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  • 1.
    Al-Madhlom, Qais
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Chabuk, Ali
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering. University of Babylon, Babylon, Hilla, Iraq.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Lindblom, Jenny
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Laue, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Hussain, Hussain M.
    University of Kufa, Kufa, Najaf, Iraq.
    Potential use of UTES in Babylon Governorate, Iraq2020In: Groundwater for Sustainable Development, ISSN 2352-801X, Vol. 10, article id 100283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a global attention that the future energy systems will be based on renewable energy like solar and wind. The large-scale utilization of renewables in space heating and cooling requires large Thermal Energy Storage TES to overcome the varying supply and demand. The process of producing the best Underground Thermal Energy Storage UTES system pass through two steps: first, finding the best type of UTES system, second, finding the best locations to install UTES system. Both of these two steps depend extremely on the site specific parameters such that the depth to the groundwater, transmissivity, type of soil, the depth to the bedrock, and seepage velocity. The purpose of this paper is to explain some of the site specific parameters that the type of UTES-system depends on and explain the suitable type of UTES systems. This study considers Babylon province (Iraq) as study area. This province has electricity deficiency due to Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning HVAC applications. The methodology of this study includes reviewing the literature that consider the study area, and using Arc Map/GIS to visualize some of the in-site parameters. The results indicate that the best type of UTES system for the considered region is either aquifer or pit type, due to the type of the soil and the depth to the crystalline bedrock. The hydraulic conductivity and the seepage velocity in the considered region are (0.0023–2.5) m/d and (1.3 × 10−6 – 3.45 × 10−3) m/d respectively. These conditions satisfy the standards which regard aquifer type.

  • 2.
    Vidal, Brenda
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Barraud, Sylvie
    Department of Civil Engineering and Urban Planning, National Institute of Applied Sciences of Lyon.
    Kärrman, Erik
    Division of the Built Environment, Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Herrmann, Inga
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Assessing the sustainability of on-site sanitation systems using multi-criteria analysis2019In: Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, ISSN 2053-1400, Vol. 5, p. 1599-1615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small on-site sanitation systems are widely present in suburban and rural areas in many countries. As these systems often underperform and have an impact on receiving waters, understanding their overall sustainability is of interest for policy and decision-makers. However, the definition and estimation of indicators defining sustainability are challenging, as it is finding the methodological approach to combine qualitative and quantitative indicators into one comprehensive assessment. In this study, twelve indicators defined by environmental, economic, social, technical and health-related criteria were used to compare nine alternatives of on-site sanitation for single households. A non-compensatory method for multi-criteria decision analysis, ELECTRE III, was used for the assessment together with weights assigned to each indicator by a reference group. Several scenarios were developed to reflect different goals and a sensitivity analysis was conducted. Overall, the graywater–blackwater separation system resulted as the most sustainable option and, in terms of polishing steps for phosphorus removal, chemical treatment was preferred over the phosphorus filter, both options being implemented together with sand filters. Assessing the robustness of the systems was a crucial step in the analysis given the high importance assigned to the aforementioned indicator by the stakeholders, thus the assessment method must be justified. The proposed multi-criteria approach contributes to aid the assessment of complex information needed in the selection of sustainable sanitation systems and in the provision of informed preferences.

  • 3.
    Søberg, Laila
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Bioretention for stormwater quality treatment: Effects of design features and ambient conditions2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Müller, Alexandra
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Österlund, Helene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nordqvist, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Building surface materials as sources of micropollutants in building runoff: A pilot study2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 680, p. 190-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Control of diffuse pollution is critical for achieving good surface water quality status. In this context, pollutant contributions from building materials have received increased attention in recent decades. This study examined the releases of metals, nonylphenols and phthalates from ten common building surface materials (installed in triplicates) into rainwater runoff from six rain events. The highest releases of metals were from copper and zinc sheets (average concentrations of 3090 μg/L Cu and 7770 μg/L Zn respectively), while other metal materials, e.g., Corten weathering steel, exhibited lower releases. PVC roofing released high concentrations of nonylphenols and phthalates (average concentrations of up to 26 μg/L nonylphenols and 455 μg/L Diisononyl phthalate, DINP) which have not been investigated in the earlier studies. Pollutant releases varied between events, likely because of weather conditions and rainfall characteristics. Study findings should be valuable for environmentally responsible applications of the existing building materials and the development of new ones, as well as the investigations and risk assessment of specific pollutants in stormwater.

  • 5.
    Broekhuizen, Ico
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Leonhardt, Günther
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Calibration event selection for green urban drainage modelling2019In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions, ISSN 1812-2108, E-ISSN 1812-2116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calibration of urban drainage models is typically performed based on a limited number of observed rainfall-runoff events, which may be selected from a longer time-series of measurements in different ways. In this study, 14 single- and two-stage strategies for selecting these events were tested for calibration of a SWMM model of a predominantly green urban area. The event selection was considered in relation to other sources of uncertainty such as measurement uncertainties, objective functions, and catchment discretization. Even though all 14 strategies resulted in successful model calibration, the difference between the best and worst strategies reached 0.2 in Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) and the calibrated parameter values notably varied. Most, but not all, calibration strategies were robust to changes in objective function, perturbations in calibration data and the use of a low spatial resolution model in the calibration phase. The various calibration strategies satisfactorily predicted 7 to 13 out of 19 validation events. The two-stage strategies performed better than the single-stage strategies when measuring performance using the Root Mean Square Error, flow volume error or peak flow error (but not using NSE); when flow data in the calibration period had been perturbed by ±40 %; and when using a lower model resolution. The two calibration strategies that performed best in the validation period were two-stage strategies. The findings in this paper show that different strategies for selecting calibration events may lead in some cases to different results for the validation period, and that calibrating impermeable and green area parameters in two separate steps may improve model performance in the validation period, while also reducing the computational demand in the calibration phase.

  • 6.
    Lindfors, Sarah
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Österlund, Helene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Meyn, Thomas
    Muthanna, Tone Merete
    Lundy, Lian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Characterisation of Dissolved Metal Fractions in Urban Runoff2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Coagulation process characteristics and pollutant removal from urban runoff2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many different stormwater control measures (SCMs) can be implemented in order to mitigate issues with polluted stormwater flows into receiving water bodies.  The treatment function of  SCMs is commonly based on the removal of particles by sedimentation, thereby also removing pollutants associated with particles. In recent years, more attention has been given to characterizing and understanding of different particle size fractions and their association with pollutants commonly found in stormwater. It has become increasingly clear that the smaller sized particles are very important pollutant transporters and should be considered when designing and implementing SCMs. However, the settling velocities for smaller sized particles are very low and may not be effectively removed in existing SCMs. One treatment process with a proven ability to enhance sedimentation is coagulation/flocculation, widespread in water and wastewater treatment, but with very few accounts of it being used in a stormwater context. This thesis aims to investigate the treatability of stormwater with a coagulation/flocculation process. This includes the determination of operating conditions, the dominating coagulation mechanism and the reduction efficiency of stormwater related pollutants. The objectives of the thesis were achieved in laboratory tests treating stormwater in a jar-testing procedure.

    An initial screening of primary coagulants and flocculant aids was conducted using an urban snowmelt mixture. Five of the chemicals were then selected for an extended testing regime which was setup up to determine the operating conditions where maximal turbidity reduction was attained by measuring the pH, conductivity, alkalinity and zeta-potential over the tested doses for each coagulant. Criteria used for chemical selection included high turbidity reduction, low dose requirement and low pH/alkalinity impacts.

    Charge reversal was observed at positive zeta-potential indicating that the dominating coagulation mechanism was charge neutralization. The content of turbidity/total suspended solids, total organic carbon, total metals and hydrocarbons by >90%. Dissolved copper was reduced by 40% on average, and the reduction rates for dissolved zinc were varying with up to a 300% increase, presumably due to changes in pH, leading to a higher mobility. Changes in the particle size distribution after coagulation/flocculation as compared to sedimentation indicated an effect on the size fraction corresponding to smaller particles.

    The performance of the coagulation/flocculation process was also tested on road runoff collected from a central road in Luleå with a high traffic intensity. Two coagulants were tested, iron chloride and pre-hydrolyzed aluminum chloride. Reduction rates for the total metal fraction were >90% on average for both coagulants, but for the dissolved metal fractions differences could be observed between the coagulants with the iron chloride resulting in higher reductions for dissolved chrome (57% compared to 34%) and copper (47% compared to 30%). Both products increased the dissolved fractions of nickel and zinc due to lower final pH.

  • 8.
    Pericault, Youen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Bruaset, Stian
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Ugarelli, Rita
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Correcting for the impact of past coordination on the estimation of pipe cohorts survival functions2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Søberg, Laila
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Winston, Ryan
    Departments of Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering and Civil, Environmental, and Geodetic Engineering, Ohio State University, 590 Woody Hayes Drive, Columbus, OH, United States of America.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Dissolved metal adsorption capacities and fractionation in filter materials for use in stormwater bioretention facilities2019In: Water Research X, ISSN 2589-9147, Vol. 4, article id 100032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dissolved metal adsorption and association was determined for ten different filter materials recommended and/or implemented in bioretention facilities. Batch adsorption and batch kinetic experiments were performed at lab-scale using both single and multi-metal solutions. Metal strengths and association were determined by sequential extraction analysis. All materials adsorbed metals and 90% of adsorption occurred within 1 h. However, as metal solutions became more complex, adsorption behavior changed. Generally, filter materials classified as sand with a naturally high pH, relatively low organic matter (OM) content and large specific surface area seem to be good choices for removing dissolved metals. Additionally, a chalk additive might improve metal adsorption whereas biochar did not significantly improve metal retention and may be an unwanted (due to degradation over time) extra source of OM. Regardless of filter material, metals primarily adsorbed to the exchangeable form which indicates that metal adsorption might not be permanent, but rather substantially reversible in some cases. More research is needed to assess whether dissolved metals adsorbed in filter materials of bioretention systems pose a delayed threat instead of an immediate threat. Finally, the authors strongly recommend filter materials intended for stormwater bioretention facilities to be tested prior to implementation.

  • 10.
    Milovanovic, Ivan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Bareš, Vojtech
    Czech Technical University in Prague.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Herrmann, Inga
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Piscek, Tomas
    Czech Technical University in Prague.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Enhancing stormwater sediment settling at detention pond inlets by a Bottom Grid Structure2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stormwater sediments of various sizes and densities are recognised as one of the most important stormwater quality parameters that can be conventionally controlled by settling in detention ponds. The Bottom Grid Structure (BGS) is an innovative (non-proprietary) concept proposed in this study to enhance removal of stormwater sediments entering ponds and reduce sediment resuspension. This concept was studied in a hydraulic scale model with the objective of elucidating the effects of the BGS geometry on stormwater sediment trapping. Towards this end, the BGS cell size and depth, and the cell cross-wall angle were varied for a range of flow rates, and the sediment trapping efficiency was measured in the model. The main value of the observed sediment trapping efficiencies, in the range from 13 to 55%, was a comparative assessment of various BGS designs. In general, larger cells (footprint 10x10 cm, in the model) were more effective than the smaller cells (5x5 cm), the cell depth exerted small influence on sediment trapping, and the cells with inclined cross-walls proved more effective in sediment trapping than the vertical cross-walls. However, the BGS with inclined cross-walls would be harder to maintain. Future studies should address an optimal cell design and testing in an actual stormwater pond.

  • 11.
    Lindfors, Sarah
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Österlund, Heléne
    Lundy, Lian
    Viklander, Maria
    Evaluation of Truly Dissolved and Bioavailable Metal Concentrations in Snowmelt and Rainfall Runoff2019In: Novatech 2019 Proceedings, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environment Quality Standards (EQS) stated by the EU Water Framework Directive complemented by national EQS support the work of risk assessments of bioavailable metals in freshwater environments. In this paper, dissolved and truly dissolved (operationally defined by ultrafiltration) Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations were used to predict and evaluate the bioavailable metal fraction (calculated using Bio-met) in snowmelt and rainfall runoff samples from two urban catchments. The results show that the bioavailable Cu and Zn concentrations exceed the EQSbioavailable and that there is a metal by metal variation regarding the fraction of truly dissolved metals that is also bioavailable. The results indicate that the truly dissolved metal fraction is not a suitable surrogate for the bioavailable fraction for these metals.

  • 12.
    Viklander, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Österlund, Helene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Müller, Alexandra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Borris, Matthias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Kunskapssammanställning: Dagvattenkvalitet2019Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This report summarizes stormwater pollutants, their sources, concentrations, and variations in concentrations. Practical guidance for field data collection, adoption of standard data from the literature and computer modelling are given. Furthermore, the effects on health, the environment and society, and associated regulations are discussed.

  • 13.
    Vijayan, Arya
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Österlund, Helene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Laboratory Melting of Late-Winter Urban Snow Samples: The Magnitude and Dynamics of Releases of Heavy Metals and PAHs2019In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 230, no 8, article id 182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laboratory snow melting experiments were conducted with actual late-winter snow samples, collected just before the final snowmelt, in two similar northern Swedish cities, Luleå and Umeå, to investigate releases of the selected heavy metals (HM) (Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd) and 16 USEPA PAHs from melting snow. Metal concentrations were determined in three fractions: total, dissolved, and truly dissolved (defined as the fraction passing through a 3-kMWCO ultrafilter). Total HM concentrations in snowmelt were rather high at both sites and reflected the accumulation of pollutants in the roadside snowbanks over a period of about 5 months: Cd = 0.43, Cu = 303, Pb = 41.9, Zn = 817 (μg/l), and TSS = 2000 (mg/l) in Luleå samples and Cd = 1.87, Cu = 905, Pb = 165, Zn = 3150 (μg/l), and TSS = 4800 (mg/l) in Umeå samples. The difference between metal and TSS concentrations at the two sites of similar characteristics was attributed to a smaller volume snowbank in Umeå. The dissolved HM concentrations represented relatively small fractions of the total concentrations (0.3–6.9% in Luleå and 0.01–3.1% in Umeå). The truly dissolved fraction represented 71–90% of the dissolved fraction in Luleå and 74–98% in Umeå. At both sites, the dissolved fractions exhibited preferential elution from the laboratory snow piles. The PAHs studied (16 US EPA PAHs) were mostly particulate bound, with only 5–12% of the total burden contributed by the meltwater, and most dissolved concentrations below the reporting limits. PAH concentrations in the Luleå samples were about one-third to one-fourth of those in Umeå. In general, the releases of PAHs from the snowbank were delayed, compared with releases of meltwater, and showed similar release patterns as TSS.

  • 14.
    Gavric, Snezana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Larm, Thomas
    StormTac corporation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Österlund, Helene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Wahlsten, Anna
    StormTac corporation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Measurement and conceptual modelling of retention of metals (Cu, Pb, Zn) in soils of three grass swales2019In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 574, p. 1053-1061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grass swales are important elements of the urban green infrastructure that convey and attenuate urban runoff and improve its quality mostly through stormwater infiltration into, and retention of conveyed pollutants by, swale soils. The retention of metals by grass swales was addressed in this study investigating the enrichment of swale soils by three common traffic-related metals: Cu, Pb and Zn. Three swales of various characteristics (L1, L2, L3) were selected for study and their soils were sampled by coring the top 30 cm and dividing the cores into 5 cm thick layers. Cumulative metal burdens were compared to those modelled by the proprietary StormTac Web model, which estimates annual loads of specific constituents for the given land uses and stormwater treatment. The comparisons of measured (MBm) and simulated (MBs) metal burdens retained by swales showed that the measured values exceed the simulated ones, as described by average ratios MBs/MBm = 0.64, 0.50 and 0.59, for swales L1, L2 and L3, respectively. The measured burdens were calculated after subtracting the native soil metal concentrations, assumed equal to those found in the deepest sampled layer, 25–30 cm below the surface. The results suggest the feasibility of assessing performance of grass swales by modelling metal (Cu, Pb, Zn) retention by swales, however for older facilities considered for rehabilitation, the simulated results should be supplemented by soil chemistry sampling.

  • 15.
    Gavric, Snezana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Larm, Thomas
    StormTac AB, Stockholm.
    Österlund, Helene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Wahlsten, Anna
    StormTac AB, Stockholm.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Measurement and Planning–Level Modelling of Retention of Trace Metals (Cu, Pb, Zn) in Soils of Three Urban Drainage Grass Swales2019In: New Trends in Urban Drainage Modelling: UDM 2018 / [ed] Giorgio Mannina, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 85-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grass swales are important elements of urban green infrastructure that convey, attenuate and improve the quality of urban runoff mostly through stormwater infiltration into and retention of conveyed pollutants by swale soils. Such processes were addressed in this study, investigating the enrichment of swale soils by ubiquitous urban trace metals, Cu, Pb and Zn. Three swales were selected for study in the City of Lulea (Northern Sweden) and their soils were sampled by coring. Sample cores covered soil depths up to 30 cm, but only the results from the top 5 cm layer characterized by 9–15 samples in each swale are discussed here. After estimating metal mass in this layer in individual swales, such burdens were compared to those modelled by the proprietary StormTac Web model, which estimates annual loads of specific constituents for given land uses and is supported by an extensive database referenced to Swedish environmental conditions. The annual loads modelled for individual swales were multiplied by the swale age to obtain long–term inputs of the trace metals. A good agreement between the measured and modelled loads in soils was obtained and characterized by the ratio Lmod/Lmeas, with an average value of 0.96 and standard deviation of 0.55. Such results suggest the feasibility of assessing the long–term performance of grass swales by modelling trace metal (Cu, Pb, Zn) inputs into swales, estimating the metal loads retained in soils by sampling and analyses, and taking the difference (Lin − Lret) as the exported load.

  • 16.
    Okwori, Emmanuel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Performance assessment of Swedish sewer pipe networks using pipe blockage and other associated performance indicators2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sewer networks are expected to operate with minimal or no interruptions. The complex nature of randomly occurring failures in sewer networks arising from blockages significantly adds to the cost of operation and maintenance. Blockages are significant due to sewage backup or basements flooding, resulting from their occurrence. Continuous performance assessment of sewer pipe networks is necessary to ensure a required level of service at an acceptable cost. This study provides insight into the performance of the sewer pipe networks by assessing the proneness of the network to blockages and drawing inferences at a holistic strategic level of influential explanatory factors of blockage proneness, using data available in the VASS statistics database managed by Swedish Water and Wastewater Association. Results indicate that medium sized municipalities are prone to at least 30% more blockages per km per year compared to other municipalities. A hypothesis of explanatory factors includes, reduced flow volumes and design flow depth resulting in flow velocities below self-cleaning velocity in sewer pipe networks encouraging the sluggishness of flow and increased possibility for sediment deposition and accumulation in sewer leading to blockages. This is also exacerbated by the deposition of non-disposables (wet wipes, baby diapers, hard paper etc.), accumulation of FOGs in sewers and increased water conservation measures. Blockages also show a trend indicating occurrence may have a constant return frequency in medium – less than small sized municipalities.

  • 17.
    Gavric, Snezana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Leonhardt, Günther
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Processes improving urban stormwater quality in grass swales and filter strips: A review of research findings2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 669, p. 431-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing interest in urban drainage green infrastructure brings attention to grass swales and filter strips (GS&GFS) and their role in stormwater management. While the understanding of the hydrology and hydraulics of these stormwater control measures is adequate for current needs, there are knowledge gaps in understanding the water quality processes in GS&GFS and such a finding motivated preparation of the review paper that follows. The review revealed that most of the empirical studies of GS&GFS flow quality focused on the removal of pollutants associated with road runoff, and particularly solids, with relatively few studies addressing nutrients, traffic associated hydrocarbons, oxygen demanding substances, chloride, and faecal indicator bacteria. The reported results suffer from limitations caused by experimental conditions often representing a steady flow used to irrigate GS&GFS and generate runoff, non-submerged flows, no lateral inflows along swale side slopes, constant dosing of solids, emphasis on larger-than-typical solids, incomplete descriptions of experimental conditions, and limited attention to experimental uncertainties. Besides settling, other treatment processes, like adsorption/desorption, plant uptake, chemical precipitation and microbial degradation are often acknowledged, but without attempting to quantify their effects on flow quality. The modelling of GS&GFS flow quality would be beneficial for an improved understanding of green urban drainage infrastructure, but currently it is infeasible without a better knowledge of stormwater quality processes in GS&GFS facilities.

  • 18.
    Søberg, Laila
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Reduction of Escherichia coliEnterococcus faecalisand Pseudomonas aeruginosa in stormwater bioretention: Effect of drying, temperature and submerged zone2019In: Journal of Hydrology X, ISSN 2589-9155, Vol. 3, article id 100025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of drying and temperature on the reduction of Escherichia coliEnterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in stormwater bioretention systems with and without a submerged zone was assessed using 16 pilot-scale bioretention columns under controlled laboratory conditions. The experimental design enabled analysis of possible interactions between the factors. First outflow and event-based samples were collected. Outflow concentrations were independent of inflow concentrations and hence controlled by internal processes. Overall TSS removal was high but sensitive to bacterial synthesis. Event-based samples had significantly higher bacteria concentrations than first outflow samples, suggesting that remaining/surviving bacteria in the bioretention cells have little effect on initial peak outflow concentrations. The effect of temperature varied between bacterial species and sample types. Long dry periods seemed beneficial for bacteria reduction, but outflow bacteria concentrations peaked during the second watering after long dry periods. Submerged zones significantly reduced bacteria outflow concentrations. However, sudden temperature increases caused bioretention cells with a submerged zone to produce significantly higher bacteria outflow concentrations than before the temperature increase, which was not the case for standard cells. Bioretention cells with submerged zones may thus be poor choices for reducing bacterial concentrations in stormwater runoff in areas experiencing winter conditions. Finally, our results suggest that adsorption (e.g. further enhanced by biofilm formation) is the major mechanism governing bacteria reduction in bioretention systems.

  • 19.
    Broekhuizen, Ico
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Leonhardt, Günther
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Selection of Calibration Events for Modelling Green Urban Drainage2019In: New Trends in Urban Drainage Modelling: UDM 2018 / [ed] Giorgio Mannina, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 608-613Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban drainage models are often calibrated using a limited number of rainfall-runoff events, which may be selected in different ways from a longer observation series. This paper compares 13 different single- and two-stage strategies for selecting events used to calibrate a SWMM model of a predominantly green urban area. Most led to successful calibration, but performance varied for various validation events. Most selection strategies were insensitive to the choice of Nash-Sutcliffe Model Efficiency or Root Mean Squared Error as the objective function. Calibrating impervious and green area parameters separately in two-stage strategies can help improve prediction of low-flow events in validation.

  • 20.
    Pericault, Youen
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Shallow co-location of water, sewer and district heating pipes: Applicability in cold climate regions2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Al-Madhlom, Qais
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering. University of Babylon, Babylon, Iraq.
    Hamza, B.
    University of Babylon, Babylon, Iraq.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Laue, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hussain, Hussain M.
    Kufa University, Kufa, Iraq.
    Site Selection Criteria of UTES Systems in Hot Climate2019In: Proceedings of the XVII ECSMGE-2019: Geotechnical Engineering foundation of the future, Iceland: The Icelandic Geotechnical Society (IGS) , 2019, Vol. 1, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Underground Thermal Energy Storage UTES systems are widely used around the world. The reason is that UTES is essential in utilizing Renewable Energy sources (RE). The efficiency of the energy system relies strongly on the efficiency of the storage system. Therefore, in the installation of a hyper-energy system, a lot of attention is to be paid in improving the storage system. In order to design an efficient storage system, firstly, standard criteria are to be investigated. These explain the process of making high efficiency storage system that must be specified. The criteria, mainly, depends on: best type and best location. These two variables are in high interference with each other. The bond between the two variables is represented by the geological, hydrological, meteorological, soil, hydrogeological properties/factors of the site. These factors are specified by geo-energy mapping. Despite the importance of this type of mapping, there is no specific criteria/formula that defines the choice. This paper aims to: give a brief literature review for UTES systems (types, classification, advantages/disadvantages for each type, and examples of an installed system). In addition, some factors within geo-energy mapping are highlighted and standard criteria to achieve good storage system are suggested. The suggested criterion comprises a process to transfer the quantity values to quality values according to the expert opinion. The suggested criteria are defined through the following stages: selecting the best type of UTES systems according to hydro-geological in site conditions; using the analytical hierarchy process to rank the best location to install the storage system and then using ArcMap (GIS-Software) to provide representative results as maps. Karbala Province (Iraq) is the study area used here

  • 22.
    Al-Madhlom, Qais
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering. College of Engineering/Al-Musaib, University of Babylon, Hillah, Iraq.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Laue, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hussain, Hussain Musa
    Remote Sensing Center, University of Kufa, Kufa, Iraq.
    Site Selection of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems in Shallow Groundwater Conditions2019In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 1393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Underground thermal energy storage (UTES) systems are widely used around the world, due to their relations to heating ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) applications [1]. To achieve the required objectives of these systems, the best design of these systems should be accessed first. The process of determining the best design for any UTES system has two stages, the type selection stage and the site selection stage. In the type selection stage, the best sort of UTES system is determined. There are six kinds of UTES systems, they are: boreholes, aquifer, bit, tank, tubes in clay, and cavern [2–5]. The selection of a particular type depends on three groups of parameters. They are: Site specific, design, and operation parameters (Figure 1). Apart from site specific parameters, the other two types can be changed through the life time of the system. The site specific parameters, e.g., geological, hydrogeological, and metrological, cannot be changed during the service period of the  ystem. Therefore, the design of the best type should depend, at first consideration, on site specific parameters.

  • 23.
    Herrmann, Inga
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Larsson, Charlotta
    Wilen, Britt-
    Slambildning och mikrobiell sammansättning av biofilm i infiltrationsanläggningar2019Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Panasiuk, Oleksandr
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Ashley, Richard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    The feasibility of using flap gates as constriction flow meters for estimating sanitary sewer overflows (SSO)2019In: Desalination and Water Treatment, ISSN 1944-3994, E-ISSN 1944-3986, Vol. 155, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased awareness of the negative effects of sanitary sewer overflow (SSO) events on human health and aquatic life led to the development of various control measures, of which implementation is impeded by the lack of information on SSO occurrences, flows and volumes. The collection of such information requires data acquisition systems, which can be costly and are fully utilized just during limited time periods of the year. In search for inexpensive approaches to SSO monitoring, the feasibility of using existing flap gate installations, serving for prevention of back-up flows into sewers, as constriction flow meters was investigated, with promising results. An experimental pilotscale setup was designed to allow steady water flow through a flap gate built into a partition wall between two chambers. The stabilized water heads in the chambers and the flow rate through the flap gate were measured, for both dry and submerged flap gate conditions, and five flap gate sizes (200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 mm), with relatively heavy covers (6–102 kg). The measured data were used to develop flow rating curves, by non-linear regression, in the form Q = f (ΔH), where Q is the discharge through the flap gate and ΔH is the pressure differential upstream and downstream of the gate. The regression curves fitted the experimental data with high precision (R2 >0.99). The use of flow rating curves for estimation of the SSO volume was discussed. This study demonstrated that the water head measurements upstream and downstream of the flap gate can provide a reliable, accurate and inexpensive method for quantification of the SSO discharges and volumes.

  • 25.
    Broekhuizen, Ico
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Rujner, Hendrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Roldin, Maria
    DHI Sweden.
    Leonhardt, Günther
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Towards using soil water content observations for calibration of distributed urban drainage models2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fully distributed urban drainage models can be used to analyse and predict the behaviour of green urban drainage infrastructure such as swales, but they need to be calibrated for specific study sites. Using only drainage outflow measurements may not provide enough information to do this in an optimal way, so additional types of measurements have to be considered. This study identifies different approaches to including soil water content (SWC) observations in the calibration process and investigates how they affect parameter identifiability and the predictive uncertainty of the calibrated model. This is done using the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation methodology applied to a model of a large urban swale. It was found that setting initial conditions based on the SWC measurements improved the fit between observed and simulated SWC, but also reduced the accuracy of the simulated amount of infiltration. Including SWC observations allowed to identify one parameter (saturated moisture content of the swale bottom) that was not identifiable from outflow measurements alone. Including SWC observations in the derivation of predictive uncertainty bounds made those bounds narrower (more precise), but where SWC had been used to set initial conditions the uncertainty bound failed to capture the observations. It is concluded that SWC observations can provide useful information for the calibration of distributed urban drainage models.

  • 26.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nordqvist, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Herrmann, Inga
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Treatment of road runoff by coagulation/flocculation and sedimentation2019In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, E-ISSN 1996-9732, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 518-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A laboratory investigation of the treatment potential of a coagulation process in the context of stormwater treatment was undertaken. The initial 25 L road runoff generated from four rain events was collected and subjected to a jar-testing regime with two commercial coagulants. The treatment effect was assessed by analysing the runoff before and after treatment for turbidity, suspended solids and metal content. The coagulation process resulted in particle and total metal reduction of more than 90% compared to 40% for only sedimentation. Up to 40% reduction of dissolved Cr, Cu and Pb was also observed compared to 0% for sedimentation. This study shows that coagulation may be a useful process for stormwater treatment systems when the treatment requirements are high.

  • 27.
    Broekhuizen, Ico
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Uncertainties in rainfall-runoff modelling of green urban drainage systems: Measurements, data selection and model structure2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Green urban drainage systems are used to avoid flooding and damages to people and property, while limiting the downstream flooding and water quality problems caused by pipe-based drainage systems. Computer models are used to analyse and predict the performance of such systems for design and operation purposes. Such models are simplifications of reality and based on uncertain measured data, so uncertainties will be involved in the modelling process and its outcomes, which can affect the design and operation of these systems. These uncertainties have been investigated extensively for traditional pipe-based urban drainage systems, but not yet for green alternatives. Therefore, the overall objective of this thesis is to contribute to improved applicability and reliability of computer models of green urban drainage systems. Specifically, the thesis aims to (1) improve understanding of the uncertainties arising from (a) model structure and (b) calibration data selection, (2) evaluate two alternative calibration methods for green urban drainage models, (3) discuss desirable structural features in urban drainage models, and (4) evaluate several sensors for hydrometeorological measurements in urban catchments.

    The effects of model structure uncertainty were investigated using long-term simulations of synthetic catchments with varying soil types and depths for three different models. First, it was found that surface runoff could be a significant part of the annual water balance in all three models, depending on the soil type and depth considered. Second, differences were found in how sensitive the different models were to changes in soil type and depth. Third, the variation between different models was often large compared to the variation between different soil types. Fourth, the magnitude of inter-annual and inter-event variation varied between the models. Overall, the findings indicate that significant differences may occur in urban drainage modelling studies, depending on which model is used, and this may affect the design or operation of such systems.

    The uncertainty from calibration data selection was investigated primarily by calibrating both a low- and high-resolution stormwater model using different sets of events. These event sets used different rainfall-runoff statistics to rank all observed events before selecting the top six for use in calibration. In addition, they varied by either calibrating all parameters simultaneously, or by calibrating parameters for impervious and pervious surfaces separately. This last approach sped up the calibration process. In the validation period the high-resolution models performed better than their low-resolution counterparts and the two-stage calibrations matched runoff volume and peak flows better than single-stage calibrations. Overall, the way in which the calibration events are selected was shown to have a major impact on the performance of the calibrated model.

    Calibration data selection was also investigated by examining different ways of including soil water content (SWC) observations in the calibration process of a model of a swale. Some model parameters could be identified from SWC, but not from outflow observations. Including SWC in the model evaluation affected the precision of swale outflow predictions. Different ways of setting initial conditions in the model (observations or an equilibrium condition) affected both of these findings.

    The precipitation sensors used in this thesis showed generally satisfactory performance in field calibration checks. Different types of precipitation sensors were associated with different requirements for maintenance and data acquisition. Sensors for sewer pipe flow rates showed good agreement with a reference instrument in the laboratory, as long as installation conditions were good. Higher pipe slopes and upstream obstacles lead to larger measurement errors, but this last effect was reduced by increasing water levels in the pipe. Sensor fouling was a source of errors and gaps in field measurements, showing that regular maintenance is required. The findings show that the evaluated flow sensors can perform satisfactorily, if measurement sites are carefully selected.

  • 28.
    Garmabaki, Amir Soleimani
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Marklund, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Thaduri, Adithya
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Underground pipelines and railway infrastructure: failure consequences and restrictions2019In: Structure and Infrastructure Engineering, ISSN 1573-2479, E-ISSN 1744-8980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Underground pipelines are an essential part of the transportation infrastructure. The structural deterioration of pipelines crossing railways and their subsequent failures can entail critical consequences for society and industry, resulting in direct and indirect costs for all the stakeholders involved. Therefore, continuous and accurate condition assessment is critical for the effective management and maintenance of pipeline networks within the transportation infrastructure. The aim of this study has been to identify failure modes and consequences related to pipelines crossing railway corridors. Expert opinions have been collected through interviews and two sets of questionnaires have been distributed to the 291 municipalities in Sweden, with 137 responses in total. The failure analysis has revealed that pipe deformation has the highest impact, followed by pipe rupture at locations where pipelines cross railway infrastructure. For underground pipelines under railway infrastructure, ageing and the external load were awarded a higher ranking than other potential causes of pipeline failure.

  • 29.
    Garmabaki, Amir Soleimani
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Marklund, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Thaduri, Adithya
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Kumar, Uday
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Underground pipelines and railway infrastructure: failure consequences and restrictions2019In: Structure and Infrastructure Engineering, ISSN 1573-2479, E-ISSN 1744-8980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Underground pipelines are an essential part of the transportation infrastructure. The structural deterioration of pipelines crossing railways and their subsequent failures can entail critical consequences for society and industry, resulting in direct and indirect costs for all the stakeholders involved. Therefore, continuous and accurate condition assessment is critical for the effective management and maintenance of pipeline networks within the transportation infrastructure. The aim of this study has been to identify failure modes and consequences related to pipelines crossing railway corridors. Expert opinions have been collected through interviews and two sets of questionnaires have been distributed to the 291 municipalities in Sweden, with 137 responses in total. The failure analysis has revealed that pipe deformation has the highest impact, followed by pipe rupture at locations where pipelines cross railway infrastructure. For underground pipelines under railway infrastructure, ageing and the external load were awarded a higher ranking than other potential causes of pipeline failure.

    Authors gratefully acknowledge the funding provided by Sweden’sinnovation agency, Vinnova, through the strategic innovation programmeInfraSweden2030. The funding was granted in a competitiveapplication process that assessed replies to an open call for proposalsconcerning “Condition Assessment and Maintenance of TransportInfrastructure (Grant No. 2016-033113)”.

    Authors gratefully acknowledge the technical support and collaboration(In-kind support) of Arrsleff R€orteknik at Sweden, Luleå RailwayResearch Center (JVTC), Stormwater&Sewers and the SwedishTransport Administration (Trafikverket). In addition, the authors arethankful to the anonymous referees for their constructive commentsand Dr Matthias Asplund and Dr Masoud Naseri for their support andsuggestions.

  • 30.
    Müller, Alexandra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Urban Surfaces as Sources of Stormwater Pollution: An Evaluation of Substances Released from Building Envelopes2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Panasiuk, Oleksandr
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Langeveld, Jeroen
    Department of Water Management, TU Delft. Partners4UrbanWater, The Netherlands.
    de Haan, Cornelis
    Partners4UrbanWater, The Netherlands.
    Liefting, Erik
    Partners4UrbanWater, The Netherlands.
    Schilperoort, Remy
    Partners4UrbanWater, The Netherlands.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) for Locating and Characterising Infiltration and Inflow into Foul Sewers before, during and after Snowmelt Period2019In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infiltration and inflow (I/I) into sewers cause negative effects on the sewer system,wastewater treatment plant and environment. Identifying the causes and locating the inflows isnecessary in order to address the I/I problem. This paper focuses on using distributed temperaturesensing (DTS) for identifying, locating and characterising I/I into a sewer system during the endof winter–beginning of summer transition period under dry and wet weather conditions. Duringsnowmelt, several locations with I/I were identified, while these locations did not show I/I duringstorm events after the snowmelt. In addition, during a very heavy storm after the snowmelt period,I/I was found at other locations. Therefore, DTS was demonstrated to be effective in identifying thetype of I/I and in locating I/I. Finally, I/I monitoring campaigns in cold climates should take intoaccount the variety of pathways of I/I during snowmelt and during rainfall.

  • 32.
    McCarthy, David T.
    et al.
    Environmental and Public Health Microbiology Laboratory (EPHM Lab), Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University.
    Zhang, Kefeng
    Monash Infrastructure Research Institute, Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University.
    Westerlund, Camilla
    Water Coordinator, Water Authority-bottenvikens Water District Lulea.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc
    Univ Lyon, INSA Lyon.
    Fletcher, Tim D.
    School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Melbourne.
    Deletic, Ana
    Monash Infrastructure Research Institute, Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University.
    Assessment of sampling strategies for estimation of site mean concentrations of stormwater pollutants2018In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 129, p. 297-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The estimation of stormwater pollutant concentrations is a primary requirement of integrated urban water management. In order to determine effective sampling strategies for estimating pollutant concentrations, data from extensive field measurements at seven different catchments was used. At all sites, 1-min resolution continuous flow measurements, as well as flow-weighted samples, were taken and analysed for total suspend solids (TSS), total nitrogen (TN) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). For each of these parameters, the data was used to calculate the Event Mean Concentrations (EMCs) for each event. The measured Site Mean Concentrations (SMCs) were taken as the volume-weighted average of these EMCs for each parameter, at each site. 17 different sampling strategies, including random and fixed strategies were tested to estimate SMCs, which were compared with the measured SMCs. The ratios of estimated/measured SMCs were further analysed to determine the most effective sampling strategies. Results indicate that the random sampling strategies were the most promising method in reproducing SMCs for TSS and TN, while some fixed sampling strategies were better for estimating the SMC of E. coli. The differences in taking one, two or three random samples were small (up to 20% for TSS, and 10% for TN and E. coli), indicating that there is little benefit in investing in collection of more than one sample per event if attempting to estimate the SMC through monitoring of multiple events. It was estimated that an average of 27 events across the studied catchments are needed for characterising SMCs of TSS with a 90% confidence interval (CI) width of 1.0, followed by E.coli (average 12 events) and TN (average 11 events). The coefficient of variation of pollutant concentrations was linearly and significantly correlated to the 90% confidence interval ratio of the estimated/measured SMCs (R2 = 0.49; P < 0.01) as well as the number of events required to achieve certain accuracy, and hence could be a promising surrogate for determining the sampling frequency needed to accurately estimate SMCs of pollutants

  • 33.
    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Karlsson, Kristin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Closure to “Environmental Risk Assessment of Sediments Deposited in Stormwater Treatment Facilities: Trace Metal Fractionation and Its Implication for Sediment Management”2018In: Journal of environmental engineering, ISSN 0733-9372, E-ISSN 1943-7870, Vol. 144, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Pericault, Youen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Kärrman, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, 11894 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Data supporting the life cycle impact assessment and cost evaluation of technical alternatives for providing water and heating services to a suburban development in Gällivare Sweden2018In: Data in Brief, E-ISSN 2352-3409, Vol. 21, p. 1204-1208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article presents input data that were used in Pericault et al. (2018) for life cycle impact assessment and total cost assessment of five technical alternatives for heat and water services provision in a suburban development in Sweden. The data consists of a list of environmental impacts (cumulative exergy demand of energy carriers – CExDe, global warming potential – GWP, abiotic depletion potential of elements – ADPE), costs, amortisation periods, lifetimes and output flows of the system processes composing the alternatives. The data was derived from values collected in lifecycle databases, environmental product declarations, scientific publications and personal communications with companies.

  • 35.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water. Lillpite älvdals ekonomiska förening.
    Bergman, Gunnar
    Lillpite älvdals ekonomiska förening.
    Wiklund, Matz
    Lillpite älvdals ekonomiska förening.
    Development of the Lillpite River Valley after Dam Removal2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Lillpite River Valley stretches 45 km NV, from Piteå at the Gulf of Bothnia. The 619 km2 large catchment area comprises a dozen lakes. The average flow rate of the river is 6.24 m3/s. Lillpite Kraft AB, which owns the two power plants in the Lillpite River, has now applied for a demolition permit after 30 years of unprofitable operation. This demolition will take place in 2020, after which there are no obstacles to the fish's migration in the river. The Lillpite River was famous for its large salmon but also for its trout, grayling and lamprey. River crayfish and freshwater pearl mussel exist in the river, both upstream and downstream of the two dams, and in the brooks. There are even eel and pikeperch in the river, which also hosts beaver and otter. The Lillpite River Economic Association manages the compensation (~30M€ over 50 years) for the wind power intrusion in the area. This organisation is committed to make the river the fishing water it once was, as a driving force for the development of the river valley. At this seminar, we seek your help and advice based on knowledge and experience. How to determine the river status before and after dam removal? River erosion? Timeline after dam removal? Evaluation of ecology and biodiversity? How to improve conditions for fish, crustaceans and pearl mussel? How to meet sceptical locals? What should/could we do before the dam removal?

  • 36.
    Tondera, Katharina
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen.
    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Tournebize, Julien
    Hydrosystems and Bioprocessus Research Unit, Irstea—National Research Institute of Science and Technology for Environment and Agriculture, Antony.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Österlund, Helene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Andersson-Wikström, Alexandra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Tanner, Chris C.
    National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton.
    Emerging Contaminants: Occurrence, Treatment Efficiency and Accumulation Under Varying Flows2018In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 93-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging contaminants became a major topic in water treatment when laboratory detection methods for concentrations at a nanogram-scale improved approximately two decades ago. Research on using ecotechnologies to remove emerging contaminants in variable stormwater and wastewater flows has been conducted for more than a decade, but so far, not all removal mechanisms are well understood and only few setups have been investigated. This chapter summarises the current knowledge, focussing on pesticides and emerging contaminants listed on the watch list of the European Union. However, large-scale investigations are still rare and further research will have to be conducted in this field to enable practitioners to provide recommendations for design and maintenance of treatment facilities in the field of ecotechnologies.

  • 37.
    Pericault, Youen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Kärrman, Erik
    RISE Built Environment, Research Institutes of Sweden, Stockholm.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Expansion of Sewer, Water and District Heating Networks in Cold Climate Regions: an Integrated Sustainability Assessment2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 3743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents an integrated sustainability assessment of technical alternatives for water and heating services provision in suburban areas affected by a cold climate. Each alternative combines a drinking water supply, sewerage (gravity or low-pressure), pipe freeze protection (deep burial or shallow burial with heat tracing) and heating solution (district heating or geothermal heat pumps). An innovative freeze protection option was considered, in which low-temperature district heating (LTDH) is used to heat trace shallow sewer and water pipes. First, the performance of each alternative regarding seven sustainability criteria was evaluated on a projected residential area in Sweden using a systems analysis approach. A multi-criteria method was then applied to propose a sustainability ranking of the alternatives based on a set of weights obtained from local stakeholders. The alternative with a deep buried gravity sewer and geothermal heat pumps was found to have the highest sustainability score in the case study. In the sensitivity analysis, the integrated trench solution with a gravity sewer, innovative heat tracing and LTDH was found to potentially top the sustainability ranking if geothermal energy was used as the district heating source, or if the weight of the cost criterion increased from 24% to 64%. The study highlights the need for integrated decision-making between different utility providers as an integrated solution can represent sustainability gains.

  • 38.
    Rujner, Hendrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Green Urban Drainage Infrastructure: Hydrology and Modelling of Grass Swales2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The management of urban runoff has evolved along with the advancement of understanding of runoff environmental impacts. Besides the impacts on water quality in the receiving waters, the impacts on the urban hydrologic regime include reduced infiltration by the sealing of pervious land, reduced evapotranspiration by removal of vegetation, and the resulting increase of stormwater runoff peaks and volumes causing flooding, and ultimately degradation of receiving waters. In such considerations, urban stormwater management benefits from the implementation of Green Infrastructure which includes decentralized vegetative controls that capture and infiltrates rain where it falls and thus reduces and improves stormwater runoff. An example of small scale elements of Green Infrastructure are traditional grass swales. Through shallow depressions with mild side slopes grass swales collect and infiltrate stormwater from parking lots and roads, while runoff flows are attenuated and further conveyed depending on the hydraulic loading. Grass swales usually operate reliably and their maintenance needs are well understood. Their hydrological performance is, beside their dimensions and the contributing area, determined mainly by hydraulic and soil-related hydrological parameters that change with the intensity of the storm. Yet, because swales discharge to downstream drainage elements, either to the conventional sewer system or to other stormwater management facilities, the knowledge of the underlying inter-related processes and influential factors that govern the hydraulic and hydrological performance of grass swales is required.

    Against this background, this thesis is devoted to such questions as (i) what are the differences in the hydraulic and hydrological performance of the studied swales, (ii) how do soil characteristics, including the antecedent soil moisture, influence the swale water balance for various hydraulic loadings; and (iii) how can the related hydrological processes be simulated in high-resolution and reliably predicted using a grid-based, distributed model. For this purpose, full-scale studies were performed in three 30-m grass swale sections in Luleå, Northern Sweden, by collecting hydraulic and hydrological data based on routine storm events mimicking block-rainfall storm events of 2 months and 3 years recurrence. The resulting runoff and soil moisture data were used to calculate the swale water balance, to derive event hydrographs and to obtain calibration and validation data for model simulations. The experimental results showed that the relative swale flow volume reduction decreased with an increasing soil moisture and indicated the transition in dominating swale functions: at low initial SWC, runoff was highly attenuated (up to 74%), but for high SWC, the conveyance function dominated (with attenuation as low as 17%). Runoff flow peaks were reduced, proportionally to the volume reductions. Swale outflow hydrograph lag times varied between 5 to 15 minutes and decreased with increasing soil moisture. The swale wetness affected runoff formation, attenuation and subsequent outlet discharge and, for the short-duration events tested, only the top soil layer contributed to these findings. In the three swales tested, soils, initial soil water content, saturated hydraulic conductivity and topography varied spatially significantly. Double-ring infiltrometer measurements resulted in values of 1.78, 4.04 and 9.41 cm/hr (n=9) in the three swales tested and deviated from estimates from averages of spatially integrated infiltration rates. However, with regard to spatial variability, only the topography, described as irregularities in the swale bottom slopes affected the swale runoff dissipation and conveyance in the early phase of the events. Together with estimates of the water stored in the top soil layer, 4-32% of runoff volumes from the mimicked 2-month storm were temporarily stored. The distributed model Mike SHE was found capable of simulating swale drainage processes, when properly calibrated. Close agreement (NSE>0.8) was found not only for the measured and simulated swale outlet hydrographs, but also for the changes of the soil moisture in the top soil layer, which shows rapid increase up to the saturated soil water content, but minor or no progression in depths of 0.2 m. The model output was little sensitive to the initial soil water content, especially for low inflow which resulted in larger residuals in simulated runoff peak flows and volumes. As in field measurements, spatial variability of the initial soil water content had no effect on the swale outflow, but the accuracy of the topographical representation. The thesis findings include several implications regarding effects of the assessed parameters in the application of the model for swale flow simulation and eventually the design of grass swales.

  • 39.
    Rujner, Hendrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Leonhardt, Günther
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    High-resolution modelling of the grass swale response to runoff inflows with Mike SHE2018In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 562, p. 411-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The feasibility of simulating the hydrological response of a grass swale to runoff inflows was examined using the hydrological model Mike SHE and the available input data from 12 irrigation events mimicking runoff from block rainfalls. The test swale channel had a trapezoidal cross-section, bottom slope of 1.5%, length of 30 m, and was built in loamy fine sand. The irrigation events consisted in releasing two equal constant inflows to the swale: a concentrated longitudinal flow at the upstream end and a distributed lateral inflow along the swale side slope adjacent to the contributing drainage area. The total inflows approximated runoff from two events with return periods of 2 months and 3 years, respectively, for durations of 30 min. Irrigation experiments were done for two states of the initial soil moisture, dry or wet antecedent moisture conditions (AMC). Mike SHE has been extensively used on catchments of various sizes, but rarely for small stormwater management facilities and their detailed topography investigated in this study. The latter application required high spatial and temporal resolutions, with computational cells of 0.2 × 0.2 m and time steps as short as 0.6 s to avoid computational instabilities. For dominant hydrological processes, the following computational options in Mike SHE were chosen: Soil infiltration – the van Genuchten equation, unsaturated zone flow – the one-dimensional Richards equation, and overland flow – the diffusive wave approximation of the St. Venant equations. For study purposes, the model was calibrated for single events representing one of four combinations of low and high inflows, and dry and wet AMC, and then applied to the remaining 11 events. This was complemented by calibration for two events, representing high inflow on wet AMC and low inflow in dry AMC. The goodness of fit was statistically assessed for observed and simulated peak flows, hydrograph volumes, Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiencies (NSE), and soil water content (SWC) in swale soil layers. The best fit (NSE > 0.8) was obtained for high inflows and wet AMC (i.e., when the primary swale function is flow conveyance); the least fit was noted for low inflows and dry AMC, when the primary swale function is flow attenuation. Furthermore, this observation indicates the overall importance of correct modelling of the soil infiltration. The effects of spatial variation of SWC on the swale discharge hydrograph could not be confirmed from simulation results, but high topographical accuracy was beneficial for reproducing well the locations of the observed water ponding. No significant increases in simulated SWC at 0.3 m or greater depths were noted, which agreed with field observations. Overall, the results indicated that Mike SHE was effective in process-oriented small-scale modelling of grass swale flow hydrographs.

  • 40.
    Mattsson, Jonathan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water. S-Group Solutions, Malmö.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Westerlund, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Dahl, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Ashley, Richard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Impacts on rural wastewater systems in subarctic regions due to changes in inputs from households2018In: Journal of cold regions engineering, ISSN 0887-381X, E-ISSN 1943-5495, Vol. 32, no 1, article id 04017019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of water-saving appliances and heat exchangers is becoming increasingly popular to decrease water consumption and recover energy from preheated water. However, such in-household changes can bring particular implications for subarctic rural areas, in terms of solids deposition in sewers and drops in performance of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), because these are already experiencing diminishing wastewater flows due to depopulation and seasonal dips in wastewater temperature resulting from infiltration into sewers. Hence, this study has considered two communities in Sweden, postulating three different cases with various scales of retrofitting and usage. The results indicate that the decrease in in-pipe velocities when all households are retrofitted with water-saving appliances could be counteracted by sewer relining, but not by the inclusion of a conventional estimate of infiltration. However, for the case in which retrofitting was combined with decreased usage of the appliances, the decrease in self-cleansing capacity could not be counteracted. The retrofitting of heat exchangers under shower trays in all households did not have a significant effect on treatment processes at the WWTP.

  • 41.
    Tondera, Katharina
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen.
    Tanner, Chris C.
    National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton.
    Chazarenc, Florent
    Department of Energy Systems and Environment, Institut Mines Telecom Atlantique, Nantes cedex 3.
    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Introduction2018In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 1-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Tondera, Katharina
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany; Stormwater Research Group, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore, Australia.
    Tanner, Chris C.
    National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton, New Zealand.
    Chazarenc, Florent
    Department of Energy Systems and Environment, Institut Mines Telecom Atlantique, Nantes cedex 3, France.
    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Introduction2018In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 1-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The occurrence of variable stormwater and wastewater flows, mostly precipitation driven, brings with them the challenge of both peak flows and pollutant loads. Wastewater treatment systems can be divided into those that are specifically designed and operated to deal with variable flows, and those that presume more steady-state operation, only coping with peak flows as anomalies for short periods of time. To date, the different types and scales of variability and the impact of this variability on functioning and treatment performance have neither been well characterised nor properly dealt with for the design of suitable treatment systems. In this book, ecotechnologies are defined as processes for the treatment of variable wastewater flows that

    • harness ecological processes involving microbes, plants, animals, natural soils and media or recycled materials;

    • have a low reliance on mechanical machinery or external energy sources; and

    • have a positive impact on the quality and biodiversity of the surrounding environment.

    This book focuses on treatment systems compliant with these definitions, but which are also specifically designed for variable flows.

  • 43.
    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Tondera, Katharina
    Stormwater Research Group, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore.
    Österlund, Helene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Metals: Occurrence, Treatment Efficiency and Accumulation Under Varying Flows2018In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 75-91Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metals were the first priority pollutants to be widely investigated in stormwater. In solid phase, they are often attached to very fine particles. The dissolved fraction creates considerable environmental problems as it is the most bioavailable fraction. Hence, removal of both fine and dissolved particles plays a major role in the treatment of polluted runoff. Ecotechnologies specifically designed to remove metals should be able to address different treatment mechanisms. However, the exhaustion of sorption capacity reduces the lifespan of treatment facilities. Additionally, metal concentrations fluctuate extremely—spatially, seasonally and over time—which poses another challenge for further increasing removal efficiencies. While soil- or sand-based systems should be designed in a way that the filter material can be exchanged, newer developments such as Floating Treatment Wetlands show promising removal capacities as the installations bind metals in sludge sediments, which can be removed from time to time. The different treatment mechanisms, aforementioned developments and techniques as well as their removal capacities will be discussed in this chapter

  • 44.
    Stott, Rebecca
    et al.
    Aquatic Pollution Group, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton.
    Tondera, Katharina
    Stormwater Research Group, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore.
    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Schreiber, Christiane
    GeoHealth Centre, Institute for Hygiene & Public Health, University Hospital, University of Bonn.
    Microbial Loads and Removal Efficiency Under Varying Flows2018In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 57-74Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A variety of ecotechnologies have shown promising yet variable results in reducing faecal microbial contaminants under challenging operational conditions. But relatively limited work has been conducted to investigate and understand faecal microbe removal in these systems under highly fluctuating hydraulic and contaminant loading. In most instances, ecotechnology-based systems such as sedimentation ponds, constructed wetlands and bioretention filters have proved effective for treating episodic discharges and demonstrated performance resilience removing faecal microbial contaminants with modest to good efficiency particularly where inflow concentrations are high. However, microbial removal may depend greatly on the type of microorganism, treatment system design and operational factors. Design characteristics such as type of filter material and depth, presence of a submerged zone, type of vegetation and operational conditions such as inflow concentration, and antecedent dry periods in combination with temperature changes can all affect the removal of faecal microbes. Factors influencing survival, fate and behaviour of retained faecal microbes are still poorly understood. These knowledge gaps need addressing in order to fully evaluate microbial removal from fluctuating contaminated flows and more accurately interpret faecal indicator bacteria-based water quality and potential health risks associated with discharge from these ecotechnology-based systems

  • 45.
    Herrmann, Inga
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Wilen, Britt-Marie
    Chalmers.
    Larsson, Charlotta
    Kungsbacka kommun.
    Forsberg, Bodil
    Kungsbacka kommun.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Microorganisms in sand filters for on-site wastewater treatment2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Moghadas, Shahab
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Leonhardt, Günther
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Modeling Urban Runoff from Rain-on-Snow Events with the U.S. EPA SWMM Model for Current and Future Climate Scenarios2018In: Journal of cold regions engineering, ISSN 0887-381X, E-ISSN 1943-5495, Vol. 32, no 1, article id 04017021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A methodological study of modeling runoff from rain-on-snow events was conducted using the northern Swedish city of Kiruna as a test case, with respect to physiographic, drainage system, and the current and projected future climate data. Runoff simulations were carried out with the PCSWMM, which is a geographic information system (GIS) supported version of the U.S. EPA Storm Water Management Model (U.S. EPA SWMM5) developed by Computational Hydraulics International (CHI). In total, 177 simulations were run covering four scenario categories: eight rain events, three climates (the current and two projected), three soil infiltration rates, and five snow water equivalent (SWE) values. Simulation results were analyzed with respect to influential rainfall/snowmelt/runoff factors and the noted differences were statistically tested for significance. Result analysis revealed new findings concerning the differences between runoff generated by rain-on-snow and summer thunderstorm events. In particular, it was noted that a relatively frequent rain-on-snow event, with a return period of 1.4 year, caused fewer flooded nodes and surcharged pipes in the catchment sewer system, but almost five times greater runoff volume, when compared to the same drainage system performance indicators corresponding to a 10-year event occurring in the summer. Depending on the physical characteristics of the snow cover, among which the depth appears the most important, rainwater and snowmelt may be retained in, or released from, the snowpack, which acts as a dynamic reservoir controlling the generation and release of runoff. Smaller snow depths produce smaller volumes of melt, smaller storage capacity and less effective insulation of soils, which may freeze to greater depths and become practically impervious, until the process of soil thawing has been completed. The impacts of climate change in the study area, described by increases in precipitation and air temperatures, are likely to cause more frequent runoff problems attributed to the future rain-on-snow events. Even though the runoff tendencies reported here reflect the characteristics of the study area and climate, they suggest the need to consider rain-on-snow events in sewer design and storm water management in regions with seasonal snow covers, certainly with respect to runoff volumes.

  • 47.
    Tondera, Katharina
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen.
    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Tournebize, Julien
    Hydrosystems and Bioprocessus Research Unit, Irstea—National Research Institute of Science and Technology for Environment and Agriculture, Antony.
    Mander, Ülo
    Department of Geography, University of Tartu.
    Tanner, Chris C.
    National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton.
    Nutrient Removal from Variable Stormwater Flows2018In: Ecotechnologies for the Treatment of Variable Stormwater and Wastewater Flows / [ed] Katharina Tondera, Godecke-Tobias Blecken, Florent Chazarenc, Chris C. Tanner, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 31-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When nutrient loads are discharged into surface waters with variable stormwater and wastewater flows, surface water pollution is impaired. Nutrients can lead to oxygen depletion and eutrophication of surface waters, including excessive plant and algae growth. Popular examples of structures harmed by excessive nutrient inflow are the Baltic Sea or the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. Hence, removing nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus compounds, is a major target when variable flows should be treated. This chapter gives an overview of the available removal mechanisms and the potential efficiencies of different treatment facilities. While particle-bound nutrients can be removed via sedimentation processes, dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus compounds cannot as they differ in their biochemical degradation: the adsorption capacity for nitrogen compounds is often renewable, whereas the uptake of phosphorus compounds is limited over time. Hence, treatment facilities need to be able to address the different requirements.

  • 48.
    Vidal, Brenda
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    On-site sanitation systems - An integrated assessment of treatment efficiency and sustainability2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Small on-site sanitation systems for wastewater collection and treatment are prevalent in suburban and rural areas in many countries. However, these systems often underperform, causing potential impact to the receiving waters and increasing the risks to public health, thus hindering the overall sustainability of the systems. Understanding the different sustainability dimensions and trade-offs between assessment indicators can support the planning of sustainable on-site sanitation systems for a specific context. The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate the sustainability and function of on-site sanitation systems by defining a set of indicators to assess on-site sanitation options and estimating them for different scenarios, and by investigating the treatment efficiency of on-site facilities for domestic wastewater treatment in a field study. Particular attention was given to the removal of phosphorus (P) and indicator bacteria due to their relevance in terms of eutrophication risk and public-health concern.

    In a multi-criteria approach, twelve indicators were defined to assess nine on-site sanitation systems. A reference group representing stakeholders’ views assigned weights to express the relative importance of each indicator. The reference group assigned the highest weights to the indicators robustness, risk of pathogen discharge and nutrient removal. Assessing the robustness proved to be challenging, as there is a gap between how the sanitation systems are expected to perform based on their design, and how they actually perform in practice, mainly due to incorrect construction, operation and maintenance. The discriminating power of the indicators was calculated using the entropy method, which showed that the indicators energy recovery and capital cost had little impact in the final ranking of the alternatives. A sustainability ranking was obtained by using the method ELECTRE III. A scenario analysis based on different settings of interest based on socio-economic and geographical factors was done to evaluate the changes in the ranking of alternatives. Overall, the greywater–blackwater separation system ranked the highest in the baseline scenario and when nutrient-related indicators were important (Scenario 2), together with the urine diversion system. The sand filter and drain field were the most sustainable options when nutrient removal and recycling was not important (Scenario 1), and (in combination with chemical P-removal) when the indicators related to energy and climate change had the highest weights (Scenario 3). In terms of P-removal, chemical removal outranked the alkaline P-filter.

    In a field study, the effluent wastewater from twelve on-site wastewater treatment facilities with sand and alkaline P-filters was evaluated in terms of removal and discharge of organic content, total and dissolved phosphorus, and indicator bacteria (E. coli, total coliforms, intestinal enterococci and C.perfringens). The results showed that the investigated sand filters generally had low P-removal capacity and sometimes exceeded the criteria for excellent water quality set by the EU bathing water directive with regard to intestinal enterococci and E. coli. Only one sand filter of eight was confirmed to remove P according to the Swedish guidelines for areas with non-sensitive receiving waters with a tot-P effluent concentration below 3 mg L−1. This indicates that a downstream treatment step is needed to meet the guidelines regarding P discharge concentrations. Alkaline P-filters generally removed P efficiently. Despite high effluent pH, the collected data did not generally confirm a further reduction of the bacterial content of the wastewater in the P-filters, as had been previously hypothesized. However, effluent concentrations of indicator bacteria showed moderate positive correlations with effluent concentrations of P and organic matter, indicating the potential of the P-filters to serve as a polishing step also for bacteria.

  • 49.
    Vidal, Brenda
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Herrmann, Inga
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Phosphorus reduction in filters for on-site wastewater treatment2018In: Journal of Water Process Engineering, ISSN 2214-7144, Vol. 22, p. 210-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discharges of phosphorus (P) from on-site wastewater treatment systems generally contribute to eutrophication problems in Swedish freshwaters and, ultimately, in the Baltic Sea. Such concerns have led to a growing interest in improving P removal in treatment facilities. This study investigated the reduction of P in 12 full-scale on-site treatment systems featuring sand filters and alkaline P-filters by sampling and analysing filter influents and effluents. The flow-proportional samples collected were analysed for total and dissolved P, BOD7, total and dissolved organic carbon (TOC and DOC), and pH. Seven of the eight investigated sand filters did not provide satisfactory total P reduction; the likely explanations are filter clogging and wastewater dilution by extraneous water. In addition, effluents from four of the eight sand filters had total P concentrations higher than 3 mg L−1, which is the Swedish effluent limit recommended for common receiving waters, indicating that a subsequent polishing step would be needed. Six of the nine investigated P-filters reduced P adequately, with total P concentrations in the effluent ranging between 0.1 and 1.9 mg L−1. The three underperforming P-filters had effluent pH values below 9; filter age, clogging, and hydraulic overload were identified as probable reasons for their poor performance. A statistically significant correlation was found between total-P reduction and filtrate pH, but no significant correlation was detected between organic load in the influent and P reduction by the P-filters. The P-filter media replacement frequency could not be established, but filtrate pH appeared to be a good estimator.

  • 50.
    Rujner, Hendrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Leonhardt, Günther
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marsalek, Jiri
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Perttu, Anna-Maria
    SENS Sustainable Energy Solutions, 12154 Nacka, Sweden.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    The effects of initial soil moisture conditions on swale flow hydrographs2018In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 644-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of soil water content (SWC) on the formation of run‐off in grass swales draining into astorm sewer system were studied in two 30‐m test swales with trapezoidal cross sections. Swale1 was built in a loamy fine‐sand soil, on a slope of 1.5%, and Swale 2 was built in a sandy loam soil,on a slope of 0.7%. In experimental runs, the swales were irrigated with 2 flow rates reproducing run‐off from block rainfalls with intensities approximately corresponding to 2‐month and 3‐year events. Run‐off experiments were conducted for initial SWC (SWCini) ranging from 0.18 to 0.43 m3/m3. For low SWCini, the run‐off volume was greatly reduced by up to 82%, but at highSWCini, the volume reduction was as low as 15%. The relative swale flow volume reductions decreased with increasing SWCini and, for the conditions studied, indicated a transition of the dominating swale functions from run‐off dissipation to conveyance. Run‐off flow peaks were reduced proportionally to the flow volume reductions, in the range from 4% to 55%. The swale outflow hydrograph lag times varied from 5 to 15 min, with the high values corresponding tolow SWCini. Analysis of swale inflow/outflow hydrographs for high SWCini allowed estimations of the saturated hydraulic conductivities as 3.27 and 4.84 cm/hr in Swales 1 and 2, respectively. Such estimates differed from averages (N = 9) of double‐ring infiltrometer measurements (9.41 and 1.78 cm/hr). Irregularities in swale bottom slopes created bottom surface depression storage of 0.35 and 0.61 m3 for Swales 1 and 2, respectively, and functioned similarly as check bermscontributing to run‐off attenuation. The experimental findings offer implications for drainage swale planning and design: (a) SWCini strongly affect swale functioning in run‐off dissipation and conveyance during the early phase of run‐off, which is particularly important for design storms and their antecedent moisture conditions, and (b) concerning the longevity of swale operation, Swale 1 remains fully functional even after almost 60 years of operation, as judged from its attractive appearance, good infiltration rates (3.27 cm/hr), and high flow capacity.