Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Goetz, Lee
    et al.
    Institute of Paper Science and Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta.
    Folston, Marcus
    Institute of Paper Science and Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Ragauskas, Arthur J.
    Institute of Paper Science and Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta.
    Poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid)-Polyethylene glycol nanocomposites cross-linked in situ with cellulose nanowhiskers2010In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 11, no 10, p. 2660-2666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocomposites were developed by cross-linking cellulose nanowhiskers with poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid) and polyethylene glycol. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed cross-linking occurs between the matrix and cellulose nanowhiskers via an esterification reaction. Proton NMR T 2 relaxation experiments provided information on the mobility of the polymer chains within the matrix, which can be related to the structure of the cross-linked nanocomposite. The nanocomposite was found to consist of mobile chain portions between cross-linked junction points and immobilized chain segments near or at those junction points, whose relative fraction increased upon further incorporation of cellulose nanowhiskers. Atomic force microscopy images showed a homogeneous dispersion of nanowhiskers in the matrix even at high nanowhisker content, which can be attributed to cross-linking of the nanowhiskers in the matrix. Relative humidity conditions were found to affect the mechanical properties of the composites negatively while the nanowhiskers content had a positive effect. It is expected that the cross-links between the matrix and the cellulose nanowhiskers trap the nanowhiskers in the cross-linked network, preventing nanowhisker aggregation subsequently producing cellulose nanocomposites with unique mechanical behaviors. The results show that in situ cross-linking of cellulose nanowhiskers with a matrix polymer is a promising route to obtain nanocomposites with well dispersed nanowhiskers, tailored nanostructure, and mechanical performance

  • 2.
    Goetz, Lee
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Jalvo, Bianca
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Alcalá.
    Rosal, Roberto
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Alcalá.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Superhydrophilic anti-fouling electrospun cellulose acetate membranes coated with chitin nanocrystals for water filtration2016In: Journal of Membrane Science, ISSN 0376-7388, E-ISSN 1873-3123, Vol. 510, p. 238-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) random mats were prepared and surface coated with chitin nanocrystals (ChNC) to obtain water filtration membranes with tailored surface characteristics. Chitin nanocrystals self-assembled on the surface of CA fibers into homogenous nanostructured networks during drying that stabilized via hydrogen bonding and formed webbed film-structures at the junctions of the electrospun fibers. Coating of CA random mats using 5% chitin nanocrystals increased the strength by 131% and stiffness by 340% accompanied by a decrease in strain. The flux through these membranes was as high as 14217 L m−2 h−1 at 0.5 bar. The chitin nanocrystal surface coating significantly impacted the surface properties of the membranes, producing a superhydrophilic membrane (contact angle 0°) from the original hydrophobic CA mats (contact angle 132°). The coated membranes also showed significant reduction in biofouling and biofilm formation as well as demonstrated improved resistance to fouling with bovine serum albumin and humic acid fouling solutions. The current approach opens up an easy, environmental friendly and efficient route to produce highly hydrophilic membranes with high water flux and low fouling for microfiltration water purification process wash water from food industry for biological contaminants.

  • 3.
    Goetz, Lee
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Karim, Zoheb
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Effect of micropatterned cellulose acetate membranes impregnated with cellulose and chitin nanocrystals on water filtration membrane behavior2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Goetz, Lee
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Gatenholm, Paul
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Ragauskas, Art
    Georgia Institute of Technology.
    A novel nanocomposite film prepared from crosslinked cellulosic whiskers2009In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 85-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose whiskers are increasingly being used as a reinforcing phase in polymer systems and their use is a growing area of importance in bionanocomposite research. Although the reinforcing effect of cellulose whiskers has been studied in various polymers, the impact of crosslinking cellulose whiskers has not been explored so far. This work deals with the development of novel cellulose nanocomposites, wherein the cellulose nanowhiskers are crosslinked with poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid) and poly(ethylene glycol). The morphology of the nanocomposite was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), which revealed a network structure embedded in a continuous phase. The water sorption studies demonstrated that the crosslinked nanocomposites are capable of absorbing up to ~ 900% water and have potential to be used as hydrogels.

  • 5.
    Goetz, Lee
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Ragauskas, Arthur J.
    Thermal gravimetric analysis of in-situ crosslinked nanocellulose whiskers - poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid) - polyethylene glycol2011In: TAPPI Journal, ISSN 0734-1415, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 29-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermal stability and decomposition of in-situ crosslinked nanocellulose whiskers – poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid) – polyethylene glycol formulations (PMVEMA-PEG), (25%, 50%, and 75% whiskers) – were investigated using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) methods. The thermal degradation behavior of the films varied according to the percent cellulose whiskers in each formulation. The presence of cellulose whiskers increased the thermal stability of the PMVEMA-PEG matrix. Application: It is possible to develop novel material properties by cross-linking cellulose whiskers in which the final physical properties are derived from the cross-linking reagents and cross-linking density. This study examines the thermal properties of cross-linking sulfuric acid derived cellulose whiskers with PMVEMA-PEG, which will be a key property as these tunable hydrogels are utilized for value-added packaging applications.

  • 6.
    Goetz, Lee
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Naseri, Narges
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University.
    Nair, Santhosh S.
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University.
    Karim, Zoheb
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University.
    All cellulose electrospun water purification membranes nanotextured using cellulose nanocrystals2018In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 3011-3023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose acetate (CA) fibers were electrospun on a mesh template to create specific surface and pore structures for membrane applications. The mesh template CA fiber mats were impregnated with cellulose nanocrystals at varying weight percentages. The membranes showed nanotextured surfaces and improved mechanical properties post impregnation. More importantly, the hydrophilicity of the original CA fibers was increased from a hydrophobic contact angle of 102°–0° thereby creating an anti-fouling membrane surface structure. The membranes showed rejection of 20–56% for particles of 0.5–2.0 μm, indicating potential of these membranes in rejecting microorganisms from water. Furthermore, high rejection of dyes (80–99%) by adsorption and potential application as highly functional affinity membranes was demonstrated. These membranes can therefore be utilized as all-cellulose, green, scalable and low cost high flux membranes (> 20,000 LMH) for water cleaning applications in food industry where microorganisms and charged contaminants are to be removed.

  • 7.
    Goetz, Lee
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Ragauskas, Art J.
    Georgia Institute of Technology.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Tying cellulose whiskers together2008In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 235, no 229Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Liu, Peng
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Karim, Zoheb
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Goetz, Lee
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Biobased nanoparticles and membranes for water purification via selective adsorption: Possibilities and challenges2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With population expansion and industrialization, water pollutions have become one of the biggest threat to human society today. The combination of biotechnology and nanotechnology offers a new and green way to the problems. Cellulose nanofibers cellulose nanocrystals and chitin nanocrystals have nanoscaled diameters and have high specific surface areas, an advantage in membrane technology and the efficiency can be further enhanced using specific functionalization, enabling highly specific interactions with targeted contaminant entities in water. Moreover, the nano-dimensions of the used active species allow the fabrication of compact and ultra-thin multifunctional membranes by introducing an orientation and/or concentration gradient. This novel water purification approach combines the physical filtration process and the adsorption process exploring the capability of the nanocellulose and/or nanochitin (with or without functionalization) to selectively adsorb, store and desorb contaminants from industrial water and drinking water while passing through a highly permeable membranes/ filters. The aim is to tailor membarnes and filters with high flux which reduces pressure and thereby energy consumption while keeping the high selectivity efficiency due to surface adsorption. The results showed highly efficient removal of metal ions (Ag+, Cu2+ and Fe3)+ from mirror making industry using nanocellulose based membranes. High removal efficiency of dyes, nitrates and organic foulants using bio- based membranes/ filters was also confirmed. The nanocellulose and nanochitin based membranes also showed significant resistance to bio-fouling. The scaled up membranes is expected to be used in the form of spiral wound modules, cartridge modules and MBR modules for water treatment in mirror industries, printing industries, mining industries as well as municipal water and storm water in Europe.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf