Change search
Refine search result
1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Barza, Sorina
    et al.
    Department of Mathematics, Physics and Engineering Sciences, Karlstad University.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Persson, Lars-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    A Sawyer duality principle for radially monotone functions in Rn2005In: Journal of Inequalities in Pure and Applied Mathematics, ISSN 1443-5756, E-ISSN 1443-5756, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Let f be a non-negative function on ℝn, which is radially monotone (0 < f↓ r). For 1 < p < ∞, g ≥ 0 and v a weight function, an equivalent expression for sup ∫ℝ fg/f↓r(∫ℝn fp v)1/p is proved as a generalization of the usual Sawyer duality principle. Some applications involving boundedness of certain integral operators are also given. © 2005 Victoria University

  • 2.
    Fosse, Trude
    et al.
    Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen .
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Hope Lossius, Magni
    Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen .
    Wagner, Anita
    Department of Teaching & Learning, Vanderbilt University, Peabody College, Nashville .
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö University .
    Stories Neglected About Children’s Mathematics Learning in Play2018In: Mathematics Education in the Early Years: Results from the POEM3 Conference, 2016 / [ed] Christiane Benz, Anna S. Steinweg, Hedwig Gasteiger, Priska Schöner, Helene Vollmuth, Johanna Zöllner., Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 93-108Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe stories of mathematics learning in play that are often neglected in this era of schoolification and discussions of what counts as learning in early childhood. Drawing on theories of early childhood teaching and learning that emphasize the importance of teachers’ (a) content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and knowledge of children’s development, (b) action competencies, and (c) attitudes and beliefs, we explore three stories of child-teacher interactions in play. We found that, despite different political and public perceptions of what counts as learning in three different countries, preschool teachers evidenced competencies in similar ways – each illustrating a neglected story of children’s mathematics learning.

  • 3.
    Gogatishvili, Amiran
    et al.
    Mathematical Institute, Czech Academy of Sciences.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Okpoti, Christopher
    Persson, Lars-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Characterisation of embeddings in Lorentz spaces2007In: Bulletin of the Australian Mathematical Society, ISSN 0004-9727, E-ISSN 1755-1633, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 69-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some new integral conditions characterising the embedding Λp(v) → Γq(w), 0 < p, q ≤ co are presented, including proofs also for the cases (i) p = ∞, 0 < q < ∞, (ii) 1 = ∞, 1 < p < ∞ and (iii) p = q = ∞. Only one condition is necessary for each case which means that our conditions are different from and simpler than other corresponding conditions in the literature. We even prove our results in a more general frame namely when the space Γq(w) is replaced by the more general space Γuq(w). In our proof we use a technique of discretisation and anti-discretisation developed by A. Gogatishvili and L. Pick, where they considered the opposite embeddingSome new integral conditions characterising the embedding Λp(v) → Γq(w), 0 < p, q ≤ co are presented, including proofs also for the cases (i) p = ∞, 0 < q < ∞, (ii) 1 = ∞, 1 < p < ∞ and (iii) p = q = ∞. Only one condition is necessary for each case which means that our conditions are different from and simpler than other corresponding conditions in the literature. We even prove our results in a more general frame namely when the space Γq(w) is replaced by the more general space Γuq(w). In our proof we use a technique of discretisation and anti-discretisation developed by A. Gogatishvili and L. Pick, where they considered the opposite embedding

  • 4.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM, Gothenburg University.
    Johansson, Maria L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Western Norway University of Applied Sciences.
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Western Norway University of Applied Sciences.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö University.
    To Gain Knowledge of How to be Challenging: Preschool Mathematics Professional Development2017In: Mathematics Teacher Education and Development, ISSN 1442-3901, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 36-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of freely-available web-based materials in professional development has rarely been investigated in mathematics education research. In this article, the responses to a survey by 267 preschool teachers about their use of online professional development materials are described. The web materials were based on a design model and the survey results are compared with its principles which focus on content, tasks and relationships. The results show that some of the content in the written materials was considered difficult to understand. Nevertheless, the requirement to work on the material in groups and to carry out tasks in their own preschools supported the teachers to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the content over time. Generally, the teachers found the material valuable for gaining knowledge about mathematics for young children that they could implement as tasks to challenge children in their preschools.

  • 5.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Malmö högskola.
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Malmö högskola.
    Riesbeck, Eva
    Malmö högskola.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    Preschool Teachers' Awareness of Mathematics2014In: Development of mathematics teaching: Design, Scale, Effects: design, scale, effects : proceedings of MADIF 9 : the ninth Swedish mathematics education research seminar, Umeå, February 4-5, 2014 / [ed] editors: Ola Helenius, Arne Engström, Tamsin Meaney, Per Nilsson, Eva Norén, Judy Sayers, Magnus Österholm, Göteborg: Svensk förening för matematikdidaktisk forskning (SMDF) , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preschool teachers’ expectations about what mathematics they should engagechildren in are generally centred about numbers and counting. However, theSwedish preschool curriculum and research into young children’s developmentof mathematical understanding suggest that children can be offered a muchricher set of ideas. In this paper, we examine material from a professionaldevelopment course which indicates that discussing Bishop’s six universalmathematical activities provided preschool teachers with a wider perspective fordiscussing the mathematics, which children in their preschools engaged with.

  • 6.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Malmö högskola, Bergen University College.
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Riesbeck, Eva
    Malmö högskola.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    Preschool teachers' perceptions of the role of videos in professional development2015In: Nordic research in mathematics education: Proceedings of NORMA14, Turku, June 3-6, 2014 / [ed] Harry Silfverberg; Tomi Kärki; Markku S. Hannula, Turku: The Finnish Research Association for Subject Didactics , 2015, p. 140-152Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Malmö högskola.
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Malmö högskola.
    Riesbeck, Eva
    Malmö högskola.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    Theorising the design of professional development web modules2014In: Development of mathematics teaching: Design, Scale, Effects: design, scale, effects : proceedings of MADIF 9 : the ninth Swedish mathematics education research seminar, Umeå, February 4-5, 2014 / [ed] editors: Ola Helenius, Arne Engström, Tamsin Meaney, Per Nilsson, Eva Norén, Judy Sayers, Magnus Österholm, Göteborg: Svensk förening för matematikdidaktisk forskning (SMDF) , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper theorises the design of Skolverket’s preschool and preschool classprofessional development web modules. By contrasting different models ofteacher change, components are identified that designers of professionaldevelopment materials may need to consider. Data from the decisions taken indesigning the Skolverket project were analysed in relation to these components.From this analysis, it was found that some design considerations were notrepresented in the previous models. Consequently, a new model is proposed.

  • 8.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Bergen University College.
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching. Bergen University College.
    Riesbeck, Eva
    Malmö högskola.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    When is preschool children’s play mathematical2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    Beginning early: mathematical exclusion2015In: Proceedings of the Eight International Mathematics Education and Society Conference: Portland, Oregon, United States, 21st to 26th June 2015, MES8 / [ed] Swapna Mukhopadhyay; Brian Greer, Portland: Portland State University , 2015, Vol. 2, p. 596-609Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Bergen University College.
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Bergen University College.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    Matematikdidaktik i förskolan: Att utveckla lekfulla matematiska barn2016Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Malmö University, Malmö högskola.
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    Mathematical exclusion with the every day2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem solving can involve using mathematics to solve everyday problems. In this study we examine an interaction between a teacher and a class of six-year olds in Sweden around an open-ended problem set in an everyday context. Using Bernstein’s ideas about vertical and horizontal discourse, a mixture of everyday and mathematicsunderstandings is identified in the interaction. This mixture seems to result in confusion for both the teacher and the children over what should be the focus. This paper raises issues about how the connection to the everyday in problem solving could reduce children’s opportunities to learn mathematics

  • 12.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    National Center for Mathematics Education, University of Gothenburg.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Bergen University College, Norway.
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Bergen University College, Norway.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University.
    Measuring temperature within the didaktic space of preschool2016In: NOMAD Nordic studies in mathematics education, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 155-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The informal character of preschool mathematics, engaged in during children’s play, places complex requirements on preschool teachers. It also leads to challenges in developing appropriate analytical tools for researching teacher work. In this paper a framework, the ”didaktic space”, is described and used to analyse interactions between preschool teachers and children in relationship to mathematical learning situations. An interaction between a preschool teacher and a group of children about how to compare their temperatures is analysed, using this framework. The analysis focuses on how the teacher’s contributions as well as those of the children changed as the role of the mathematics changed. The paper discusses how the didaktic space offers a nuanced understanding of preschool mathematical situations, both to researchers and to teachers.

  • 13.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM, Gothenburg University.
    Johansson, MariaLuleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.Lange, TroelsMalmö University, Malmö högskola, Bergen University College.Meaney, TasminMalmö University, Malmö högskola, Bergen University College.Riesbeck, EvaMalmö högskola.Wernberg, AnnaMalmö högskola.
    Mathematics Education in the Early Years: Results from the POEM2 Conference, 20142016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of Bishop’s six mathematical activities is playing which includes modelling, hypothetical thinking and abstraction. These can be in young children’s play, but do they by their presence make this play mathematical? In this chapter, we explore this question by first defining play and then comparing its features with what is known about mathematicians’ academic play and how mathematics education researchers have described young children’s play. From this theoretical discussion, we discuss the features of play, which can enable it to be described as mathematical. We use these features to analyse a small episode of children playing to discuss if and how their play could be considered to be mathematical

  • 14.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM, Gothenburg University.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Malmö University, Malmö högskola, Bergen University College.
    Meaney, Tasmin
    Malmö University, Malmö högskola, Bergen University College.
    Riesbeck, Eva
    Malmö högskola.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    When Is Young Children’s Play Mathematical?2016In: Mathematics Education in the Early Years: Results from the POEM2 Conference, 2014 / [ed] Tamsin Meaney; Ola Helenius; Maria L. Johansson; Troels Lange; Anna Wernberg, Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2016, p. 139-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of Bishop’s six mathematical activities is playing which includes modelling, hypothetical thinking and abstraction. These can be in young children’s play, but do they by their presence make this play mathematical? In this chapter, we explore this question by first defining play and then comparing its features with what is known about mathematicians’ academic play and how mathematics education researchers have described young children’s play. From this theoretical discussion, we discuss the features of play, which can enable it to be described as mathematical. We use these features to analyse a small episode of children playing to discuss if and how their play could be considered to be mathematical

  • 15.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM, Gothenburg University.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Malmö University, Malmö högskola, Bergen University College.
    Meaney, Tasmin
    Malmö University, Malmö högskola, Bergen University College.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    Intruction2016In: Mathematics Education in the Early Years: Results from the POEM2 Conference, 2014 / [ed] Tamsin Meaney; Ola Helenius; Maria L. Johansson; Troels Lange; Anna Wernberg, Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2016, p. 3-17Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of Bishop’s six mathematical activities is playing which includes modelling, hypothetical thinking and abstraction. These can be in young children’s play, but do they by their presence make this play mathematical? In this chapter, we explore this question by first defining play and then comparing its features with what is known about mathematicians’ academic play and how mathematics education researchers have described young children’s play. From this theoretical discussion, we discuss the features of play, which can enable it to be described as mathematical. We use these features to analyse a small episode of children playing to discuss if and how their play could be considered to be mathematical

  • 16.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Malmö högskola.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    Lange, Troels
    Malmö högskola.
    Riesbeck, Eva
    Malmö högskola.
    Analysing Instrumental and Pedagogic Situations in Preschools using the Didaktic Space2014In: Development of mathematics teaching: Design, Scale, Effects: design, scale, effects : proceedings of MADIF 9 : the ninth Swedish mathematics education research seminar, Umeå, February 4-5, 2014 / [ed] editors: Ola Helenius, Arne Engström, Tamsin Meaney, Per Nilsson, Eva Norén, Judy Sayers, Magnus Österholm, g: Svensk förening för matematikdidaktisk forskning (SMDF) , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers rarely discuss methodological issues in regard to preschoolmathematics education and if they do, they do not take their starting point fromreconceptualisations of what mathematics might be for preschool children. Thispaper presents as an analytical tool the “didaktic space” that arose whenresponding to issues related to the analysis of data collected in a Swedishpreschool. The issues that arose from categorising situations using Bishop’s sixactivities required some reconsiderations of the methodology in relationship tothe research questions. The paper discusses how methodological decisions canaffect the analysis and the future possibilities that the didaktic space offers.

  • 17.
    Jablonka, Eva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Expanding or limiting: a re-analysis of a researcher's interaction with students in a modelling session2012In: Proceedings of NORMA 11: the sixth Nordic conference on mathematics education in Reykjavik, May 11-14 2011 / [ed] Gudny Helga Gunnarsdottir, Reykjavik: University of Iceland Press, 2012, p. 349-358Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this paper is methodological and theoretical. By means of a re-analysis of a transcript from a research publication, we attempt to show how the researcher, in a similar way as we have observed teachers in classrooms, guides the students towards more or less general mathematical investigations in the context of solving a task. We intend to raise methodological issues related to the original as compared to our interpretation of the data. In addition, we want to exemplify the starting point of the development of a language of description that allows accounting for the emergence and distribution of unequal attainment in mathematics at the micro-level of classroom interaction.

  • 18.
    Jablonka, Eva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Johansson, Maria
    Rohdin, Mikaela
    Studying the effects of a hybrid curriculum and apparent weak framing: glimpses from an ongoing investigation of two Swedish classrooms2010In: Proceedings of the Sixth International Mathematics Education and Society Conference / [ed] Uwe Gellert; Eva Jablonka; Candia Morgan, Berlin: Freie Universität Berlin , 2010, Vol. 2, p. 251-261Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report from an ongoing study of two Swedish mathematics classrooms, in which the students and their teachers are together for the first time at the very beginning of their upper secondary education. The students are enrolled in two different programmes, in which they study the same mathematics course. The investigation of these two classes is part of a larger comparative project that studies the emergence of disparities from a theoretical perspective that examines their social construction in the context of the practices of the mathematics classroom.

  • 19.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    A new characterization of the Hardy and it's limit Pólya-Knopp inequality for decreasing functions2009In: Inequalities and Applications / [ed] C. Bandle; A. Gilányi; L. Losonczi; Z. Páles; M. Plum, Birkhäuser Verlag, 2009, p. 97-107Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    A new characterization of the Hardy and its limit Pólya-Knopp inequality for decreasing functions2007Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    A unified approach to the Sawyer and Sinnamon characterizations of Hardy´s inequality for decreasing functions2007Report (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Candy or equation? Why do students get different explanations on the same problem?2012In: Evaluation and Comparison of Mathematical Achievement: Dimensions and Perspectives: proceedings of MADIF 8, The Eighth Mathematics Education Research Seminar, Umeå, January 24-25, 2012 / [ed] Christer Bergsten; Eva Jablonka; Manya Sundström, Linköping: Svensk förening för matematikdidaktisk forskning, SMDF , 2012, p. 111-120Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The individualisation of school mathematics teaching might be necessary in the face of the inhomogeneity of classrooms, but the choices, the students and the teacher face, might actually reinforce differences in achievement. In the following article I present and analyse data from a study about the emergence of disparity in achievement in mathematics classrooms. In the example we can see some of the effects of individualisation. The investigation shows differences in the teacher’s explanations on the same problem in the interaction with different students.

  • 23.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Carleman type inequalities and Hardy type inequalities for monotone functions2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This Ph.D. thesis deals with various generalizations of the inequalities by Carleman, Hardy and Polya-Knopp. In Chapter 1 we give an introduction and overview of the area that serves as a frame for the rest of the thesis. In Chapter 2 we consider Carleman's inequality, which may be regarded as a discrete version of Polya-Knopp's inequality and also as a natural limiting inequality of the discrete Hardy inequality. We present several simple proofs of and remarks (e.g. historical) about this inequality. In Chapter 3 we give some sharpenings and generalizations of Carleman's inequality. We discuss and comment on these results and put them into the frame presented in the previous chapter. We also include some new proofs and results. In Chapter 4 we prove a multidimensional Sawyer duality formula for radially decreasing functions and with general weights. We also state the corresponding result for radially increasing functions. In particular, these results imply that we can describe mapping properties of operators defined on cones of such monotone functions. Moreover, we point out that these results can also be used to describe mapping properties of operators between some corresponding general weighted multidimensional Lebesgue spaces. In Chapter 5 we give a weight characterization of the weighted Hardy inequality for decreasing functions and we use this results to give a new weight characterization of the weighted Polya-Knopp inequality for decreasing functions and we also give a new scale of weightconditions for the Hardy inequality for decreasing functions. In Chapter 6 we make a unified approach to Hardy type inequalitits for non-increasing functions and prove a result which covers both the Sinnamon result with one condition and Sawyer's result with two independent conditions for the case when one weight is non-decreasing. In all cases we point out that this condition is not unique and can even be chosen among some (infinte) scales of conditions. In Chapter 7 we obtain the characterization of the general Hardy operator restricted to monotone functions. In Chapter 8 we present some new integral conditions characterizing the embedding between some Lorentz spaces. Only one condition is necessary for each case which means that our conditions are different and simpler than other corresponding conditions in the literature. We even prove our results in a more general frame. In our proof we use a technique of discretization and anti-discretization developed by A. Gogatishvili and L. Pick, where they considered the opposite embedding.

  • 24. Johansson, Maria
    Hardy and Carleman type inequalities2004Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with various generalizations of the inequalities by Carleman, Hardy and Pólya-Knopp. In Chapter 1 we give an introduction and overview of the area that serves as a frame for the rest of the thesis. In Chapter 2 we consider Carleman's inequality, which may be regarded as a discrete version of Pólya-Knopp's inequality and also as a natural limiting inequality of the discrete Hardy inequality. We present several simple proofs of and \ remarks (e.g. historical) about this inequality. In Chapter 3 we give some sharpenings and generalizations of Carleman's inequality. We discuss and comment on these results and put them into the frame presented in the previous chapter. We also include some new proofs and results. In Chapter 4 we give a new weight characterization of the weighted Hardy inequality for decreasing functions. In Chapter 5 we use the results from Chapter 4 to give a new weight characterization of the weighted Pólya-Knopp inequality for decreasing functions and we also give a new scale of weightconditions for the embedding L^{p}(v) to L^{q}(u) for the case 1

  • 25.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Perceptions of mathematics in preschool: "-Now we have a way of talking about the mathematics that we can work with"2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching question for this thesis is what is preschool mathematics? This question is examined using different points of views or different perspectives such as the children’s, the preschool teachers and the researchers. The foundation for this thesis is seven articles, two single author articles and five co-authored articles. The project described in this thesis developed out of my research interest and discussions in the research group of which I have been part.In the first article we use video recording to capture the typical situations that children are engaged in when they are at preschool. The videos were analysed in order to classify the mathematics in evidence according to Bishop’s six mathematical activities. This research activity raised the issue of whose perspective- the researcher, the preschool teacher or the children - was important when discussing what is preschool mathematics? The second article discusses the issue of whose perspective in more detail and introduces a methodological tool, the didaktic space to differentiate between the perspectives of the preschool teacher and children as identified by the researcher. The didaktic space makes it possible to simultaneously see the different perspectives separately but also together so the impact of the teacher and the children on the dynamic nature of the situation can be described. In the third article I investigate preschool teachers’ and child care staff’s (barnskötare) perception of mathematics in preschool using data from related professional development courses. The stories that the preschool teachers and childcare staff related as part of a final assignment in the courses were categorised using Bishop’s six mathematical activities. The result from this study shows that the perceptions of preschool teachers are not just on Counting, as is reported in earlier research, but on almost all of the six mathematical activities except for Playing. These results from the preschool teachers are then compared with the results from childcare staff. The childcare staff had more stories involving Counting but they also had more stories connected to Playing. This result led to the investigation discussed in the next article (article four) which was a theoretical discussion on Playing as a mathematical activity, with an empirical example used to highlight some of the issues. In this article, we compare different perspectives to identify the common features of mathematical play. The empirical example came from a video of children in a preschool class engaging in free play and allowed an identification of the mathematics which could be used by children when there is no adult present. In article five, I combine the discussions from the previous articles and focuses on why preschool teachers struggle to identify Playing as a mathematical activity in children’s interactions in preschools. The data come from a large professional development programme in which the preschool teachers read and discussed Playing as a mathematical activity. The results of the analysis suggest that the way that play is discussed as a basis for learning in the Swedish preschool curriculum could contribute to teachers having a professional blind spot in regard to Playing as a mathematical activity. Article six and seven provide insights into children’s perspectives about mathematics in preschools. The data used in these articles comes from the same project as the video used in article four recorded in a preschool class. The data from preschool class, described as the bridge between preschool and school in Swedish educational circles, allows the pedagogy used in preschools to be contrasted with that used in school. In article six we focus on the mathematical inclusion or exclusion that mathematical play provides when there is an adult present.In article seven we also focus on the mathematical inclusion or exclusion but now with comparing the independent play situation from article four with the teacher led situation in article six. The theoretical framework for article six and seven is Bernstein’s vertical and horizontal discourse. This change of theories was a response to the questions about how some children can become mathematically excluded which are issues of a socio-political nature.These different perceptions, children, teacher, researcher, and perspectives, descriptive, theoretical and socio-political, provide a deeper understanding of what preschool mathematics is, how it could be conceptualised and how it includes or excludes children from opportunities to learn. As a consequence of this extended investigation, it can be said in the words of one of the preschool teachers, “now we have a way of talking about the mathematics that we can work with”.

  • 26.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    School mathematics: an initiation into what?2010In: Mathematics and mathematics education: Cultural and social dimensions: Proceedings of MADIF 7, The Seventh Mathematics Education Research Seminar, Stockholm, January 26-27, 2010 / [ed] Eva Jablonka; Christer Bergsten; Tine Wedege, Linköping: Svensk förening för matematikdidaktisk forskning, SMDF , 2010, p. 267-269Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Fosse, Trude
    Bergen University College.
    Lossius, Magni
    Bergen University College.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    Wager, Anita
    University of Wisconsin-Madison.
    Conflicting Narratives About What Counts As Mathematics in Early Childhood2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lange, Troels
    Malmö University.
    Meaney, Tasmin
    Malmö University.
    Riesbeck, Eva
    Malmö University.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö University.
    Young children’s multimodal mathematical explanations2014In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 895-909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how three children provided mathematical explanations whilst playing with a set of glass jars in a Swedish preschool. Using the idea of semiotic bundles combined with the work on multimodal interactions, the different semiotic resources used individually and in combinations by the children are described. Given that the children were developing their verbal fluency, it was not surprising to find that they also included physical arrangements of the jars and actions to support their explanations. Hence, to produce their explanations of different attributes such as thin and sameness, the children drew on each other’s gestures and actions with the jars. This research has implications for how the relationship between verbal language and gestures can be viewed in regard to young children’s explanations.

  • 29.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Malmö högskola.
    Lange, Troels
    Malmö högskola.
    Riesbeck, Eva
    Malmö högskola.
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola.
    What maths do children learn in Swedish preschools?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to better understand the mathematics that preschool children engage in, we categorised the activities made available in one Swedish preschool. Although using Bishop’s 6 categories of mathematical activities and Walkerdine’s distinction between instrumental and pedagogical activities overcame some of our categorisation issues, they did not solve all of them. Some activities could be included in several categories which brought us back to a discussion about who was making what kinds of distinctions and for what purposes.

  • 30.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Matematik och problemlösning2017In: Entreprenöriellt lärande i matematik: vad, hur, varför? / [ed] Lena Karlsson, Maria Johansson, Hanna Palmér, Stockholm: Natur & Kultur Läromedel , 2017, p. 12-24Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Persson, Lars-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Multidimensional inequalities of Hardy and (limit) Pólya-Knopp types2012In: Analysis for science, engineering and beyond: the tribute workshop in honour of Gunnar Sparr held in Lund, May 8-9, 2008, Heidelberg: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2012, p. 267-304Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Persson, Lars-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Scales of equivalent integral conditions related to Hardy type inequalities with applications2007In: Eurasian Mathematical Journal, ISSN 2077-9879, no 3, p. 22-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Persson, Lars-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Wedestig, Anna
    A new approach to the Sawyer and Sinnamon characterizations of Hardy's inequality for decreasing functions2008In: Georgian Mathematical Journal, ISSN 1072-947X, E-ISSN 1572-9176, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 295-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some Hardy type inequalities for decreasing functions are characterized by one condition (Sinnamon), while others are described by two independent conditions (Sawyer). In this paper we make a new approach to deriving such results and prove a theorem, which covers both the Sinnamon result and the Sawyer result for the case where one weight is increasing. In all cases we point out that the characterizing condition is not unique and can even be chosen among some (infinite) scales of conditions.

  • 34. Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Persson, Lars-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Wedestig, Anna
    Carleman's inequality: history, proofs and some new generalizations2003In: Journal of Inequalities in Pure and Applied Mathematics, ISSN 1443-5756, E-ISSN 1443-5756, Vol. 4, no 3, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carleman's inequality reads where , are positive numbers. In this paper we present some simple proofs of and several remarks (e.g. historical) about the inequality and its corresponding continuous version. Moreover, we discuss and comment on some very new results. We also include some new proofs and results e.g. a weight characterization of a general weighted Carleman type inequality for the case 0 p q We also include some facts about T. Carleman and his work.

  • 35. Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Persson, Lars-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Wedestig, Anna
    Carlemans olikhet: historik, skärpningar och generaliseringar2003In: Normat, ISSN 0801-3500, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 89-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Rohdin, Mikaela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Jablonka, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Achievement as a matter of choice?2010In: Mathematics and Mathematics Education : Cultural and Social Dimensions: Proceedings of MADIF 7, The Seventh Mathematics Education Research Seminar, Stockholm, January 26-27, 2010 / [ed] Christer Bergsten; Eva Jablonka; Tine Wedege, Linköping: Svensk förening för matematikdidaktisk forskning, SMDF , 2010, p. 113-123Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Stepanov, Vladimir D
    Department of Mathematical Analysis and Function Theory, Peoples Friendship University, Moscow.
    Ushakova, Elena P.
    Computing Center, Far Eastern Scientific Center, Russian Academy of Sciences.
    Hardy inequality with three measures on monotone functions2007Report (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Stepanov, Vladimir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Ushakova, Elena
    Hardy inequality with three measures on monotone functions2008In: Mathematical Inequalities & Applications, ISSN 1331-4343, E-ISSN 1848-9966, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 393-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Characterization of Lvp[0, ∞) - L μq[O, ∞) boundedness of the general Hardy operator (Hsf)(x) =(∫[0,x] fsudλ) 1/s restricted to monotone functions f ≥ 0 for 0 < p.q.s < ∞ with positive Borel σ -finite measures λ, μ and v is obtained.

  • 39.
    Karlsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linneuniversitetet.
    Johansson, MariaLuleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.Palmér, HannaLinneuniversitetet.
    Entreprenöriellt lärande i matematik: vad, hur, varför?2017Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Karlsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitet.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lärarrollen2017In: Entreprenöriellt lärande i matematik: vad, hur, varför? / [ed] Lena Karlsson, Maria Johansson, Hanna Palmér, Stockholm: Natur & Kultur Läromedel , 2017, p. 151--166Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linneus University.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Combining entrepreneurship and mathematics in primary school: what happens?2018In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 331-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on an educational design research study exploring the potential of combining entrepreneurship and mathematics – two of the key competencies stressed as important in a society of lifelong learning. The aim of the study was to explore what happens when entrepreneurship is integrated into mathematics lessons. Eight Swedish primary schools were involved in the iterative design wherein researchers and teachers together planned, implemented, and evaluated lessons. The results indicate that combining entrepreneurial and mathematical competencies may produce a win-win situation. Entrepreneurial competencies can be of value when students are learning mathematics, and at the same time mathematics teaching can be organised so that students develop both mathematical and entrepreneurial competencies.

  • 42.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Johansson, Maria L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Karlsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Teaching for entrepreneurial and mathematical competences: teachers stepping out of their comfort zone2018In: Students' and Teachers' Values, Attitudes, Feelings and Beliefs in Mathematics Classrooms: Selected Papers from the 22nd MAVI Conference / [ed] Hanna Palmér, Jeppe Skott, Cham, 2018, p. 13-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an educational design research study exploring the potential in combining the teaching of entrepreneurial and mathematical competences in Swedish primary schools. The focus in this paper, however, is not on the wholeness of this study but on changes in the teacher role when entrepreneurial and mathematical competences are to be combined in teaching – as expressed by the teachers themselves. Two of these expressed changes are “saying less” and “daring to let go of control”. In the paper, these two changes are explored in relation to how they seem to influence these teachers’ teaching of mathematics, and some implications are drawn regarding how their students’ possibilities to learn mathematics may have been influenced.

  • 43.
    Tossavainen, Timo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Faarinen, Ewa-Charlotte
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Klisinska, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Tossavainen, Anne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Swedish Primary and Preprimary Student Teachers' Views Of Using Digital Tools in Preprimary Mathematics Education2018In: Journal of Technology and Information Education, ISSN 1803-537X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our study surveys Swedish primary and preprimary student teachers' (n=94) views of content and methods of mathematics education in preschool and, especially, of using digital tools in preprimary mathematics education. The views related to digital tools turned out to be clearly positive in general. Students who are strongly for using digital tools are also more sure in saying that mathematics education in preschool should be fun. However, they agree less with the claims such as mathematics lessons should be structured, or that the responsibility for the mathematics education of small children belongs mainly to their parents. Those students who were quite strongly for using digital tools agreed less with the claim that mathematics is one of the most important areas of preprimary education. The willingness to take responsibility for children's mathematical education from the parents was the most significant single factor to explain the participants' opinions about using digital tools.

1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf