materials, University of Manchester.
    Sampson, William W.
    School of Materials, University of Manchester.
    Eichhorn, Stephen J.
    College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter.
    Stress-transfer in microfibrillated cellulose reinforced poly(lactic acid) composites using Raman spectroscopy2012In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 1145-1152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lyocell fibres were used to make microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) by combined homogenisation and sonication. A web-like structure was obtained with fibril diameters in the range of several micrometers to less than 80 nm. Composite samples with PLA resin reinforced with MFC networks were prepared using compression moulding. Young's modulus and tensile strength of these composites increased by ∼60% and 14% respectively, compared to the pure resin material. Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor the molecular deformation of networks and composite materials. A Raman band initially located at ∼1095 cm -1 was observed to shift towards a lower wavenumber position upon tensile deformation. The rate of Raman band shift with respect to strain for the composites was higher than for the pure MFC networks, indicating that the observed improvement in mechanical properties results from stress transfer from the PLA resin to the MFC fibrils.

  • 17.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    et al.
    Learning Institute King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi Bangkok .
    Witayakran, Suteera
    Kasetsart Agricultural and Agro-Industrial Product Improvement Institute Kasetsart University Bangkok.
    All-cellulose composites from pineapple leaf microfibers: Structural, thermal, and mechanical properties2018In: Polymer Composites, ISSN 0272-8397, E-ISSN 1548-0569, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 895-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pineapple leaf microfibers (PALM) were used to prepare all‐cellulose composites using the surface selective dissolution method. Effect of dissolution times on mechanical and physical properties of the all‐cellulose composites was investigated. The structural transformation from cellulose I to cellulose II was observed when the fibers were dissolved in a mixed solution of lithium chloride (LiCl) and N,N‐dimethylacetamide (DMAc). Values of 42.8 MPa and 1.2 GPa for tensile strength and Young's modulus, respectively, were obtained from the composites with 120 min dissolution time in the LiCl/DMAc solution, whereas the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the undissolved PALM mats were found to be only 1.5 MPa and 0.1 GPa, respectively. The failure mechanism of the composites was changed from the fiber pull‐out to the fiber breakage when the dissolution time was longer. However, lower thermal stability and degree of crystallinity of the composites were caused by the change of the cellulose structure. The composites prepared in this work can be called as biodegradable materials, and could be the potential candidates to replace nonbiodegradable materials.

  • 18.
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    et al.
    Learning Institute, King Mongkut's University of Technology, Thonburi, Bangkok.
    Witayakran, Suteera
    Kasetsart Agricultural and Agro-Industrial Product Improvement Institute, Kasetsart University, Bangkok.
    Mechanical properties of all-cellulose composites made from pineapple leaf microfibers2015In: Key Engineering Materials, ISSN 1013-9826, E-ISSN 1662-9795, Vol. 659, p. 453-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pineapple leaf microfibers were firstly prepared using steam explosion, and all-cellulose composites were subsequently prepared using a surface selective dissolution process with the solvent of lithium chloride and N,N-dimethylacetamide (LiCl/DMAc). Mechanical properties and surface morphology of all-cellulose composites with immersion times of pineapple leaf microfibers in the solvent of LiCl/DMAc were investigated using tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The tensile strength of the all-cellulose composites with 120 min-immersion time was approximately 28 times higher than that of the pineapple leaf microfiber mats. These biocomposites made from pineapple leaf microfibers could be one of the potential alternatives to replace glass fiber reinforced composites.

  • 19.
    Yuwawech, Kitti
    et al.
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi(KMUTT), Bangkok.
    Wootthikanokkhan, Jatuphorn
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology (KMUTT)Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology (KMUTT)Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Effects of Two Different Cellulose Nanofiber Types on Properties of Poly(vinyl alcohol) Composite Films2015In: Journal of Nanomaterials, ISSN 1687-4110, E-ISSN 1687-4129, Vol. 2015, article id 908689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work concerns a study on the effects of fiber types and content of cellulose nanofiber on mechanical, thermal, and optical properties polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites. Two different types of cellulose nanofibers, which are nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and bacterial cellulose (BC), were prepared under various mechanical treatment times and then incorporated into the PVA prior to the fabrication of composite films. It was found that tensile modulus of the PVA film increased with nanofibers content at the expense of its percentage elongation value. DSC thermograms indicate that percentage crystallinity of PVA increased after adding 2-4 wt% of the fibers. This contributed to the better mechanical properties of the composites. Tensile toughness values of the PVA/BC nanocomposite films were also superior to those of the PVA/NFC system containing the same fiber loading. SEM images of the composite films reveal that tensile fractured surface of PVA/BC experienced more ductile deformation than the PVA/NFC analogue. The above discrepancies were discussed in the light of differences between the two types of fibers in terms of diameter and their intrinsic properties. Lastly, percentage total visible light transmittance values of the PVA composite films were greater than 90%, regardless of the fiber type and content.

  • 20.
    Yuwawech, Kitti
    et al.
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi(KMUTT), Bangkok.
    Wootthikanokkhan, Jatuphorn
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology (KMUTT)Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology (KMUTT)Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Enhancement of thermal, mechanical and barrier properties of EVA solar cell encapsulating films by reinforcing with esterified cellulose nanofibres2015In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 48, p. 12-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solar cell encapsulating film based on ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) was modified by using bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibres. Bacterial cellulose was chemically modified with propionic anhydride prior to compounding with EVA in a twin screw extruder. The effects of fibre content on the mechanical, thermal, optical and barrier properties of the EVA composite films were investigated. Better mechanical and barrier properties of the EVA films were obtained when the modified BC nanofibres were used. The results were ascribed to the different chemical functional groups on the fibre surface, as verified by FTIR spectra. Deacetylation of the EVA was delayed and visible light transparency of the EVA films above 75% was retained. Overall, our study showed that it was possible to improve the barrier properties of EVA film without sacrificing much transparency by using a suitable type and content of cellulose nanofibres.

  • 21.
    Yuwawech, Kitti
    et al.
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology (KMUTT)Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Wootthikanokkhan, Jatuphorn
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology (KMUTT)Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Wanwong, Sompit
    Nanotec-KMUTT Center of Excellence on Hybrid Nanomaterials for Alternative Energy, King Mongkut's University of Technology (KMUTT)Thonburi, Bangkok .
    Tanpichai, Supachok
    School of EnergyEnvironment and Materials, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi (KMUTT)Bangkok .
    Polyurethane/esterified cellulose nanocrystal composites as a transparent moisture barrier coating for encapsulation of dye sensitized solar cells2017In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 134, no 45, article id 45010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research work aims to investigate the effects of types and concentration of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) prepared from bacterial cellulose (BC) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) on structure properties of polyurethane (PU) composites. Feasibility of applying the polymer composite for encapsulation of dye sensitized solar cells was of interest. Both CNCs were pretreated via esterification before mixing with the polyurethane by a solution process. Tensile strength and thermal stability of the PU/esterified CNCs were found to be superior to those of the systems reinforced with untreated CNCs. With the introduction of both untreated and esterified CNCs, water vapor transmission rates through the PU composite films were lowered while their visible light transmittance values were maintained to be above 80%. Also, better efficiency and stability of the solar cell were obtained when the PU was reinforced with CNCs, indicating its longer lifetime usage. The most suitable cell, described in terms of durability, was obtained when the PU was mixed with 2 wt % of esterified CNCs obtained from BC. Overall, this study shows that the surface modification of the CNCs is an important factor, affecting the reinforcing efficacy.

1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf