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  • 1.
    Aguilera, Roberto F.
    et al.
    Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, Perth.
    Radetzki, Marian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    The synchronized and exceptional price performance of oil and gold: Explanations and prospects2017In: Resources policy, ISSN 0301-4207, E-ISSN 1873-7641, Vol. 54, p. 81-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares the global markets for gold and oil so as to explain the surprisingly high correlation of the two materials’ prices since 1970, and the exceedingly impressive rise of both price series compared with that of virtually all other primary commodities. We propose that developments in the oil market, and the resulting effects on the macroeconomy, influenced investment activity in gold, thus providing the most plausible explanation for the two commodities’ price synchronization. Our view on the extraordinary price increases of oil and gold, compared to a broad category of metals and minerals, is that oil prices rose first based on above-ground hurdles that restrained the capacity to produce, and gold prices then reacted as they were pushed up by rising safe-haven investment to store value – an attribute not shared by other metals and minerals. The paper also comments on the likely future price evolution of these important materials, arguing that oil prices will stagnate at levels observed from late 2014, or even weaken in the coming decades, but that gold prices will continue to ride relatively high – thus leading to a collapse of the oil/gold price connection.

  • 2.
    Radetzki, Marian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Mineral Economics and Policy J E Tilton and J I Guzmán RFF Press, New York City, 2016 Pp. 255. ISBN: 978-1-138-83895-62016In: Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, ISSN 0818-9935, E-ISSN 1467-8411, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 123-124Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Radetzki, Marian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    The Oracle of Oil: A Maverick Geologist's Quest for a Sustainable Future2018In: Energy Journal, ISSN 0195-6574, E-ISSN 1944-9089, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 257-259Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Radetzki, Marian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Wårell, Linda
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    A Handbook of Primary Commodities in the Global Economy2016 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Tilton, John E.
    et al.
    Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business; Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Department of Mining Engineering, Santiago, Chile.
    Crowson, Phillip C.F.
    Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law & Policy, University of Dundee.
    DeYoung Jr, John H.
    Herndon, VA, USA.
    Eggert, Roderick G.
    Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
    Ericsson, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Guzmán, Juan Ignacio
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Department of Mining Engineering, Santiago.
    Humphreys, David
    DiaEcon Advisors, London.
    Lagos, Gustavo
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Department of Mining Engineering, Santiago.
    Maxwell, Philip
    Curtin University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Perth, Western Australia.
    Radetzki, Marian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Singer, Donald A.
    Singer Consulting, Cupertino, CA.
    Wellmer, Friedrich-W.
    Academy of Geosciences and Geotechnology, Hannover; National Academy of Science and Engineering, Munich and Berlin, Germany.
    Public policy and future mineral supplies2018In: Resources policy, ISSN 0301-4207, E-ISSN 1873-7641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A widespread and pessimistic view of the availability of mineral commodities calls for strong government initiatives to ensure adequate future supplies. This article provides a more market oriented and optimistic perspective, one that focuses on production costs and prices rather than physical availability. It sees short-run shortages continuing to plague commodity markets in the future as in the past. Though painful while they last, these shortages are temporary and do not pose a serious long-run threat to human welfare. Moreover, even without government intervention, they self-correct. The sharply higher prices that they evoke create strong incentives that foster supply and curb demand.

    Potentially more serious are long-run shortages due to mineral depletion. Such shortages are often thought to be inevitable, a conclusion that flows directly from the physical view of depletion. For various reasons, we reject this view of depletion in favor of an economic view. The latter recognizes that depletion may create long-run shortages, but stresses that this need not be the case if new technology can continue to offset the cost-increasing effects of depletion in the future as it has in the past. The economic view also suggests that a list of mineral commodities most threatened by depletion can best be compiled using cumulative availability curves rather than the more common practice of calculating commodity life expectancies based on estimates of available stocks

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