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  • 1.
    Dordlofva, Christo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Design for Qualification: A Process for Developing Additive Manufacturing Components for Critical Systems2018In: Proceeding of NordDesign 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive Manufacturing (AM), and more specifically Powder Bed Fusion, offers design freedom, functional integration, and cost efficient manufacturing of customised products. These design and manufacturing capabilities are relevant for the space industry with its characteristic low production volumes, high-performance products, pursuit for low weight, and a recent need for cost reduction due to increased market competition. At the same time, the space industry is characterised by products in harsh environments without room for failure, nor the possibility to repair broken parts in service. Product qualification is therefore an important part of the product development process in the space industry, with the purpose of showing that the product design and its manufacturing process fulfils the technical requirements. Qualification is a challenge for AM that currently exhibits a sensitivity in part mechanical properties based on geometry and build orientation, as well as a variability in process outcome. As with other manufacturing processes, design engineers have to take process capabilities into account during product design to render a manufacturable product (Design for AM), but also to achieve the right quality and function (Design for Excellence). Apart from manufacturability, product qualification has to be considered early in the product development process of AM parts. Given the lack of understanding of AM process characteristics, design engineers are in need of design supports to facilitate the qualification of critical AM parts. This paper presents a Design for Qualification process model for development of AM components in critical space systems. The model is proposed based on research performed in the space industry with several case companies. 

  • 2.
    Wikberg Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Normark, Jörgen
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Öhrling, Therese
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Experiences of educational reform: Implementation of cdio at industrial design engineering2017In: Proceedings of the 13th International CDIO Conference, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, June 18-­22, 2017, University of Calgary Press, 2017, Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Luleå University of Technology (LTU) joined the CDIO initiative in 2015. The development of the MSc program Industrial Design Engineering (IDE) was one of LTU’s four test pilots of educational reform with support of the CDIO framework. The current educational reform comprises all CDIO standards, however some have been easier to implement than others. The results from the current CDIO-implementation are so far positive experiences from both faculty and students. While the program curriculum has been developed at a macro level, changes also impact the program objectives, teachers’ skills development, and students’ learning outcomes at a micro level where, for example, courses have been redesigned regarding teaching and learning activities, and assessments have been developed to include both formative and summative feedback to promote a deep learning approach. Great efforts have also been put into development of new learning environments, finalized in 2016. However, implementation of CDIO also deals with changing the educational culture, a work that takes more efforts and time than just one year. A success factor in the current implementation is the involvement of experienced CDIO-implementers that have inspired, motivated and coached the IDE faculty in re-designing the program. 

  • 3.
    Dordlofva, Christo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Qualification Challenges with Additive Manufacturing in Space Applications2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) has the potential to remove boundaries that traditional manufacturing processes impose on engineering design work. The space industry pushes product development and technology to its edge, and there can be a lot to gain by introducing AM. However, the lack of established qualification procedures for AM parts has been highlighted, especially for critical components. While the space industry sees an advantage in AM due to expensive products in low volumes and long lead-times for traditional manufacturing processes (e.g. casting), it also acknowledges the issue of qualifying mission critical parts within its strict regulations. This paper focuses on the challenges with the qualification of AM in space applications. A qualitative study is presented where conclusions have been drawn from interviews within the aerospace industry. The results highlight important gaps that need to be understood before AM can be introduced in critical components, and gives insight into conventional component qualification.

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Managing the paradox of early production involvement and Innovativeness: To involve or evolve, is that the question?2016In: Proceedings of International Design Conference - Design 2016 / [ed] N. Bojcetic ; D. Marjanovic ; N. Pavkovic; M. Storga; S. Skec, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture , 2016, p. 1065-1074Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early involvement of production can on the one hand create products better adapted for realization, but on the other hand introduce the risk that incremental adjustments of existing operations and processes is favoured at the expense of more radical ones. The research reported in this paper aims to explore how innovative projectteams manage this paradox of early production involvement and innovativeness. Results show that a number of separation strategies at the micro level in the organization play an important role in practice.

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Mitigating lack of knowledge: a study of ideas in innovative projects2016In: International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation, ISSN 2165-0349, E-ISSN 2165-0357, Vol. 4, no 3-4, p. 144-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ideas and concepts are the carriers of innovation, which many regard as a critical source of competitive advantage. At the same time, an initial idea is untested and unrealized, i.e., it is always surrounded by a lack of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how different types of ideas develop and interact with knowledge, by focusing on remediating activities performed by design teams. Results are based on a retrospective interview study involving respondents from eight projects, all selected for their high degree of innovativeness. The analysis emphasized two types of ideas (product ideas and concept ideas) and three spaces of design knowledge (the why-space, the what-space, and the how-space). The results reveal two possibilities: either the content of the knowledge space differs depending on the type of idea, or different knowledge spaces exist. Moreover, activities conducted to improve the idea have different characteristics depending on the type of idea. It is thus important to distinguish between different types of ideas and to choose corresponding mitigation activities to support idea development.

  • 6.
    Dordlofva, Christo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Lindwall, Angelica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Opportunities and Challenges for Additive Manufacturing in Space Applications2016In: Proceedings of Norddesign 2016: Biannual conference on Design and Development, 10-12 August, NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and TechnologyTrondheim, Norway / [ed] Casper Boks, Johannes Sigurjonsson Martin Steinert, Carlijn Vis, Andreas Wulvik, Glasgow: The Design Society, 2016, Vol. 1, p. 401-410Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a fast developing manufacturing technology that brings many opportunities for the design teams at companies working with product development. One industry that has embraced this is aerospace, and more specifically within space applications (satellites and launchers). Although there are huge possibilities with this technology, there are also several challenges that need to be overcome. This paper is based on interviews, study visits and a state of the art review from the current literature. The focus of this work has been to map the opportunities and challenges with AM in space applications and to highlight the research gaps that have been found. There are few documents available that address AM and/or innovation within space applications. The results show that design for AM, as well as product and process qualification, are areas that need to be further investigated.

  • 7.
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Student Competence Profiles: a complementary or competetive approach to CDIO?2016In: The 12th International CDIO Conference: Proceedings – Full papers / [ed] Jerker Björkqvist; Kristina Edström; Ronald J. Hugo; Juha Kontio; Janne Roslöf; Rick Sellens; Seppo Virtanen, Turku, 2016, p. 844-858Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For students to develop independent learning strategies, it is essential to have anunderstanding of what it is they are aiming for. For this reason, every educational programme in Sweden has learning outcomes as stated by the Swedish Higher Education Authority.However, these are rather formal and sometimes described in a way that is not easy, either for teachers or for students, to implement in teaching and learning activities. A challenge is to both apply CDIO-standards and comply with the Swedish Higher Education Authority’s stated learning objectives. At the same time, we should uphold students’ motivation to develop their competences and teachers’ understanding of which teaching and learning activities are relevant, and how and what to assess in students’ learning to contribute to all of these approaches. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a competence profile. The idea is primarily based on the Vitae Research Development Framework, but with inspiration from several other frameworks and approaches. The competence profile is designed to support students´ individual professional industrial design engineering competences. It allows the students themselves to map their knowledge, skills, experiences and qualities, and also provide support for teachers’ feedback and assessment. In other words,the student competence profile is used to describe what students are supposed to be able to do (prior to courses), what the learning activities are supposed to contribute to (during courses) and for formative and summative feedback of how well it has been done (during and after courses). It also allows a visualisation on how different courses contribute to the overall programme objectives.

  • 8.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Collaborative Design2015In: Indian Institute of Science. Journal, ISSN 0970-4140, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 353-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global cooperation is a reality for most engineering design teams today, and even though the core group is co-located, they are forced to cooperate with subcontractors or experts with complementary knowledge and skills. The design process can be seen as an integration of a technical, cognitive and social process, and such process is clearly multidisciplinary. This review presents research challenges and emerging directions for future research and focuses on interpersonal communication in collaborative design – small teams of interdisciplinary stakeholders who work jointly toward a common goal that would not otherwise be accomplished by the individual participants themselves.

  • 9.
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Design: process och metod2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    På nittiotalet, då jag utbildade mig till industridesigner på HDK vid Göteborgs Universitet, var det inte många som visste något om det yrket, de frågade ”... menar du kläder?”. Vilken skillnad jämfört med nu när alla verkar veta och tycka något om designade prylar och använder många olika digitala tjänster.Som nyanställd på ett konsultföretag upptäckte jag att inte heller i näringslivet var design speciellt känt. Jag fick ofta prata med kunderna om vilken möjlighet designtänkande kunde vara för dem och deras produkter. Det grundlade en övertygelse hos mig om behovet av strukturerade metoder och ett arbetssätt som kommunicerar väl med kunden. Jag ville arbeta mer med det så 2001 beslutade jag mig för att börja undervisa. Under fem år som lärare i industridesign på HDK och tio år vid Teknisk design på Chalmers har jag använt många böcker med olika inriktningar och möjlighet till fördjupning. Jag har saknat en bra översikt som studenterna kan komma tillbaka till i projekt och som de senare i yrkeslivet kan använda för att visa helheten för andra, tills jag blev inkopplad på den här boken. Det finns idag många olika utbildningar och yrkesvarianter av designers. Fler och fler upptäcker att design är något av det viktigaste som finns. Det påverkar ju oss dagligen, avgör om och när vi väljer något och hur vi använder det. Design är också, som du kommer att märka när du läser boken, mycket mera än bara sakerna vi ser. Ja egentligen kan allt som skapas och formuleras på något sätt vara designat. Men det är skillnad på design och design, ibland är den bara en fördyrande detalj eller uppsnyggning av något, ibland är den innovativ och tar hänsyn till själva användningen och användaren. Det svåraste för de som betraktar eller ska introduceras till design brukar vara förhållandet mellan det objektiva och det subjektiva - vad är sant för alla och vad är bara sant för en utvald grupp? Och vad är den viktigaste delen av design; är det tekniken, nyhetsvärdet, utseendet eller funktionen? Efter att ha sett tusentals projekt och lösningar är jag övertygad om att de lösningar som överlevt, och kommer att överleva längst, är designade av människor som förstått vilka som ska använda deras lösningar och hur användarens behov av form och funktion är. En optimal designlösning är olika för olika människor och olika situationer, när du kan hantera det har du kommit långt som designer. En vanlig missuppfattning om design är att det är något som fixas till i slutet eller att det är en rent konstnärlig process där man väntar på inspiration. Det bästa resultatet kommer när designtänkandet är strukturerat och finns med tidigt. Många av dagens produktsystem är svåra att förstå och använda. Här kan olika professioner hjälpas åt eftersom en av designerns viktigaste uppgift är att analysera och visualisera behov, gränser och innovationsmöjligheter för och tillsammans med andra. Därför behövs förståelse för designtänkande mer än någonsin inom många yrken, såväl tekniskt som socialt. Det är, som jag brukar säga till studenterna, enkelt att göra något svårt men svårt att göra något enkelt - det gäller att hitta essensen av någots existens. Det har varit mycket roligt att få vara en del i framtagandet av den här boken. Här finns en helhet som är sällsynt. Författarna har i Design:process och metod lagt mycket arbete och efterforskningar på att strukturera och ta fram en unik sammansättning av olika synsätt och metoder för alla som vill förstå designarbete och beprövade designverktyg som en helhet. Genom att studera och prova dessa kan den som läser få en korrekt start, bli mer kreativ, göra en bättre presentation av sitt eget designarbete eller förstå andra som arbetar med design. Det här är en bok som borde vara obligatorisk läsning för alla som handskas med utvecklingsprojekt. Örjan SöderbergMaster of Fine Arts i industridesign HDK AIVELektor och programansvarig på Civilingenjörsprogrammet i Teknisk Design på Chalmers tekniska högskola

  • 10.
    Ekman, Jonas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Antti, Marta-Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Martin-Torres, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Emami, Reza
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Kuhn, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Minami, Ichiro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Gustafsson, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Zorzano Mier, Maria-Paz
    Milz, Mathias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Behar, Etienne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
    Wolf, Veronika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Dordlofva, Christo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Mendaza de Cal, Maria Teresa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Jamali, Maryam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Roos, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Ottemark, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nieto, Chris
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Soria Salinas, Álvaro Tomás
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Vázquez Martín, Sandra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Nyberg, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Neikter, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Lindwall, Angelica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Fakhardji, Wissam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Projekt: Rymdforskarskolan2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Graduate School of Space Technology

  • 11.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Enhancing Student motivation: "raise the bar"2014In: Design education & human technology relations: proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands 4th - 5th September 2014 / [ed] Erik Bohemia; Arthur Eger; Wouter Eggink, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2014, p. 414-419Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quest for enhancing student motivation, commitment and performance in higher education is anever-present struggle for university teachers. Of course, the hunt for a good grade is something that isvery central for students, but as a teacher you would like to reach further and find a deeper, morepersonal motivation within each student. A hypothesis that was investigated was that students willaccept high demands if they are clearly defined and presented directly in the beginning instead ofbeing introduced gradually during the course. In the present course, a team of six teachers was puttogether in order to be able to handle the students’ need for coaching and support. The course includedmultiple sub-deadlines concluded by status presentations, called Design Reviews, where the groupsupdated the teaching team and other groups on the project’s progress. The Design Reviews includedboth an oral presentation of five minutes and a written memorandum, called PM. Each student wasresponsible for one oral presentation and one PM. Examination of the course was based on the finalproject result as well as on performance during the Design Reviews. The conclusions from thisapproach are that the general motivation was increased. The project results were very good andincluded several innovative solutions. Student reaction to the high demands was positive but teachercoaching is a very important factor for keeping this on a manageable and stimulating level for thestudents and preventing it from being an oppressive stress factor.

  • 12.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Innovationspiloter: studenter ökar innovationsförmågan hos företag2014In: NU 2014: Umeå 8-10 oktober : abstracts, Umeå: Umeå universitet. Pedagogiska institutionen , 2014, p. 203-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Johansson, Christian
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona.
    Managing rejected ideas from projects: a way to avoid idea cemeteries2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An often neglected topic in idea management research is the continuity and stability of current idea management practices. This study addresses this topic by following a hand-over of ideas from a project to the line organization in a company. Moreover, idea portfolios are proposed and empirically explored as a means of managing and further developing these ideas. This particular idea-capturing scheme is believed to incorporate both codification and personalization approaches in the management of ideas. Twenty-one (21) semi-structured interviews, as well as observations, were conducted during a year, both before and during the implementation of idea portfolios at the company. Results from the study show the importance of considering the recipient of a codification effort in order for codification to become a constructive element rather than a barrier. Another finding is that different stages of maturity and levels of activity should be handled when managing ideas. Therefore, an idea portfolio is something of a hybrid between an idea bank and a register of on-going activities. Managing ideas in a transparent way was also shown to have its pros and cons. Increased transparency can both provide enhanced legitimacy for working with an idea, and increase the accountability of an idea, and can therefore be perceived as an obstacle. Finally, the shared responsibility of an idea that is the consequence of working with an idea portfolio can make the line manager something of an “accomplice”. This in turn helps in propelling the development of the idea forward.

  • 14.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    TD-Challenge: erfarenheter från temadag för Teknisk design2014In: NU 2014: Umeå 8-10 oktober : abstracts, Umeå: Umeå universitet. Pedagogiska institutionen , 2014, p. 191-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A deep dive into creative thinking: the now-wow-how framework2013In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED13), Design for Harmonies: Human Behaviour in Design / [ed] U. Linderman; S Venkataraman; YS Kim; SW Lee; P. Badke-Schaub; K. Sato, Design Research Society, 2013, Vol. 7, p. 337-346Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation strategies are becoming even more vital for manufacturers that wish to turn their business into a service based one. Integration of product and service aspects in early design stages insists on approaches where all competences are used for to provide the foundation for new solutions. Often such creative work is expected to randomly come from ordinary work tasks or from passionate geniuses. Few companies apply an intentional and coherent process for bringing together mixed teams to create ideas for radically new product and services.Besides describing the background for the development of a radical innovation workshop format, this article presents a three-step framework for a collaborative process in which the participants diverse competences and skills are seen as the source of creativity. The framework, called now-wow-how, allows a workshop to be planned, designed and conducted in order to analyze an existing situation (now), a preferred alternative future (wow) and elaborate on how these two can be bridged (how). The paper provides examples of creative methods that can be used to conduct each stage, and also a guide for how to facilitate a creative workshop.

  • 16.
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Snowflake: en bred bok om design- och utvecklingsprocesser2013Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    What happens to rejected ideas?: exploring the life of ideas following the completion of projects2013In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED13): Design For Harmonies / [ed] U Lindemann; S Venkataraman; YS Kim; SW Lee; M Cantamessa; B Yannou, Design Research Society, 2013, Vol. 3, p. 229-238Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an ongoing development project there is a risk that promising ideas are rejected due to time constraints. Given that ideas are the carriers of innovation, and that novel and radical ideas are, to a greater extent, exposed to rejections and resistance than more conservative, those ideas, previously rejected from projects, could be seen as a potential goldmine of innovations. The aim of this paper is to explore the ‘life’ of rejected ideas following the completion of design projects. An exploratory approach was chosen in order to gather information about companies’ ways of working with rejected ideas. Respondents from seven companies were interviewed, and two main routes for managing rejected ideas became apparent: codification and personalisation. All participating companies had some sort of codification approach, but this was always complemented by a personalisation approach, whether implicit or explicitly stated. This is important as an idea management system is unable to fully carry an idea forward as it lacks intent, insight, and argumentation. Furthermore, responsibility for rejected ideas and maturity of ideas both seem to affect the processing of rejected ideas

  • 18.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Garrido, Pablo
    5 senses of interaction: a model for categorising collaborative tools and creative methods2012In: Proceedings of the the 12th International Design Conference, DESIGN 2012: May 21-24 2012, Dubrovnik, Croatia / [ed] D Marjanović; Mario Štorga ; N. Pavković ; N. Bojčetić, Dubrovnik: Design Research Society, 2012, p. 569-578Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative tools today are not adapted to the real needs of the collaborators, instead the collaborators have to adapt to existing technology. This work explore the designer’s behaviour in creative collaborative design meetings and create a graphic approach – 5 senses of interaction which can be used to assess and evaluate interaction needs for a meeting or for assessing an existing collaborative technology. The visual method gives the user a better understanding of the interaction requirements and can be used to find out a suitable collaboration tool.

  • 19.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Development of engineering knowledge models to achieve product innovation2011In: Impacting society through engineering design: ICED 11 København, the 18th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 15th - 18th August 2011, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Copenhagen, Denmark ; proceedings volumes / [ed] Steve Culley; Ben Hicks; Tim McAloone; T.J. Howard, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2011, Vol. 6 : Design for X, design to X, p. 322-331Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To pursue understanding of governing principles, observations of phenomena and simulation of processes instead of relying purely on trial-and-error, is becoming more and more important in product development activities. This suggests that use of engineering knowledge models is an important part of future innovations. The purpose of this study is therefore to gain insight into the development and use of engineering knowledge models in the innovation process. Based on interviews with originators of such models within a manufacturing company this descriptive study emphasizes the following aspects: the ambivalent aspect of reuse, multi-use of existing models and increased interactivity provided by engineering knowledge models.

  • 20. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, External, LTU Business AB.
    Johansson, Christian
    Johansson, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wenngren, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Ylinenpää, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Project: PIEp - Product Innovation Engineering Programme2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    PROJEKTSAMMANFATTNINGPIEp, Product Innovation Engineering Program är ett nationellt program som syftar till att stärka förmågan till innovativ produkt- och affärsutveckling. PIEp spänner över fältet från teori till praktik, från forskning om innovationssystem till proaktivt arbete för att stärka innovationskraft och därigenom uppnå en systemförändring inom forskning, utbildning och utveckling. PIEp skall pågå under tio år, 2007-2016 och engagera flera av Sveriges lärosäten och forskningsinstitut involverade i innovation och produktutveckling. PIEp leds och administreras vid KTH i partnerskap med Lunds Tekniska Högskola, Högskolan i Jönköping, Designhögskolan vid Umeå Universitet, Centrum för Teknik, Medicin och Hälsa, Luleå Tekniska Universitet, samt en rad företag och organisationer.

  • 21.
    Panarotto, Massimo
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sustainability Innovation in early phases2011In: Impacting society through engineering design: ICED 11 København, the 18th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 15th - 18th August 2011, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Copenhagen, Denmark ; proceedings volumes / [ed] Steve Culley; Ben Hicks; Tim McAloone; T.J. Howard, Design Research Society, 2011, Vol. 5 : Design for X, design to X, p. 187-197Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability is a complex but extremely important issue. To achieve a new industrial revolution that focuses on sustainability, we need innovation. Just improving our technologies and our habits will not save our planet from its current gradual degradation.In recent decades many Eco-tools have been developed; this paper evaluates the most important and used today, how they help to consider sustainability in the product development process and identify important and missing characteristics, arguing that many eco-tools were experienced by the companies as too complex and time-consuming and often not aid the innovation process. These characteristics guided the development of a new framework for sustainability innovation based on a multidisciplinary workshop approach. It focuses on analyzing customers from a sustainable viewpoint, understanding their real needs, using ideation tools to generate ideas in areas not usually considered in current eco-tools, e.g. changing customer behavior or the business model. The method was developed, tested and evaluated in an iterative approach over a six-month period.

  • 22.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Törlind, Peter
    4I4I : Four I:s for Innovation: a book with easy to use methods and ideas to foster innovative product development2010Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A book with easy to use methods and ideas to foster innovative product development.

  • 23.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Bergström, Mattias
    Future ideation: creating ideas despite distance2010In: International Reports on Socio-Informatics (IRSI), ISSN 1861-4280, E-ISSN 1861-4280, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 264-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Team-based innovation, which builds on the true collaboration and thinking together strategy are at the heart for most manufacturing companies today. This strategy builds on a multifunctional team to increase the innovation potential. Diversity builds up the multifunctionality within the team and is a prerequisite for coming up with new innovations. Efficient idea generation demands facilitation, one example is brainstorming, which is easily performed. However, brainstorming is often misused, as it is not applied properly. A successful brainstorm seems chaotic, team members use Post-It notes and/or a whiteboard to write and sketch down ideas. In engineering design, computer tools support many of the development team's tasks, but an interactive computer support for idea generation is not commonly used. Also, existing tools do not support the "physical" activities found in classical brainstorming, they are commonly based on the logics of documentation than actual facilitation of a creative process. The study in this paper is based on observations of design teams and the purpose is to set up and present a specification for an idea generation tool that is both facilitated and mimics the best aspects of physical brainstorming.

  • 24. Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Wenngren, Johan
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Where do innovations come from?2010In: Design 2010: 11th International Design Conference, Dubrovnik - Croatia, May 17 - 20, 2010 / [ed] D. Marjanovic; M. Storga; N. Pavkovic; N. Bojcetic, Zagreb: Design Research Society, 2010, p. 545-554Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a descriptive study of two types of innovation awards within a manufacturing company. The purpose is to identify sources and understand the background of these awarded innovations. An industrial view of the concept innovation is of importance in order to support future product development processes. Based on the interviews of several team members in awarded innovation projects, some aspects can be emphasized: the importance of the exploration and knowledge acquisition phase, importance of external triggers and that innovation is not a linear process.

  • 25.
    Hicks, Ben
    et al.
    University of Bath.
    McAlpine, Hamish
    University of Bath.
    Blanco, Eric
    Grenoble Institute of Technology.
    Cantamessa, Marco
    Politecnico di Torino.
    Montagna, Francesca
    Politecnico di Torino.
    Storga, Mario
    University of Zagreb.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    An intelligent design environment: overcoming fundamental barriers to realising a step change in design performance and innovation?2009In: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Margareta Norell Bergendahl, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2009, p. 199-210Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the modern design environment, demands on performance, innovation and productivity are always increasing as global competition rises and business models(such as the product-service paradigm) evolve. Central to the ability of organisations to realise continued improvements has been the widespread adoption of new design tools, methods, technologies and processes. Arguably, today's highly distributed design teams are almost totally reliant on these elements to be successful. Whilst there is no doubt that they have improved performance in many cases, the sheer number and variety have given rise to new issues, such as information overload and analysis paralysis. This paper argues that one way to significantly improve this situation is via an ‘intelligent design environment' in which the tools, methods, technologies and processes are active components that - where appropriate - intervene in the design activity. A network of design research groups have held workshops to theorise about possible active elements and their interventions. The results, consisting of an overview of possible active elements and interventions, fundamental research and technical challenges, and the possible benefits are discussed.

  • 26.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Larsson, Andreas
    Törlind, Peter
    Design thinking challenges in education2009In: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Margareta Norell Bergendahl, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2009, p. 89-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development processes are commonly represented in sequential models covering the necessary stages from planning to product rollout, while processes to take needs into the development activities show other aspects, namely that understanding needs requires, for a product developer, additional skills. In our curricula for engineering design education we apply some aspects of design thinking to bring together (a) business savvy, in terms of understanding people’s needs as market opportunities, and (b) product development process, in terms of team-based creativity and collaborative skills, with (c) the basic engineering knowledge. This is a demanding aim, much because the approaches, methods and mindsets differ widely from what the students are used to. Hence, in this paper we elaborate on our efforts to educate engineers in design thinking to provide insights into some challenges for engineering design.  Three key challenges are identified, (1) integrative approaches are not straightforwardly implemented, (2) training of ‘soft’ capabilities to provide a change in thinking, and (3) social competence to make use of design thinking.

  • 27.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sonalkar, Neeraj
    Stanford University.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Blanco, Eric
    Grenoble Institute of Technology.
    Hicks, Ben
    University of Bath.
    McAlpine, Hamish
    University of Bath.
    Lessons learned and future challenges for design observatory research2009In: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Margareta Norell Bergendahl, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video observation has been used for ethnographic studies for decades and is becoming more popular in engineering design research. This paper presents some of the lessons learned of using design observation in research. The paper focuses on the design and usage of physical environments designed specifically for design team observation – Design Observatories (DO). The paper argues that in the past DO focused on observation, whereas DO of the future will provide real time analysis and the possibility to intervene to improve the design activity. Five different types of studies are identified and categorized. Three different design observatories and the rationale for their design are described, as well as twelve design studies ranging from short experiments to long ethnographic studies in industry. Finally, the implications for design observatory research are presented – DO must support an iterative research approach, since design experiments are emergent and are not defined up front. There is a need for a more longitudinal capture of data and the emergence of robust coding schemes that enable machine coding needs to be supported.

  • 28. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Johansson, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, External, LTU Business AB.
    Wenngren, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Bertoni, Marco
    Isaksson, Ola
    Kalhori, Vahid
    Sandvik Coromant, Sverige.
    Kårdén, Håkan
    Eurostep, Sverige.
    Svanerudh, Patrik
    Designtech, Sverige.
    Project: ProViking THINK - Team för Heterogen Innovationskunskap2008Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Begreppet product-service systems (PSS), eller funktionella produkter, förutspås ha betydande påverkan för ett framtida hållbart samhälle. Ett PSS-synsätt kommer att förändra hur produkter och tjänster används, men också förändra tillvägagångssättet i utvecklingen, eftersom ansvaret för den fysiska produkten genom hela dess livscykel kvarstår hos företaget eller konsortiet som utvecklar PSS-lösningen. I och med detta kan aktiviteterna med omkonstruktion, återanvändning och återvinning, utföras på ett totalt annorlunda sätt än i dag. I den här situationen blir kapaciteten att ständigt förbättra kundupplevt värde genom nya lösningar en viktig förmåga. Således står utvecklingsteam idag inför två stora utmaningar; dels ska de kunna hantera mer abstrakta kundbehov, dels ska de på ett effektivt sätt ständigt bidra till nya lösningar. Det här projektets mål är att stödja PSS-utvecklingsteamets innovationsprocess genom att föreslå faciliterande metoder och verktyg. Specifikt fokus ligger på följande aspekter för att bidra till utvecklingen av en sammanhängande metodologi för team-baserad innovation:- Identifiering, analys och kommunikation av kundbehov samt modellering av värde- Tvärfunktionella team- Effektiv kunskapsdelning- Modellering och visualisering av lösningar baserat på ett kunskapslivscykel perspektiv Projektet kommer att vara en gemensam prestation av industri- och akademirepresentanter. Det praktiska arbetet kommer att utföras i ett nära samarbete. I stort vägleds projektet av antagandet att – visualisering av affärs- och utvecklingsrelaterad kunskap samt snabba modellerings- och simuleringsmöjligheter i tidiga faser stödjer PSS-teamets förmåga att finna nya lösningar och genomföra hållbar utveckling. Förutom ökad kunskap om strategier och tillvägagångssätt för team-baserad innovation kommer demonstratorer av verktyg och metoder vara ett resultat av projektarbetet.

  • 29. Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Nergård, Henrik
    Larsson, Andreas
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Prompting innovation: dedicated places2008In: Proceedings: 2nd Conference on Nordic Innovation Research, December 3-4 2007; Luleå University of Technology / [ed] Håkan Ylinenpää, Luleå tekniska universitet, 2008, p. 161-173Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our view, close collaboration in joint work meetings has gained limited attention from universities. Our vision for promoting innovative forms of academia-industry collaboration is to bridging meeting content, goal and physical domains to facilitate the meetings and everyday interactions of creative and innovative teams. This paper provides an outline of how an emerging approach for team innovation encourages a reorganization of research and development work, as well as provides a new rational for the design and use of collaborative work spaces. The opportunity to dedicate a room, i.e., a boiler room, for creative collaborative meetings occurred when our offices was going to be refurbished. The space, i.e., the physical constraints of the room, was given. Structurally, it is a typical squared room, nothing remarkable about that. However, by observing and talking about our own collaboration and meetings a set of needs was identified. For the boiler room these needs was captured in the words static and flexible. On the foundation of these words the boiler room has been furnish. A furniture FocIn-FocOut was designed to guide people into different modes. The rationale for the boiler room has been made visible and thereby, also the notion of place as a cultural phenomena.

  • 30.
    Hicks, BJ
    et al.
    Innovative Design & Manufacturing Research Centre, University of Bath.
    McAlpine, HC
    Innovative Design & Manufacturing Research Centre, University of Bath.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Storga, M
    Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, University of Zagreb.
    Dong, A
    Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney.
    Blanco, E
    Laboratoire G-SCOP, Grenoble INP.
    The issues and benefits of an intelligent design observatory2008In: Design 2008: 10th International Design Conference, May 19-22, 2008, Dubrovnik, Croatia / [ed] Dorian Marjanovic; Mario Storga; Neven Pavkovic; Nenad Bojcetic, Zagreb: University of Zagreb , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to support today's digital, knowledge-driven and highly distributed design activities there is a fundamental requirement to improve the means by which design researchers observe industry practice, evaluate tools and methods, and assesses the state-of-the-art. A prerequisite for this is the ability to undertake more holistic investigation, perform controlled experiments, and capture, analyse and organise experimental data. To begin to address these issues the creation of an intelligent design observatory is proposed and the issues associated with designing the environment, monitoring and recording design activities, data processing and analysis, observation and measurement, and an appropriate experimental methodology are discussed.

  • 31. Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Towards virtual co-location in functional product development2008In: Collaboration and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case studies / [ed] Paul Cunningham; Miriam Cunningham, IOS Press, 2008, p. 806-814Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The shift in industry towards Functional Product Innovation implies more collaborative efforts between the partners forming joint ventures, i.e. cross-company collaboration. Hence, new demands are put on collaborative technology. Insights into needs for both industry and collaborative design teams provide the possibilities for ‘virtual co-location' to be enhanced. Following a workshop format, the radical innovation workshop, industrial criterions for collaborative technology has been analyzed based on empirical data from five Swedish manufacturing companies. During the workshop three scenarios were put forward by the industry as most relevant; (1) the design review, (2) to on-site remotely collaborate with an expert and (3) the day-to-day communication. Based on these scenarios, three industrial criterions emerged, namely efficient collaboration, effortless setup of communication and the capability to create trust without touch. Technologies to support Functional Product Innovation seem to insist on meeting these criterions.

  • 32.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A framework for collection of collaborative design research2007In: Design for society: knowledge, innovation and sustainability ; ICED '07 - Paris, 16th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 28 - 30 August 2007, Paris, France ; conference proceedings, Paris: Design Research Society, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In design research different methods are used to develop a descriptive understanding of a design activity. One approach is to use video and audio recordings of complex activities such as team meetings in engineering design. Video and audio recordings provide the researcher with a permanent data corpus that can be used to understand events considered difficult to observe in real time. The video approach also has several limitations, especially when observing distributed teams. This paper describes the needs for a data collection framework of distributed meetings, and how a prototype system has been realized. It also presents a framework on how a physical environment - the design studio - can be used to further facilitate design research. The presented tool is based on a conferencing system where additional video streams from the design environment can be recorded (showing detail views of interesting areas etc.). The tool uses a layered video approach and all video streams can be recorded and replayed for analysis. The tool supports visual and textual bookmarks that can be used to find a particular event in the recorded data. The tool clearly has some advantages compared to traditional data collection methods and enables researchers to follow distributed design sessions.

  • 33. Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Enabling technologies for distributed collaboration in functional product development2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34. Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Examining creative collaboration in distributed and co-located design teams2007In: Design for society: knowledge, innovation and sustainability ; ICED '07 - Paris, 16th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 28 - 30 August 2007, Paris, France ; conference proceedings, Paris: Design Research Society, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development, including all its phases, is today performed to a greater extent in globally dispersed teams. This paper compares two creative design sessions early in the product development process, one co-located session and one distributed session. The workflow in the co-located session was fluid and natural, whereas in the distributed session, it was sometimes disturbed by limitations ofthe mediating technology. The major deficiencies of the technology are the limited support for shared drawing surfaces, for shared control of these surfaces and for creation of concepts. In the co-located session embodied representation were used to describe, communicate and build upon concepts. Due to the limitations of the technology, these types of communication were seldom used in the distributedsession.

  • 35. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Nergård, Henrik
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, External, LTU Business AB.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Project: ProViking - Development of Functional Products in a Distributed Virtual Environment2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This research programme proposes to investigate the development of Functional Products, the development of integration between hardware, software and service. The research will be carried out in close collaboration with industry and in four work packages, all focused on the development of Functional Products but targeting different aspects of it.

  • 36. Nybacka, Mikael
    et al.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Johanson, Mathias
    Törlind, Peter
    Distributed real-time vehicle validation2006In: Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference - 2006: presented at 2006 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, September 10 - 13, 2006, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, New York: American Society of Mechanical Engineers , 2006, Vol. 3 : 26th Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, p. 805-812Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the increasing complexity of embedded systems and software in vehicles, the automotive industry faces an increasing need for testing and verification of components and subsystems under realistic conditions. At the same time, development cycles must be shortened for vehicle manufacturers to be competitive on the global market, and an increased amount of testing and verification must thus be performed in less time. However, simply increasing the testing volume can be prohibitively costly, meaning that testing and verification processes must be made more efficient to reduce the need for more prototypes.This paper presents a concept for distributed testing and verification of vehicles in real-time, with the aim of improving testing and verification efficiency. Through a novel combination of software tools for distributed collaborative engineering, real-time simulation, visualization, and black box simulation, the realized system makes it possible for vehicle manufacturers and their subcontractors to work more concurrently and efficiently with testing and validation. An early implementation of a system prototype is described and future development plans for the system are presented. The main software components used to build up the system are ADAMS/Car RealTime, Matlab/Simulink and a Java-based real-time visualization module originally developed for the gaming industry.A main benefit of the concept is that different disciplines involved in the product development process can use the system to enhance the concurrency between them. Control systems and mechanical engineers can view ongoing tests in real-time and change designs, and efficiently re-simulate and influence ongoing tests in a distributed manner. Through advanced visualization of simulation results and measurement data, engineers can get a clearer view of how the system or product behaves, thereby improving the quality of the validation process.The concept for distributed real-time simulation and visualization described in this paper will gather more information during the early stages of product development, and speed up the product development process due to its real-time nature. The fact that engineers can stay at their home office and only follow the test when needed will enhance their efficiency.

  • 37.
    Nergård, Henrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Sandberg, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Functional product development: discussing knowledge enabling technologies2006In: Proceedings of Design 2006: 9th International Design Conference, May 15-18, 2006, Dubrovnik, Croatia, Zagreb: University of Zagreb , 2006, p. 587-593Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of functional products affects the business as a whole. The hardware will be offered to customers as one part incorporated in a total offer. The offer as a whole compromise services related to and/or designed into that hardware. The product development level will be affected, this emerging development process is called Functional Product Development (FPD). Computer tools to support decisions in engineering design are commonly used by design teams. Today, these tools are considered to be internal and support engineering specific knowledge. However, FPD insists on collaboration between companies to achieve additional knowledge. The purpose in this paper is to discuss new demands on computer tools to support decisions in FPD.

  • 38.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Re-experiencing engineering meetings: knowledge reuse challenges from virtual meetings2006In: Challenges in collaborative engineering: CCE '06 ; state of the art and future challenges in collaborative design ; proceedings of the international workshop, April 19 - 20 2006, Prague, Czech Republic, in conjunction with DDECS '06 / [ed] Leandro Soares Indrusiak, Gliwice: Interprint , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Löfstrand, Magnus
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Design for versatility: the changing face of workspaces for collaborative design2005In: 15th International Conference on Engineering Design - ICED 05: 15 - 28 August 2005 / [ed] Andrew Samuel; William Lewis, Barton: Institution of Engineers, Australia , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a fiercely competitive business climate, which is increasingly characterized by global alliances, partnerships and outsourcing agreements, companies struggle to decrease the negative impact of geographic distance on development efforts. The role of workspaces for collaborative design is gaining considerable attention, and there is currently an increasing interest in moving from individual tools or technologies to a more inclusive view of collaborative workspaces. This paper reports on the underlying motivation and justification for a new collaborative design studio at Luleå University of Technology, Sweden. The studio provides a rapid-response environment, in which the significance of issues raised through ethnographic observations of engineering work can be evaluated and solutions offered.

  • 40.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Getting physical: interacting with physical objects in distributed collaboration2005In: 15th International Conference on Engineering Design - ICED 05: 15 - 28 August 2005 / [ed] Andrew Samuel; William Lewis, Barton: Institution of Engineers, Australia , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Karlsson, Lennart
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Löfstrand, Magnus
    Larsson, Andreas
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Elfström, Bengt-Olof
    Isaksson, Ola
    Information driven collaborative engineering: enabling functional product innovation2005In: Challenges in Collaborative Engineering: CCE '05 ; the knowledge perspective in collabotative engineering ; proceedings of the international workshop, 14th - 15th April 2005, Sopron, Hungary in conjunction with DDECS '05 / [ed] Gianni Jacucci, Interprint , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Johanson, Mathias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Sharing the unshareable: distributed product review using tangibles2005In: Proceedings: 2nd International Forum on Applied Wearable Computing, IFAWC : March 17 - 18, 2005 in Zurich, Switzerland / [ed] Otthein Herzog; Michael Lawo, Berlin: VDE-Verlag , 2005, p. 161-175Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the ongoing globalization of businesses and the collaboration occurring between geographically dispersed organizations, distributed collaborative work using computer based support tools becomes increasingly important. When trying to perform design work while relying heavily on the use of physical artefacts such as early mock-ups, a need to share the unshareable, i.e. physical objects, will inevitably occur in a distributed setting. In an attempt to realize this, the authors studied a design team during their design reviews where a physical mock-up was used. A wearable conferencing unit (the Boblebee computer) was then developed to give remote collaborators a first person view of the mock-up using a head mounted video camera. With the Boblebee computer, remote collaboration with large tangible objects can successfully be realized. This paper relates experiences from the design of the system, and reports on early observations of its use.

  • 43.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Löfstrand, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics.
    Towards true collaboration in global design teams?2005In: 15th International Conference on Engineering Design - ICED 05: 15 - 28 August 2005 / [ed] Andrew Samuel; William Lewis, Barton: Institution of Engineers, Australia , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s collaboration tools can support formal meetings to a certain extent, though there is still an immense potential for improvement when it comes to designing virtual and physical places where global design teams can collaborate in more ‘natural’ ways than existing distributed environments allow. One challenge for global product development is to support true collaboration within global design teams, where diversity and competences of the whole team can be utilized and where team members can think together rather then merely exchange information, opinions and divide work. This paper summarizes the results of several case studies and development projects performed within the Polhem Laboratory over the last four years and proposes challenges for future research. From our findings some of the most important challenges are how to support users with communication tools for more natural formal and informal communication (i.e. as a co-located team communicates), while automatically storing information and context from the distributed meetings.

  • 44.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A collaborative framework for distributed winter testing2004In: eAdoption and the knowledge economy: issues, applications, case studies / [ed] Paul Cunningham; Miriam Cunningham, IOS Press, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A clear trend within the automotive sector is that more and more functionalities are being built into the car with the help of software; however, all this new technology must be rigorously tested under realistic conditions. By introducing a framework for distributed winter testing, based on distributed engineering tools combined with telematics, visualization of temperature data from a test vehicle can be conducted at another location 1,500 km away. Despite the distance, car manufacturers can follow the tests at the test site in real-time, communicate interactively with very high quality, and collaboratively interact with test engineers situated at the test site with the incoming stream of test data. The presented system enables a new way of working with winter testing of vehicles, allowing companies to simplify the testing procedures and get a quick response and an understanding of the process.

  • 45.
    Johanson, Mathias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Mobility support for distributed collaborative teamwork2004In: Electronic journal of information technology in construction, ISSN 1403-6835, E-ISSN 1400-6529, Vol. 9, p. 355-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the trend in computer and network architecture towards smaller and lighter devices that are more or less constantly connected to the Internet through wireless access networks, mobile computing has emerged as a promising means to improve the possibilities of distributed collaborative teamwork. However, the mobility support implemented in state of the art collaboration software has hitherto been rather limited. In this paper we investigate the emerging technologies for wireless network access and mobile computing, how mobility support can be built into the software tools used today for distributed collaborative teamwork, and the benefits it gives users. The main focus is on synchronous, real-time communication tools like multimodal teleconferencing, and the perspective is both technical and methodological. Until now text has been the primary medium for mobile collaboration and our key finding is that user mobility support for video can substantially enhance the possibilities for informal, spontaneous communication between team members. Furthermore, we argue that mobility support for the applications in question is more appropriately implemented at the application level rather than at the network level.

  • 46.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Distributed engineering via broadband: a case study2003In: Research for practice - innovation in products, processes and organisations: ICED 03, 14th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 19 - 21 August 2003, The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm / organized by the Royal Institute of Technology / [ed] Anders Folkeson, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Mabogunje, A.
    Leifer, L.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Elfström, Bengt-Olof
    Distributed team innovation: a framework for distributed product development2003In: Research for practice - innovation in products, processes and organisations: ICED 03, 14th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 19 - 21 August 2003, The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm / organized by the Royal Institute of Technology / [ed] Anders Folkeson, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2003, p. 321-322Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Johanson, Mathias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Mobility support for video-mediated collaborative teamwork2003In: Concurrent Engineering: the vision for the future generation in research and applications : proceedings of the 10th ISPE International Conference on Concurrent Engineering : research and applications / [ed] R. Jardim-Gonçalves; Jianzhong Cha; Adolfo Steiger-Garção, Lisse: Balkema Publishers, A.A. / Taylor & Francis The Netherlands , 2003, p. 761-769Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The trend in computer and network architecture is towards smaller and lighter devices that are more or less constantly connected to the Internet through wireless network access technologies. For engineering and design work, this offers increased opportunities for distributed collaborative teamwork by enabling mobile team members to participate in synchronous and asynchronous information exchange processes. In this paper we investigate the emerging technologies for wireless network access and mobile computing, how mobility support can be built into the software tools used today for distributed collaborative teamwork, and the benefits it gives users. The main focus is on synchronous, real-time communication tools like multimodal teleconferencing, and the perspective is both technical and methodological. Until now text has been the primary medium for mobile collaboration and our key finding is that user mobility support for video can substantially enhance the possibilities for informal, spontaneous communication between team members. Furthermore, we argue that mobility support for the applications in question is more appropriately implemented at the application level rather than at the network level.

  • 49. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Mabogunje, Ade
    Stanford University.
    Milne, Andrew
    Stanford University.
    Distributed design teams: embedded one-on-one conversations in one-to-many2002In: Proceedings of the Design Research Society International Conference at Brunel University / [ed] David Durling; John Shackleton, Staffordshire University Press , 2002, p. 604-614Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering design is fundamentally social, requiring a lot of interaction and communication between the people involved. Additionally, good design often relies upon the ability of a cross-functional team to create a shared understanding of the task, the process and the respective roles of its members. The negotiation and bargaining for common ground are essential in the design process. It is important to provide tools and methods so that also geographically distributed design teams are given the opportunity to engage in such social interactions. This paper presents a study of interpersonal communication within the Distributed Team Innovation (DTI) framework; a joint product design project between Luleå University of Technology and Stanford University that investigates the future of collaborative product development. The common object of work is to design "Virtual Pedals" for Volvo Car Corporation.In the study, we noticed that one-on-one conversations, held in parallel to a main discussion, were common in co-located teamwork and that they are a natural part of creative teamwork. These conversations were mainly used to clarify things and to discuss vague ideas or personal disagreements. Additionally, they were often used instead of, or as a precursor to, bringing up a topic with the whole group. In distributed meetings side conversations were discouraged and current systems for distributed collaboration could not provide sufficient support for these subtle interactions. This has important implications for supporting and improving the performance of global teams, and it suggests that the one-to-many channel of today's video conferencing technology is severely limiting.

  • 50.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Distributed engineering: tools and methods for collaborative product development2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering design is fundamentally social, requiring much interaction and communication between the people involved. Additionally, good design often relies upon the ability of a cross-functional team to create a shared understanding of the task, the process, and the respective roles of its members. Coordination and exchange of information between participants in a distributed product development team is technically difficult and time consuming, where different locations and time zones further complicate communication. It is therefore important to provide tools and methods so that a geographically distributed design team can also collaborate as co- located teams do. Successful teamwork in geographically distributed teams is not only dependent on formal meetings; they are also highly dependent on tools that support informal communication, such as opportunistic and spontaneous interaction. Such informal communication is responsible for much of the information flow in an organisation. A distributed engineering environment must support many forms of collaboration: formal meetings with high quality videoconferencing, brainstorming sessions where people use their body language and whiteboards to clarify their ideas, and informal and mobile communication. This thesis presents a distributed engineering environment that uses broadband conferencing, shared multimedia, shared whiteboards, application sharing, and a distributed virtual reality environment for sharing engineering information. The system also supports lightweight informal communication such as the web based contact portal combining several information channels in one place, e.g. e-mail archives, awareness cameras, diaries, instant messaging, and SMS. The Contact Portal is the natural starting point for initiating and maintaining contact with remote team members. The thesis also presents how mobility support for distributed collaborative teamwork can be designed. The physical environment where the collaboration is done is also very important; the design of several types of collaboration environments is presented and evaluated, from high end studios to low end personal workspaces. The development of the environment is based on several case studies of distributed work where the tools have been used and evaluated in a realistic environment in close collaboration with several industrial companies such as Volvo Car Corporation, Conex, Hägglunds Drives and Alkit Communications.

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