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  • 1.
    Egberth, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Nyberg, Gert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Næsset, Erik
    Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
    Gobakken, Terje
    Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
    Mauya, Ernest
    Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
    Malimbwi, Rogers
    Department of Forest Mensuration and Management, Sokoine University of Agriculture, United Republic of Tanzania.
    Katani, Josiah
    Department of Forest Mensuration and Management, Sokoine University of Agriculture, United Republic of Tanzania.
    Chamuya, Nurdin
    Tanzania Forest Services Agency, Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism, United Republic of Tanzania.
    Bulenga, George
    Department of Forest Mensuration and Management, Sokoine University of Agriculture, United Republic of Tanzania.
    Olsson, Håkan
    Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Combining airborne laser scanning and Landsat data for statistical modeling of soil carbon and tree biomass in Tanzanian Miombo woodlands2017In: Carbon Balance and Management, ISSN 1750-0680, E-ISSN 1750-0680, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil carbon and biomass depletion can be used to identify and quantify degraded soils,and by using remote sensing, there is potential to map soil conditions over large areas.Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager satellite data and airborne laser scanning datawere evaluated separately and in combination for modeling soil organic carbon, aboveground tree biomass and below ground tree biomass. The test site is situated in theLiwale district in southeastern Tanzania and is dominated by Miombo woodlands. Treedata from 15m radius field-surveyed plots and samples of soil carbon down to a depthof 30cm were used as reference data for tree biomass and soil carbon estimations.Cross-validated plot level error (RMSE) for predicting soil organic carbon was 28%using only Landsat 8, 26% using laser only, and 23% for the combination of the two.The plot level error for above ground tree biomass was 66% when using only Landsat8, 50% for laser and 49% for the combination of Landsat 8 and laser data. Results forbelow ground tree biomass were similar to above ground biomass. Additionally it wasfound that an early dry season satellite image was preferable for modelling biomasswhile images from later in the dry season were better for modelling soil carbon.The results show that laser data is superior to Landsat 8 when predicting both soilcarbon and biomass above and below ground in landscapes dominated by Miombowoodlands. Furthermore, the combination of laser data and Landsat data weremarginally better than using laser data only.

  • 2.
    Ilstedt, U.
    et al.
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences—SLU.
    Tobella, A. Bargues
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences—SLU.
    Bazie, H.R.
    Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles, Departement Productions.
    Bayala, J.H.
    World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), West and Central Africa Regional Office, Sahel.
    Verbeeten, E.
    Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam.
    Nyberg, Gert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sanou, J.
    Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles, Departement Productions.
    Benegas, L.
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences—SLU.
    Murdiyarso, D.
    Department of Geophysics and Meteorology, Bogor Agricultural University, Jl..
    Laudon, H.
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences—SLU.
    Sheil, D.
    Center for International Forestry Research, Jl. CIFOR, Situgede, Bogor.
    Malmer, A.
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences—SLU.
    Intermediate tree cover can maximize groundwater recharge in the seasonally dry tropics2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 21930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water scarcity contributes to the poverty of around one-third of the world's people. Despite many benefits, tree planting in dry regions is often discouraged by concerns that trees reduce water availability. Yet relevant studies from the tropics are scarce, and the impacts of intermediate tree cover remain unexplored. We developed and tested an optimum tree cover theory in which groundwater recharge is maximized at an intermediate tree density. Below this optimal tree density the benefits from any additional trees on water percolation exceed their extra water use, leading to increased groundwater recharge, while above the optimum the opposite occurs. Our results, based on groundwater budgets calibrated with measurements of drainage and transpiration in a cultivated woodland in West Africa, demonstrate that groundwater recharge was maximised at intermediate tree densities. In contrast to the prevailing view, we therefore find that moderate tree cover can increase groundwater recharge, and that tree planting and various tree management options can improve groundwater resources. We evaluate the necessary conditions for these results to hold and suggest that they are likely to be common in the seasonally dry tropics, offering potential for widespread tree establishment and increased benefits for hundreds of millions of people

  • 3.
    Stage, Jesper
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Andersson, Camilla
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Nyberg, Gert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Project: Restoration of forests, carbon and livelihoods: REDD+ and the economics of miombo land use2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This application brings together a multidisciplinary team to study the opportunities for, and implications of, better management of miombo forest landscapes in Tanzania. To develop and improve miombo production systemsthere is need for both broadened and deepened understanding of present land use, forest ecology, forest products economy, and related social and economic structures on process scale and up-scaled in the landscape. Tightly coupled to this is the analysis on the appropriateness and sustainability of different C-sequestration and C-trade mechanisms and land use forest management in relation to adaptation to climate vulnerability. Tanzania is chosen because of significantly heightened interest in the forest sector, but the suggested research will be applicable for the larger miombo area as well as for dry land Africa at large.

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