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  • 1.
    Ahmadi, Mahdieh
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Mazandaran University of Science and Technology, Babol.
    Seneviratne, Dammika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Garmabaki, Amir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    An approach to Symbolic Modelling: a Railway Case study for Maintenance Recovery Level Identification2017In: Proceedings of MPMM 2016: 6th International Conference on Maintenance Performance Measurement and Management, 28 November 2016, Luleå, Sweden / [ed] Diego Galar, Dammika Seneviratne, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2017, p. 187-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing demand for quality and reliability of the asset is progressively seen as a motivation for improved maintenance procedure and management. Always the role of qualitative maintenance data is neglected in the maintenance recovery level identification. Human factor parameter in the maintenance and qualitative technical data, for instance, maintenance experience, maintenance knowledge, training, quality before maintenance, number of previous maintenance, maintenance documentation and environmental condition can be collected and evaluated to increase the accuracy of maintenance recovery estimation. This information always expressed linguistically and considering their effect in the recovery model is challenging. The aim of this study is to propose a symbolic model to capture the effect of above qualitative factor on maintenance recovery level. Fuzzy inference systems are applied to qualitative expert knowledge to extract the percentage effect which can be incorporated in the recovery level model. The tamping railway case study is considered to validate the model. The results show that the maintenance experience and environmental condition are playing main role in maintenance quality. The application of above method can be extended to asset condition assessment in combination with data driven and physical model

  • 2.
    Galar, Diego
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Seneviratne, DammikaLuleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Management Systems in Production Engineering: Maintenance Performance Measurement and Management Challenges:  From Sensing to Decision Support2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Galar, Diego
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Seneviratne, DammikaLuleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    MPMM 2016, Maintenance, Performance, Measurement & Management: conference proceedings2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The maintenance function is inherent to production but its activities are not always understood or quantified. A characteristic of maintenance is that its activity involves more than a group of people or a workshop and goes beyond the limits of a traditional department.

    The scope of maintenance in a manufacturing environment is illustrated by its various definitions. British Standards Institute defines maintenance as a combination of all technical and associated administrative activities required to keep equipment, installations and other physical assets in the desired operating condition or restore them to this condition, some authors indicate that maintenance is about achieving the required asset capabilities within an economic or business context, or consists of the engineering decisions and associated actions necessary and sufficient for the optimization of specified equipment ‘capability’ where capability is the ability to perform a specified function within a range of performance levels that may relate to capacity, rate, quality, safety and responsiveness. However, they all agree that the objective of maintenance is to achieve the agreed-upon output level and operating pattern at minimum resource cost within the constraints of system condition and safety.

    We can summarize the maintenance objectives under the following categories: ensuring asset functions (availability, reliability, product quality etc.); ensuring design life; ensuring asset and environmental safety; ensuring cost effectiveness in maintenance; ensuring efficient use of resources (energy and raw materials). For production equipment, ensuring the system functions as it should is the prime maintenance objective. Maintenance must provide the required reliability, availability, efficiency and capability of production systems. Ensuring system life refers to keeping the equipment in good condition to achieve or prolong its designed life. In this case, cost has to be optimized to achieve the desired plant condition. Asset safety is very important, as failures can have catastrophic consequences. The cost of maintenance has to be minimized while keeping the risks within strict limits and meeting the statutory requirements.

    For a long time, maintenance was carried out by the workers themselves, in a more loosely organized style of maintenance with no haste for the machinery or tools to be operational again. However, things have changed.

    •        First, there is a need for higher asset availability. With scale economies dominating the global map, the demand for products is increasing. However, companies suffer financially from the costs of expansion, purchase of industrial buildings, production equipment, acquisitions of companies in the same sector, and so on. Productive capacities must be kept at a maximum, and organizations are beginning to worry about keeping track of the parameters that may affect the availability of their plants and machinery.

    •        The second concern follows from the first. When organizations begin to optimize their production costs and create cost models attributable to the finished product, they start to question maintenance cost. This function has grown to include assets, personnel etc., consuming a significant percentage of the overall organization budget. Therefore, when companies are establishing policies to streamline costs, the question of the maintenance budget arises, followed by questions about the success of this budget. They start to consider availability and quality parameters.

    A question that has haunted maintenance throughout history now appears: how do we maximize availability at the lowest cost? To answer this question, various methodologies, technologies and batteries of indicators are being developed to observe the impacts of improvements.

  • 4.
    Garmabaki, Amir
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Seneviratne, Dammika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Ahmadi, Mahdieh
    Barabadi, Abbas
    Tromsø University.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Data driven RUL estimation of rolling stock using intelligent functional test2017In: Risk, Reliability and Safety: Innovating Theory and Practice - Proceedings of the 26th European Safety and Reliability Conference, ESREL 2016 / [ed] Walls L.,Revie M.,Bedford T, London: CRC Press, 2017, p. 1994-1999Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rolling stock health condition is important for both passenger and freight trains in terms of safety, availability, punctuality and efficiency. Various inspection and maintenance methodologies are per-formed on rolling stock equipment to fulfill the above performance measures. This paper suggests a new approach, namely, intelligent functional test (IFTest) to estimate the remaining useful life (RUL) of the equipment, sub-systems and systems of rolling stock dynamically by data driven methods. IFTest generates a baseline of the current operational abilities in contrast to the required abilities. The test integrates the historical and new set of data to track the trend of degradation of equipment. With this approach, the operation and maintenance personnel have ample time to make decisions for the maintenance and failure consequences. In addition, it is supposed that by using such data we are achieving a more accurate result for the estimation of reliability and RUL of critical rolling stock equipment.

  • 5.
    Garmabaki, Amir
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Thaduri, Adithya
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Seneviratne, Dammika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Opportunistic inspection planning for Railway eMaintenance2016In: IFAC-PapersOnLine, ISSN 2405-8963, Vol. 49, no 28, p. 197-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Railway infrastructure is a complex system that comprises of several subsystems which interacts in hierarchical, multi-distributive and multi-user environment. It is a difficult task to perform inspections for all the assets at an instant because the train management system decides when to conduct different types of inspection techniques on several assets in a particular track section. There are two main wastes of resources for inspection planning occurred in maintenance; under usage due to inaccurate prediction of failure and over usage because the necessary information already has been acquired from other sources. These irregularities lead to wastage of resources, for instance, human, machine and time that has tremendous implications on cost, availability and manpower. This paper proposes a methodology by using intelligent functional test outcome to assess the performability of an asset and integrating the data to the eMaintenance cloud platform of Swedish railway infrastructure. By implementing this methodology, we can achieve better planning of resources for optimal performance of assets. A case study is performed on Switches and Crossings of Swedish railway infrastructure for the applicability of the proposed methodology.

  • 6.
    Teymourian, Kiumars
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Seneviratne, Dammika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Galar, Diego
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Ergonomics contribution in maintainability2017In: Management Systems in Production Engineering, ISSN 2299-0461, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 217-223, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to describe an ergonomics contribution in maintainability. The economical designs, inputs and training helps to increase the maintainability indicators for industrial devices. This analysis can be helpful, among other cases, to compare systems, to achieve a better design regarding maintainability requirements, to improve this maintainability under specific industrial environment and to foresee maintainability problems due to eventual changes in a device operation conditions. With this purpose, this work first introduces the notion of ergonomics and human factors, maintainability and the implementation of assessment of human postures, including some important postures to perform maintenance activities. A simulation approach is used to identify the critical posture of the maintenance personnel and implements the defined postures with minimal loads on the personnel who use the equipment in a practical scenario. The simulation inputs are given to the designers to improve the workplace/equipment in order to high level of maintainability. Finally, the work concludes summarizing the more significant aspects and suggesting future research.

  • 7.
    Teymourian, Kiumars
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Seneviratne, Dammika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Galar, Diego
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Ergonomics Contribution in Maintainability2017In: Proceedings of MPMM 2016: 6th International Conference on Maintenance Performance Measurement and Management, 28 November 2016, Luleå, Sweden / [ed] Diego Galar, Dammika Seneviratne, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2017, p. 180-186Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to describe an ergonomics contribution in maintainability. The economical designs, inputs and training helps to increase themaintainability indicators for industrial devices. This analysis can be helpful, among other cases, to compare systems, to achieve a better design regarding maintainability requirements, to improve this maintainability under specific industrial environment and to foresee maintainability problems due to eventual changes in a device operation condition. With this purpose, this work first introduces the notion of ergonomics and human factors, maintainability and the implementation of assessment of human postures, including some important postures to perform maintenance activities. A simulation approach is used to identify the critical posture of the maintenance personnel and implements the defined postures with minimal loads on the personnel who use the equipment in a practical scenario. The simulation inputs are given to the designers to improve the workplace/equipment in order to high level of maintainability. Finally, the work concludes summarizing the more significant aspects and suggesting future research.

  • 8.
    Villarejo, Roberto
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Johansson, Carl-anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Urko, Leturiondo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics. IK4 Ikerlan, P J Ma Arizmendiarrieta 2, Arrasate Mondragon 20500, Spain.
    Simon, Victor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Seneviratne, Dammika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Galar, Diego
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Bottom to Top Approach for Railway KPI Generation2017In: Management Systems in Production Engineering, ISSN 2299-0461, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 191-198, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Railway maintenance especially on infrastructure produces a vast amount of data. However, having data is not synonymous with having information; rather, data must be processed to extract information. In railway maintenance, the development of key performance indicators (KPIs) linked to punctuality or capacity can help planned and scheduled maintenance, thus aligning the maintenance department with corporate objectives. There is a need for an improved method to analyse railway data to find the relevant KPIs. The system should support maintainers, answering such questions as what maintenance should be done, where and when. The system should equip the user with the knowledge of the infrastructure's condition and configuration, and the traffic situation so maintenance resources can be targeted to only those areas needing work. The amount of information is vast, so it must be hierarchized and aggregated; users must filter out the useless indicators. Data are fused by compiling several individual indicators into a single index; the resulting composite indicators measure multidimensional concepts which cannot be captured by a single index. The paper describes a method of monitoring a complex entity. In this scenario, a plurality of use indices and weighting values are used to create a composite and aggregated use index from a combination of lower level use indices and weighting values. The resulting composite and aggregated indicators can be a decision-making tool for asset managers at different hierarchical levels.

1 - 8 of 8
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  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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