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  • 1.
    Uusitalo, Petri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Understanding development of dynamic capabilities in industrialized house building: A case study2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialized house building of multi-storey residential buildings is not only gaining practical importance in Sweden but is also emphasized as a way for companies to address the demands for lower and more predictable production costs, shorter delivery times and higher product quality. However, to be competitive on the market, IHB companies need to protect and capitalize their specific investments into platforms and organizations. The engagement inplatforms and industrialized way of working, it is not just about the complexity of integration but it is also about having a capability over time to handle this market variation (i.e. dynamic capabilities). Industrialized house building has mainly been investigated from an operational view, leaving a gap in the characterization from a strategical (dynamic) view.

    Purpose of this research is to increase understanding about industrialized house building, from a dynamic capability view, described the characteristics of industrialized house building through exploring and describing the evolution and development of and industrialized house building company. An in-depth, longitudinal case study approach was adopted to get and deeper understanding of the development of dynamic capabilities in an industrialized house building company. The unit of analysis was the long-term interaction between house-market development, the case company’s business development, and external collaboration activities between the years 1993 and 2018. The findings from the case study were then analyzed against a theoretical framework based on dynamic capabilities.

    Industrialized house building can be characterized by a set of dynamic capabilities constructs that are evolved and developed in order to cope with the changing conditions derived from both internal and external factors, entailed in entrepreneurship and long-term thinking. The findings indicate that the organization's focus may vary between different kinds of dynamic capabilities over-time. In addition, findings indicate that development of dynamic capabilities supporting collaboration and building trust to the market was of importance at the beginning of their journey. These dynamic capabilities evolved in close relations with external partners, due to external market pressure. This study also indicates that path dependency affects the development of dynamic capability, through collaboration, trust, and learning – which influence how the company behaves and through their investments in a platform constraining future actions.

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  • 2.
    Uusitalo, Petri
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Engström, Susanne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Detecting and understanding bottlenecks in production using multiple methods2017In: ICCREM 2016: BIM Application and Offsite Construction - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Construction and Real Estate Management 2016 / [ed] Wang Y.,Al-Hussein M.,Shen G.Q.P.,Zhu Y., Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017, p. 307-315Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a competitive situation where clients demand for high responsiveness to order-specific requirements, suppliers of volumetric preassemblies are struggling to maintain efficiency in production. In operation management literature, bottleneck detection has been suggested as key to continuous improvement processes in manufacturing. Yet, there is no consensus on definition and detection of bottlenecks. In an ongoing study, aiming to better understand manufacturing implications of high responsiveness to unique clients' specifications, a volumetric preassembly company providing prefabricated bathroom pods was addressed. Bottlenecks were explored based on three methods suggested in the literature i.e. by asking knowledgeable employees, by observing WIP inventory, and by analyzing process data in a field experiment. By juxtaposing the results, a mixed and somewhat contradictory view was displayed of bottlenecks and their potential root causes. Thus, a more complex view emerges of how to understand and address bottlenecks to improve production efficiency, highlighting the need to potentially extend shop-floor assessments to include supplier and client interfaces.

  • 3.
    Uusitalo, Petri
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Lavikka, Rita
    Smart Energy and Built Environment, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Overcoming Path Dependency in an Industrialised House-Building Company through Entrepreneurial Orientation2020In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1-22, article id 45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although it is well-established that industrialised construction can improve construction companies’ productivity, the uptake of industrialised ways of working has been slow and traditional construction companies remain unwilling to move towards industrialisation. One key reason is that there is little understanding of how construction companies can overcome path dependency (PD). Drawing on a longitudinal case study looking at an industrialised house-building (IHB) company, this work investigates how entrepreneurial orientation (EO) has influenced the development of a construction company that was able to transform from a traditional construction company to an IHB company over 25 years and to overcome PD in the process. The study found that by focusing on a niche market segment, developing a platform in collaboration with external actors, and an entrepreneurial mindset supported the company in overcoming its PD. However, being the “first-mover” in the industry created new path dependencies that may hinder other companies from entering this specific niche market area and the development of the industry as a whole. This study contributes to the theoretical buildup of EO, PD and strategic orientations of IHB companies, and contributes to practitioners’ understanding of IHB companies from a strategic management contingency perspective.

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    fulltext
  • 4.
    Uusitalo, Petri
    et al.
    Stora Enso Plc, FI-94800, Kemi.
    Lidelöw, Helena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    The Struggle of Multiple Supply Chain Structures: Theoretical Overview2015In: Procedia Economics and Finance, E-ISSN 2212-5671, Vol. 21, p. 185-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supplier firms are integrating downstream closer to the construction client. Sawmills have tried for decades to start producing timber buildings in order to capitalise on their core product; sawn timber. Their efforts have often failed, which is attributed to the different business logics between sawing timber and constructing buildings. This research identifies the supply chain structure as an important classification of production and business logic. Many firms operate make-to-stock, make-to-order and even engineer-to-order within the same firm, thus utilising the same or overlapping resources. From a theoretical viewpoint, this paper explores the problem of multiplicity in supply chains within construction and construction supplier firms. Literature on operations strategies, operations management, and supply chain structures is covered and put into perspective. It is an important capability to handle diversity in supply chain structures, not only when expanding business, but also in balancing different product categories internally e.g. to handle variations in market demand. The effect on internal resource utilisation can be vast. Operations management must take the differences in supply chain structures into account when developing key performance indicators and operations management strategies.

  • 5.
    Uusitalo, Petri
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Stehn, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
    Brege, Staffan
    Linköping University IEI (Institutionen för Ekonomisk och Industriell Utveckling) Department of Management and Engineering.
    Wernicke, Brian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Reciprocal dynamic effectiveness for industrialized house builder2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve competitive advantage, companies have different capabilities that supports a reciprocal and dynamic effectiveness way of operating. This research aim to extend theory about business models and get deeper understanding on how industrialized house building coordination takes place and the dynamic aspects of the coordination. It was conducted as case study, using two deliberately different industrialized house building companies. The results indicates processes links to reciprocal dynamic effectiveness here are complex, no single answer as for how reciprocal dynamic effectiveness in IHB can be described, due to because its complexity. The empirical data, implies that if a company takes active actions in jointly inall  all four dimensions in the model must be considered. The theoretical contribution lies in the definition of reciprocal and dynamic effectiveness needed to maintain a viable business model

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