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  • 1.
    Axelsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kihlberg, Sara
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Davis, Paul
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Psychotherapy students' experiences of supervisee-centred supervision based on deliberate practice, feedback-informed treatment and self-compassion2024In: Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1473-3145, E-ISSN 1746-1405, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 719-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There are few methods that focus on therapists' experiences of supervision. To facilitate the development of psychologist students, a supervisee-centred supervision, based on deliberate practice, feedback informed treatment and self-compassion, was introduced.

    Methods: This study examines six supervisees’ experiences of a supervisee-centred supervision. A semi- structured interview was used for the collection of the data, which identified two main themes: Learning and Development and five associated sub-themes: structure and purposesfulness, prerequisites, experience-based learning, therapeutic skills and personal development.

    Conclusion: The experience- and feedback-based approach was perceived as efficient, structured and goal oriented. This created high-focused activity and participation, a strong group dynamic and a good alliance with the supervisors, providing a good climate for learning and development. Focusing on performance and feedback was perceived as a potential obstacle that could create stress and anxiety.

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  • 2.
    Bäcklund, Christian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation. Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Röhlcke, Sebastian
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Exploring the relationship between personality and gaming disorder symptoms in a sample of Dota 2 players2024In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the relationship between the big five personality traits and gaming disorder symptoms (GDS) in a sample of Dota 2 players. Recent research has indicated that the relationship between personality traits and GDS may depend on the video game genre investigated. However, the association between GDS and personality has yet to be investigated within a specific game, which may be even more relevant to explore as each game offers unique gameplay mechanics that can influence player behavior differently. Thus, the present study investigated the relationship between the big five personality traits and GDS in a sample of video game players from a specific game, DOTA 2 (n = 321, M = 23.25 years, SD = 4.51). Multiple linear regression was used to analyze GDS formatted as a composite score, and one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were further conducted for analyses in which gamers were classified into normal gamers (i.e., less than three criteria endorsed), moderate-risk gamers (i.e., four criteria endorsed), and high-risk gamers (i.e., all criteria endorsed). The analysis of the composite score showed a significant relationship between neuroticism, conscientiousness, agreeableness, and GDS. Analyses of the gaming classifications revealed that neuroticism was the most crucial factor concerning differentiating moderate-risk and high-risk from normal gamers. The findings and their practical implications are further discussed.

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  • 3.
    Colombo, Simone
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hansson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nyström, Markus B.T.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Mining players’ experience in computer games: Immersion affects flow but not presence2023In: Computers in Human Behavior Reports, E-ISSN 2451-9588, Vol. 12, article id 100334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how different levels of immersion influence the experiences of flow and presence can shed light on the intricate interplay between these constructs and provide valuable insights into the factors that contribute to engaging and immersive gameplay. The independent variable, immersion, was manipulated in three conditions (high, moderate, and low) in a between-subject design within the video game Minecraft. Participants were asked to complete 15 min of gameplay and then fill out the questionnaires concerning flow and presence. The experiment was conducted remotely on a video-sharing platform. Bayesian analysis revealed an effect of immersion level on flow, while no evidence of an effect was found for the experience of presence. This study provides evidence in favor of a relation between flow and immersion while supporting a presumed double dissociation of immersion from presence. Future research using a Bayesian approach is encouraged to build further knowledge on this research topic.

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  • 4.
    Gomes, Lúcia
    et al.
    CIDEFES, Universidade Lusófona, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Teixeira, Diogo
    CIDEFES, Universidade Lusófona, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Slawinska, Malgorzata
    Institute of Sport - National Research Institute, Warsaw, Poland.
    Davis, Paul
    Department of Psychology, Umeå university, Umeå, Sweden.
    López-Flores, Marcos
    Sport Innovation Hub, Spain.
    Nyström, Markus
    Department of Psychology, Umeå university.
    Silva, Marlene
    CIDEFES, Universidade Lusófona, Lisboa, Portugal; Programa Nacional de Promoção da Atividade Física; Direcção Geral da Saúde, Portugal..
    Palmeira, António
    CIDEFES, Universidade Lusófona, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Pereira, Hugo
    CIDEFES, Universidade Lusófona, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Adolescents' Perspectives on Smartphone Applications for Physical Activity Promotion: Insights from Focus Group Discussions2024In: Retos, ISSN 1579-1726, Vol. 56, p. 85-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explores how children and adolescents perceive physical activity (PA) and PA apps. We aim to understand their perceptions, past experiences, and expectations of PA and PA apps. Methods: Participants (N=39) aged 11-15 from five European countries: Netherlands (NL), Poland (PL), Portugal (PT), Spain (ES), and Sweden (SWE) participated in the study. They provided insight regarding Behaviour Chance Techniques (BCTs) that enhance app engagement. Results: The results offer valuable insights for creating fun and engaging adolescent PA apps that meet diverse user preferences. They also provide invaluable guidance for designing PA apps that boost adolescents' enjoyment, fun, and engagement while considering a broad spectrum of user preferences. Key BCTs identified as significantly impacting app engagement included self-monitoring, rewards, feedback, social support, action planning, and reminders - preferences and suggestions varied by gender, age, and PA levels. Conclusions: Findings in the present study inform the MOVE4FUN project that contributes to understanding how BCTs promote sustained PA in adolescents. It underscores the pivotal role of personalised app design and a supportive climate in fulfilling individual needs and intrinsic goals. These insights contribute significantly to developing educational tools that encourage regular PA and nurture the holistic development of physically educated citizens.

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  • 5.
    Jingili, Nuru
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Oyelere, Solomon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Anyshchenko, Lina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    A systematic review on the efficacy of virtual reality and gamification interventions for managing anxiety and depression2023In: Frontiers in Digital Health, E-ISSN 2673-253X, Vol. 5, article id 1239435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This systematic review aims to assess the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR) and gamification interventions in addressing anxiety and depression. The review also seeks to identify gaps in the current VR treatment landscape and provide guidelines for future research and development. A systematic literature search was conducted using Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed databases, focusing on studies that utilized VR and gamification technology to address anxiety and depression disorders. A total of 2,664 studies were initially identified, 15 of those studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The efficacy of VR in addressing anxiety and depression was evident across all included studies. However, the diversity among VR interventions highlights the need for further investigation. It is advised to incorporate more diverse participant samples and larger cohorts and explore a broader spectrum of therapeutic approaches within VR interventions for addressing anxiety and depression to enhance the credibility of future research. Additionally, conducting studies in varying socioeconomic contexts would contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of their real-world applicability.

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  • 6.
    Jingili, Nuru
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Oyelere, Solomon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Ojwang, Frank
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Lapland, 96300 Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Agbo, Friday Joseph
    School of Computing, University of Eastern Finland, 80100 Joensuu, Finland; School of Computing and Data Science, Willamette University, Salem, OR 97301, USA.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Virtual Reality for Addressing Depression and Anxiety: A Bibliometric Analysis2023In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 9, article id 5621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual reality is an emerging field in mental health and has gained widespread acceptance due to its potential to treat various disorders, such as anxiety and depression. This paper presents a bibliometric analysis of virtual reality (VR) use in addressing depression and anxiety from 1995 to 2022. The study analysed 1872 documents using the Scopus database, identifying the field’s most relevant journals and authors. The results indicate that using VR for addressing anxiety and depression is a multidisciplinary field with a wide variety of research topics, leading to significant collaborative research in this area. The Annual Review of Cybertherapy and Telemedicine was identified as the most relevant journal, while Behavior Research and Therapy was found to be the most cited journal. The analysis of keywords suggests that there is more research on using VR for anxiety and related disorders than for depression. Riva G. was identified as the top author in producing research outputs on VR-AD, and the University of Washington emerged as the leading institution in scientific outputs on VR-AD. Thematic and intellectual analyses helped identify the main themes within the research domain, providing valuable insight into the current and future directions of the field.

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  • 7.
    Mårs, Tove
    et al.
    Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Swansea University, United Kingdom; Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden and Umeå School of Sport Science, Sweden.
    Knight, Camilla J.
    Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Swansea University, United Kingdom; Department of Sport Science and Physical Education, University of Agder, Norway.
    Davis, Louise
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden and Umeå School of Sport Science, Sweden; School of Psychology, Swansea University, United Kingdom.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Rouquette, Olivier Y.
    Swansea University Medical School, Swansea University, United Kingdom.
    Understanding parental secure base support across youth sport contexts in Sweden2024In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 73, article id 102658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of secure base explains how a child can grow and become independent through access to a significant other (i.e., parent) who is available, encouraging, and noninterfering. The purpose of the current study was to develop an understanding of parental secure base support within the context of youth sport in Sweden, with a specific focus on: (a) what parental behaviors constitute a secure base, and (b) how these behaviors differ across contexts (at home before and after sport, at practice and during competitions). An interpretive descriptive methodology (Thorne, 2016) was used. Interviews were conducted with 13 family triads (children aged 12-15 years) and 1 dyad living in Sweden. Analysis was conducted to illuminate associations, patterns, and relationships within the sample. Analysis led to the development of nine categories of parental behaviors that were perceived to underpin a secure base. Availability was seen to comprise physical presence and support provision, being responsive, and developing positive mental representations. Encouragement encompassed demonstrating that sport participation is valued, motivating to explore sporting endeavors, and reinforcing and rewarding persistence in sports. Interference was described as unrequested interference, requested interference, and intentionally constrained involvement. Additionally, influencing factors such as communication, family structure and culture, were identified. The findings provide an empirical illustration for several behaviors that have been perceived as positive in previous literature, as well as highlighting numerous further complexities, particularly as it relates to interference.

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  • 8.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    et al.
    Deparment of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; The Graduate School in Population Dynamics and Public Policy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    Deparment of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kormi-Nouri, Reza
    School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rönnlund, Michael
    Deparment of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    To what extent is subjective well-being in late adulthood related to subjective and objective memory functioning? Five-year cross-lagged panel analyses2019In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, Australia.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Wigforss, Thomas
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlbring, Per
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Are physical activity and sedentary behavior related to depression?2019In: Cogent Psychology, E-ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 1633810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression is an increasing public health concern with rising prevalence. Nevertheless, far from everyone seeks help or receives adequate treatment. Although psychotherapy and antidepressants still constitute the bulk of treatments offered, recent research suggests that physical activity (PA) can be a powerful adjunct therapy while sedentary behavior (SB) is a definite risk factor for developing depression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between PA, SB and depressive symptoms in a population (n = 962) of applicants for an online treatment study. This study hypothesised that there will be; (1) a positive relationship between SB and depressive symptoms, and (2) a negative relationship between PA and depressive symptoms. In addition we investigated whether the combination of a sedentary lifestyle and physical inactivity increased the risk for depressive symptoms. Finally, we also examined whether gender, age, marital status, educational level, or medication affected the relationship between PA, SB, and depressive symptoms. The results showed a positive correlation between SB and depression. There was, however, no statistically significant support for a negative relation between PA and depressive symptoms. Even though no conclusions about causality can be drawn, our results suggest that high SB, being a woman, being young, not being in a stable relationship, and current or previous medication are risk factors for depression. To be able to determine the causal direction, that is, whether high SB increases the risk for depressive symptoms, or if depressive symptoms increase the likelihood of high SB, further research is needed.

  • 10.
    Olander, Angelica
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Wilhelmsson, Jenny
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Davis, Paul A.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gomes, Lúcia
    Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Lusófona University, Lisbon, Portugal; Research Center in Sport, Physical Education, and Exercise and Health (CIDEFES), Lisbon, Portugal.
    Pereira, Hugo V.
    Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Lusófona University, Lisbon, Portugal; Research Center in Sport, Physical Education, and Exercise and Health (CIDEFES), Lisbon, Portugal.
    Teixeira, Diego S.
    Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Lusófona University, Lisbon, Portugal; Research Center in Sport, Physical Education, and Exercise and Health (CIDEFES), Lisbon, Portugal.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    An Exploration of Swedish Adolescents’ Experiences of Mobile Apps for Physical Activity2024In: Psychological topics, ISSN 1333-0742, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 91-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent reports on children and adolescents’ physical activity indicate that approximately 80% do not meet the World Health Organisation’s recommended levels of physical activity. Childhood is a critical period of development; as such, it is important to prioritize health promotion in this phase of one’s life. Use of gamification in mobile apps has been shown to positively influence physical activity levels in children and adolescents. Inclusion of behaviour change techniques (BCTs) has been noted to increase the effect of health promoting interventions. Previous research highlights that children and adolescents find the BCTs of goal setting/planning, feedback, reward, self-monitoring, social comparison, and social support to be of interest. The aim of this study was to explore Swedish adolescents’ experience with physical activity and apps with a focus on the influence of BCTs. Three focus group interviews were undertaken with a total of 18 participants (11-15 years of age). The data were explored using reflective thematic analysis. In addition to the BCTs identified in previous research, participants in the present study indicated they were positive about mobile apps providing instruction on how to perform a behaviour, demonstration of the behaviour, and the influence of removal of reward. Other attractive features of physical activities apps included developing a streak, competition, and provision of an adequate level of challenge. The present study contributes to a deeper understanding of how BCTs and other features can be implemented in physical activity apps, where individualization and renewal appear to be more important than the actual content features. These findings are important for future work to create interventions that increase the level of physical activity among adolescents both in Sweden and other countries.

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  • 11.
    Sehlström, Malcolm
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Claeson, Anna-Sara
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Relations of personality factors and suitability ratings to Swedish military pilot education completion2024In: International Journal of Selection and Assessment, ISSN 0965-075X, E-ISSN 1468-2389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved understanding of what it takes to be a pilot is an ongoing effort within aviation. We used an exploratory approach to examine whether there are personality-related differences in who completes the Swedish military pilot education. Assessment records of 182 applicants, accepted to the education between the years of 2004 and 2020 were studied (Mean age 24, SD 4.2 96% men, 4% women). Discriminant analysis was used to explore which personality traits and suitability ratings might be related to education completion. Analysis included suitability assessments made by senior pilots and by a psychologist, a number of traits assessed by the same psychologist, as well as the Commander Trait Inventory (CTI). The resulting discriminant function was significant (Wilk's Lambda = 0.808, (20) = 32.817, p = .035) with a canonical correlation of 0.44. The model was able to classify 74.1% of sample cases correctly. The modeling suggests that senior pilot assessment and psychologist assessment both predict education completion. Also contributing were the traits energy, professional motivation, study forecast and leader potential.

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  • 12.
    Sehlström, Malcolm
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Claeson, Anna‐Sara
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    The relation of neuroticism to physiological and behavioral stress responses induced by auditory startle2022In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 12, no 5, article id e2554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction The negative cognitive effects of the startle response are not yet fully understood. Ecological observations in the aviation field indicate risk for severe outcomes in complex or pressured situations, while sparse previous research suggests milder negative effects on simple cognitive tasks. Neuroticism is proposed as a factor related to the level of negative effects following startle.

    Methods This study examined the effects of startle on performance in a choice reaction time task and analyzed relations between performance, neuroticism, and physiological stress.

    Results Our results indicate that reaction time directly following startle was not affected, but reaction time in subsequent trials was significantly slower. Neuroticism and physiological stress were both unrelated to this performance effect.

    Discussion We argue that higher complexity/demand tasks are necessary to complement the research on base cognitive functioning in relation to startle. If neuroticism is related to startle effects, this is more likely to be found in these higher demand situations.

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