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  • 1.
    Hansson, Heidi
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    “Winter Feeds It”: Cold and the Construction of Good and Evil in Susan Cooper’s The Dark Is Rising2016In: The Lion and the unicorn, ISSN 0147-2593, E-ISSN 1080-6563, Vol. 40, no 1, 62-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Naughty Boys and Sexy Girls: The Representation of Young Individuals in a Web-Based Corpus of English2016In: Journal of English Linguistics, ISSN 0075-4242, E-ISSN 1552-5457, Vol. 44, no 4, 318-345 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although stereotypical gender patterns have been reported in a number of studies over the last forty years or so, and attempts to address gender-biased representation have been made, males and females are still represented differently in modern English-speaking societies. Further research uncovering gender-marked language and biased gender structures is therefore needed. The study presented here is a contribution to the still small, but nevertheless growing number of studies employing corpora to study the discourse of gender. The focus of the study is the representation of young individuals in a previously unexplored one-hundred-million-word web corpus of English, the New Model Corpus (NMC). Following earlier work on collocation and gender, the aim of this paper is to explore what verbs collocate with the lemmas girl and boy as subject and object and what words modify them in a worldwide corpus of English. The purpose is to reveal how these two lemmas pattern with other words, and in doing so point at cultural and social meanings embodied in the representation of girls and boys.

  • 3.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The relevance of lexi: A corpus-based study of L2 English textbooks2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Lady Audley's Secret, Gender and the Representation of Emotions2013In: Women's Writing, ISSN 0969-9082, E-ISSN 1747-5848, Vol. 20, no 4, 441-457 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between gender, emotion and normative ideals is a prominent theme in British sensation fiction of the 1860s, and a central concern in Mary Elizabeth Braddon's novel Lady Audley's Secret (1862). But despite critical assent concerning the importance of emotions in the text, there are no focused studies of their meaning and narrative function. This study explores how representations of anger and shame convey gender specificity, and how the way characters express and perform emotions interplays with constructions of social power in the novel. Braddon's work contains more examples of women than men exhibiting signs of anger and more instances of men than women showing shame, which means that anger might be understood as a female and shame as a male quality in the text. The contexts where these emotions occur indicate the opposite, however. Women displaying anger are shown to transgress gendered conduct codes, whereas men mostly experience shame because of women's misbehaviour and as their guardians. Although the distribution of instances when male and female characters show anger or shame could initially be understood as a manifestation of the disruptive qualities of the sensation genre, such an interpretation is undermined by the gendered relations between emotional expression, power and control in the novel.

  • 5.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Johansson, Jeaneth
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Accounting terminology and translation: a linguistic challenge2013In: The LSP Journal - Language for special purposes, professional communication, knowledge management and cognition, ISSN 1904-4135, E-ISSN 1904-4135, Vol. 4, no 1, 30-48 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on linguistic comparability and the understanding of accounting terms between languages in the context of international standardization of accounting principles. By analyzing the translations of the American English term income in bilingual dictionaries (English/Swedish and Swedish/English), the complexity of translating accounting terms, and the risk of miscommunication involved in the process, is highlighted.The study shows that non-technical uses of terms are commonly confused with technical uses, and that the information presented in bilingual technical dictionaries may be both incorrect and misleading. The research demonstrates the fuzzy nature of language, and shows that linguistic and cultural aspects in accounting communication cannot be ignored in the on-going work of standardizing accounting world-wide.

  • 6.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Male and female shame: a corpus-based study of emotion2012In: Corpora, ISSN 1749-5032, E-ISSN 1755-1676, Vol. 7, no 2, 159-185 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, I investigate the representation of the emotion terms shame, ashamed and shameless in relation to women and men in late twentieth-century British English. The study is based on analyses of examples of shame retrieved from the British National Corpus with the specific aim to study in what contexts men and women express shame or are associated with it, and evaluate whether the emotion is represented as negative or positive. I present two general models of shame, where the first model concentrates on a negative connection between shame and pain, exposure and embodiment, and the second model describes shame as a necessary ingredient of social life that makes people recommit to socially sanctioned behaviour and values. Most examples of women's shame in the material correspond to the description given in the first model, whereas the majority of the examples of men's shame correspond with the second. The two models illustrate how shame functions to preserve hierarchical gender structures.

  • 7.
    Hansson, Heidi
    et al.
    Department of English Literature, Umeå University.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Storms of tears: emotion metaphors and the construction of gender in East Lynne2012In: Orbis Litterarum, ISSN 0105-7510, E-ISSN 1600-0730, Vol. 67, no 2, 154-170 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that the consequences of emotional actions are a central theme in British nineteenth-century sensation fiction, studies of the genre have generally focused on thrilling and socially disruptive elements of the genre. Attention to descriptions of transgressive behaviour and in particular women’s violations of patriarchal norms has enabled interpretations that endow the genre with a feminist agenda. Reading the novels with a focus on how emotions are represented, however, demonstrates an underlying patriarchal pattern that limits the potential for feminist interpretations.This article focuses on the clusters of metaphors used to express emotion in Ellen Wood’s sensation novel East Lynne (1861–1862). Close readings of text examples in combination with analyses of metaphorical expressions highlight the novel’s ideological ambiguities and ambivalences concerning gender and emotion.

  • 8. Hansson, Heidi
    et al.
    Norberg, CathrineLuleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Cold matters: cultural perceptions of snow, ice and cold2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Cold and dangerous women: anger and gender in sensation fiction2009In: Cold matters: cultural perceptions of snow, ice and cold, Umeå: Umeå University and Royal Skyttean Society , 2009, 157-173 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on humoural doctrine, male anger has historically been viewed as a hot emotion associated with rationality and stability. Female anger, on the other hand, has traditionally been ascribed the opposite traits that is, coldness, emotionality and instability. Typically male anger has been defined as a temporary loss of control, whereas anger expressed by women has been perceived as lasting longer, and therefore often viewed as a matter of feminine nature. Thus, female anger has been viewed as a less refined form of anger. Sensation fiction of the 1860s suggests that the ancient view of understanding female anger as closely connected with the female nature and as a consequence more deceptive, colder and more dangerous than male anger persisted in nineteenth-century England. Victorian women, as depicted in the literature of the day, are defined as more emotional than male characters, at the same time as most forms of female emotionality are presented as a break against ideal femininity. The contradictory conception of emotionality, as outlined by ancient philosophers, continued to inform the common view of anger and gender, although the belief in humoural theory and its supposed influence on human characteristics was less pronounced.

  • 10.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Revisioning the value of cold2009In: Cold matters: cultural perceptions of snow, ice and cold, Umeå: Umeå University and Royal Skyttean Society , 2009, 7-22 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Varför kokar vi av ilska?2008In: Genus i norrsken, ISSN 1654-7640, Vol. 1, no 3-4, 10-12 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Hansson, Heidi
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Silencing for a reason: Elizabeth Gaskell's Cousin Phillis2008In: Orbis Litterarum, ISSN 0105-7510, E-ISSN 1600-0730, Vol. 63, no 5, 422-440 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The view of the emotionally volatile woman as a sharp contrast to the rational man is not compatible with Victorian understandings of women as passionless creatures devoid of true feelings. Elizabeth Gaskell dramatises this contradictory view of womanhood in her novella Cousin Phillis (1864) by showing that although women in nineteenth-century fiction are depicted as slaves to their feelings, intense emotions are seen as the prerogatives of men. Thus, on the surface Cousin Phillis may be understood as a text that adheres to conventional gender codes. Gaskell's representation of women and men, however, clearly indicates that women are emotionally and intellectually crippled in patriarchal societies. Self-control and control of others are shown to be important factors for the structuring of gendered emotions, and if emotions have historically been gendered female, it is evident that the act of silencing and controlling has been gendered male. The gendered interplay of verbal and emotional expression and silencing, as well as a strict adherence to rationality before emotion, constitute the main themes in Gaskell's novella. To reinforce the theme of silencing Gaskell's role as producer of the text is concealed behind the voice of a male narrator.

  • 13.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    K som i korrekthet2007In: Tidens tecken, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2007, 99-106 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Friends and lovers in Shakespeare2005In: Friends: interdisciplinary speculations on a social artefact, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2005, 50-61 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Whores and cuckolds: on male and female terms in Shakespeare's comedies2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis constitutes a study of the relations between men and women in Elizabethan society, as reflected in the terms used for them in Shakespeare’s comedies. The terms included in this study are classified as: “occupational” (chapter 4), “central” (chapter 5), “gender-neutral” (chapter 6), “axiological” (chapter 7), “metaphor” (chapter 8) and “kinship” (chapter 9). Two introductory chapters devoted to semantic theories and the cultural and political climate in Shakespeare’s time are provided as background. The view of perceiving concepts in terms of prototypical examples has been adopted for the present study. The basic idea is that the meaning of words is dependent on human beings and their interaction with the world. To some extent prototypes prevalent during the Renaissance are compared with prototypical terms for women and men in current English. Differences in male and female usage are analyzed. Statistical information regarding the frequency of the terms in male and female speech respectively is provided. The current work shows how much the study of words can reveal about attitudes, structure values, views, gender roles and relationships between the genders in society, in this case Elizabethan society. It can be concluded that the concepts of ‘male’ and ‘female’ in Shakespeare’s time were associated with completely different values and ideas. Men were judged by their actions, women most commonly by their appearance. The concept of ‘male’ may be equated with power, activity and control, whereas ‘female’ in most contexts in Shakespeare’s comedies is associated with dependency, passivity and subordination.

  • 16.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Chaucer's women: female occupational terms in The Canterbury Tales1996In: Male and Female Terms in English: Proceedings of the Symposium at Umeå University, May 18-19, 1994 / [ed] Gunnar Persson; Mats Rydén, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 1996, 115-134 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Handel med Ryssland ur ett norrbottniskt perspektiv: delrapport i projektet "I reformernas kölvatten"1994In: I reformernas kölvatten, Umeå: Europool , 1994, 1-33 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 17 of 17
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
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