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  • 1.
    Andersson, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Ahonen-Jonnarth, Ulla
    Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Mattias
    Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Marsh, John Everett
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, lärande och teknik, Hälsa, medicin och rehabilitering. School of Psychology and Computer Science, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Bökman, Fredrik
    Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    What Influences People’s Tradeoff Decisions Between CO2 Emissions and Travel Time? An Experiment With Anchors and Normative Messages2021Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, artikkel-id 702398Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the today’s greatest challenges is to adjust our behavior so that we can avoid a major climate disaster. To do so, we must make sacrifices for the sake of the environment. The study reported here investigates how anchors (extrinsic motivational-free information) and normative messages (extrinsic motivational information) influence people’s tradeoffs between travel time and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the context of car travel and whether any interactions with environmental concern (an intrinsic motivational factor) can be observed. In this study, people received either a CO2, health or no normative message together with either a high anchor, a low anchor, or no anchor. People that received both a high anchor and a CO2 emission normative message were willing to travel for a longer time than those that only received a high anchor. If a low anchor was presented, no differences in willingness to travel for a longer time were found between the three different conditions of normative message groups, i.e., CO2 normative message, health normative message, or no normative message. People with higher concern for the environment were found to be willing to travel for a longer time than those with lower concern for the environment. Further, this effect was strongest when a high anchor was presented. These results suggest that anchors and normative messages are among the many factors that can influence people’s tradeoffs between CO2 emission and travel time, and that various factors may have to be combined to increase their influence over pro-environmental behavior and decisions.

  • 2.
    Bak, Thomas H
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh.
    Vega Mendoza, Mariana
    University of Edinburgh.
    Sorace, Antonella
    University of Edinburgh.
    Never too late? An advantage on tests of auditory attention extends to late bilinguals.2014Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 5, artikkel-id 485Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies, using predominantly visual tasks, indicate that early bilinguals tend to outperform monolinguals on attention tests. It remains less clear whether such advantages extend to those bilinguals who have acquired their second language later in life. We examined this question in 38 monolingual and 60 bilingual university students. The bilingual group was further subdivided into early childhood (ECB), late childhood (LCB), and early adulthood bilinguals (EAB). The assessment consisted of five subtests from the clinically validated Test of Everyday Attention (TEA). Overall, bilinguals outperformed monolinguals on auditory attention tests, but not on visual search tasks. The latter observation suggests that the differences between bilinguals and monolinguals are specific and not due to a generally higher cognitive performance in bilinguals. Within the bilingual group, ECB showed a larger advantage on attention switching, LCB/EAB on selective attention. We conclude that the effects of bilingualism extend into the auditory domain and are not confined to childhood bilinguals, although their scope might be slightly different in early and late bilinguals.

  • 3.
    Ciardo, F.
    et al.
    Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Genoa, Italy.
    Wykowska, Agnieszka
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik. Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Genoa, Italy.
    Response Coordination Emerges in Cooperative but Not Competitive Joint Task2018Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, artikkel-id 1919Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective social interactions rely on humans' ability to attune to others within social contexts. Recently, it has been proposed that the emergence of shared representations, as indexed by the Joint Simon effect (JSE), might result from interpersonal coordination (Malone et al., 2014). The present study aimed at examining interpersonal coordination in cooperative and competitive joint tasks. To this end, in two experiments we investigated response coordination, as reflected in instantaneous cross-correlation, when co-agents cooperate (Experiment 1) or compete against each other (Experiment 2). In both experiments, participants performed a go/no-go Simon task alone and together with another agent in two consecutive sessions. In line with previous studies, we found that social presence differently affected the JSE under cooperative and competitive instructions. Similarly, cooperation and competition were reflected in co-agents response coordination. For the cooperative session (Experiment 1), results showed higher percentage of interpersonal coordination for the joint condition, relative to when participants performed the task alone. No difference in the coordination of responses occurred between the individual and the joint conditions when co-agents were in competition (Experiment 2). Finally, results showed that interpersonal coordination between co-agents implies the emergence of the JSE. Taken together, our results suggest that shared representations seem to be a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for interpersonal coordination. 

  • 4.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Hansson, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Körning Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Different Features of Bilingualism in Relation to Executive Functioning2019Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, nr 269Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion that the long-term practice of managing two languages is beneficial for the executive control system is an ongoing debate. Criticism have been raised that studies demonstrating a bilingual advantage often suffer from small sample sizes, and do not control for fluid intelligence as a possible confound. Taking those suggested factors into account, focusing on older bilingual age groups and investigating the potential effects of linguistic distances, this study aimed to improve the interpretations of the bilinguals’ advantages. Measures of inhibition (Flanker, Stroop, Simon task) and switching (Number-letter, Color-Shape, Local-global task) were collected in participants in the ages 50-75 years (n = 193). Despite a large study sample, results did not support any beneficial effects related to improve processing costs in executive functioning. Sub-analyses of the two different language groups (Swedish – Finnish / Swedish – English) intended to investigate the effect of linguistic distances did not change this outcome. Future studies exploring the potential long-term term effects of bilingualism would benefit from identifying tests of cognitive control with greater ecological validity and include other measures of cognitive functioning. Language learning interventions may also be a promising tool for future research.

  • 5.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hansson, Patrik
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Pritschke, Ilona
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Körning Ljungberg, Jessica
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik. Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Complexity of Primary Lifetime Occupation and Cognitive Processing2019Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, artikkel-id 1861Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, there are a lack of studies focusing on the relationship between occupational complexity and executive functioning. This is noteworthy since executive functions are core aspects of cognitive processing. The present study was aimed to investigate if three occupational complexity factors (with data, people, and things) of main lifetime occupation were related to performance in executive tasks (inhibition, switching, updating). We analyzed cross-sectional data that were available for 225 participants aged 50–75 years. Results from structural equation models showed that higher complexity levels of working with data were related to lower error rates in the updating component of cognitive control. In addition, higher rates of complexity working with people was associated with lower error rates in task-switching, which also persisted after adjustment of fluid intelligence. Complexity with things, however, was not related to performance in the executive tasks. Future studies would benefit from a longitudinal design to investigate if the results from this study also hold in the long term and to further investigate the directionality between factors.

  • 6.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Körning Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Rönnlund, Michael
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Reading Habits Among Older Adults in Relation to Level and 15-Year Changes in Verbal Fluency and Episodic Recall2018Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, artikkel-id 1872Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this study was to investigate reading habits in older adults in relation to level and 15-year changes in verbal fluency and episodic recall. We examined a sample of 1157 participants (55 years at baseline) up to 15 years after the baseline assessment using latent growth curve modeling of cognitive measures with baseline reading frequency (books, weekly magazines) as a predictor of cognitive level (intercept) and rate of change (slope). Subgroup analyses were performed to investigate the role of an early adult g factor in the association between reading habits and cognitive ability in midlife. Frequent reading of books, but not of magazines, was associated with higher levels of verbal fluency and recall but unrelated to rate of longitudinal decline. Subgroup analyses indicated that the g factor in early adulthood predicted reading and cognitive level in midlife and this factor removed the current association between reading habits and level of cognitive ability (both cognitive factors). The results indicate an enduring relationship between book reading and level of cognitive ability across the adult life span and provide little support of the hypothesis that frequent reading protects against latelife cognitive decline. The extent to which book reading promotes cognitive functioning in childhood/youth remains to be demonstrated. Intervention studies may be useful in this regard.

  • 7.
    Hulaj, Rame
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    E. Sörman, Daniel
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik.
    Backlund, Christian
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik.
    Röhlcke, Sebastian
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Bert
    Department of Applied Educational Science, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    A Motivational Model Explaining Performance in Video Games2020Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 11, artikkel-id 1510Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Esports are a rapidly growing phenomenon and understanding of factors underlying game performance are therefore of great interest. The present study investigated the influence of satisfaction of basic psychological needs (competence, autonomy, and relatedness), type of motivation (amotivation, external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, integrated regulation, and intrinsic motivation), and number of matches played (time on task) on individuals’ performance on a matchmaking rating (MMR) in the video game Defence of the Ancients 2 (Dota 2). Collected data from 315 participants was included in the analyses. A web-based questionnaire was used to collect data and structural equation modelling (SEM) was performed to analyze the data. The results show that perceived competence and autonomy were the only significant predictors of MMR performance beyond matches played. Fulfillment of relatedness, as well as motivational factors, were not found to be predictors of MMR scores. The strong effect of matches played, used as proxy of time on task, emphasize the effect of time and practice as a critical aspect of video-game expertise.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Ledin, Kjell
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, lärande och teknik, Hälsa, medicin och rehabilitering.
    Bengtsson, Peter
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, lärande och teknik, Hälsa, medicin och rehabilitering.
    Ärlemalm, Tore
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, lärande och teknik, Hälsa, medicin och rehabilitering.
    What Do They Do? Construction of a Team Leader Intervention Model2021Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, artikkel-id 552521Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This research report aimed to present a team leader intervention model regarding when unexpected events arise in meetings. Onward, the model will form a starting point for the creation and validation of a team leader interventions inventory. Sixteen managers provided the empirical material for the construction of the model. The subjects proposed as many interventions as possible based on 10 different group meeting scenarios. In total, 327 interventions were proposed, which constituted the basis for a conceptual framework comprising six categories—Control, Inform, Initiate, Investigate, Support, and Avoid. Three of the categories correspond to classical leadership behaviours: the Control category to Authoritative Leadership and Task Behaviour and structure; the Support category to Democratic Leadership and Relationship Behaviour and consideration; and the Avoid category to Laissez-Faire Leadership, letting events pass without taking leadership. In addition, the conceptual framework includes three new categories in addition to the classical leadership theory. The Inform category is related to the controlling function. When the leader clarifies goals and how to achieve the goals, it is indirectly a controlling function. The Initiate category is related to launching procedural or distracting activities. Finally, the Investigate category is an almost necessary step ahead of the other categories. Before controlling, informing, initiating, supporting, or avoiding, the leader ought to investigate the causes of the disorder and then decide which intervention is most appropriate.

     

  • 9.
    Marsh, John E.
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Psychology, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden. School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom.
    Hansson, Patrik
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik. Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Executive Processes Underpin the Bilingual Advantage on Phonemic Fluency: Evidence From Analyses of Switching and Clustering2019Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, artikkel-id 1355Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Bilinguals often show a disadvantage in lexical access on verbal fluency tasks wherein the criteria require the production of words from semantic categories. However, the pattern is more heterogeneous for letter (phonemic) fluency wherein the task is to produce words beginning with a given letter. Here, bilinguals often outperform monolinguals. One explanation for this is that phonemic fluency, as compared with semantic fluency, is more greatly underpinned by executive processes and that bilinguals exhibit better performance on phonemic fluency due to better executive functions. In this study, we re-analyzed phonemic fluency data from the Betula study, scoring outputs according to two measures that purportedly reflect executive processes: clustering and switching. Consistent with the notion that bilinguals have superior executive processes and that these can be used to offset a bilingual disadvantage in verbal fluency, bilinguals (35-65 years at baseline) demonstrated greater switching and clustering throughout the 15-year study period.

  • 10.
    Rouchitsas, Alexandros
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik.
    Alm, Håkan
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik.
    External Human-Machine Interfaces for Autonomous Vehicle-to-Pedestrian Communication: A Review of Empirical Work2019Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, artikkel-id 2757Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction between drivers and pedestrians is often facilitated by informal communicative cues, like hand gestures, facial expressions, and eye contact. In the near future, however, when semi- and fully autonomous vehicles are introduced into the traffic system, drivers will gradually assume the role of mere passengers, who are casually engaged in non-driving-related activities and, therefore, unavailable to participate in traffic interaction. In this novel traffic environment, advanced communication interfaces will need to be developed that inform pedestrians of the current state and future behavior of an autonomous vehicle, in order to maximize safety and efficiency for all road users. The aim of the present review is to provide a comprehensive account of empirical work in the field of external human–machine interfaces for autonomous vehicle-to-pedestrian communication. In the great majority of covered studies, participants clearly benefited from the presence of a communication interface when interacting with an autonomous vehicle. Nevertheless, standardized interface evaluation procedures and optimal interface specifications are still lacking.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Corrigendum
  • 11.
    Socher, Michaela
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ellis, Rachel Jane
    Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Comparison of Expressive Spoken Language Skills in Children With Cochlear Implants and Children With Typical Hearing2020Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 11, artikkel-id 1405Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    When children start formal education, they are expected to be able to express complex thoughts. However, in order to do so, they need to be able to use both complex grammatical structures and a variety of words. One group that is at risk of having a delay in terms of their expressive language ability is children with cochlear implants (CI). In this study, we evaluated whether children with CI perform comparably to children with typical hearing (TH) on a standard expressive spoken grammar and a standard expressive spoken vocabulary task when the groups were matched on non-verbal intelligence and working memory capacity. It was found that the children with CI in this study performed more poorly on a standard expressive spoken vocabulary task but not on a standard expressive spoken grammar task when compared to the children with TH. Differences in terms of expressive spoken vocabulary do not seem to be explained by differences in cognitive ability. In addition, the variation in terms of expressive spoken language ability was larger in the children with CI compared to the children with TH. This might be explained by additional confounding factors, like the time of language deprivation or by a greater influence of cognitive differences for the acquisition of spoken language for children with CI.

  • 12.
    Socher, Michaela
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Ellis, Rachel
    Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gärskog, Malin
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hedström, Ingrid
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik.
    Pragmatic Language Skills: A Comparison of Children With Cochlear Implants and Children Without Hearing Loss2019Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, artikkel-id 2243Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Pragmatic language ability refers to the ability to use language in a social context. It has been found to be correlated with success in general education for deaf and hard of hearing children. It is therefore of great importance to study why deaf and hard of hearing children often perform more poorly than their hearing peers on tests measuring pragmatic language ability. In the current study the Pragmatics Profile questionnaire from the CELF-IV battery was used to measure pragmatic language ability in children using cochlear implants (N = 14) and children without a hearing loss (N = 34). No significant difference was found between the children with cochlear implants (CI) and the children without hearing loss (HL) for the sum score of the pragmatics language measure. However, 35.71% of the children with CI performed below age norm, while only 5.89% of the children without HL performed below age norm. In addition, when dividing the sum score into three sub-measures: Rituals and Conversational skills (RCS), Asking for, Giving, and Responding to Information (AGRI), and Nonverbal Communication skills (NCS), significant differences between the groups were found for the NCS measure and a tendency for a difference was found for the RCS measure. In addition, all three sub-measures (NCS, AGRI, RCS) were correlated to verbal fluency in the children with CI, but not the children without HL.

  • 13.
    Steg, Linda
    et al.
    Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Perlaviciute, Goda
    Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Sovacool, Benjamin K.
    Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Bonaiuto, Marino
    Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
    Diekmann, Andreas
    Department of Humanities, Social and Political Sciences, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Filippini, Massimo
    Department of Management, Technology, and Economics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Hindriks, Frank
    Faculty of Philosophy, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Jacobbson Bergstad, Cecilia
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Matthies, Ellen
    Institute of Psychology, Otto von Guericke Universität Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Samhällsvetenskap.
    Mulder, Machiel
    Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pahl, Sabina
    School of Psychology, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, United Kingdom.
    Roggenkamp, Martha
    Faculty of Law, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Schuitema, Geertje
    College of Business, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Stern, Paul C.
    Social and Environmental Research Institute, Greenfield, MA, United States.
    Tavoni, Massimo
    Department of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Thogersen, John
    Department of Management, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Woerdman, Edwin
    Faculty of Law, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    A Research Agenda to Better Understand the Human Dimensions of Energy Transitions2021Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, artikkel-id 672776Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) have a key role to play in understanding which factors and policies would motivate, encourage and enable different actors to adopt a wide range of sustainable energy behaviours and support the required system changes and policies. The SSH can provide critical insights into how consumers could be empowered to consistently engage in sustainable energy behaviour, support and adopt new technologies, and support policies and changes in energy systems. Furthermore, they can increase our understanding of how organisations such as private and public institutions, and groups and associations of people can play a key role in the sustainable energy transition. We identify key questions to be addressed that have been identified by the Platform for Energy Research in the Socio-economic Nexus (PERSON, see person.eu), including SSH scholars who have been studying energy issues for many years. We identify three main research themes. The first research theme involves understanding which factors encourage different actors to engage in sustainable energy behaviour. The second research theme focuses on understanding which interventions can be effective in encouraging sustainable energy behaviour of different actors, and which factors enhance their effects. The third research theme concerns understanding which factors affect public and policy support for energy policy and changes in energy systems, and how important public concerns can best be addressed as to reduce or prevent resistance.

  • 14.
    Threadgold, Emma
    et al.
    School of Psychology and Computer Science, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom.
    Marsh, John Everett
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik, konst och samhälle, Människa och teknik. School of Psychology and Computer Science, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom.
    Holmgren, Mattias
    Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems, and Sustainability Science, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Andersson, Hanna
    Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems, and Sustainability Science, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden; Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Nelson, Megan
    Department of Psychology, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
    Ball, Linden John
    School of Psychology and Computer Science, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom.
    Biased Estimates of Environmental Impact in the Negative Footprint Illusion: The Nature of Individual Variation2022Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, artikkel-id 648328Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    People consistently act in ways that harm the environment, even when believing their actions are environmentally friendly. A case in point is a biased judgment termed the negative footprint illusion, which arises when people believe that the addition of “eco-friendly” items (e.g., environmentally certified houses) to conventional items (e.g., standard houses), reduces the total carbon footprint of the whole item-set, whereas the carbon footprint is, in fact, increased because eco-friendly items still contribute to the overall carbon footprint. Previous research suggests this illusion is the manifestation of an “averaging-bias.” We present two studies that explore whether people’s susceptibility to the negative footprint illusion is associated with individual differences in: (i) environment-specific reasoning dispositions measured in terms of compensatory green beliefs and environmental concerns; or (ii) general analytic reasoning dispositions measured in terms of actively open-minded thinking, avoidance of impulsivity and reflective reasoning (indexed using the Cognitive Reflection Test; CRT). A negative footprint illusion was demonstrated when participants rated the carbon footprint of conventional buildings combined with eco-friendly buildings (Study 1 and 2) and conventional cars combined with eco-friendly cars (Study 2). However, the illusion was not identified in participants’ ratings of the carbon footprint of apples (Study 1 and 2). In Studies 1 and 2, environment-specific dispositions were found to be unrelated to the negative footprint illusion. Regarding reflective thinking dispositions, reduced susceptibility to the negative footprint illusion was only associated with actively open-minded thinking measured on a 7-item scale (Study 1) and 17-item scale (Study 2). Our findings provide partial support for the existence of a negative footprint illusion and reveal a role of individual variation in reflective reasoning dispositions in accounting for a limited element of differential susceptibility to this illusion.

  • 15.
    Visi, Federico
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik, medier och teater.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik, medier och teater.
    Ek, Robert
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för konst, kommunikation och lärande, Musik, medier och teater.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Hälsa, medicin och rehabilitering.
    Method Development for Multimodal Data Corpus Analysis of Expressive Instrumental Music Performance2020Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 11, nr 576751Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Musical performance is a multimodal experience, for performers and listeners alike. This paper reports on a pilot study which constitutes the first step toward a comprehensive approach to the experience of music as performed. We aim at bridging the gap between qualitative and quantitative approaches, by combining methods for data collection. The purpose is to build a data corpus containing multimodal measures linked to high-level subjective observations. This will allow for a systematic inclusion of the knowledge of music professionals in an analytic framework, which synthesizes methods across established research disciplines. We outline the methods we are currently developing for the creation of a multimodal data corpus dedicated to the analysis and exploration of instrumental music performance from the perspective of embodied music cognition. This will enable the study of the multiple facets of instrumental music performance in great detail, as well as lead to the development of music creation techniques that take advantage of the cross-modal relationships and higher-level qualities emerging from the analysis of this multi-layered, multimodal corpus. The results of the pilot project suggest that qualitative analysis through stimulated recall is an efficient method for generating higher-level understandings of musical performance. Furthermore, the results indicate several directions for further development, regarding observational movement analysis, and computational analysis of coarticulation, chunking, and movement qualities in musical performance. We argue that the development of methods for combining qualitative and quantitative data are required to fully understand expressive musical performance, especially in a broader scenario in which arts, humanities, and science are increasingly entangled. The future work in the project will therefore entail an increasingly multimodal analysis, aiming to become as holistic as is music in performance.

  • 16.
    Walton, Lois
    et al.
    Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Eriksson Domellöf, Magdalena
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen (ISMC), Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Domellöf, Erik
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Rönnqvist, Louise
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bäckström, David
    Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Stigsdotter Neely, Anna
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik. Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    The Effects of Working Memory Updating Training in Parkinson’s Disease: A Feasibility and Single-Subject Study on Cognition, Movement and Functional Brain Response2021Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 11, artikkel-id 587925Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Parkinson’s disease (PD), the fronto-striatal network is involved in motor and cognitive symptoms. Working memory (WM) updating training engages this network in healthy populations, as observed by improved cognitive performance and increased striatal BOLD signal. This two-part study aimed to assess the feasibility of WM updating training in PD and measure change in cognition, movement and functional brain response in one individual with PD after WM updating training. A feasibility and single-subject (FL) study were performed in which patients with PD completed computerized WM updating training. The outcome measures were the pre-post changes in criterion and transfer cognitive tests; cognitive complaints; psychological health; movement kinematics; and task-related BOLD signal. Participants in the feasibility study showed improvements on the criterion tests at post-test. FL displayed the largest improvements on the criterion tests and smaller improvements on transfer tests. Furthermore, FL reported improved cognitive performance in everyday life. A shorter onset latency and smoother upper-limb goal-directed movements were measured at post-test, as well as increased activation within the striatum and decreased activation throughout the fronto-parietal WM network. This two-part study demonstrated that WM updating training is feasible to complete for PD patients and that change occurred in FL at post-test in the domains of cognition, movement and functional brain response.

  • 17.
    Wass, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik.
    Anmyr, Lena
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Social Work in Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Östlund, Elisabet
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Predictors of Reading Comprehension in Children With Cochlear Implants2019Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, artikkel-id 2155Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with a profound hearing loss who have been implanted with cochlear implants (CI), vary in terms of their language and reading skills. Some of these children have strong language skills and are proficient readers whereas others struggle with language and both the decoding and comprehension aspects of reading. Reading comprehension is dependent on a number of skills where decoding, spoken language comprehension and receptive vocabulary have been found to be the strongest predictors of performance. Children with CI have generally been found to perform more poorly than typically hearing peers on most predictors of reading comprehension including word decoding, vocabulary and spoken language comprehension, as well as working memory. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationships between reading comprehension and a number of predictor variables in a sample of twenty-nine 11–12-year-old children with profound hearing loss, fitted with CI. We were particularly interested in the extent to which reading comprehension in children with CI at this age is dependent on decoding and receptive vocabulary. The predictor variables that we set out to study were word decoding, receptive vocabulary, phonological skills, and working memory. A second purpose was to explore the relationships between reading comprehension and demographic factors, i.e., parental education, speech perception and age of implantation. The results from these 29 children indicate that receptive vocabulary is the most influential predictor of reading comprehension in this group of children although phonological decoding is, of course, fundamental.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Wass, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Människa och teknik.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    Department of Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Anmyr, Lena
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden. Department of Social Work in Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Östlund, Eva
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Correlates of Orthographic Learning in Swedish Children With Cochlear Implants2019Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, artikkel-id 143Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study set out to explore the cognitive and linguistic correlates of orthographic learning in a group of 32 deaf and hard of hearing children with cochlear implants, to better understand the factors that affect the development of fluent reading in these children. To date, the research about the mechanisms of reading fluency and orthographic learning in this population is scarce. The children were between 6:0 and 10:11 years of age and used oral language as their primary mode of communication. They were assessed on orthographic learning, reading fluency and a range of cognitive and linguistic skills including working memory measures, word retrieval and paired associate learning. The results were analyzed in a set of correlation analyses. In line with previous findings from children with typical hearing, orthographic learning was strongly correlated with phonological decoding, receptive vocabulary, phonological skills, verbal-verbal paired-associate learning and word retrieval. The results of this study suggest that orthographic learning in children with CI is strongly dependent on similar cognitive and linguistic skills as in typically hearing peers. Efforts should thus be made to support phonological decoding skill, vocabulary, and phonological skills in this population.

  • 19.
    Wykowska, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany.
    Anderl, Christine
    Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany; Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands; Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Schubö, Anna
    Philipps University, Marburg, Germany.
    Hommel, Bernard
    Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Motivation modulates visual attention: evidence from pupillometry2013Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, artikkel-id 59Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 20.
    Wykowska, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Hommel, Bernard
    Department of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Schubö, Anna
    Faculty of Psychology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Imaging when acting: Picture but not word cues induce action-related biases of visual attention2012Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 3, nr Issue OCT, artikkel-id 388Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 21.
    Wykowska, Agnieszka
    et al.
    General and Experimental Psychology Unit, Department Psychologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich, Munich, Germany.
    Schubö, Anna
    Fachbereich Psychologie, Philipps-Universität, Marburg, Germany.
    Action intentions modulate allocation of visual attention: Electrophysiological evidence2012Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 3, artikkel-id 379Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
1 - 21 of 21
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