Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 62
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bell, David
    et al.
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå.
    Hjältén, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Department of Wildlife, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Christer
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Landscape Ecology Group, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Therese
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Studies.
    Forest restoration to attract a putative umbrella species, the white-backed woodpecker, benefited saproxylic beetles2015In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, E-ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 6, no 12, article id 278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Umbrella species are often spatially demanding and have limited ability to adapt to environmental changes induced by human land-use. This makes them vulnerable to human encroachment. In Sweden, broadleaved trees are disadvantaged by forestry, and commercially managed forests are often deprived of dead wood. This has led to a situation where previously widespread top predators in saproxylic food webs, such as the white-backed woodpecker (Dendrocopos leucotos), have become species of conservation concern. The white-backed woodpecker is generally considered an umbrella species, and it has been linked to forests with large volumes of dead wood from broadleaved trees. In recent years, forest stands have been restored for the white-backed woodpecker, but post-treatment evaluations have rarely included other species that also occur in broad-leaved forests (co-occurring species). Many co-occurring species are saproxylic beetles. In this study, we collected saproxylic beetles and environmental data in restored and commercially managed forests to evaluate if habitat restoration for the white-backed woodpecker also benefited other species with similar habitat associations. We found that volumes of coarse woody debris were higher in restored than in commercially managed forests, and that a majority of man-made snags and downed logs were created from birch trees (Betula spp.). Most spruce trees (Picea abies) were extracted during forest restoration, and this opened up the forest canopy, and created stands dominated by broadleaved trees.Many saproxylic beetles were more common in restored forests, and there were significant differences in species composition between treatments. These differences were largely explained by species traits. Effects of sunexposure were particularly important, but many beneficiary species were also linked to dead wood from broadleaved trees. Red-listed saproxylic beetles showed a similar pattern with more species and individuals in restored sites. The white-backed woodpecker is still critically endangered in Sweden, but important prey species are already responding to forest restoration at the stand level. We recognize that landscape-level improvements will be required to bring the white-backed woodpecker back, but also that the umbrella species concept can provide a useful framework for successful forest restoration as many co-occurring saproxylic beetle species seemingly benefitted from restoration for the white-backed woodpecker

  • 2.
    Bergmark, Paulina
    et al.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Lophelia pertusa conservation in the North Sea using obsolete offshore structures as artificial reefs2014In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, ISSN 0171-8630, E-ISSN 1616-1599, Vol. 516, p. 275-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep-water coral reefs are classified as vulnerable marine ecosystems, with trawling identified as the primary cause of reef destruction. Lophelia pertusa is the main reef-building species in deep-water coral reefs. In addition to occurring on natural hard substrates, the species has been previously observed on standing offshore oil and gas structures in the North Sea. In this study, we review the available published information about Lophelia growth on standing offshore oil and gas industry structures in the North Sea. We discuss the potential uses of obsolete offshore structures repurposed as artificial reefs for targeted Lophelia habitat. Our survey of previous studies indicates that artificial reefs created from obsolete structures have a strong potential to form Lophelia reef communities similar to those found on natural substrates, although the absence of the polychaete worm Eunice norvegica poses some concerns about the completeness of the coral communities that develop on artificial reef structures

  • 3.
    Hasselquist, Eliza Maher
    et al.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Nilsson, Christer
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Hjältén, Joakim
    Department of Wildlife, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Lind, Lovisa
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Polvi, Lina E.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Time for recovery of riparian plants in restored northern Swedish streams: A chronosequence study2015In: Ecological Applications, ISSN 1051-0761, E-ISSN 1939-5582, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 1373-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A lack of ecological responses in stream restoration projects has been prevalent throughout recent literature with many studies reporting insufficient time for recovery. We assessed the relative importance of time, site variables, and landscape setting for understanding how plant species richness and understory productivity recover over time in riparian zones of northern Swedish streams. We used a space-for-time substitution consisting of 13 stream reaches restored 5-25 years ago, as well as five unrestored channelized reference reaches. We inventoried the riparian zone for all vascular plant species along 60-m study reaches and quantified cover and biomass in plots. We found that while species richness increased with time, understory biomass decreased. Forbs made up the majority of the species added, while the biomass of graminoids decreased the most over time, suggesting that the reduced dominance of graminoids favored less productive forbs. Species richness and density patterns could be attributed to dispersal limitation, with anemochorous species being more associated with time after restoration than hydrochorous, zoochorous, or vegetatively reproducing species. Using multiple linear regression, we found that time along with riparian slope and riparian buffer width (e.g., distance to logging activities) explained the most variability in species richness, but that variability in total understory biomass was explained primarily by time. The plant community composition of restored reaches differed from that of channelized references, but the difference did not increase over time. Rather, different time categories had different successional trajectories that seemed to converge on a unique climax community for that time period. Given our results, timelines for achieving species richness objectives should be extended to 25 years or longer if recovery is defined as a saturation of the accumulation of species over time. Other recommendations include making riparian slopes as gentle as possible given the landscape context and expanding riparian buffer width for restoration to have as much impact as possible.

  • 4.
    Hjälten, Joakim
    et al.
    Department of Wildlife, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Christer
    Landscape Ecology Group, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Bell, David
    Department of Wildlife, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Forest-Stream Links, Anthropogenic Stressors, and Climate Change: Implications for Restoration Planning2016In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 66, no 8, p. 646-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global extraction of forest and water resources has led to habitat degradation, biodiversity loss, and declines in ecosystem services. As a consequence, ecological restoration has become a global priority. Restoration efforts to offset this trend, however, are not always effective. One reason is that many restoration projects target single ecosystems and fail to acknowledge functional links between ecosystems. We synthesized current knowledge on links between forest and stream ecosystems, the effect of anthropogenic stressors on these links, and their implications for restoration planning. Many examples show that lateral subsidies, such as invertebrate prey and nutrients, are important in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Stressors such as commercial forestry, flow regulation, stream channelization, and climate change affect these links and should be considered in restoration planning. Restoration practitioners are encouraged to view adjacent forest and stream ecosystems as one entity.

  • 5.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    A Blueprint for Destruction: Eco-Activism in Doctor Who during the 1970s2012In: Ecozona, ISSN 2171-9594, E-ISSN 2171-9594, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 11-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the television science-fiction show Doctor Who as a cultural forum within the context of British eco-activism of the 1970s. It examines four serials which aired during the 1970s during the first wave of eco-activism in the UK: "The Green Death" (1973), "The Invasion of the Dinosaurs" (1974), "The Seeds of Doom" (1976), and "Nightmare of Eden" (1979). Two environmentalist concerns-pollution and species conservation-put forward by the early British eco-activist movement as underscored in texts such as The Blueprint for Survival from 1972 are evident in these serials. While affirming the validity of some elements of environmentalist concerns, each serial also proposes that the ends do not always justify the means. The Doctor, although a supporter of eco-activism, rejects seemingly utopian approaches to reset the Earth's ecosystems. Rather than presenting viewers with a guide to sustainability, these Doctor Who serials offer dystopian visions of future realities steeped in ecological transgressions – these are the blueprints for destruction

  • 6.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    A new place for stories: Blogging as an environmental history research tool2017In: Methodological Challenges in Nature-Culture and Environmental History Research / [ed] Jocelyn Thorpe, Stephanie Rutherford, and L. Anders Sandberg, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 248-259Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    “All Good Rule of the Citee”: Sanitation and Civic Government in England, 1400—16002010In: Journal of urban history, ISSN 0096-1442, E-ISSN 1552-6771, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 300-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how providing one basic city service—sanitation—influenced civic governmentalstructures from 1400 to 1600 in two of England’s largest provincial cities, Norwich and Coventry,and how those changes meshed with concepts of good rule. Although sanitation services wereneither the most costly nor the highest profile activity of city councils, they can be a windowinto the evolution of governmental structures during the early phase of city rule. The periodwitnessed an increasing reliance on a myriad of officials to provide services, but this transitionwas not straightforward. City councils grappled with how to allocate responsibility for sanitationduties among civic officials, and the assignment of responsibility shifted often over the period.In general, the trend was to allocate responsibility closer and closer to the physical problem—that is, movement from the mayor as overseer to local inspectors.

  • 8.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    An Oasis in a Watery Desert?: Discourses on an Industrial Ecosystem in the Gulf of Mexico Rigs-to-Reefs Program2009In: History & Technology, ISSN 0734-1512, E-ISSN 1477-2620, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 343-364Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    City Sanitation Regulations in the Coventry Mayor’s Proclamation of 14212012In: Environment & Society Portal, Arcadia, ISSN 2199-3408, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Conservation implications of parasite co-reintroduction2015In: Conservation Biology, ISSN 0888-8892, E-ISSN 1523-1739, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 602-604Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Cooperative Sanitation: Managing Streets and Gutters in Late Medieval England and Scandinavia2008In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 547-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the workings of sanitation technologies in late medieval English and Scandinavian cities through both written and archeological evidence. It defines the roles of city corporations and individuals in the areas of street maintenance and waste management between the years 1350 and 1550. It argues that although the urban environment was managed through seemingly simple technologies, such as latrines and guttered cobblestone streets, the technologies required a conjunction of city-provided services and individual behavior management to make them work as intended. The late medieval city governments under investigation therefore crafted social relations to create functional sanitation systems. Because responsibility for sanitation was allocated both to individuals and to the city government, the waste-handling and sanitation strategies of the late medieval city were possibly not as ineffective as they appear on the surface

  • 12.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Dartmoor's Alluring Uplands: Transhumance and Pastoral Management in the Middle Ages by Harold Fox. Exeter : University of Exeter Press , 2012 . 291 pp., $55.00 , paperback, ISBN 978-0-85989-865-22015In: Agricultural History, ISSN 0002-1482, E-ISSN 1533-8290, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 114-115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Ecological restoration as objective, target, and tool in international biodiversity policy2015In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecological restoration has been mainstreamed in international biodiversity policies in the last five years. I analyze statements about restoration in three international policies: the Convention for Biodiversity Strategic Plan 2011-2020 and Aichi Biodiversity Targets, the Convention for Biodiversity Decision XI/16 on ecosystem restoration, and the European Union’s Biodiversity Strategy to 2020. I argue that restoration functions at three different levels in these policies: as an objective, as a target, and as a tool. Because restoration appears at all three levels, the policies encourage counting all restoration activity as meeting the objectives of the policy regardless of the activity’s actual effect on ecosystem services or biodiversity more broadly. Reaching a numerical target for a restored area may not necessarily support the overarching policy goals of maintaining Earth’s biodiversity and supporting ecosystem services.

  • 14.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Ecological restoration in the Convention on Biological Diversity targets2013In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 22, no 12, p. 2977-2982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecological restoration has been incorporated into several Multilateral Environmental Agreements, including the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Target 15 of the Aichi Targets for 2020 sets a numerical goal of restoration of 15 percent of degraded ecosystems; however, the CBD has not established a clear statement defining restoration within this context. Without such a definition, the CBD will be unable to measure progress against the goal. The adopted definition of ecological restoration would have to allow for measurement against the numerical target, or the target should be modified to match the chosen definition

  • 15.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Endling, the Power of the Last in an Extinction-Prone World2017In: Environmental Philosophy, ISSN 1718-0198, E-ISSN 2153-8905, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 119-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In April 1996, two men working at a convalescent center wrote a letter to the journal Nature proposing that a new word be adopted to designate a person who is the last in the lineage: endling. This had come up because of patients who were dying and thought of themselves as the last of their family line. The word was not picked up in medical circles. But, in 2001, when the National Museum of Australia (NMA) opened its doors, it featured a gallery called Tangled Destinies and endling reappeared. On the wall facing a case with a thylacine specimen was written: Endling (n.) The last surviving individual of a species of animal or plant. Since that appearance, the word endling has slowly seeped into popular culture, appearing in symphonic music, performance art, science fiction stories, comics, and other art works. This paper examines the cultural power of the concept of endling as the last of a species and the history of its mobilization in a world facing extinction around every corner.

  • 16.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Environment, Society and Landscape in Early Medieval England, by Tom Williamson. Woodbridge, The Boydell Press, 2013. viii, 270 pp. $80.00 US (cloth).2014In: Canadian Journal of History, ISSN 0008-4107, E-ISSN 2292-8502, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 487-488Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Environmentalists on both sides: enactments in the California rigs-to-reefs debate2013In: New Natures: Joining Environmental History with Science and Technology Studies, Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2013, p. 51-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Finding Oil: The Nature of Petroleum Geology, 1859-1920. By Brian Frehner. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2011. Pp. xiii+232. $502013In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 202-203Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Forests and forestry—Europe2008In: Encyclopedia of Society and Culture in the Medieval World, New York: Facts on File, 2008, p. 473-475Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Illuminating ephemeral medieval agricultural history through manuscript art2015In: Agricultural History, ISSN 0002-1482, E-ISSN 1533-8290, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 186-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are objects and practices we would not know existed if we relied only on written texts or archeological evidence to piece together medieval agricultural history. These ephemeral aspects of the agricultural past are sometimes, however, captured in art. This essay explores some of the possible ways to recover fleeting history using medieval illuminations, which are hand-painted illustrations in books most often unrelated to agriculture. Unglamorous technologies, agricultural processes, plant varietals, animal breeds, housing design, and variation of agricultural practice in time and space can all be explored in medieval manuscript art. Medieval illuminations can, under the right conditions, give us new knowledge about agricultural practice rather than serving as simple “illustrations” of agricultural history known from textual sources.

  • 21.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Jørgensen, Thorstein and Gerhard Jaritz. Isolated Islands in Medieval Nature, Culture and Mind. CEU Medievalia. Budapest: Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bergen; Central European University Department of Medieval Studies; Central European University Press, 2011. Pp. 152. $30. ISBN: 978-615-5053-24-5.2012In: Medieval Review, ISSN 1096-746X, E-ISSN 1096-746XArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Linda Clark and Carole Rawcliffe, eds., Society in an Age of Plague. (Fifteenth Century 12.)Woodbridge, UK, and Rochester, NY: Boydell Press, 2013. Pp. x, 223; 9 black-andwhite figures and 1 map. $99. ISBN: 978-1-84383-875-3.2015In: Speculum, ISSN 0038-7134, E-ISSN 2040-8072, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 527-528Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Local government responses to urban river pollution in late medieval England2010In: Water History, ISSN 1877-7236, E-ISSN 1877-7244, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 35-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the local responses to medieval urban river pollution in three leading English towns—Coventry, Norwich, and York—during the late fourteenth through sixteenth centuries. The case studies reveal the extent to which local governments became involved in river upkeep. Interventions by the town governments were twofold: (1) preventative actions in the form of regulations and regulatory enforcement and (2) responsive actions to physically remove materials that had already accumulated in the rivers. Previous histories have not treated pollution regulations and regular river upkeep activities such as scouring and dredging as part of the same toolbox for responding to urban river pollution, yet these two seemingly separate activities were indeed connected during the medieval period. Both legislative action and scouring projects were responses to filth and waste accumulation in urban waterways. By overlooking the connection between pollution legislation and river cleansing, historians have underappreciated the extent of involvement by local town governments in controlling and responding to pollution in the riverine landscape

  • 24.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Making the Action Visible: Making Environments in Northern Landscapes2013In: Northscapes: history, technology and the making of northern environments, Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2013, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    University of Virginia.
    Medieval Latrines and the Law2006In: Medium Aevum Quotidianum, ISSN 1029-0737, Vol. 53, p. 16-majArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes two types of latrine regulation in far northern Europe during the medieval period: latrine placement and waste disposal. It shows that latrines in the later fourteenth through mid-sixteenth centuries were very much within the public sphere. Public regulation of latrine placement and waste disposal was required to control individual behavior for the larger public good. Making this private matter into a public concern was integral to good city government in the eyes of elite citizens.

  • 26.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Migrant muskoxen and the naturalization of national identity in Scandinavia2015In: The Historical Animal, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2015, p. 184-201Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Mixing oil and water: naturalizing offshore oil platforms in American aquariums2014In: Oil Culture, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014, p. 267-288Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine the integration of oil and ocean, this essay analyzes depictions of offshore ecosystems in American aquarium displays owned by a variety of organizations, ranging from commercial restaurant chains to nonprofit environmentally focused organizations. The essay will argue that much of the public presentation of the offshore ecosystem is tied up with the development of Rigs-to-Reefs programs, which allow the conversion of offshore oil structures into artificial reefs after they are decommissioned from active use. The Rigs-to-Reefs concept developed as part of broad strategies to improve U.S. fishing grounds and to make offshore oil production environmentally friendly, and Louisiana began the first state Rigs-to-Reefs program in 1986. In the wake of the Rigs-to-Reefs developments, aquariums located in the Gulf Coast chose to display Gulf of Mexico tanks highlighting the contribution of the oil industry to the Gulf’s ecosystem. After discussing these Gulf exhibits and their context, the essay turns to an exhibit in California, which was introduced during a protracted legislative conflict about permitting Rigs-to-Reefs in that state. By placing these displays into the specific social and political context of the Rigs-to-Reefs program, we can see why aquariums developed hybrid schemes for the representation of marine life in the region that mixed oil and water.

  • 28.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Mixing Oil and Water: Naturalizing Offshore Oil Platforms in Gulf Coast Aquariums2012In: Journal of American Studies, ISSN 0021-8758, E-ISSN 1469-5154, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 461-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On 26 June 2010, the brand new Gulf of Mexico exhibit at the National Mississippi River Museum & Aquarium in Dubuque, Iowa opened devoid of life. The tanks were purposefully left empty, rather than showing the vibrant aquatic life of the Gulf, to highlight the oil spill associated with BP's Deepwater Horizon offshore drilling incident earlier in 2010. According to the museum's press release, the museum wanted to open a Gulf exhibit recognizing the crisis that is happening on the Gulf Coast … The exhibit, without fish, now has the opportunity to make a bold statement related to the oil spill in the Gulf Coast by asking Museum & Aquarium visitors to imagine a lifeless Gulf.

  • 29.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Modernity and medieval muck2014In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 225-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article challenges the common presentation of the medieval street as a mud- and muck-filled cesspit. Using the television episode "Medieval London" of the Filthy Cities series aired by BBC Two in 2011 as a springboard, I discuss the realities of medieval waste management and modern conceptions of it. Through an examination of historical records from London, I show that the early fourteenth-century medieval street was not nearly as filthy as portrayed in Filthy Cities. Rather than being based on medieval evidence, our notion of the dirty medieval city is built on modern ideas of civility and scientific progress. Interpretations like that in Filthy Cities reflect more on our modern condition than the medieval one. The constructed dichotomy of medieval filth versus modern cleanliness obscures our contemporary waste problems and reinforces a physical and mental distance from our own waste.

  • 30.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    University of Houston.
    Multi-use management of the medieval Anglo-Norman forest2004In: Journal of the Oxford University History Society, Vol. 1, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Muskox in a Box and Other Tales of Containers as Domesticating Mediators in Animal Relocation2016In: Animal Housing and Human–Animal Relations: Politics, Practices and Infrastructures, London: Routledge Mental Health, 2016, p. 100-114Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Not by human hands: Five technological tenets for environmental history in the Anthropocene2014In: Environment and History, ISSN 0967-3407, E-ISSN 1752-7023, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 479-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technologies in the hands of humans have turned humans into a force of nature. Environmental historians have increasingly recognised the value of history of technology to explain many environmental changes. Scholarship at the environment-technology junction, deploying ideas developed with the framework of Science and Technology Studies (STS), has revealed the usefulness of seeing the whole constellation of science, technology, and environment as simultaneously human-made. Based on recent work at the intersection of history of technology and environment, I propose five technological tenets about human interaction with nonhuman living beings that should be adopted as central elements of environmental history. The tenets demand that historians break down conceptual barriers between artefacts and animals: animals and plants are themselves technologies; technologies provide means of controlling other living beings; technologies mediate our knowledge of animals; technologies affect our valuation of other living creatures; and technology is part of the ecosystem.

  • 33.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    OSPAR’s exclusion of rigs-to-reefs in the North Sea2012In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 58, p. 57-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on how the debate over the deep-water disposal of offshore oil and gas installations has been central to shaping North Sea artificial reef policy. Through a close empirical historical study, this article reconstructs how Greenpeace’s protest of the deep-water disposal of the Brent Spar spurred the exclusion of rigs-to-reefs (the conversion of obsolete offshore oil and gas structures into artificial reefs) as a viable decommissioning option by the primary international treaty organization with jurisdiction over North Sea waters, the Oslo-Paris Commission (OSPAR). During OSPAR’s artificial reef guideline development, several OSPAR contracting parties implied that there is a conspiracy among oil companies to use rigs-to-reefs as a cover for evading the deep-water disposal rules, although they never presented evidence to back up these claims. In the face of pressure to “close the loophole” for deep-water disposal and in spite of scientific objection, OSPAR’s final guidelines excluded all non-virgin materials as acceptable reef construction materials, essentially banning rigs-to-reefs. Because a significant number of steel offshore installations will be decommissioned in North Sea waters in the decade and the most up-to-date science has concluded that manmade deep-water reefs may be beneficial to some species including threatened cold-water coral, this article suggests that OSPAR revise its guidelines. Rigs-to-reefs should be not categorically excluded; a case-by-case determination of the suitability of a structure for reuse as an artificial reef would be most appropriate.

  • 34.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Pigs and Pollards: Medieval Insights for UK Wood Pasture Restoration2013In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 387-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    English wood pastures have become a target for ecological restoration, including the restoration of pollarded trees and grazing animals, although pigs have not been frequently incorporated into wood pasture restoration schemes. Because wood pastures are cultural landscapes, created through the interaction of natural processes and human practices, a historical perspective on wood pasture management practices has the potential to provide insights for modern restoration projects. Using a wide range of both written and artistic sources form the Middle Ages, this article argues that pigs were fed in wood pastures both during the mast season when acorns were available and at other times as grazing fields. Pollarded pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) likely dominated these sustainable cultural landscapes during the medieval period.

  • 35.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Presence of absence, absence of presence, and extinction narratives2016In: Nature, Temporality and Environmental Management: Scandinavian and Australian Perspectives on Peoples and Landscapes, Routledge Mental Health, 2016, p. 45-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter addresses where two issues – the problem of not seeing at a certain time and the idea of a static nature over time – converge in two historical searches for the last: the European beaver (Castor fiber) in Sweden at the end of the nineteenth century and the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) of Tasmania in the twentieth. I explore how the presence of an absence (no known animals) became understood over time as an absence of presence (extinction) through narrative. Swedish beavers and Tasmanian thylacines had both become rare and then finally unseen, which led some people to claim their extinction. Others, however, claimed that the animals had survived, that they continued to exist in the wild fringes beyond civilization. Significantly these searches appear on the fringes of the modern developed world: the northern forests of the northern nation of Sweden and the island of Tasmania off the southeastern coast of Australia. Contentious conclusions resulted from the uncertainty of knowledge and management of the unknown. Consensus on the extinction of the beaver was more easily reached than the thylacine, but in both cases, extinction narratives became fixed and paved the way for efforts to reverse the extinctions. These histories reveal how extinction narratives are built on the acceptance of presence of absence as a sign for absence of presence.

  • 36.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    University of Virginia.
    Private need, public order: Urban sanitation in late medieval England and Scandinavia2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Reaching beyond environmental history2015In: Environment and History, ISSN 0967-3407, E-ISSN 1752-7023, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 641-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Reintroduction and De-extinction2013In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 63, no 9, p. 719-720Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Remembering the past for the future: The function of museums in science fiction time travel narratives2015In: Time Travel in the Popular Media: essays on film, television, literature and video games / [ed] Matthew Jones; Joan Ormrod, Jefferson, N.C: McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers , 2015, p. 118-131Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Rethinking rewilding2015In: Geoforum, ISSN 0016-7185, E-ISSN 1872-9398, Vol. 65, p. 482-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term 'rewilding' sounds as if it should have a straightforward meaning 'to make wild again'. But in truth the term has a complex history and a host of meanings have been ascribed to it. Rewilding as a specific scientific term has its beginnings as a reference to the Wildlands Project, which was founded in 1991 and aimed to create North American core wilderness areas without human activity that would be connected by corridors. Words, however, do not stand still-they change over time and take on new meanings, while sometimes simultaneously retaining the older sense. Employing Foucault's idea of historical genealogy, this article examines how the term rewilding was historically adopted and modified in ecological scientific discourse over the last two decades. This investigation probes what and, by extension, when and where, rewilding refers to as it has moved into various geographies across the globe. It then examines how the term has moved outside of science and been adopted by environmental activists as a plastic word. Taken as a whole, rewilding discourse seeks to erase human history and involvement with the land and flora and fauna. Such an attempted split between nature and culture may prove unproductive and even harmful. A more inclusive rewilding is a preferable strategy.

  • 41.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Review of An Environmental History of the Middle Ages: The Crucible of Nature, London, Routledge, 2013, ISBN: 9780415779463; 344pp.; Price: £24.99 (review no. 1487)2013In: Reviews in History, ISSN 1749-8155, no OctoberArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Rigs-to-reefs is more than rigs and reefs2012In: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, ISSN 1540-9295, E-ISSN 1540-9309, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 178-179Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Running amuck?: Urban swine management in late medieval England2013In: Agricultural History, ISSN 0002-1482, E-ISSN 1533-8290, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 429-451Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Rödlistorna, arternas historia och övervakning av naturen2016In: Biodiverse, ISSN 1401-5064, no 2, p. 10-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses the political and natural implications of the historical criteria included in Red List designations.

  • 45.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Sinking Prospect: Oil Rigs and Greenpeace in the North Sea2013In: Solutions Journal, ISSN 2154-0896, E-ISSN 2154-0926, Vol. 4, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Sir Hugh Plat: The Search for Useful Knowledge in Early Modern London by Malcolm Thick2011In: Agricultural History, ISSN 0002-1482, E-ISSN 1533-8290, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 422-423Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    The enduring landscape of medieval cathedral construction2014Report (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    The Medieval Sense of Smell, Stench and Sanitation2013In: Les cinq sens de la ville du Moyen Age à nos jours, Tours: Presses universitaires François-Rabelais, 2013, p. 301-313Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    "The Metamorphosis of Ajax, jakes, and early modern urban sanitation"2010In: Early English Studies, ISSN 2156-0102, Vol. 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines Sir John Harington’s A New Discourse of a Stale Subject, Called The Metamorphosis of Ajax through the lens of urban environmental history, examining the everyday context of Harington’s discourse. It argues that although Harington may have used the work for the political and social commentary discussed by other scholars, he also puts forward a vision of a new physical urban sanitation system to address concerns about disease transmission from exposure to waste. His proposal includes both individually-owned improved flushed privies and government-sponsored sewage systems, a hitherto overlooked element of his program.

  • 50.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    The Palm Islands, Dubai, UAE2014In: Iconic designs: 50 stories about 50 things, London: Bloomsbury Visual Arts , 2014, p. 62-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 62
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf