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  • 1.
    Jansson, Gustav
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Viklund, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Advancement of Platform Development in Industrialised Building2015In: Procedia Economics and Finance, E-ISSN 2212-5671, Vol. 21, p. 461-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demand for productivity in house-building is today causing changes of work methods in the building industry, for example bythe utilization of house-building platforms. This requires development processes separated from those of individual house products. The aim of this study is to examine how platform development processes in the building industry are carried out and how product development theories fit to the studied context. A qualitative case studyanalysis shows how a house-building platform can be developed in a sequential manner with product development theories that could capture values fromthe construction company, property owner and from end user.

  • 2.
    Jansson, Gustav
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Viklund, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Lidelöw, Helena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Design management using knowledge innovation and visual planning.2016In: Automation in Construction, ISSN 0926-5805, E-ISSN 1872-7891, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 330-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An open platform used for industrialised house-building imposes restrictions on the flexibility of the product offering when developing design standardisation. How design process standardisation incorporates variations in products has not been widely studied. The aim of this research is to explain how design breakdown enables Lean Product Development Flow (LPDF) and look-ahead planning in an industrialised house-building context where an open platform is used. A case study was conducted of how one of the leading industrialised house-building companies in Sweden introduced the LPDF tool Knowledge Innovation/Visual Planning (KI-VP) into their design process. The implementation of KI-VP led to an increased cross-functional understanding of relationships between activities, which are an important factor in achieving flexibility and a synchronised workflow. By using design standardisation, look-ahead planning was implemented and used in the management of design flow. Standardisation through design breakdown provides a basis for knowledge innovation that enables improvement of the open platform using a bottom-up approach and increases the production flow. 

  • 3.
    Jansson, Gustav
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Viklund, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Olofsson, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Artistic and Engineering Design of Platform-Based Production Systems: A Study of Swedish Architectural Practice2018In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 8, no 2, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on platform-based production systems for house-building has focused on production and manufacturing issues. The aim of this research is to explore how the architectural design process contributes to the industrialised house-building industry from the perspective of creative design work. It also aims to describe how constraints affect architectural design work in the engineer-to-order context, when using platform-based production systems. Architects with experience in using platform-based building systems with different degrees of constraints were interviewed regarding creative aspects of the design work. The interviews, together with documents relating to platform constraints, were then analysed from the perspective of artistic and engineering design theories. The results show the benefits and issues of using platform constraints, both with prefabrication of volumetric modules, as well as prefabricated slab and wall elements. The study highlights a major research gap by describing how architectural work, from both the creative artistic and engineering design perspectives, is affected by constraints in the building platform: (1) the architectural design work goes through a series of divergent and convergent processes where the divergent processes are explorative and the convergent processes are solution-oriented; and (2), there is a trade-off between creativity and efficiency in the design work. Open parameters for layout design are key to architectural creativity, while predefinition supports efficiency. The results also provide an understanding of the potential for creativity in artistic and engineering work tasks through different phases in design, and how they are related to constraints in the platform. The main limitation of the research is the number of interviewed architects who had different background experiences of working with different types of platform constraints. More studies are needed to confirm the observations and to understand how creativity and efficiency interact with divergent and convergent design processes.

  • 4.
    Lidelöw, Helena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Jansson, Gustav
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Viklund, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Design Breakdown in Industrialized Construction: Supporting Lean Manufacturing2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 Modular and Offsite Construction (MOC) Summit & 1st International Conference on the Industrialization of Construction (ICIC) / [ed] Mohammed Al-Hussein; Osama Moselhi; Sunkuk Kim; Ryan E. Smith, Edmonton, Canada: University of Alberta Press , 2015, p. 255-262Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A turn-key commitment towards the client compels the contractor to optimize the entire supply chain from design to delivery of the finished building. Industrialization of residential construction can be accomplished using either an open or a closed platform. In the case of an open platform, the client can greatly affect design solutions and the subsequent production phase. The aim of this research is to explain how design process breakdown into activities and deli-veries supports Lean manufacturing in an open platform situation. The most successful industria-lized contractor in Sweden was studied through mapping their design process of modular buildings using their visual planning display. Describing the improvement strategy, the visual content, and the standardization efforts in design revealed the support for Lean manufacturing. Analyzing each activity for repetitive elements identified the base for standardization. The conclusion is that design breakdown is a successful method that effectively supports Lean manufacturing and provides a base for standardization in an open platform context.

  • 5.
    Sandberg, Marcus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Gerth, Robert
    Design Evolution Scandinavia AB.
    Viklund, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    A design automation development process for building and bridge design2016In: Proceedings of the 33rd CIB W78 Conference 2016, Oct. 31st – Nov. 2nd 2016, Brisbane, Australia, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing industrialization and standardization of construction opens up for the field of design automation. Such applications, for buildings and infrastructural products, are starting to appear by using software from the manufacturing industry. A challenge is, however, to develop such design automation applications since approaches combining product analyses, requirements management, and development of product platforms and configurators are lacking for construction. Using a bottom up approach to study existing best practice and create more general approaches is one way. In this paper we study the design automation development process from three cases; 1) edge beams, focusing on requirements management, 2) outer non-bearing walls, considering configurator development, and 3) end frame bridge superstructures, featuring the development of generic analysis procedures. These three processes are analyzed and merged into a more generic process which can be used to guide future developments of design automation applications within construction.

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  • 6.
    Viklund, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Arkitekters syn på kravhantering vid byggnadsutformning: Resultatredovisning2017Report (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 7.
    Viklund, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Design approaches in industrialized house building: A creativity perspective2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house builders strive towards structure and control of their processes, including design. Such structure is seldom sought for in architectural design practice, where individuality and autonomy are considered essential. This is causing a tension in the construction industry as industrialized house builders and architects strive to improve their collaboration. In this licentiate thesis, a first step towards better understanding this tension is taken by exploring different design approaches from a creativity perspective. The analytical framework builds on a theoretical conceptualization of design approach features, including design task, design process, design organization, and knowledge sharing. A creativity perspective is added using heuristic or algorithmic design tasks; divergent or convergent design processes; autonomy or imposed structure from the design organization; and sole designer or teamwork as the basis for knowledge sharing. This framework is used to analyze four empirically explored design approaches, two focusing on platform development and two focusing on project specific design. Three of these are explored using a case study approach, while the fourth is explored through interviews with multiple architects.

    The architectural design approach’s features seem likely to facilitate creativity: the design task is mainly heuristic; the design process enables divergence; and the architects have autonomy in how to go about the design process. However, they experience a lack of knowledge sharing, which could further facilitate creativity. The studied standardized design development approach has the opposite features: the design task is mainly algorithmic; the design process facilitates convergence; and there is a clear structure with instructions of how each subtask should be executed. Hence, this design approach is not likely to facilitate creativity (which was also not its intention). The structure has however improved the design team’s knowledge sharing, which is likely to facilitate creativity.

    The two platform development approaches have a mix of features. Both design tasks are more algorithmic than heuristic and creativity was not expected of the design results. The design processes are clearly convergent. While the house platform development team is multi-functional and work in close collaboration, the design automation platform developers’ knowledge sharing is based on communication with the client’s organization, thus not enabling as many perspectives on the designed product. The design automation platform developers use a support structure with process descriptions and methods to ensure quality, motivated by the variety of platforms that they develop on a regular basis. The house product platform developers on the other hand, were expected to develop only this one platform. Hence, they worked autonomously, using the teamwork setting to progress and converge in the process.

    In summary, the creative intention seems related to how design is approached. If creativity is sought for, the design task is heuristic, and divergence and autonomy is promoted. If creativity is not sought for, structure seem to facilitate other benefits such as reliability and quality control. Knowledge sharing could however be potentially beneficial in most design approaches. By understanding that different design approaches will influence creativity in different ways, a first step has been taken towards understanding why architects and industrialized house builders approach design differently.

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    fulltext
  • 8.
    Viklund, Emma
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Sandberg, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Lidelöw, Helena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Jansson, Gustav
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Modularization based on commonalities in house-building requirements2017In: ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016 / [ed] Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y., Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017, p. 126-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some of the requirements governing the design of houses are common between projects. This opens up for using modularization based on product commonalities. Though modularization is well known in the manufacturing industry, its use in house-building contexts is less studied. Even more scarce is research focusing on how requirement commonalities between one-of-a-kind products are found and managed in a modularization process. In this research, modularization from a requirements management perspective is empirically explored using a case study approach. Though the studied modularization process can be described as sequential, the process steps are highly interrelated, with overlaps and iterations. Commonalities are found by functional decomposition of the customer's portfolio projects, tracing technical solutions back to their initial requirements. These are balanced with the customer's requirements on the product and on the design automation tool. The requirement list is continuously updated based on portfolio analysis and communication of modularization results to the customer

1 - 8 of 8
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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