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  • 1.
    Ask, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Methodology for determination of the complete stress tensor and its variation versus depth based on overcoring rock stress data2017In: Rock Mechanics and Engineering: Volume 1: Principles, CRC Press, 2017, p. 245-265Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a methodology for evaluating the complete stress field and its variation versus depth. The validity of the protocol is visualized in the case study at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), south-eastern Sweden, a site predominantly sampled using the overcoring method. Overcoring data involve explicit (measurementrelated) as well as implicit uncertainties. The former include for example uncertainties regarding determination of the location of the test sections in physical space and of the value of elastic parameters, as well as uncertainties in strain-/displacement measurements, etc. The explicit types of uncertainties are fairly straightforward to analyze and correct for during the stress calculation procedure. The implicit uncertainties, on the other hand, such as the assumption of homogeneity and linear-elasticity, are much more difficult to appreciate and correct for, if possible at all. Yet, as for explicit errors, they may render an individual test or a series of tests completely meaningless, and it is therefore crucial that both categories of uncertainties are identified, understood, and properly considered within the process of stress field determinations. The proposed methodology follows the directions outlined by ISRM for rock stress estimation using overcoring methods (Sjöberg et al., 2003; Sjöberg & Klasson, 2003). In addition, we pay particular attention on avoiding, identifying, and correcting for various potential sources of error, the sampling strategy, and considerations of the continuity hypothesis.

  • 2.
    Ask, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ask, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. FracSinus Rock Stress Measurement AB, Luleå.
    Cornet, Francois
    University of Strasbourg, School and Observatory of Earth Sciences, Strasbour.
    Nilsson, Tommy
    University of Strasbourg, School and Observatory of Earth Sciences, Strasbourg.
    A hydraulic stress measurement system for deep borehole investigations2017In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, ISSN 1029-7006, E-ISSN 1607-7962, Vol. 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lulea University of Technology (LTU) is developing and building a wire-line system for hydraulic rock stress measurements, with funding from the Swedish Research Council and Lulea University of Technology. In this project, LTU is collaborating with University of Strasbourg and Geosigma AB. The stress state influences drilling and drillability, as well as rock mass stability and permeability. Therefore, knowledge about the state of in-situ stress (stress magnitudes, and orientations) and its spatial variation with depth is essential for many underground rock engineering projects, for example for underground storage of hazardous material (e.g. nuclear waste, carbon dioxide), deep geothermal exploration, and underground infrastructure (e.g. tunneling, hydropower dams). The system is designed to conduct hydraulic stress testing in slim boreholes. There are three types of test methods: (1) hydraulic fracturing, (2) sleeve fracturing and (3) hydraulic testing of pre-existing fractures. These are robust methods for determining in situ stresses from boreholes. Integration of the three methods allows determination of the three-dimensional stress tensor and its spatial variation with depth in a scientific unambiguously way. The stress system is composed of a downhole and a surface unit. The downhole unit consists of hydraulic fracturing equipment (straddle packers and downhole imaging tool) and their associated data acquisition systems. The testing system is state of the art in several aspects including: (1) Large depth range (3 km), (2) Ability to test three borehole dimensions (N=76 mm, H=96 mm, and P=122 mm), (3) Resistivity imager maps the orientation of tested fracture; (4) Highly stiff and resistive to corrosion downhole testing equipment; and (5) Very detailed control on the injection flow rate and cumulative volume is obtained by a hydraulic injection pump with variable piston rate, and a highly sensitive flow-meter. At EGU General Assembly 2017, we would like to present this new and unique stress measurement system and some initial test results from a 1200 m long borehole in crystalline rock

  • 3.
    Ask, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ask, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Rosberg, Jan Erik
    Lund University.
    Exploration for deep enhanced geothermal systems with Riksriggen and the LTU downhole stress measurement system2017In: 4th Sustainable Earth Sciences Conference and Exhibition 2017, Held at Near Surface Geoscience Conference and Exhibition 2017, European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, 2017, p. 21-25Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments in drilling technology have resulted in about five to ten times faster penetration rates compared to penetration rates of conventional diamond drilling. The increased penetration rates open up for affordable drilling of deep boreholes in regions with cold crust, such as in Scandinavia, allowing for geothermal energy generation in enhanced geothermal systems. We present two infrastructures for downhole sampling and testing, Riksriggen and the LTU downhole stress measurement system. Riksriggen produces a borehole that allows in-situ sampling and testing to 2.5 km depth. Furthermore, highly relevant data for geothermal energy production is produced, for example fracture geometries and frequencies, as well as depth of zones with elevated transmissivity zones and their in-situ hydraulic conductivities. The LTU downhole stress measurement system allows determination of the three-dimensional stress tensor and its spatial variation with depth in a scientific unambiguously way. Thus, Riksriggen and the LTU downhole stress measurement system provide data needed for planning most stable borehole trajectory with depth and to determine optimal pattern of production and injection wells (e.g. hydraulic stimulation by fraccing), as well as for assessing the risk of induced seismicity.

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