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  • 1.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Spanopoulos, Athanasios
    Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 5 Iroon Polytechniou Str, Zografou Campus, Athens, Greece.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Single cell oil and ethanol production by the oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans utilizing dried sweet sorghum stalks2020In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 146, p. 1609-1617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of the oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans to efficiently produce lipids when cultivated in dried sweet sorghum was evaluated. First, lipid production was evaluated in synthetic media mimicking the composition of sweet sorghum stalks and optimized based on the nitrogen source and C: N ratio. Under optimum conditions, the lipid production reached 3.66 g/L with 21.91% w/w lipid content by using a mixture of sucrose, glucose and fructose and peptone at C: N ratio 160. Cultivation on pre-saccharified sweet sorghum stalks offered 1.97 g/L, while it was found that sweet sorghum stalks can support yeast growth and lipid production without the need for external nitrogen source addition. At an attempt to increase the carbon source concentration for optimizing lipid production, the Crabtree effect was observed in T. fermentans. To this end, the yeast was evaluated for its potential to produce ethanol under anaerobic conditions in synthetic media and sweet sorghum. The ethanol concentration at 100 g/L glucose was 40.31 g/L, while utilizing sweet sorghum by adding a distinct saccharification step and external nitrogen source offered ethanol concentration equal to 23.5 g/L. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time that the Crabtree effect is observed in T. fermentans.

  • 2.
    Bonturi, Nemailla
    et al.
    Department of Materials and Bioprocess Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Miranda, Everson Alves
    Department of Materials and Bioprocess Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas.
    Berglund, Kris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Single Cell Oil Producing Yeasts Lipomyces starkeyi and Rhodosporidium toruloides: Selection of Extraction Strategies and Biodiesel Property Prediction2015In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 5040-5052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single cell oils (SCOs) are considered potential raw material for the production of biodiesel. Rhodosporidium sp. and Lipomyces sp. are good candidates for SCO production. Lipid extractability differs according to yeast species and literature on the most suitable method for each oleaginous yeast species is scarce. This work aimed to investigate the efficiency of the most cited strategies for extracting lipids from intact and pretreated cells of Rhodosporidium toruloides and Lipomyces starkeyi. Lipid extractions were conducted using hexane or combinations of chloroform and methanol. The Folch method resulted in the highest lipid yields for both yeasts (42% for R. toruloides and 48% for L. starkeyi). Also, this method eliminates the cell pretreatment step. The Bligh and Dyer method underestimated the lipid content in the tested strains (25% for R. toruloides and 34% for L. starkeyi). Lipid extractability increased after acid pretreatment for the Pedersen, hexane, and Bligh and Dyer methods. For R. toruloides unexpected fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) composition were found for some lipid extraction strategies tested. Therefore, this work provides useful information for analytical and process development aiming at biodiesel production from the SCO of these two yeast species.

  • 3.
    Kalogiannis, Konstantinos G
    et al.
    Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute (CPERI), Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), 6th km Harilaou-Thermi Rd, 57001 Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Aspden, James
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Lappas, Angelos A
    Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute (CPERI), Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), 6th km Harilaou-Thermi Rd, 57001 Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Acid Assisted Organosolv Delignification of Beechwood and Pulp Conversion towards High Concentrated Cellulosic Ethanol via High Gravity Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Fermentation2018In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 23, no 7, article id 1647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Future biorefineries will focus on converting low value waste streams to chemical products that are derived from petroleum or refined sugars. Feedstock pretreatment in a simple, cost effective, agnostic manner is a major challenge.

    Methods: In this work, beechwood sawdust was delignified via an organosolv process, assisted by homogeneous inorganic acid catalysis. Mixtures of water and several organic solvents were evaluated for their performance. Specifically, ethanol (EtOH), acetone (AC), and methyl- isobutyl- ketone (MIBK) were tested with or without the use of homogeneous acid catalysis employing sulfuric, phosphoric, and oxalic acids under relatively mild temperature of 175 °C for one hour.

    Results: Delignification degrees (DD) higher than 90% were achieved, where both AC and EtOH proved to be suitable solvents for this process. Both oxalic and especially phosphoric acid proved to be good alternative catalysts for replacing sulfuric acid. High gravity simultaneous saccharification and fermentation with an enzyme loading of 8.4 mg/gsolids at 20 wt.% initial solids content reached an ethanol yield of 8.0 w/v%.

    Conclusions: Efficient delignification combining common volatile solvents and mild acid catalysis allowed for the production of ethanol at high concentration in an efficient manner

  • 4.
    Kalogiannis, Konstantinos G.
    et al.
    Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute (CPERI), Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Lappas, Angelos A.
    Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute (CPERI), Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Aromatics from Beechwood Organosolv Lignin through Thermal and Catalytic Pyrolysis2019In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 12, no 9, article id 1606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomass fractionation, as an alternative to biomass pretreatment, has gained increasing research attention over the past few years as it provides separate streams of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. These streams can be used separately and can provide a solution for improving the economics of emerging biorefinery technologies. The sugar streams are commonly used in microbial conversions, whereas during recent years lignin has been recognized as a valuable compound as it is the only renewable and abundant source of aromatic chemicals. Successfully converting lignin into valuable chemicals and products is key in achieving both environmental and economic sustainability of future biorefineries. In this work, lignin retrieved from beechwood sawdust delignification pretreatment via an organosolv process was depolymerized with thermal and catalytic pyrolysis. ZSM-5 commercial catalyst was used in situ to upgrade the lignin bio-oil vapors. Lignins retrieved from different modes of organosolv pretreatment were tested in order to evaluate the effect that upstream pretreatment has on the lignin fraction. Both thermal and catalytic pyrolysis yielded oils rich in phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons. Use of ZSM-5 catalyst assisted in overall deoxygenation of the bio-oils and enhanced aromatic hydrocarbons production. The oxygen content of the bio-oils was reduced at the expense of their yield. Organosolv lignins were successfully depolymerized towards phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons via thermal and catalytic pyrolysis. Hence, lignin pyrolysis can be an effective manner for lignin upgrading towards high added value products

  • 5.
    Karnaouri, Anthi C
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Topakas, Evangelos
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Department of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology Laboratory, National Technical University of Athens.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Development of Thermophilic Tailor-Made Enzyme Mixtures for the Bioconversion of Agricultural and Forest Residues2016In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 7, article id 177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though the main components of all lignocellulosic feedstocks include cellulose, hemicellulose, as well as the protective lignin matrix, there are some differences in structure, such as in hardwoods and softwoods, which may influence the degradability of the materials. Under this view, various types of biomass might require a minimal set of enzymes that has to be tailor-made. Partially defined complex mixtures that are currently commercially used are not adapted to efficiently degrade different materials, so novel enzyme mixtures have to be customized. Development of these cocktails requires better knowledge about the specific activities involved, in order to optimize hydrolysis. The role of filamentous fungus Myceliophthora thermophila and its complete enzymatic repertoire for the bioconversion of complex carbohydrates has been widely proven. In this study, four core cellulases (MtCBH7, MtCBH6, MtEG5, and MtEG7), in the presence of other four “accessory” enzymes (mannanase, lytic polyssacharide monooxygenase MtGH61, xylanase, MtFae1a) and β-glucosidase MtBGL3, were tested as a nine-component cocktail against one model substrate (phosphoric acid swollen cellulose) and four hydrothermally pretreated natural substrates (wheat straw as an agricultural waste, birch, and spruce biomass, as forest residues). Synergistic interactions among different enzymes were determined using a suitable design of experiments methodology. The results suggest that for the hydrolysis of the pure substrate (PASC), high proportions of MtEG7 are needed for efficient yields. MtCBH7 and MtEG7 are enzymes of major importance during the hydrolysis of pretreated wheat straw, while MtCBH7 plays a crucial role in case of spruce. Cellobiohydrolases MtCBH6 and MtCBH7 act in combination and are key enzymes for the hydrolysis of the hardwood (birch). Optimum combinations were predicted from suitable statistical models which were able to further increase hydrolysis yields, suggesting that tailor-made enzyme mixtures targeted toward a particular residual biomass can help maximize hydrolysis yields. The present work demonstrates the change from “one cocktail for all” to “tailor-made cocktails” that are needed for the efficient saccharification of targeted feed stocks prior to the production of biobased products through the biorefinery concept.

  • 6.
    Karnaouri, Anthi C
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Topakas, Evangelos
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Fine-tuned enzymatic hydrolysis of organosolv pretreated forest materials for the efficient production of cellobiose2018In: Frontiers in Chemistry, E-ISSN 2296-2646, Vol. 6, article id 128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-digestible oligosaccharides (NDOs) are likely prebiotic candidates that have been related to the prevention of intestinal infections and other disorders for both humans and animals. Lignocellulosic biomass is the largest carbon source in the biosphere, therefore cello-oligosacharides (COS), especially cellobiose, are potentially the most widely available choice of NDOs. Production of COS and cellobiose with enzymes offers numerous benefits over acid-catalyzed processes, as it is milder, environmentally friendly and produces fewer by-products. Cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) and a class of endoglucanases (EGs), namely processive EGs, are key enzymes for the production of COS, as they have higher preference toward glycosidic bonds near the end of cellulose chains and are able to release soluble products. In this work, we describe the heterologous expression and characterization of two CBHs from the filamentous fungus Thermothelomyces thermophila, as well as their synergism with proccessive EGs for cellobiose release from organosolv pretreated spruce and birch. The properties, inhibition kinetics and substrate specific activities for each enzyme are described in detail. The results show that a combination of EGs belonging to Glycosyl hydrolase families 5, 6 and 9, with a CBHI and CBHII in appropriate proportions, can enhance the production of COS from forest materials, underpinning the potential of these biocatalysts in the production of NDOs.

  • 7.
    Katsimpouras, Constantinos
    et al.
    Industrial Biotechnology & Biocatalysis Group, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
    Zacharopoulou, Maria
    Industrial Biotechnology & Biocatalysis Group, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Topakas, Evangelos
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Industrial Biotechnology & Biocatalysis Group, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
    Sequential high gravity ethanol fermentation and anaerobic digestion of steam explosion and organosolv pretreated corn stover2017In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 244:1, p. 1129-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work investigates the suitability of pretreated corn stover (CS) to serve as feedstock for high gravity (HG) ethanol production at solids-content of 24 wt%. Steam explosion, with and without the addition of H2SO4, and organosolv pretreated CS samples underwent a liquefaction/saccharification step followed by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Maximum ethanol concentration of ca. 76 g/L (78.3% ethanol yield) was obtained from steam exploded CS (SECS) with 0.2% H2SO4. Organosolv pretreated CS (OCS) also resulted in high ethanol concentration of ca. 65 g/L (62.3% ethanol yield). Moreover, methane production through anaerobic digestion (AD) was conducted from fermentation residues and resulted in maximum methane yields of ca. 120 and 69 mL/g volatile solids (VS) for SECS and OCS samples, respectively. The results indicated that the implementation of a liquefaction/saccharification step before SSF employing a liquefaction reactor seemed to handle HG conditions adequately.

  • 8.
    Kirtania, Kawnish
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Axelsson, Joel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Umeki, Kentaro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Furusjö, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Kinetic study of catalytic gasification of wood char impregnated withdifferent alkali salts2017In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 118, p. 1055-1065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different concentrations (0.1 and 1 M K+/Na+) of salt solutions (K2CO3, Na2CO3, NaOH and NaCl) were used to impregnate alkali in sawdust. After devolatilization, char samples were gasified at different temperatures (750–900 °C) under CO2 in a macro-thermogravimetric analyzer for gasification kinetics. Morphologically, three classes of chars could be identified. Chars experiencing the highest catalytic influence were in Class-2 (0.5 M K2CO3 and 1 M NaOH) with a swollen and molten surface. In contrast, Class-1 (wood char like) and Class-3 (with salt deposits) chars showed moderate and low catalytic effect on gasification reactivity respectively. It is believed to be related to char surface swelling and alkali salt used. At 850 °C or below, the reactivity increased linearly (Class-1 and Class-3 Char) with initial alkali content up to 2200 mmol alkali/kg of char (except for NaCl). The same reaction rate was maintained until 3600 mmol/kg of char of alkali loading (Class-2) and then decreased. However, no trend was observed at 900 °C due to drastic change in reactivity of the samples, probably due to alkali transformation. Among the salts, K2CO3 (0.5 M) was found to be the most suitable for catalytic gasification due to its high catalytic activity in combination with relatively low carbon leaching.

  • 9.
    Kirtania, Kawnish
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Axelsson, Joel
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Furusjö, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Umeki, Kentaro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Alkali catalyzed gasification of solid biomass: influence on fuel conversion and tar/soot reduction2016In: Proceedings of the 24th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition, Amsterdam: ETA Florence Renewable Energies , 2016, p. 533-536Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on char gasification experiments in an isothermal thermogravimetric analyzer, a suitable concentration of alkali salt (K2CO3) was chosen for impregnation due to almost five-fold increase in gasification reactivity and relatively low amount of carbon leaching during impregnation. Furthermore, an optimum method for wet alkali impregnation was proposed based on the several tests performed by varying temperature and time. To study the catalytic effect on tar and soot yield, untreated and impregnated woody biomass were gasified under entrained flow condition between 900 oC and 1200 oC. Impregnation leads to 70% lower tar yield from gasification around 1000 oC and 1100 oC. The lowest amount of soot was detected for the same temperature range whereas the soot yield was one order of magnitude higher for untreated biomass. For tar, this influence became insignificant at a higher temperature (1200 oC). This defines the suitable temperature range for alkali catalyzed gasification without the loss of catalytic activity.

  • 10.
    Lage, Sandra
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå.
    Kudahettige, Nirupa P.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå.
    Ferro, Lorenza
    Umeå University, Umeå.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Funk, Christiane
    Umeå University, Umeå.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Gentili, Francesco G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå.
    Microalgae Cultivation for the Biotransformation of Birch Wood Hydrolysate and Dairy Effluent2019In: Catalysts, ISSN 2073-4344, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to investigate environmentally sustainable sources of organic carbon and nutrients, four Nordic green microalgal strains, Chlorella sorokiniana, Chlorella saccharophila, Chlorella vulgaris, and Coelastrella sp., were grown on a wood (Silver birch, Betula pendula) hydrolysate and dairy effluent mixture. The biomass and lipid production were analysed under mixotrophic, as well as two-stage mixotrophic/heterotrophic regimes. Of all of the species, Coelastrella sp. produced the most total lipids per dry weight (~40%) in the mixture of birch hydrolysate and dairy effluent without requiring nutrient (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium-NPK) supplementation. Overall, in the absence of NPK, the two-stage mixotrophic/heterotrophic cultivation enhanced the lipid concentration, but reduced the amount of biomass. Culturing microalgae in integrated waste streams under mixotrophic growth regimes is a promising approach for sustainable biofuel production, especially in regions with large seasonal variation in daylight, like northern Sweden. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of using a mixture of wood hydrolysate and dairy effluent for the growth and lipid production of microalgae in the literature.

  • 11.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Evaluation of Myceliopthora thermophila as an enzyme factory for the production of thermophilic cellulolytic enzymes2015In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 5140-5158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enzymatic hydrolysis is a key step in bioethanol production. Efficient hydrolysis requires a consortium of different enzymes that are able to hydrolyze cellulose and hemicellulose into fermentable sugars. Myceliopthora thermophila is a promising candidate for the production of thermophilic cellulolytic enzymes, the use of which could reduce the cost of ethanol production. The growth conditions of the fungus were optimized in order to achieve increased secretion of extracellular cellulases. Optimal conditions were found to be 7.0% w/v brewer’s spent grain as the carbon source and 0.4% w/v ammonium sulfate as the nitrogen source. The cellulases obtained were characterized for their optimum activity. The optimum temperature and pH for cellulase activity are 65 °C and pH 5.5, respectively. Studies on thermal inactivation of the crude extract showed that the cellulases of M. thermophila are stable for temperatures up to 60 °C. At this temperature the half-life was found to be as high as 27 h. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose resulted in 31.4% hydrolysis yield at 60 °C after 24 h of incubation. Finally, the recalcitrance constant for cellulose and cellulose pretreated with ionic liquids was calculated to be 5.46 and 2.69, respectively.

  • 12.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Bonturi, Nemailla
    Department of Materials and Bioprocess Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas.
    Miranda, Everson Alves
    Department of Materials and Bioprocess Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    High concentrations of dried sorghum stalks as a biomass feedstock for single cell oil production by Rhodosporidium toruloides2015In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, ISSN 1754-6834, E-ISSN 1754-6834, Vol. 8, article id 8:6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Environmental crisis and concerns for energy security have made the research for renewable fuels that will substitute the usage of fossil fuels an important priority. Biodiesel is a potential substitute for petroleum, but its feasibility is hindered by the utilization of edible vegetable oil as raw material, which is responsible for alarge fraction of the production cost and fosters the food versus fuel competition. Microbial oils are an interesting alternative as they do not compete with food production, and low cost renewable materials could serve as raw materials during cultivation of microorganisms. Sweet sorghum is an excellent candidate as substrate for microbial oil production, as it possesses high photosynthetic activity yielding high amounts of soluble and insoluble carbohydrates, and does not require high fertilization and irrigation rates.Results: Initially the ability of sweet sorghum to fully support yeast growth, both as a carbon and nitrogen source was evaluated. It was found that addition of an external nitrogen source had a negative impact on single cell oil (SCO) production yields, which has a positive effect on the process economics. Subsequently the effect of thepresence of a distinct saccharification step on SCO was examined. The presence of an enzymatic saccharification step prior to SCO production improved the production of SCO, especially in high solid concentrations. Removal of solids was also investigated and its positive effect on SCO production was also demonstrated. When juice from 20%w/w enzymatically liquefied sweet sorghum was used as the raw material, SCO production was 13.77 g/L. To the best of our knowledge this is one of the highest SCO titers reported in the literature when renewable raw materials were utilized.Conclusions: The use of sweet sorghum at high solid concentrations as a feedstock for the efficient production of SCO by Rhodosporidium toruloides was demonstrated. Moreover, addition of enzymes not only led to liquefaction of sweet sorghum and permitted liquid fermentation, but also enhanced lipid production by 85.1% and 15.9%when dried stalks or stalk juice was used, respectively.

  • 13.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Ethanol Production from Enzymatically Treated Dried Food Waste Using Enzymes Produced On-Site2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1446-1458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental crisis and the need to find renewable fuel alternatives have made production of biofuels an important priority. At the same time, the increasing production of food waste is an important environmental issue. For this reason, production of ethanol from food waste is an interesting approach. Volumes of food waste are reduced and ethanol production does not compete with food production. In this work, we evaluated the possibility of using source-separated household food waste for the production of ethanol. To minimize the cost of ethanol production, the hydrolytic enzymes that are necessary for cellulose hydrolysis were produced in-house using the thermophillic fungus Myceliophthora thermophila. At the initial stage of the study, production of these thermophilic enzymes was studied and optimized, resulting in an activity of 0.28 FPU/mL in the extracellular broth. These enzymes were used to saccharify household food waste at a high dry material consistency of 30% w/w, followed by fermentation. Ethanol production reached 19.27 g/L with a volumetric productivity of 0.92 g/L·h, whereas only 5.98 g/L of ethanol was produced with a volumetric productivity of 0.28 g/L·h when no enzymatic saccharification was used.

  • 14.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    National Technical University of Athens.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    National Technical University of Athens.
    Fermentation of liquefacted hydrothermally pretreated sweet sorghum bagasse to ethanol at high-solids content2013In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 127, p. 202-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of sweet sorghum bagasse to be utilized as feedstock for ethanol production at high initial dry matter concentration was investigated. In order to achieve high enzymatic hydrolysis yield, a hydrothermal pretreatment prior to liquefaction and saccharification was applied. Response surface methodology had been employed in order to optimize the pretreatment step, taking into account the yield of cellulose hydrolysis. Liquefaction of the pretreated bagasse was performed at a specially designed liquefaction chamber at 50 °C for either 12 or 24 h using an enzyme loading of 10 FPU/g·DM and 18% DM. Fermentation of liquefacted bagasse was not affected by liquefaction duration and leaded to an ethanol production of 41.43 g/L and a volumetric productivity of 1.88 g/L h. The addition of extra enzymes at the start up of SSF enhanced both ethanol concentration and volumetric productivity by 16% and 17% after 12 and 24 h saccharification, respectively.

  • 15.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    BIOtechMASS Unit, Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Optimization of ethanol production from high dry matter liquefied dry sweet sorghum stalks2013In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 51, p. 91-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of sweet sorghum to be utilized as feedstock for ethanol production at high initial dry material concentration was investigated. Sweet sorghum, after being dried, was liquefacted employing commercial cellulase solution Celluclast® 1.5L, in order submerged fermentation to be permitted under high-solids concentrations. The presence of a separate enzymatic liquefaction step at 350 kg m−3 initial DM enhanced both ethanol production and productivity by 29.76% and 250%, respectively. Response surface methodology, based on the central composite design was applied to explore the combined effect of liquefaction duration and enzyme loading in order liquefaction conditions to be optimized. When the optimum conditions were tested using an enzyme load of 8.32 FPU g−1 of dry material for 8.6 h at 50 °C, high productivity (3.0 kg m−3 h−1) and final ethanol production (62.5 kg m−3) were achieved.

  • 16.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Gao, Qiuju
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Jansson, Stina
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Green conversion of municipal solid wastes into fuels and chemicals2017In: Electronic Journal of Biotechnology, ISSN 0717-3458, E-ISSN 0717-3458, Vol. 26, p. 69-83Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presently, the society is facing a serious challenge for the effective management of the increasing amount of produced municipal solid wastes. The accumulated waste has caused a series of environmental problems such as uncontrolled release of greenhouse gases. Moreover, the increasing amount has resulted in a shortage of areas available for waste disposal, resulting in a non-sustainable waste management. These problems led to serious public concerns which in turn resulted in political actions aiming to reduce the amount of the waste ending in the environment. These actions aim to promote sustainable waste management solutions. The main objective of these policies is to promote recycling of municipal solid waste and also the conversion of waste to energy and valuable chemicals. These conversions can be performed by using either biological (e.g. anaerobic digestion) or thermochemical processes (e.g. pyrolysis). The research efforts during the last years have been fruitful and many publications demonstrate the effective conversation of municipal solid waste to energy and chemicals. These processes are discussed in the current review article together with the change of waste policy that was implemented in EU during the last years.

  • 17.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Giannakou, Maria
    Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
    Vörös, Dimitrij
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Effect of synthetic and natural media on lipid production from Fusarium oxysporum2017In: Electronic Journal of Biotechnology, ISSN 0717-3458, E-ISSN 0717-3458, Vol. 30, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Dependence on fossil resources, for the production of fuels and energy, has resulted in environmental and financial problems, which require our immediate action in order to reverse the situation. Use of renewable sources for the production of fuels and energy is an important alternative with biodiesel remains as one of the promising options. Aim of this work is to evaluate the fungus Fusarium oxysporum for its potentials to accumulate microbial lipids when grown on synthetic media and saccharified sweet sorghum stalks.

    Results

    The effect of different carbon sources, nitrogen sources and C/N ratio on the lipid production was initially examined, which resulted in a lipid concentration of 4.4 g/L, with lipid content of 42.6% w/w. Sweet sorghum stalks were able to support growth and lipid production of the fungus, both as carbon source and as nitrogen source. It was also shown that saccharification of the dried stalks is an important step to increase lipid production. Removal of the remaining stalk solids enabled the lipid production during cultivation in increased initial solids of up to 16 w/w. This resulted in a lipid production of 3.81 g/L.

    Conclusions

    It was demonstrated that F. oxysporum can be used as an efficient oleaginous microorganism, with sweet sorghum serving as an excellent raw material for the cultivation of the fungus. The lipids obtained during this work were also found to have a fatty acid profile with good potentials to be used for biodiesel production.

  • 18.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Hruzova, Katerina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Biological Production of 3-Hydroxypropionic Acid: An Update on the Current Status2018In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of high added-value chemicals from renewable resources is a necessity inour attempts to switch to a more sustainable society. 3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) is a promisingmolecule that can be used for the production of an important array of high added-value chemicals,such as 1,3-propanediol, acrylic acid, acrylamide, and bioplastics. Biological production of 3HP hasbeen studied extensively, mainly from glycerol and glucose, which are both renewable resources.To enable conversion of these carbon sources to 3HP, extensive work has been performed to identifyappropriate biochemical pathways and the enzymes that are involved in them. Novel enzymeshave also been identified and expressed in host microorganisms to improve the production yieldsof 3HP. Various process configurations have also been proposed, resulting in improved conversionyields. The intense research efforts have resulted in the production of as much as 83.8 g/L 3HP fromrenewable carbon resources, and a system whereby 3-hydroxypropionitrile was converted to 3HPthrough whole-cell catalysis which resulted in 184.7 g/L 3HP. Although there are still challengesand difficulties that need to be addressed, the research results from the past four years have been animportant step towards biological production of 3HP at the industrial level.

  • 19.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Karnaouri, Anthi C
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Cwirzen, Andrzej
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Fire Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Formation of Lignin Nanoparticles by Combining Organosolv Pretreatment of Birch Biomass and Homogenization Processes2018In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 23, no 7, article id 1822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Valorization of lignocellulosic biomass into a biorefinery scheme requires the use of all biomass components; in this, the lignin fraction is often underutilized. Conversion of lignin to nanoparticles is an attractive solution. Here, we investigated the effect of different lignin isolation processes and a post-treatment homogenization step on particle formation. Lignin was isolated from birch chips by using two organosolv processes, traditional organosolv (OS) and hybrid organosolv-steam explosion (HOS-SE) at various ethanol contents. For post-treatment, lignin was homogenized at 500 bar using different ethanol:water ratios. Isolation of lignin with OS resulted in unshaped lignin particles, whereas after HOS-SE, lignin micro-particles were formed directly. Addition of an acidic catalyst during HOS-SE had a negative impact on the particle formation, and the optimal ethanol content was 50⁻60% v/v. Homogenization had a positive effect as it transformed initially unshaped lignin into spherical nanoparticles and reduced the size of the micro-particles isolated by HOS-SE. Ethanol content during homogenization affected the size of the particles, with the optimal results obtained at 75% v/v. We demonstrate that organosolv lignin can be used as an excellent starting material for nanoparticle preparation, with a simple method without the need for extensive chemical modification. It was also demonstrated that tuning of the operational parameters results in nanoparticles of smaller size and with better size homogeneity.

  • 20.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Loizidou, Maria
    Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
    Kekos, Dimitris
    Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Utilization of Household Food Waste for the production of ethanol at high dry material content2014In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, ISSN 1754-6834, E-ISSN 1754-6834, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundEnvironmental issues and shortage of fossil fuels have turned the public interest to the utilization of renewable, environmentally friendly fuels, such as ethanol. In order to minimize the competition between fuels and food production, researchers are focusing their efforts to the utilization of wastes and by-products as raw materials for the production of ethanol. household food wastes are being produced in great quantities in European Union and their handling can be a challenge. Moreover, their disposal can cause severe environmental issues (for example emission of greenhouse gasses). On the other hand, they contain significant amounts of sugars (both soluble and insoluble) and they can be used as raw material for the production of ethanol. ResultsHousehold food wastes were utilized as raw material for the production of ethanol at high dry material consistencies. A distinct liquefaction/saccharification step has been included to the process, which rapidly reduced the viscosity of the high solid content substrate, resulting in better mixing of the fermenting microorganism. This step had a positive effect in both ethanol production and productivity, leading to a significant increase in both values, which was up to 40.81% and 4.46 fold, respectively. Remaining solids (residue) after fermentation at 45% w/v dry material (which contained also the unhydrolyzed fraction of cellulose), were subjected to a hydrothermal pretreatment in order to be utilized as raw material for a subsequent ethanol fermentation. This led to an increase of 13.16% in the ethanol production levels achieving a final ethanol yield of 107.58 g/kg dry material. ConclusionsIn conclusion, the ability of utilizing household food waste for the production of ethanol at elevated dry material content has been demonstrated. A separate liquefaction/saccharification process can increase both ethanol production and productivity. Finally, subsequent fermentation of the remaining solids could lead to an increase of the overall ethanol production yield.

  • 21.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Nitsos, Christos
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Raghavendran, Vijayendran
    Division of Industrial Biotechnology, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg.
    Yakimenko, Olga
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Persson, Gustav
    Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg.
    Olsson, Eva
    Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Olsson, Lisbeth
    Division of Industrial Biotechnology, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    A novel hybrid organosolv: steam explosion method for the efficient fractionation and pretreatment of birch biomass2018In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, ISSN 1754-6834, E-ISSN 1754-6834, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main role of pretreatment is to reduce the natural biomass recalcitrance and thus enhance saccharification yield. A further prerequisite for efficient utilization of all biomass components is their efficient fractionation into well-defined process streams. Currently available pretreatment methods only partially fulfill these criteria. Steam explosion, for example, excels as a pretreatment method but has limited potential for fractionation, whereas organosolv is excellent for delignification but offers poor biomass deconstruction.

    Results

    In this article, a hybrid method combining the cooking and fractionation of conventional organosolv pretreatment with the implementation of an explosive discharge of the cooking mixture at the end of pretreatment was developed. The effects of various pretreatment parameters (ethanol content, duration, and addition of sulfuric acid) were evaluated. Pretreatment of birch at 200 °C with 60% v/v ethanol and 1% w/wbiomass H2SO4 was proven to be the most efficient pretreatment condition yielding pretreated solids with 77.9% w/w cellulose, 8.9% w/w hemicellulose, and 7.0 w/w lignin content. Under these conditions, high delignification of 86.2% was demonstrated. The recovered lignin was of high purity, with cellulose and hemicellulose contents not exceeding 0.31 and 3.25% w/w, respectively, and ash to be < 0.17% w/w in all cases, making it suitable for various applications. The pretreated solids presented high saccharification yields, reaching 68% at low enzyme load (6 FPU/g) and complete saccharification at high enzyme load (22.5 FPU/g). Finally, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 20% w/w solids yielded an ethanol titer of 80 g/L after 192 h, corresponding to 90% of the theoretical maximum.

    Conclusions

    The novel hybrid method developed in this study allowed for the efficient fractionation of birch biomass and production of pretreated solids with high cellulose and low lignin contents. Moreover, the explosive discharge at the end of pretreatment had a positive effect on enzymatic saccharification, resulting in high hydrolyzability of the pretreated solids and elevated ethanol titers in the following high-gravity SSF. To the best of our knowledge, the ethanol concentration obtained with this method is the highest so far for birch biomass.

  • 22.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Nitsos, Christos
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Vörös, Dimitrij
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    High-Titer Methane from Organosolv-Pretreated Spruce and Birch2017In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The negative impact of fossil fuels and the increased demand for renewable energy sources has led to the use of novel raw material sources. Lignocellulosic biomass could serve as a possible raw material for anaerobic digestion and production of biogas. This work is aimed at using forest biomass, both softwood (spruce) and hardwood (birch), as a raw material for anaerobic digestion. We examined the effect of different operational conditions for the organosolv pretreatment (ethanol content, duration of treatment, and addition of acid catalyst) on the methane yield. In addition, we investigated the effect of addition of cellulolytic enzymes during the digestion. We found that inclusion of an acid catalyst during organosolv pretreatment improved the yields from spruce, but it did not affect the yields from birch. Shorter duration of treatment was advantageous with both materials. Methane yields from spruce were higher with lower ethanol content whereas higher ethanol content was more beneficial for birch. The highest yields obtained were 185 mL CH4/g VS from spruce and 259.9 mL CH4/g VS from birch. Addition of cellulolytic enzymes improved these yields to 266.6 mL CH4/g VS and 284.2 mL CH4/g VS, respectively.

  • 23.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Novak, Katharina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Enman, Josefine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Acetate-detoxification of wood hydrolysates with alkali tolerant Bacillus sp. as a strategy to enhance the lipid production from Rhodosporidium toruloides2017In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 242, p. 287-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the current work was to convert an acetate-rich hemicellulose liquid fraction (LF) from hot-water extraction of Betula pendula to oils for biodiesel, with Rhodosporidium toruloides. The toxicity of acetate was circumvented by biological detoxification with an isolated alkali-tolerant and acetate-resistant Bacillus sp. strain. Removal of other lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, such as furfural and phenols, was evaluated by two strategies; an activated carbon (AC) treatment of the undiluted LF, and dilution of the LF by 25% (0.75LF) and 50%. (0.50LF). The bacterium consumed most of the acetic acid in 6-8 days in the treated or diluted media, which were subsequently used for cultivation of the yeast, for conversion of sugars to oils. The oil concentration reached 2.8 and 1.8 g/L, in the AC LF and 0.75LF medium, respectively. In comparison, the oil accumulation in the same media without prior cultivation of Bacillus sp. was 0.86 and 0.03 g/L, respectively.

  • 24.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Raghavendran, Vijayendran
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Industrial Biotechnology, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering,Göteborg, Sweden. Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Firth Court, Western Bank, University of Sheffield, UK.
    Yakimenko, Olga
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Persson, Gustav
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Physics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Olsson, Eva
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Physics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Olsson, Lisbeth
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Industrial Biotechnology, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Lignin-first biomass fractionation using a hybrid organosolv: Steam explosion pretreatment technology improves the saccharification and fermentability of spruce biomass2019In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 273, p. 521-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For a transition to a sustainable society, fuels, chemicals, and materials should be produced from renewable resources. Lignocellulosic biomass constitutes an abundant and renewable feedstock; however, its successful application in a biorefinery requires efficient fractionation into its components; cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Here, we demonstrate that a newly established hybrid organosolv – steam explosion pretreatment can effectively fractionate spruce biomass to yield pretreated solids with high cellulose (72% w/w) and low lignin (delignification up to 79.4% w/w) content. The cellulose-rich pretreated solids present high saccharification yields (up to 61% w/w) making them ideal for subsequent bioconversion processes. Moreover, under high-gravity conditions (22% w/w) we obtained an ethanol titer of 61.7 g/L, the highest so far reported for spruce biomass. Finally, the obtained high-purity lignin is suitable for various advanced applications. In conclusion, hybrid organosolv pretreatment could offer a closed-loop biorefinery while simultaneously adding value to all biomass components.

  • 25.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Evaluation of dried sweet sorghum stalks as raw material for methane production2014In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2014, article id 731731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of utilizing dried sweet sorghum stalks as raw material for anaerobic digestion has been evaluated. Two different treatments were tested, a mild thermal and an enzymatic, alone or in combination. Thermal pretreatment was found to decrease the methane yields, whereas one-step enzymatic treatment resulted in a significant increase of 15.1% comparing to the untreated sweet sorghum. Subsequently, in order to increase the total methane production, the combined effect of enzyme load and I/S on methane yields from sweet sorghum was evaluated by employing response surface methodology. The obtained model showed that the maximum methane yield that could be achieved is 296 mL CH4/g VS at I/S ratio of 0.35 with the addition of 11.12 FPU/g sweet sorghum.

  • 26.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Sequential parametric optimization of methane production from different sources of forest raw material2015In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 6, article id 1163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increase in environmental problems and the shortage of fossil fuels have led to the need for action in the development of sustainable and renewable fuels. Methane is produced through anaerobic digestion of organic materials and is a biofuel with very promising characteristics. The success in using methane as a biofuel has resulted in the operation of several commercial-scale plants and the need to exploit novel materials to be used. Forest biomass can serve as an excellent candidate for use as raw material for anaerobic digestion. During this work, both hardwood and softwood species—which are representative of the forests of Sweden—were used for the production of methane. Initially, when untreated forest materials were used for the anaerobic digestion, the yields obtained were very low, even with the addition of enzymes, reaching a maximum of only 40 mL CH4/g VS when birch was used. When hydrothermal pretreatment was applied, the enzymatic digestibility improved up to 6.7 times relative to that without pretreatment, and the yield of methane reached up to 254 mL CH4/g VS. Then the effect of chemical/enzymatic detoxification was examined, where laccase treatment improved the methane yield from the more harshly pretreated materials while it had no effect on the more mildly pretreated material. Finally, addition of cellulolytic enzymes during the digestion improved the methane yields from spruce and pine, whereas for birch separate saccharification was more beneficial. To achieve high yields in spruce 30 filter paper units (FPU)/g was necessary, whereas 15 FPU/g was enough when pine and birch were used. During this work, the highest methane yields obtained from pine and birch were 179.9 mL CH4/g VS and 304.8 mL CH4/g VS, respectively. For mildly and severely pretreated spruce, the methane yields reached 259.4 mL CH4/g VS and 276.3 mL CH4/g VS, respectively. We have shown that forest material can serve as raw material for efficient production of methane. The initially low yields from the untreated materials were significantly improved by the introduction of a hydrothermal pretreatment. Moreover, enzymatic detoxification was beneficial, but mainly for severely pretreated materials. Finally, enzymatic saccharification increased the methane yields even further.

  • 27.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Strategies for Enhanced Biogas Generation through Anaerobic Digestion of Forest Material: An Overview2016In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 5482-5499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incorporation of biofuels into the existing selection of fuels is a very important measure to slow down environmental destruction and to counter the imminent fossil fuel shortage. Biogas is a very interesting option for use in both electricity and heat production, and also as a fuel for vehicles. The positive fuel characteristics of biogas and the high yields of biogas obtained from traditional raw materials (e.g., animal manure) have resulted in operation of several commercial units around the globe. On the other hand, there is an increased demand for biogas production which, for the need to be met, should have renewable resources incorporated into it. Forest materials are an interesting candidate, and there is a rising interest in the research and industrial communities to exploit them as raw materials for anaerobic digestion in biogas production. In this review article, we aim to give the reader an insight into the most recent processes for conversion of various sources of forest materials into biogas.

  • 28.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Sterioti, Aikaterini-Aithra
    Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Use of dried sweet sorghum for the efficient production of lipids by the yeast Lipomyces starkeyi CBS 18072014In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 62, p. 367-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi to efficiently produce lipids when cultivated on saccharified sweet sorghum stalks juice was evaluated. Initially the production of lipids using synthetic media mimicking sweet sorghum stalks has been studied and optimized concerning the nitrogen source and the C:N ratio. Under optimum conditions (yeast extract as nitrogen source and C:N ratio of 190) the lipid production reached 5.81 g/L with a lipid content of 47.3% (w/w) from a mixture of sucrose, glucose and fructose, mimicking the sugar composition of sorghum. When cultivated on sweet sorghum stalks juice, it was observed that no external nitrogen addition was necessary which could result in substantial decrease of the initial C:N ratio. Moreover a distinct saccharification process prior to yeast cultivation improved the lipid production yield as it resulted in an increase of the C:N ratio. The highest lipid production, which was 6.40 g/L with a lipid content of 29.5% (w/w), was obtained when juice from saccharified sweet sorghum stalks at an initial sorghum content of 12% (w/w) was used as feedstock.

  • 29.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Topakas, Evangelos
    National Technical University of Athens.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    New trends in microbial production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid2014In: Current Biochemical Engineering, ISSN 2212-7119, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 141-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production of bio-based chemicals nowadays is more crucial than ever. 3-Hydroxypropionic acid can serve as a building block chemical for the production of other high added value chemicals, fact that have made it as one of the most valuable chemicals according to US DOE. Recently, researchers have turned their interest in the construction of a microbial cell factory that will be capable of producing 3-hydroxypropionic acid from renewable raw materials. Most of the work is dedicated in the utilization of glycerol as raw material by employing either Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae strains. Several genes were tested and evaluated and different cultivation techniques were applied. During the last few years, promising levels of 3- hydroxypropionic acid were obtained, however more effort has to be dedicated on this direction of the commercialization of the process that seems to be closer than even before.

  • 30.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA.
    Wu, Jian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Chen, Minjiao
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Two important factors of selecting lignin as efficient lubricating additives in poly (ethylene glycol): Hydrogen bond and molecular weight2019In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 129, p. 564-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin, one of the most abundant natural polymers, has been successfully used as an effective lubricant additive with high value. The chemical structure of lignin is very diverse and strongly affected by both the source of lignin (i.e. plant species) and the lignin extraction process. In this work, a series of lignin from different biomass sources (hard or soft wood) and extraction process (organosolv with or without acid catalyst) has been successfully incorporated into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and fortified lubricating properties were achieved. The effects of different lignin on the rheological, thermal and tribological properties of the lignin/EG lubricants were systematically investigated by different characterization techniques. Lignin in PEG significantly improves the lubricating property, where a wear reduction of 93.8% was observed. The thermal and lubrication properties of the PEG lubricants filled with different kinds of lignin are tightly related to the synergistic state of hydrogen bonding and molecular weight distribution. Lignin with broader molecular weight distribution and higher hydroxyl content shows better adhesion on metal surfaces and strengthened lubricating film, which could be used as the efficient lubricating additives. This work provides a criterion for selecting appropriate lignin as the efficient lubricant additive and accelerates the application of lignin.

  • 31.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Wu, Jian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Chen, Minjiao
    Vahidi, Alireza
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Lignin from Hardwood and Softwood Biomass as a Lubricating Additive to Ethylene Glycol2018In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 23, no 3, article id 537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethylene glycol (EG)-based lubricant was prepared with dissolved organosolv lignin from birch wood (BL) and softwood (SL) biomass. The effects of different lignin types on the rheological, thermal, and tribological properties of the lignin/EG lubricants were comprehensively investigated by various characterization techniques. Dissolving organosolv lignin in EG results in outstanding lubricating properties. Specifically, the wear volume of the disc by EG-44BL is only 8.9% of that lubricated by pure EG. The enhanced anti-wear property of the EG/lignin system could be attributed to the formation of a robust lubrication film and the strong adhesion of the lubricant on the contacting metal surface due to the presence of a dense hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network. The lubricating performance of EG-BL outperforms EG-SL, which could be attributed to the denser H-bonding sites in BL and its broader molecular weight distribution. The disc wear loss of EG-44BL is only 45.7% of that lubricated by EG-44SL. Overall, H-bonding is the major contributor to the different tribological properties of BL and SL in EG-based lubricants.

  • 32.
    Nitsos, Christos
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Triantafyllidis, Kostas
    Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute, Centre for Research and Technology-Hellas (CPERI/CERTH), 57001 Thessaloniki, Greece, Laboratory of General and Inorganic Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Evaluation of Mediterranean Agricultural Residues as a Potential Feedstock for the Production of Biogas via Anaerobic Fermentation2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, article id 171635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrothermal, dilute acid, and steam explosion pretreatment methods, were evaluated for their efficiency to improve the methane production yield of three Mediterranean agricultural lignocellulosic residues such as olive tree pruning, grapevine pruning, and almond shells. Hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreatments provided low to moderate increase in the digestibility of the biomass samples, whereas steam explosion enabled the highest methane yields to be achieved for almond shells at 232.2 ± 13.0 mL CH4/gVS and olive pruning at 315.4 ± 0.0 mL CH4/gVS. Introduction of an enzymatic prehydrolysis step moderately improved methane yields for hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreated samples but not for the steam exploded ones.

  • 33.
    Nitsos, Christos
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Laboratory of General and Inorganic Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Triantafyllidis, Kostas
    Laboratory of General and Inorganic Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute, Centre for Research and Technology-Hellas (CPERI/CERTH).
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Investigation of different pretreatment methods of Mediterranean-type ecosystem agricultural residues: characterisation of pretreatment products, high-solids enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol production2018In: Biofuels, ISSN 1759-7269, E-ISSN 1759-7277, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 545-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agricultural and agro-industrial lignocellulosic residues represent an important renewable resource for the production of fuels and chemicals towards a bio-based economy. Olive pruning, vineyard pruning and almond shells are important residues from agricultural activities in Mediterranean-type ecosystems. In the current work, bioethanol production from the above three types of agro-residues was studied, focusing on the effect of different pretreatment methods on enzymatic saccharrification efficiency of cellulose and production of second-generation bioethanol. Dilute acid, hydrothermal and steam explosion pretreatments were compared in order to remove hemicellulose and facilitate the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the hemicellulose-deficient biomass to glucose. Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed in a free-fall mixing reactor enabling high solids loading of 23% w/w. This allowed hydrolysis of up to 67% of available cellulose in almond shells and close to 50% in olive pruning samples, and facilitated high ethanol production in the subsequent fermentation step; the highest ethanol concentrations achieved were 47.8 g/L for almond shells after steam explosion and 42 g/L for hydrothermally pretreated olive pruning residue.

  • 34.
    Patel, Alok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Enman, Josefine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Lipids detection and quantification in oleaginous microorganisms: an overview of the current state of the art2019In: BMC Chemical Engineering, ISSN 2524-4175, Vol. 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oleaginous microorganisms are among the most promising feedstocks for the production of lipids for biofuels and oleochemicals. Lipids are synthesized in intracellular compartments in the form of lipid droplets. Therefore, their qualitative and quantitative analysis requires an initial pretreatment step that allows their extraction. Lipid extraction techniques vary with the type of microorganism but, in general, the presence of an outer membrane or cell wall limits their recovery. This review discusses the various types of oleaginous microorganisms, their lipid accumulating capabilities, lipid extraction techniques, and the pretreatment of cellular biomass for enhanced lipid recovery. Conventional methods for lipid quantification include gravimetric and chromatographic approaches; whereas non-conventional methods are based on infrared, Raman, nuclear magnetic resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopic analysis. Recent advances in these methods, their limitations, and fields of application are discussed, with the aim of providing a guide for selecting the best method or combination of methods for lipid quantification.

  • 35.
    Patel, Alok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Hruzova, Katerina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Sustainable biorefinery concept for biofuel production through holistic volarization of food waste2019In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 294, article id 122247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to utilize the whole food waste in two stages. In the first stage, the carbohydrate and protein fractions of food waste recovered after enzymatic hydrolysis was used to cultivate heterotrophic microalgae, resulting in biomass yield of 0.346 ± 0.09 g/gsugars and lipid yield of 0.216 ± 0.06 g/gsugars. In the second stage, oil (14.15% w/w) was extracted from food waste after hydrolysis and converted to biodiesel by a two-step transesterification reaction that generated 135.8 g/kgfood waste of fatty acid methyl esters and 13.8 g/kgfood waste of crude glycerol. Finally, crude glycerol obtained from both processes was used at 20 g/L to cultivate heterotrophic microalgae, resulting in a cell dry weight and total lipid concentration of 6.23 g/L and 2.91 g/L, respectively. A total 248.21 g of fatty acid methyl esters were obtained from the 1 kg of food waste through this integrated process.

  • 36.
    Patel, Alok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    A comparative study on de novo and ex novo lipid fermentation by oleaginous yeast using glucose and sonicated waste cooking oil2019In: Ultrasonics sonochemistry, ISSN 1350-4177, E-ISSN 1873-2828, Vol. 52, p. 364-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are only a few reports available about the assimilation of hydrophobic substrates by microorganisms, however, it is well known that oleaginous microorganisms are capable of utilizing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates and accumulate lipids via two different pathways namely de novo and ex novo lipid synthesis, respectively. In the present study, an oleaginous yeast, Cryptococcus curvatus, was investigated for its potentials to utilize a waste substrate of hydrophobic nature (waste cooking oil – WCO) and compared with its ability to utilize a hydrophilic carbon source (glucose). To facilitate the utilization of WCO by C. curvatus, the broth was sonicated to form a stable oil-in-water emulsion without adding any emulsifier, which was then compared with WCO samples without any ultrasound treatment (unsonicated) for the yeast cultivation. Ultrasonication reduces the size of hydrophobic substrates and improves their miscibility in an aqueous broth making them easily assimilated by oleaginous yeast. Under de novo lipid fermentation, the yeast synthesized 9.93 ± 0.84 g/L of cell dry weight and 5.23 ± 0.49 g/L lipids (lipid content of 52.66 ± 0.93% w/w) when cultivated on 40 g/L of glucose (C/N ratio of 40). The amount of cell dry weight, lipid concentration, and lipid content were considerably higher during the ex novo lipid synthesis. More specifically, the highest lipid content achieved was 70.13 ± 1.65% w/w with a corresponding dry cell weight and lipid concentration of 18.62 ± 0.76 g/L and 13.06 ± 0.92 g/L respectively, when grown on 20 g/L sonicated WCO. The highest lipid concentration, however, was observed when the yeast was cultivated on 40 g/L sonicated WCO. Under these conditions, 20.34 g/L lipids were produced with a lipid content of 57.05% w/w. On the other hand, lipid production with unsonicated WCO was significant lower, reaching 11.16 ± 1.02 g/L (69.14 ± 1.34% w/w of lipid content) and 12.21 ± 1.34 g/L (47.39 ± 1.67% w/w of lipid content) for 20 g/L and 40 g/L of WCO, respectively. This underpins the significance of the sonication treatment, especially at elevated WCO concentrations, to improve the accessibility of the yeast to the WCO. Sonication treatment that was used in this study assisted the utilization of WCO without the need to add emulsifiers, thus reducing the need for chemicals and in turn has a positive impact on the production costs. The microbial lipids produced presented a different fatty acid composition compared to the WCO, making them more suitable for biodiesel production as suggested by the theoretical estimation of the biodiesel properties.

  • 37.
    Patel, Alok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Hruzova, Katerina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Biosynthesis of Nutraceutical Fatty Acids by the Oleaginous Marine Microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum Utilizing Hydrolysates from Organosolv-Pretreated Birch and Spruce Biomass2019In: Marine Drugs, ISSN 1660-3397, E-ISSN 1660-3397, Vol. 17, no 12, article id 119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential for human function, however they have to be provided through the diet. As their production from fish oil is environmentally unsustainable, there is demand for new sources of PUFAs. The aim of the present work was to establish the microalgal platform to produce nutraceutical-value PUFAs from forest biomass. To this end, the growth of Phaeodactylum tricornutum on birch and spruce hydrolysates was compared to autotrophic cultivation and glucose synthetic media. Total lipid generated by P. tricornutum grown mixotrophically on glucose, birch, and spruce hydrolysates was 1.21, 1.26, and 1.29 g/L, respectively. The highest eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) production (256 mg/L) and productivity (19.69 mg/L/d) were observed on spruce hydrolysates. These values were considerably higher than those obtained from the cultivation without glucose (79.80 mg/L and 6.14 mg/L/d, respectively) and also from the photoautotrophic cultivation (26.86 mg/L and 2.44 mg/L/d, respectively). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the use of forest biomass as raw material for EPA and docosapentaenoic acid (DHA) production.

  • 38.
    Patel, Alok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Molecular Microbiology Laboratory, Biotechnology Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (IIT-R), Roorkee, Uttarakhand, India .
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Pruthi, Parul A
    Molecular Microbiology Laboratory, Biotechnology Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (IIT-R), Roorkee, Uttarakhand, India .
    Pruthi, Vikas
    Molecular Microbiology Laboratory, Biotechnology Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (IIT-R), Roorkee, Uttarakhand, India .
    Potential of aquatic oomycete as a novel feedstock for microbial oil grown on waste sugarcane bagasse2018In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 25, no 33, p. 33443-33454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biodiesel production from vegetable oils is not sustainable and economical due to the food crisis worldwide. The development of a cost-effective non-edible feedstock is essential. In this study, we proposed to use aquatic oomycetes for microbial oils, which are cellulolytic fungus-like filamentous eukaryotic microorganisms, commonly known as water molds. They differ from true fungi as cellulose is present in their cell wall and chitin is absent. They show parasitic as well as saprophytic nature and have great potential to utilize decaying animal and plant debris in freshwater habitats. To study the triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in the aquatic oomycetes, the isolated water mold Achlya diffusa was cultivated under semi-solid-state conditions on waste sugarcane bagasse, which was compared with the cultivation in Czapek (DOX) medium. A. diffusa grown on waste sugarcane bagasse showed large lipid droplets in its cellular compartment and synthesized 124.03 ± 1.93 mg/gds cell dry weight with 50.26 ± 1.76% w/w lipid content. The cell dry weight and lipid content of this water mold decreased to 89.54 ± 1.21 mg/gds and 38.82% w/w, respectively, when cultivated on standard medium Czapek-Dox agar (CDA). For the fatty acid profile of A. diffusa grown in sugarcane bagasse and CDA, in situ transesterification (IST) and indirect transesterification (IDT) approaches were evaluated. The lipid profile of this mold revealed the presence of C12:0, C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2, C20:0, and C21:0 fatty acids, which is similar to vegetable oils. The biodiesel properties of the lipids obtained from A. diffusa satisfied the limits as determined by international standards ASTM-D6751 and EN-14214 demonstrating its suitability as a fuel for diesel engines.

  • 39.
    Patel, Alok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    A perspective on biotechnological applications of thermophilic microalgae and cyanobacteria2019In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 278, p. 424-434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of expanding our knowledge on microorganisms derived from extreme environments stems from the development of novel and sustainable technologies for our health, food, and environment. Microalgae and cyanobacteria represent a group of diverse microorganisms that inhabit a wide range of environments, are capable of oxygenic photosynthesis, and form a thick microbial mat even at extreme environments. Studies of thermophilic microorganisms have shown a considerable biotechnological potential due to their optimum growth and metabolisms at high temperatures (≥50 °C), which is supported by their thermostable enzymes. Microalgal and cyanobacterial communities present in high-temperature ecosystems account for a large part of the total ecosystem biomass and productivity, and can be exploited to generate several value-added products of agricultural, pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and industrial relevance. This review provides an overview on the current status of biotechnological applications of thermophilic microalgae and cyanobacteria, with an outlook on the challenges and future prospects.

  • 40.
    Patel, Alok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Heterotrophic cultivation of Auxenochlorella protothecoides using forest biomass as a feedstock for sustainable biodiesel production2018In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, ISSN 1754-6834, E-ISSN 1754-6834, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The aim of this work was to establish a process for the heterotrophic growth of green microalgae using forest biomass hydrolysates. To provide a carbon source for the growth of the green microalgae, two forest biomasses (Norway spruce and silver birch) were pretreated with a hybrid organosolv-steam explosion method, resulting in inhibitor-free pretreated solids with a high cellulose content of 77.9% w/w (birch) and 72% w/w (spruce). Pretreated solids were hydrolyzed using commercial cellulolytic enzymes to produce hydrolysate for the culture of algae.

    Results

    The heterotrophic growth of A. protothecoides was assessed using synthetic medium with glucose as carbon source, where the effect of sugar concentration and the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio were optimized, resulting in accumulation of lipids at 5.42 ± 0.32 g/L (64.52 ± 0.53% lipid content) after 5 days of culture on glucose at 20 g/L. The use of birch and spruce hydrolysates was favorable for the growth and lipid accumulation of the algae, resulting in lipid production of 5.65 ± 0.21 g/L (66 ± 0.33% lipid content) and 5.28 ± 0.17 g/L (63.08 ± 0.71% lipid content) when grown on birch and spruce, respectively, after only 120 h of cultivation.

    Conclusions

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of using organosolv pretreated wood biomass hydrolysates for the growth and lipid production of microalgae in the literature. The pretreatment process used in this study provided high saccharification of biomass without the presence of inhibitors. Moreover, the lipid profile of this microalga showed similar contents to vegetable oils which improve the biodiesel properties.

  • 41.
    Patel, Alok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Mikes, Fabio
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Bühler, Saskja
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Valorization of Brewers’ Spent Grain for the Production of Lipids by Oleaginous Yeast2018In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 23, no 12, article id 3052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brewers’ spent grain (BSG) accounts for 85% of the total amount of by-products generated by the brewing industries. BSG is a lignocellulosic biomass that is rich in proteins, lipids, minerals, and vitamins. In the present study, BSG was subjected to pretreatment by two different methods (microwave assisted alkaline pretreatment and organosolv) and was evaluated for the liberation of glucose and xylose during enzymatic saccharification trials. The highest amount of glucose (46.45 ± 1.43 g/L) and xylose (25.15 ± 1.36 g/L) were observed after enzymatic saccharification of the organosolv pretreated BSG. The glucose and xylose yield for the microwave assisted alkaline pretreated BSG were 34.86 ± 1.27 g/L and 16.54 ± 2.1 g/L, respectively. The hydrolysates from the organosolv pretreated BSG were used as substrate for the cultivation of the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides, aiming to produce microbial lipids. The yeast synthesized as high as 18.44 ± 0.96 g/L of cell dry weight and 10.41 ± 0.34 g/L lipids (lipid content of 56.45 ± 0.76%) when cultivated on BSG hydrolysate with a C/N ratio of 500. The cell dry weight, total lipid concentration and lipid content were higher compared to the results obtained when grown on synthetic media containing glucose, xylose or mixture of glucose and xylose. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report using hydrolysates of organosolv pretreated BSG for the growth and lipid production of oleaginous yeast in literature. The lipid profile of this oleaginous yeast showed similar fatty acid contents to vegetable oils, which can result in good biodiesel properties of the produced biodiesel

  • 42.
    Patel, Alok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Mikes, Fabio
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    An Overview of Current Pretreatment Methods Used to Improve Lipid Extraction from Oleaginous Microorganisms2018In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 23, no 7, article id 1562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial oils, obtained from oleaginous microorganisms are an emerging source of commercially valuable chemicals ranging from pharmaceuticals to the petroleum industry. In petroleum biorefineries, the microbial biomass has become a sustainable source of renewable biofuels. Biodiesel is mainly produced from oils obtained from oleaginous microorganisms involving various upstream and downstream processes, such as cultivation, harvesting, lipid extraction, and transesterification. Among them, lipid extraction is a crucial step for the process and it represents an important bottleneck for the commercial scale production of biodiesel. Lipids are synthesized in the cellular compartment of oleaginous microorganisms in the form of lipid droplets, so it is necessary to disrupt the cells prior to lipid extraction in order to improve the extraction yields. Various mechanical, chemical and physicochemical pretreatment methods are employed to disintegrate the cellular membrane of oleaginous microorganisms. The objective of the present review article is to evaluate the various pretreatment methods for efficient lipid extraction from the oleaginous cellular biomass available to date, as well as to discuss their advantages and disadvantages, including their effect on the lipid yield. The discussed mechanical pretreatment methods are oil expeller, bead milling, ultrasonication, microwave, high-speed and high-pressure homogenizer, laser, autoclaving, pulsed electric field, and non-mechanical methods, such as enzymatic treatment, including various emerging cell disruption techniques.

  • 43.
    Patel, Alok
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Molecular Microbiology Laboratory, Biotechnology Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (IIT-R), Roorkee, India.
    Sartaj, K.
    Molecular Microbiology Laboratory, Biotechnology Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (IIT-R), Roorkee, India.
    Pruthi, P.A.
    Molecular Microbiology Laboratory, Biotechnology Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (IIT-R), Roorkee, India.
    Pruthi, V.
    Molecular Microbiology Laboratory, Biotechnology Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (IIT-R), Roorkee, India.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Utilization of Clarified Butter Sediment Waste as a Feedstock for Cost-Effective Production of Biodiesel2019In: Foods, E-ISSN 2304-8158, Vol. 8, no 7, article id 234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rising demand and cost of fossil fuels (diesel and gasoline), together with the need for sustainable, alternative, and renewable energy sources have increased the interest for biomass-based fuels such as biodiesel. Among renewable sources of biofuels, biodiesel is particularly attractive as it can be used in conventional diesel engines without any modification. Oleaginous yeasts are excellent oil producers that can grow easily on various types of hydrophilic and hydrophobic waste streams that are used as feedstock for single cell oils and subsequently biodiesel production. In this study, cultivation of Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae on a hydrophobic waste (clarified butter sediment waste medium (CBM)) resulted in considerably high lipid accumulation (70.74% w/w). Maximum cell dry weight and total lipid production were 15.52 g/L and 10.98 g/L, respectively, following cultivation in CBM for 144 h. Neutral lipids were found to accumulate in the lipid bodies of cells, as visualized by BODIPY staining and fluorescence microscopy. Cells grown in CBM showed large and dispersed lipid droplets in the intracellular compartment. The fatty acid profile of biodiesel obtained after transesterification was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS), while its quality was determined to comply with ASTM 6751 and EN 14214 international standards. Hence, clarified sediment waste can be exploited as a cost-effective renewable feedstock for biodiesel production. 

  • 44.
    Raghavendran, Vijayendran
    et al.
    Industrial Biotechnology Division, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Nitsos, Christos
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Olsson, Lisbeth
    Industrial Biotechnology Division, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology.
    A comparative study of the enzymatic hydrolysis of batch organosolv-pretreated birch and spruce biomass2018In: AMB Express, ISSN 2191-0855, E-ISSN 2191-0855, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A shift towards a sustainable and green society is vital to reduce the negative effects of climate change associated with increased CO2 emissions. Lignocellulosic biomass is both renewable and abundant, but is recalcitrant to deconstruction. Among the methods of pretreatment available, organosolv (OS) delignifies cellulose efficiently, significantly improving its digestibility by enzymes. We have assessed the hydrolysability of the cellulose-rich solid fractions from OS-pretreated spruce and birch at 2% w/v loading (dry matter). Almost complete saccharification of birch was possible with 80 mg enzyme preparation/gsolids (12 FPU/gsolids), while the saccharification yield for spruce was only 70%, even when applying 60 FPU/gsolids. As the cellulose content is enriched by OS, the yield of glucose was higher than in their steam-exploded counterparts. The hydrolysate was a transparent liquid due to the absence of phenolics and was also free from inhibitors. OS pretreatment holds potential for use in a large-scale, closed-loop biorefinery producing fuels from the cellulose fraction and platform chemicals from the hemicellulose and lignin fractions respectively.

  • 45.
    Sarris, Dimitris
    et al.
    Agricultural University of Athens.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Agricultural University of Athens.
    Aggelis, George
    University of Patras.
    Koutinas, Apostolis
    Agricultural University of Athens.
    Papanikolaou, Seraphim
    Agricultural University of Athens.
    Aerated vs non-aerated conversions of molasses and olive mill wastewaters blends into bioethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under non-aseptic conditions2014In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 56, p. 83-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAK-1 to convert blends of molasses and olive mill wastewaters (OMWs) into compounds of higher added-value under aerated and non-aerated conditions was studied in the current investigation. Noticeable decolorization (up to 60%) and moderate removal of phenolic compounds (up to 28%, w/w) was observed. Under aerated conditions in non-sterile shake-flask cultures, cultures in molasses-based media in which supplementation with OMWs had been performed did not significantly decrease ethanol and biomass production in comparison with control experiments (cultures in which no OMWs had been added). Ethanol of 34.3 g L−1 (with simultaneous yield of ethanol produced per sugar consumed of ∼0.40 g g−1) and biomass of 7.3 g L−1 (with yield of ∼0.08 g g−1) was observed. Under similar aerated bioreactor cultures, biomass production (up to 5.7 g L−1 with yield of biomass produced per sugar consumed of ∼0.07 g g−1) decreased while, on the other hand, ethanol biosynthesis was notably enhanced (up to 41.8 g L−1 with yield of ethanol produced of ∼0.49 g g−1 – value very close to the maximum theoretical one). Comparing non-sterile aerated with non-aerated bioreactor experiments, biomass production showed some slight increase and ethanol production slightly increased in the latter case. It is concluded that S. cerevisiae MAK-1 is a microorganism of importance amenable for simultaneous OMWs remediation and production of added-value compounds.

  • 46.
    Sjöblom, Magnus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels2016In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, ISSN 0378-1097, E-ISSN 1574-6968, Vol. 363, no 8, article id fnw064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fermentation based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium and Platinum based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals.

  • 47.
    Sjöblom, Magnus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Production of butyric acid by Clostridium tyrobutyricum (ATCC25755) using sweet sorghum stalks and beet molasses2015In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 74, p. 535-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enzymatically liquefied sweet sorghum stalks and beet molasses were evaluated for butyrate production using Clostridium tyrobutyricum in 1 L scale fed-batch fermentations. The hydrolysates used for the fermentations were prepared separately by liquefying the sorghum stalks at 50 °C, pH 5.0 for 18 h, with 30% (w/v) DM content using the enzyme preparation Cellic® CTec2 at an activity of 26.5 FPU/g DM. To enhance sucrose consumption, the fermentations were supplemented with invertase at an activity equivalent to 8.3 U/g DM. With the hydrolysate as the feedstock, a butyrate concentration of 37.2 ± 0.8 g/L, a productivity of 0.86 ± 0.02 g/L h and a yield of 0.39 ± 0.02 g/g (p = 0.05) consumed sugars were obtained. Finally, a butyrate concentration of 58.8 g/L, a productivity of 1.9 g/L h, a butyrate yield of 0.52 g/g consumed sugars and a dry cell mass concentration of 15.7 g/L were obtained with fed-batch cultivation and a constant feed consisting of 64% sorghum hydrolysate juice and 36% molasses. Evidence for inducible saccharolytic activity was also proven, as the cellulase activity in the culture supernatant was found more than double during feed with limiting sugar concentrations. The present study clearly demonstrates that combinations of low cost raw materials can be used for efficient butyrate production, also without cell immobilization.

  • 48.
    Sjöblom, Magnus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Krige, Adolf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Direct electricity generation from sweet sorghum stalks and anaerobic sludge2017In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 108, p. 505-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dried sweet sorghum stalks were valorized as a raw material for electricity generation in a two chamber microbial fuel cell using anaerobic sludge from a biogas plant as inoculum. The maximum voltage obtained on the sorghum stalks at an operating temperature of 35 °C was 546 mV with a maximum power- and current density of 131 mW/m2 and 543 mA/m2, respectively. The coulombic efficiency was 2.2%. Polarization data indicated that Ohmic resistances were dominant with an internal resistance of 182 Ω. The total electrical energy per gram of dried sorghum stalks was 165 J/g. Enzymatic treatment of the sorghum stalks did not improve the total electrical energy obtained. A metabolic study demonstrated that the sugars were quickly fermented to formate, acetate, propionate, lactate and butyrate with acetate and butyrate being the dominant acids during electricity generation

1 - 48 of 48
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