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  • 1.
    Nilsson, Hans
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Hamrin, Maria
    Department of Physics, Umeå University.
    Pitkänen, Timo
    Department of Physics, Umeå University.
    Karlsson, Tomas
    Space and Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Andersson, Laila O.
    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado.
    Gunell, Herbert
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik , Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels.
    Schillings, Audrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala.
    Oxygen ion response to proton bursty bulk flows2016In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 121, no 8, p. 7535-7546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have used Cluster spacecraft data from the years 2001 to 2005 to study how oxygen ions respond to bursty bulk flows (BBFs) as identified from proton data. We here define bursty bulk flows as periods of proton perpendicular velocities more than 100 km/s and a peak perpendicular velocity in the structure of more than 200 km/s, observed in a region with plasma beta above 1 in the near-Earth central tail region. We find that during proton BBFs only a minor increase in the O+ velocity is seen. The different behavior of the two ion species is further shown by statistics of H+ and O+ flow also outside BBFs: For perpendicular earthward velocities of H+ above about 100 km/s, the O+ perpendicular velocity is consistently lower, most commonly being a few tens of kilometers per second earthward. In summary, O+ ions in the plasma sheet experience less acceleration than H+ ions and are not fully frozen in to the magnetic field. Therefore, H+ and O+ motion is decoupled, and O+ ions have a slower earthward motion. This is particularly clear during BBFs. This may add further to the increased relative abundance of O+ ions in the plasma sheet during magnetic storms. The data indicate that O+ is typically less accelerated in association with plasma sheet X lines as compared to H+.

  • 2.
    Schillings, Audrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna, Sweden.
    O+ outflow during geomagnetic storms observed by Cluster satellites2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The region of space dominated by the Sun's magnetic field is called the heliosphere. It envelops the entire solar system including Earth. Therefore, a strong coupling exists between the Sun and our planet. The Sun continuously ejects particles, the solar wind, and when these high energy particles hit Earth, the magnetosphere (the region around the Earth governed by the geomagnetic field) is affected. When the solar wind is enhanced this disturbs the magnetosphere and perturbations can be seen also in ground-based observations.

    The upper atmosphere is subjected to solar radiation that ionise the neutral atoms and molecules, this region is referred to as the ionosphere. In the ionosphere, some of the heavier ion populations, such as O+, are heated and accelerated through several processes and flow upward. In the polar regions these mechanisms are particularly efficient and when the ions have enough energy to escape the Earth's gravity, they move outward along open magnetic field lines and may be lost into interplanetary space. Ion outflow in general has already been well studied, however, ion outflow under extreme magnetospheric conditions has not been investigated in detail.

    Disturbed magnetospheric conditions correlate with solar active periods, such as coronal holes or the development of solar active regions. From these regions, strong ejections called coronal mass ejections (CMEs) emerge. When these extreme events interact with Earth, they produce a compression of the magnetosphere as well as reconnection between the terrestrial magnetic field lines and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines, which most of the time leads to geomagnetic storms. The amounts of incoming solar particles and energy increase during geomagnetic storms and we also observe an increase in the O+ outflow.

    Our observations are made with the Cluster mission, a constellation of 4 satellites flying around Earth in the key magnetospheric regions where ion outflow is usually observed. In this thesis, we estimate O+ outflow under disturbed magnetospheric conditions and for several extreme geomagnetic storms. We find that O+ outflow lost into the solar wind increases exponentially with enhanced geomagnetic activity (Kp index) and increases about 2 orders of magnitude during extreme geomagnetic storms.

  • 3.
    Schillings, Audrey
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Slapak, R.
    EISCAT Scientific Association, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Wintoft, P.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Lund, Sweden.
    Yamauchi, M.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Wik, M.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Lund, Sweden.
    Dandouras, I.
    IRAP, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, UPS, CNES, France.
    Carr, C.M.
    Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    O+ Escape During the Extreme Space Weather Event of 4–10 September 20172018In: Space Weather: The international journal of research and applications, ISSN 1542-7390, E-ISSN 1542-7390, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1363-1376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the consequences of extreme space weather on ion outflow from the polar ionosphere by analyzing the solar storm that occurred early September 2017, causing a severe geomagnetic storm. Several X-flares and coronal mass ejections were observed between 4 and 10 September. The first shock—likely associated with a coronal mass ejection—hit the Earth late on 6 September, produced a storm sudden commencement, and began the initial phase of the storm. It was followed by a second shock, approximately 24 hr later, that initiated the main phase and simultaneously the Dst index dropped to Dst = −142 nT and Kp index reached Kp = 8. Using COmposition DIstribution Function data on board Cluster satellite 4, we estimated the ionospheric O+ outflow before and after the second shock. We found an enhancement in the polar cap by a factor of 3 for an unusually high ionospheric O+ outflow (mapped to an ionospheric reference altitude) of 1013 m−2 s−1. We suggest that this high ionospheric O+ outflow is due to a preheating of the ionosphere by the multiple X-flares. Finally, we briefly discuss the space weather consequences on the magnetosphere as a whole and the enhanced O+ outflow in connection with enhanced satellite drag.

  • 4.
    Schillings, Audrey
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instiutet for rymdfysik, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instiutet for rymdfysik, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Yamauchi, M
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Westerberg, Lars Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Relative outflow enhancements during major geomagnetic storms: Cluster observations2017In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 1341-1352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rate of ion outflow from the polar ionosphere is known to vary by orders of magnitude, depending on the geomagnetic activity. However, the upper limit of the outflow rate during the largest geomagnetic storms is not well constrained due to poor spatial coverage during storm events. In this paper, we analyse six major geomagnetic storms between 2001 and 2004 using Cluster data. The six major storms fulfil the criteria of Dst 100 nT or Kp 7C. Since the shape of the magnetospheric regions (plasma mantle, lobe and inner magnetosphere) are distorted during large magnetic storms, we use both plasma beta and ion characteristics to define a spatial box where the upward OC flux scaled to an ionospheric reference altitude for the extreme event is observed. The relative enhancement of the scaled outflow in the spatial boxes as compared to the data from the full year when the storm occurred is estimated. Only OC data were used because HC may have a solar wind origin. The storm time data for most cases showed up as a clearly distinguishable separate peak in the distribution toward the largest fluxes observed. The relative enhancement in the outflow region during storm time is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher compared to less disturbed time. The largest relative scaled outflow enhancement is 83 (7 November 2004) and the highest scaled OC outflow observed is 2 1014 m2 s1 (29 October 2003).

  • 5.
    Schillings, Audrey
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Slapak, Rikard
    EISCAT Scientifc Association, Kiruna.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Dandouras, Iannis
    IRAP, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, UPS, CNES, Toulouse, France.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Earth atmospheric loss through the plasma mantle and its dependence on solar wind parameters2019In: Earth, Planets and Space, Vol. 71, no 70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atmospheric loss and ion outfow play an important role in the magnetospheric dynamics and in the evolution of the atmosphere on geological timescales—an evolution which is also dependent on the solar activity. In this paper, we investigate the total O+ outfow [s−1 ] through the plasma mantle and its dependency on several solar wind param‑ eters. The oxygen ion data come from the CODIF instrument on board the spacecraft Cluster 4 and solar wind data from the OMNIWeb database for a period of 5 years (2001–2005). We study the distribution of the dynamic pressure and the interplanetary magnetic feld for time periods with available O+ observations in the plasma mantle. We then divided the data into suitably sized intervals. Additionally, we analyse the extreme ultraviolet radiation (EUV) data from the TIMED mission. We estimate the O+ escape rate [ions/s] as a function of the solar wind dynamic pressure, the interplanetary magnetic feld (IMF) and EUV. Our analysis shows that the O+ escape rate in the plasma mantle increases with increased solar wind dynamic pressure. Consistently, it was found that the southward IMF also plays an important role in the O+ escape rate in contrast to the EUV fux which does not have a signifcant infuence for the plasma mantle region. Finally, the relation between the O+ escape rate and the solar wind energy transferred into the magnetosphere shows a nonlinear response. The O+ escape rate starts increasing with an energy input of approxi‑ mately 1011W.

  • 6.
    Schillings, Audrey
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Kiruna, Sweden .
    Slapak, Rikard
    EISCAT Scientific Association, Kiruna.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Kiruna.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Kiruna.
    Dandouras, Iannis
    Université de Toulouse, CNRS, UPS, CNES, Toulouse, France.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Earth atmospheric loss through the plasma mantle and its dependence onsolar wind parameters2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Schillings, Audrey
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Slapak, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Atmospheric loss during major geomagnetic storms: Cluster observations2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Hamrin, Maria
    Department of Physics, Umeä University.
    Pitkänen, Timo
    Department of Physics, Umeä University.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Karlsson, Tomas
    Space and Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Schillings, Audrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Quantification of the total ion transport in the near-Earth plasma sheet2017In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 869-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies strongly suggest that a majority of the observed O+ cusp outflows will eventually escape into the solar wind, rather than be transported to the plasma sheet. Therefore, an investigation of plasma sheet flows will add to these studies and give a more complete picture of magnetospheric ion dynamics. Specifically, it will provide a greater understanding of atmospheric loss. We have used Cluster spacecraft 4 to quantify the H+ and O+ total transports in the near-Earth plasma sheet, using data covering 2001-2005. The results show that both H+ and O+ have earthward net fluxes of the orders of 1026 and 1024 s -1, respectively. The O+ plasma sheet return flux is 1 order of magnitude smaller than the O+ outflows observed in the cusps, strengthening the view that most ionospheric O+ outflows do escape. The H+ return flux is approximately the same as the ionospheric outflow, suggesting a stable budget of H+ in the magnetosphere. However, low-energy H+, not detectable by the ion spectrometer, is not considered in our study, leaving the complete magnetospheric H+ circulation an open question. Studying tailward flows separately reveals a total tailward O+ flux of about 0. 5 × 1025 s -1, which can be considered as a lower limit of the nightside auroral region O+ outflow. Lower velocity flows ( < 100kms -1) contribute most to the total transports, whereas the high-velocity flows contribute very little, suggesting that bursty bulk flows are not dominant in plasma sheet mass transport.

  • 9.
    Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Schillings, Audrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Atmospheric loss from the dayside open polar region and its dependence on geomagnetic activity: Implications for atmospheric escape on evolutionary time scales2017In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 721-731Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Slapak, Rikard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Schillings, Audrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Yamauchi, Masatoshi
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Corrigendum to Atmospheric loss from the dayside open polar region and its dependence on geomagnetic activity: Implications for atmospheric escape on evolutionary time scales, published in Ann. Geophys., 35, 721–731,20172018In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Yamauchi, M
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Kiruna, Sweden.
    Sergienko, T
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Kiruna, Sweden .
    Enell, C-F
    EISCAT Scientific Association, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Schillings, Audrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Kiruna, Sweden.
    Slapak, Rikard
    EISCAT Scientific Association, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Johnsen, M G
    Tromsø Geophysical Observatory (TGO), UiT the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Tjulin, A
    EISCAT Scientific Association, Kiruna, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Kiruna, Sweden .
    Ionospheric Response Observed by EISCAT During the 6–8 September 2017 Space Weather Event: Overview2018In: Space Weather: The international journal of research and applications, ISSN 1542-7390, E-ISSN 1542-7390, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1437-1450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present ionospheric plasma conditions observed by the EISCAT radars in Tromsø and on Svalbard, covering 68°–81° geomagnetic latitude, during 6–8 September 2017. This is a period when X2.2 and X9.3 X‐ray flares occurred, two interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) arrived at the Earth accompanied by enhancements of MeV‐range energetic particle flux in both the solar wind (SEP event) and inner magnetosphere, and an AL < −2,000 substorm took place. (1) Both X flares caused enhancement of ionospheric electron density for about 10 min. The X9.3 flare also increased temperatures of both electrons and ions over 69°–75° geomagnetic latitude until the X‐ray flux decreased below the level of X‐class flares. However, the temperature was not enhanced after the previous X2.2 flare in the prenoon sector. (2) At around 75° geomagnetic latitude, the prenoon ion upflow flux slightly increased the day after the X9.3 flare, which is also after the first ICME and a SEP event, while no outstanding enhancement was found at the time of these X flares. (3) The upflow velocity sometimes decreased when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) turned southward. (4) Before the first ICME arrival after the SEP event under weak IMF with Bz ~0 nT, a substorm‐like expansion of the auroral arc signature took place without local geomagnetic signature near local midnight, while no notable change was observed after the ICME arrival. (5) AL reached <−2,000 nT only after the arrival of the second ICME with strongly southward IMF. Causality connections between the solar/solar wind event and the ionospheric responses remain unclear.

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