Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Cockell, Charles S.
    et al.
    UK Centre for Astrobiology, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Midlothian, UK.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. UK Centre for Astrobiology, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Midlothian, UK; Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (UGR-CSIC), Granada, Spain .
    Zorzano, Maria-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Torrejon de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid, Spain.
    Bhardwaj, Anshuman
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Soria-Salinas, Álvaro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mathanla, Thasshwin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Israel Nazarious, Miracle
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Vakkada Ramachandran, Abhilash
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Suckling, Barbara
    Boulby Underground Laboratory, Boulby, UK.
    Subsurface scientific exploration of extraterrestrial environments (MINAR 5): analogue science, technology and education in the Boulby Mine, UK2019In: International Journal of Astrobiology, ISSN 1473-5504, E-ISSN 1475-3006, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 157-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The deep subsurface of other planetary bodies is of special interest for robotic and human exploration. The subsurface provides access to planetary interior processes, thus yielding insights into planetary formation and evolution. On Mars, the subsurface might harbour the most habitable conditions. In the context of human exploration, the subsurface can provide refugia for habitation from extreme surface conditions. We describe the fifth Mine Analogue Research (MINAR 5) programme at 1 km depth in the Boulby Mine, UK in collaboration with Spaceward Bound NASA and the Kalam Centre, India, to test instruments and methods for the robotic and human exploration of deep environments on the Moon and Mars. The geological context in Permian evaporites provides an analogue to evaporitic materials on other planetary bodies such as Mars. A wide range of sample acquisition instruments (NASA drills, Small Planetary Impulse Tool (SPLIT) robotic hammer, universal sampling bags), analytical instruments (Raman spectroscopy, Close-Up Imager, Minion DNA sequencing technology, methane stable isotope analysis, biomolecule and metabolic life detection instruments) and environmental monitoring equipment (passive air particle sampler, particle detectors and environmental monitoring equipment) was deployed in an integrated campaign. Investigations included studying the geochemical signatures of chloride and sulphate evaporitic minerals, testing methods for life detection and planetary protection around human-tended operations, and investigations on the radiation environment of the deep subsurface. The MINAR analogue activity occurs in an active mine, showing how the development of space exploration technology can be used to contribute to addressing immediate Earth-based challenges. During the campaign, in collaboration with European Space Agency (ESA), MINAR was used for astronaut familiarization with future exploration tools and techniques. The campaign was used to develop primary and secondary school and primary to secondary transition curriculum materials on-site during the campaign which was focused on a classroom extra vehicular activity simulation.

  • 2.
    Ekman, Jonas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Antti, Marta-Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Emami, Reza
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Kuhn, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Minami, Ichiro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Gustafsson, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Zorzano Mier, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Milz, Mathias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Behar, Etienne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Wolf, Veronika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Dordlofva, Christo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Mendaza de Cal, Maria Teresa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Jamali, Maryam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Roos, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Ottemark, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nieto, Chris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Soria Salinas, Álvaro Tomás
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Vázquez Martín, Sandra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nyberg, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Neikter, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Lindwall, Angelica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Fakhardji, Wissam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Projekt: Rymdforskarskolan2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Graduate School of Space Technology

  • 3.
    Pandey, S.
    et al.
    Mars Society Australia, Clifton Hill, VIC, Australia. Amity Centre of Excellence in Astrobiology, Amity University Mumbai, Mumbai, India. Blue Marble Space Institute of Science, Seattle, WA, United States.
    Clarke, J.
    Mars Society Australia, Clifton Hill, VIC, Australia.Australian Centre of Astrobiology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Nema, P.
    Blue Marble Space Institute of Science, Seattle, WA, United States.
    Bonaccorsi, R.
    Space Sciences Division, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States. SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, Mountain View, CA, United States.
    Som, S.
    Blue Marble Space Institute of Science, Seattle, WA, United States.
    Sharma, M.
    Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, Lucknow, India.
    Phartiyal, B.
    Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, Lucknow, India.
    Rajamani, S.
    Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune, India.
    Mogul, R.
    Blue Marble Space Institute of Science, Seattle, WA, United States. California Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA, United States.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR), Armilla, Granada, Spain.
    Vaishampayan, P.
    Blue Marble Space Institute of Science, Seattle, WA, United States.
    Blank, J.
    Blue Marble Space Institute of Science, Seattle, WA, United States.Space Sciences Division, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States.
    Steller, L.
    Australian Centre of Astrobiology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Srivastava, A
    Mars Society, Lakewood, CO, United States.
    Singh, R.
    Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, Lucknow, India.
    McGuirk, S.
    Mars Society Australia, Clifton Hill, VIC, Australia. Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.
    Zorzano Mier, María-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology. Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid, Spain.
    Güttler, J.M.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Cal, Maria Teresa Mendaza de
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Soria-Salinas, Álvaro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Ahmad, S.
    Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, Lucknow, India.
    Ansari, A.
    Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, Lucknow, India.
    Singh, V.K
    Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, Lucknow, India.
    Mungi, C.
    Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune, India.
    Bapat, N.
    Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune, India.
    Ladakh: Diverse, high-altitude extreme environments for off-earth analogue and astrobiology research2019In: International Journal of Astrobiology, ISSN 1473-5504, E-ISSN 1475-3006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper highlights unique sites in Ladakh, India, investigated during our 2016 multidisciplinary pathfinding expedition to the region. We summarize our scientific findings and the site's potential to support science exploration, testing of new technologies and science protocols within the framework of astrobiology research. Ladakh has several accessible, diverse, pristine and extreme environments at very high altitudes (3000–5700 m above sea level). These sites include glacial passes, sand dunes, hot springs and saline lake shorelines with periglacial features. We report geological observations and environmental characteristics (of astrobiological significance) along with the development of regolith-landform maps for cold high passes. The effects of the diurnal water cycle on salt deliquescence were studied using the ExoMars Mission instrument mockup: HabitAbility: Brines, Irradiance and Temperature (HABIT). It recorded the existence of an interaction between the diurnal water cycle in the atmosphere and salts in the soil (which can serve as habitable liquid water reservoirs). Life detection assays were also tested to establish the best protocols for biomass measurements in brines, periglacial ice-mud and permafrost melt water environments in the Tso-Kar region. This campaign helped confirm the relevance of clays and brines as interest targets of research on Mars for biomarker preservation and life detection.

  • 4.
    Soria-Salinas, Álvaro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    The ExoMars 2020 HABIT Instrument Wind and Air Temperature Sensors: Development of Instrumentation for Planetary Exploration2020Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents the development of the air temperature sensors (ATS) and wind retrieval method of the HABIT (HabitAbility: Brines, Irradiation and Temperature) instrument, an European payload of the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars 2020 mission. The research work is focused on modelling the influence of forced convection from on the HABIT ATS to provide the air temperature and wind speed of the local airflow. The preliminary simulations and testing phases provided inputs to the early designs of the HABIT structure and configured the final flight model (FM) instrument design.

    The wind speed retrieval was first tested using temperature measurements from the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) instrument on board the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The new wind retrieval approach that we propose may eventually be able to supply MSL with wind values for contextualizing the rover’s operations and for meteorological studies on the surface of Mars. The method is based on forced convection modelling of the ATS of REMS as thin rods immersed in the extreme low-pressure and high-radiating atmospheric conditions of the Martian thermal boundary layer at a height of ∼ 1.5 m from the surface. A preliminary validation of the possibilities and limitations of this retrieval was performed (before the delivery of the HABIT instrument) using comparative analysis with existing REMS wind field-site data for the same sols that are available at the Planetary Data System (PDS). Assuming the previously reported REMS wind sensor (WS) retrieval errors of 20% for the wind speed, ±30° for the horizontal ”front” wind directions, and ±45° for the horizontal ”rear” wind directions, we report agreement with the WS values of up to 77% of the acquisition time, on average, for wind speeds and coincidence between 60% and 80% of the time for wind directions. These promising results are limited to only evening extended acquisitions from 18:00 to 21:00 local mean solar time (LMST) and orientations within the validity region of the retrieval; that is, the method is only considered valid over a narrow angle range of 13° to 107° in azimuth angle. This method could be applied to daytime conditions. The results suggest a new optimal orientation for wind speed and direction retrievals of 60° clockwise with respect to the forward direction of the Curiosity rover, although the technique was not yet ready to be considered for planning of the Curiosity rover operations.

    Regarding the design, testing and calibration of HABIT, an experimental testing campaign was developed using the HABIT engineering and qualification model (EQM) and the FM to further explore the capabilities of the retrieval when applied to the actual data from HABIT ATS. After the calibration of the EQM and FM ATS, the EQM was tested at the Aarhus Wind Tunnel Simulator (AWTS) under typical near-surface Martian winds.

    By modelling forced convective heat transfer from three horizontally inclined rectangular- based cylinders (rods), the average heat transfer coefficient was determined from steady CO2 flows at a pressure of 9.9 mbar, an ambient temperature of 25°C, and for horizontal free-stream velocities between 0.8 and 12 m/s. Several relationships between the Nusselt number and the Reynolds and Prandtl numbers reported in the literature and tested on the REMS ATS temperature data were evaluated in the tunnel to model convective heat transfer through the ATS rods. Where needed, corrections to account for radiative heat transfer within the AWTS were implemented to correct for experimental artefacts. The tests demonstrated that with this retrieval method, under representative Martian conditions, can derive the wind speed for frontal winds in the range of 0 to 10 m/s, with an error of ±0.3 m/s, using the cooling profile of the ATS rod 3, and for lateral winds in the range of 0 to 6 m/s, with an error of ±0.3 m/s, using the ATS rod 2 cooling profile.

    This wind retrieval method can be applied not only to the future analysis of HABIT data at Oxia Planum, but also to reanalyse the ATS data of REMS at Gale crater, and for future comparative analysis with the Temperature and Wind Sensors for InSight (TWINS)/InSight, the HabitAbility: Brines, Irradiation and Temperature (HABIT)/ExoMars 2020, and the Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer (MEDA)/Mars 2020 rover instruments.

  • 5.
    Soria-Salinas, Álvaro
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Wittman, Philipp
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano Mier, Maria-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Wind Retrieval Measurements for the Mars Surface Exploration2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a novel method to quantify the heat transfer coefficient h at the near environment of a spacecraft operating under Mars surface atmospheric conditions. As part of the scientific instruments of the ExoMars 2018 Surface Platform, the HABIT (HabitAbility: Brines, Irradiance and Temperature) instrument will be operating on Mars surface in order to establish the habitability of the landing site. By resolving the energy balance equation in temperatures over the three HABIT Air Temperature Sensor (ATS), we will retrieve the fluid temperature Tf and the known as m-parameter directly related with the heat transfer coefficient and sensitive to variations in wind density and velocity field

  • 6.
    Soria-Salinas, Álvaro
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano Mier, Maria-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Convective Heat Transfer at the Martian Boundary Layer, Measurement and Model2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Soria-Salinas, Álvaro
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano Mier, Maria-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Thermal and Heat Transfer Studies Using the HABIT Instrument on the ExoMars 2018 Surface Platform2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Soria-Salinas, Álvaro
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano Mier, Maria-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Feiccabrino, James
    Department of Water Resources Engineering., Lund University.
    Convective Heat Transfer Measurements at the Martian Surface2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Soria-Salinas, Álvaro
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Zorzano Mier, Maria-Paz
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Sánchez-García-Casarrubios, J.
    Department of Signal and Telecommunication Theory, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.
    Pérez-Díaz, J-L
    Department of Signal and Telecommunication Theory, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.
    Vakkada Ramachandran, Abhilash
    Luleå University of Technology.
    A Xenon Mass Gauging through Heat Transfer Modeling for Electric Propulsion Thrusters2017In: World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology: An International Journal of Science, Engineering and Technology, ISSN 2010-376X, E-ISSN 2070-3740, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 94-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current state-of-the-art methods of mass gauging of Electric Propulsion (EP) propellants in microgravity conditions rely on external measurements that are taken at the surface of the tank. The tanks are operated under a constant thermal duty cycle to store the propellant within a pre-defined temperature and pressure range. We demonstrate using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations that the heat-transfer within the pressurized propellant generates temperature and density anisotropies. This challenges the standard mass gauging methods that rely on the use of time changing skin-temperatures and pressures. We observe that the domes of the tanks are prone to be overheated, and that a long time after the heaters of the thermal cycle are switched off, the system reaches a quasi-equilibrium state with a more uniform density. We propose a new gauging method, which we call the Improved PVT method, based on universal physics and thermodynamics principles, existing TRL-9 technology and telemetry data. This method only uses as inputs the temperature and pressure readings of sensors externally attached to the tank. These sensors can operate during the nominal thermal duty cycle. The improved PVT method shows little sensitivity to the pressure sensor drifts which are critical towards the end-of-life of the missions, as well as little sensitivity to systematic temperature errors. The retrieval method has been validated experimentally with CO2 in gas and fluid state in a chamber that operates up to 82 bar within a nominal thermal cycle of 38 °C to 42 °C. The mass gauging error is shown to be lower than 1% the mass at the beginning of life, assuming an initial tank load at 100 bar. In particular, for a pressure of about 70 bar, just below the critical pressure of CO2, the error of the mass gauging in gas phase goes down to 0.1% and for 77 bar, just above the critical point, the error of the mass gauging of the liquid phase is 0.6% of initial tank load. This gauging method improves by a factor of 8 the accuracy of the standard PVT retrievals using look-up tables with tabulated data from the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf