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  • 1.
    Lindgren, Eva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Gabrielsson, Sebastian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    A method to give voice to young people with experience of mental ill-health2019In: 5TH HORATIO FESTIVAL OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Melder, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Existential health: A valuable dimension when promoting health throughout the life-course in Sweden2019In: WAIORA: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation. Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Lundqvist, Catarina
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Nyström, Lena
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Henriksson, Annica
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Nordstrand, Annika
    Norrbotten County Council.
    "Hälsoskolan": the national government, local authorities and university in a joint effort to promote health literacy in arctic children and youth2019In: WAIORA: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation. Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    "On top of the world": promoting health and equity in children andyouth in the arctic region2019In: WAIORA: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Forsberg, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Carlerby, Heidi
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Nordstrand, Annika
    Director of the Public Health Center, Region Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden.
    Risberg, Anitha
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Positive self-reported health might be an important determinant of student's experiences of high school in northern Sweden2019In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 78, no 1, article id 1598758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for more knowledge about positive health determinants in the school setting. The overall aim of this study was to analyse if positive self-reported health is associated with experiences of school among high-school students. Data originated from the health dialogue questionnaire answered by students in grade 1 of high school. A total of 5035 students participated from the academic years 2013 to 2016. Logistic regression with positive odds ratio (POR) was used to analyse associations between positive self-reported health and school experiences. There was an association between positive self-reported health and school experiences among students. Positive mental health was the strongest predictor for positive school experiences. To frequently participate in Physical Education, have a positive body image and satisfactory sleep nearly doubled the students' odds for positive school experiences. The results also revealed gender differences; boys more often reported positive experiences of school and positive health than girls. Positive self-reported health is associated with positive experiences of school, particularly mental health. Moreover, these findings have significant implications for how students experience school and demonstrate the importance of including health-promoting interventions in systemic school improvement, meeting both girls' and boys' needs.

  • 6.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Schoolchildren’s play: A tool for health education2019In: Health Education Journal, ISSN 0017-8969, E-ISSN 1748-8176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to gain more knowledge about the phenomenon of the inner child in relation to health and well-being as reflected in play experienced by schoolchildren. Design/method: Participants were 20 schoolchildren recruited from a primary school in a medium-size city in central Sweden. The children who agreed to participate were 14 girls and 6 boys aged between 9 and 10 years old in grade 3. A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was used to analyse the data consisting of the schoolchildren’s drawings and transcribed interviews. Participants’ verbal reflections on their drawings enabled deeper insight into their lived experiences of play. Results: Findings from this study demonstrate how schoolchildren are influenced by the inner child in childhood to handle conflicts, to cope, to make choices, to build relationships to connect and to dream about the future. The schoolchildren in this study developed their coping skills in conflict situations as part of friendship making. Conclusion: The value play offers for health and well-being reveals how schoolchildren are influenced by the inner child in childhood. Gaining knowledge from schoolchildren’s own voices about play makes a worthwhile contribution to research. In addition, the value play provides to schoolchildren’s health and well-being suggest that play can be an important tool as part of health education.

  • 7.
    Lögdberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Department of Culture and Media Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Using photovoice to promote young migrants health: benefits and challenges with the method2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Young migrants are a group that are seldom asked to share their experiences of health. More research focusing on an inside perspective on young migrants health is needed. Through photovoice, young people are given the opportunity to document and discuss their lives by using photography.

    Purpose of study: Illuminating experiences from collaborating with young migrants to promote health using photovoice, focusing on benefits and challenges with the method.

     Methods/Theory: The study was based on a social perspective on health. Photovoice was the chosen method inviting 28 young migrants in a municipality in northern Sweden aged 16-20 from 5 different countries to take pictures and discussing these with focus on experiences and conditions for health and how health can be promoted. The four step process: 1) Introduction, 2) Photographing session, 3) Workshops, and 4) Final presentation.

     Findings: Using photovoice with young migrants enabled insights into several aspects of the participants’ everyday life inside and outside the school context. The participants could identify health promotion factors but also health challenges in their everyday life. More important, it enabled conversations based on the participants' pictures of their lives rather than questions posed by the researcher. The study also revealed ethical challenges addressing power imbalance and how to reach social change, which is further discussed.

     Conclusion: We recommend using photovoice with young migrants as it proved to be a rich tool to promote critical thinking and discussions allowing self-reflection. However, more research is needed to discuss how to reach social change, the last step of the method. 

  • 8.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Appreciative student voice model: reflecting on an appreciative inquiry research method for facilitating student voice processes2018In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 623-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe and discuss Appreciative Inquiry (AI) as a research method to facilitate student voice in school research. The paper sets out a model for conducting AI in schools. The research questions identified are: What are the researcher’s reflections when using Appreciative Inquiry in school research? What challenges and opportunities can be found when using Appreciative Inquiry in research processes with students? An application of the model will be presented and problematised. The conclusions indicate the importance of inviting students to participate in the process of defining research topics, and of using multimodal methods for facilitating students’ exploration of school experiences. It is also vital that adults support students in imagining and articulating visions on how to improve the school, as well as plans designing for enacting visions. Finally, a ‘whole school approach’ is emphasised for contributing to sustainable appreciative student voice work in schools.

  • 9.
    Alerby, Eva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Beyond the boundaries of the classroom: Interpersonal relationships in thetransformation from (edu)room to (edu)roam2018In: NERA2018 - 46th Congress: Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Egenmakt, jämlikhet och effektivitet: hur kan e-hälsotjänster inom barn- och ungdomspsykiatrin möta de ungas behov?2018In: BUP kongress: Moderna tider på BUP, Luleå, april 24-25, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    From 9 to 91 in good health: the health promoting role of the inner child through the life course2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Future health2018In: Addressing Societal Challenges / [ed] Editors Johan Frishammar Åsa Ericson, Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2018, p. 71-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Good health has always been crucial to people’s life situation.Throughout the history of health care, cures for diseaseshave been discovered, and great strides have been made toallow humans to live longer and healthier lives. However, newchallenges arise, for example, mental ill-health in childrenand young adults, coping with an older population, and servicingsparsely populated areas, such as the Arctic regions.Moreover, increased migration brings unique challenges andliving in a digital world increase health risks. However, inevery challenge, there is an opportunity. At LTU, health is aprioritized area, with a focus on innovative interdisciplinaryresearch, for example, including the perspective of health inArctic living, widening educational research to include healthpromotion, and exploring technology within the e-health field.One possible approach is to support people to increase controlover and improve their health at individual and organizationallevels, as well as using social innovations to promotehealth with a “cool” northern perspective.

  • 13.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Hallberg, Josef
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Gamification of health education: Schoolchildren’s participation in the development of a serious game to promote health and learning2018In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 354-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The use of modern technology has many challenges and risks. However, by collaborating with schoolchildren, ideas to effectively promote health and learning in school can be identified. This study aimed to examine how a participatory approach can deepen the understanding of how schoolchildren relate to and use gamification as a tool to promote physical activity and learning.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Inspired by the concept and process of empowerment and child participation, the methodological focus of this study was on consulting schoolchildren. During a 2-month period, 18 schoolchildren (10–12-years-old) participated in workshops to create game ideas that would motivate them to be physically active and learn in school.

    Findings

    The phenomenological analysis resulted in one main theme, ‘Playing games for fun to be the best I can be’. This consisted of four themes with two sub-themes each. The findings offer insights on how to increase physical activity and health education opportunities using serious games in school.

    Originality/value

    The knowledge gained provides gamification concepts and combinations of different technological applications to increase health and learning, as well as motivational aspects suggested by the schoolchildren. The findings are discussed with health promotion and health education in mind.

  • 14.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Eliasson, Benitha
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Henriksson, Annica
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Lundqvist, Catarina
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Nordstrand, Annika
    Norrbotten County Council.
    Health and learning: building a common bridge challenging educationalscience and school development2018In: NERA2018 - 46th Congress: Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    "Like the cement in a brick wall": Health Promotion in schools according to students, school staff and politicians2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Bergstrom-Wuolo, Maya
    et al.
    Public Health Center, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå.
    Dahlström, Josefin
    Health Counselor in Luleå.
    Hertting, Krister
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    My heart has no hurt: the health of young immigrants2018In: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, ISSN 1747-9894, E-ISSN 2042-8650, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 290-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore health from the perspective of young immigrants in Sweden.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A total of 25 newly arrived young immigrants attending Swedish language classes in northern Sweden participated by drawing and writing open letters. They continued the open-ended sentence “Now I’ll draw and describe a day when I was feeling good, that was […].”

    Findings

    The phenomenological analysis resulted in three themes: longing to be in control for a better life, searching for power in the good and the bad, and striving for a sense of belonging in the new society. The findings illuminate young immigrants’ perspectives of a health-promoting everyday life consisting of agency, reflection and a sense of community. The findings also highlight the young immigrants’ experiences when health-promoting aspects are lacking, characterized by disillusionment, anxiety and loneliness. The findings are discussed with health promotion, health literacy and young immigrants in mind.

    Practical implications

    According to young immigrants, meeting basic needs such as food, sleep and housing is health promoting but easily taken for granted. Being able to have a say in matters concerning everyday life, social inclusion and finding power in memories – positive and negative – can promote health in young immigrants.

    Originality/value

    The young immigrants were able to communicate via drawings and words to overcome language barriers.

  • 17.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Students’ Experiences of Meaningful Situations in School2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 538-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on school situations students experienced as meaningful and how these experiences can guide educational improvement. Participants included 15 students in grade 3 from a Swedish school. In this qualitative study, the data consisted of drawings, multimodal productions, interviews, and field notes. The analysis resulted in four themes: Having the opportunity to learn in different spaces; Being free and able to participate; Experiencing caring and sharing, and Recognizing one’s own growth and achievement. The findings suggest that situations students find meaningful involve aspects of both learning and wellbeing. The practical implication for these results is that student-generated qualitative data can help indicate needs for educational improvement.

  • 18.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Lundqvist, Catarina
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Nyström, Lena
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Henriksson, Annica
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Nordstrand, Annika
    Norrbotten County Council.
    The Health Dialogue as a Tool to Increase Health Literacy: Schoolchildren’s and Professional’s Perspectives.2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lögdberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Department of Culture and Media Studies, Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden..
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    "Thinking about the future, what's gonna happen?": How young people in Sweden who neither work nor study perceive life experiences in relation to health and well-being.2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1422662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore how young people in Sweden who neither work nor study perceive life experiences in relation to health and well-being.

    Methods: A task-based interview technique was used and data was analysed with qualitative content analysis. Interviews were conducted with 16 participants aged 16-20 who were unemployed and not eligible for upper secondary school, or who had dropped out of school.

    Results: Three themes emerged from the analysis illustrating how the young people perceive their life experiences in relation to health and well-being: Struggling with hardships in the absence of caring connections, Feeling good when closely connected to others, and Being forced to question what has been taken for granted. Each theme consists of 2-3 subthemes.

    Conclusion: Based on the young people's narrated experiences health can be understood as: something that is created in relation to others and in relation to the social and cultural context; as something dynamic and changeable; as the ability to adapt and respond to challenges; and finally as something existing on a collective as well as an individual level. Implications for school, social services and health promotion initiatives are discussed, with an emphasis on working with young people.

  • 20.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Useful life lessons for health and well-being: adults' reflections of childhood experiences illuminate the phenomenon of the inner child2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1441592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe and gain more knowledge about the phenomenon of the inner child in relation to health and well-being reflected in events during childhood experienced by adults. Method: In this hermeneutical phenomenological study, 20 adults, 10 men and 10 women aged 22–68, were interviewed. Results: The analysis of the data illuminated the phenomenon of the inner child in one theme: Gaining useful life lessons through childhood experiences, made up by four sub-themes: Sharing relationshipsplaying to healbeing strong or frail and supporting the next generationConclusion: The participants’ experiences of events during childhood were illuminating the phenomenon of the inner child as promoting or hindering health and well-being and impact human adaptation throughout life. Our findings indicate that the participants learned useful life lessons suggesting that experiences during childhood can help us to adapt across the life span and over generations, and this is the essence of the inner child. Our findings also contribute to the health literacy discussion and detail how knowledge and action competency is developed in mental, social and existential dimensions of health and well-being.

  • 21.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Bykachev, Kirsi
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Karppi, Jussi
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Kumpulainen, Kirsti
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Sormunen, Marjorita
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Turunen, Outi
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Turunen, Hannele
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Thompson, Lucy
    University of Aberdeen.
    Wilson, Philip
    University of Aberdeen.
    Breivik, Elin Anne
    Norwegian Centre for e-Health Research.
    Hege Fagerheim, Siv
    Norwegian Centre for e-Health Research.
    Larsen, Frank
    Norwegian Centre for e-Health Research.
    Experiences of using eHealth to improve psychiatry services for children andadolescents in peripheral areas2017In: Ninth International Congress of Arctic Social Sciences: People and Place (ICASS IX), 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Hertting, Krister
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad university,.
    Health Literacy in an age of technology: schoolchildren's experiences and ideas2017In: International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, ISSN 1463-5240, E-ISSN 2164-9545, Vol. 55, no 5/6, p. 234-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he aim of this paper was to explore opportunities to promote schoolchildren’s health literacy based on their own experiences and ideas. Research suggests the necessity for health literacy to be included into the school curriculum, and to view health promotion as part of lifelong learning. There is also a need to involve schoolchildren in developing health literacy so they can find strategies to improve their health. However, there is limited research on the best practices of health literacy, based on the schoolchildren’s own experiences and ideas. In this article, a secondary analysis of the data from two previous studies was performed. In total, 540 schoolchildren aged 10–15 from the northern regions of Finland, Sweden, Norway and Russia participated by sharing their experiences in written reflections or by completing an open question in a survey. Two questions were posed to gather the data in the secondary analysis: ‘What signifies the schoolchildren’s experiences of health and well-being?’ and ‘What are the strategies to promote health and well-being suggested by the schoolchildren?’ The results show that people and interactive technology support schoolchildren’s health literacy. The schoolchildren highlighted the importance of being cared for, confirmed by and connected to others. They also stressed the importance of being in an environment that enabled them to participate and thus be engaged, which made them empowered to take care of their own health and well-being. In addition, they identified empowering aspects of technology as a tool in health promotion that created health opportunities for the schoolchildren.

  • 23.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Hallberg, Josef
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    A slice of the win-win game: Swedish schoolchildren’s ideas on gamification to promote physical activity and cognitive ability2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Activity: ’The golden rule’ and enabling technology: Schoolchildren’s experiences give perspectives on promoting health literacy2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Lögdberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Department of Culture and Media Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Doing research together with young people who are not in employment or education: aiming at inclusion and dealing with exclusion2016In: YOUTH MOVES - Voices - Såaces - Subjectivities, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Melder, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Department of Religious Studies/Psychology of Religion.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Existential health: developing and evaluating methods for successful health promotion in a secularized context2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Hertting, Krister
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Health promoting interactive technology: Finnish, Norwegian, Russian and Swedish students' reflections2016In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 505-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate Finnish, Norwegian, Russian and Swedish students' reflections and ideas on how interactive technology can be used to promote health in school. The data were collected in the northern part of these four countries, and 630 students aged 13-15 filled out the World Health Organization's 'Health Behavior in School-Aged Children' self-completion questionnaire with one additional open question, which is analyzed in this article (n = 419). The phenomenological analysis resulted in four themes: A sense of control, Balancing enjoyable options, Sharing with others and Learning made easier. The students point out that interactive technology promotes empowerment and independence, reduces stress and makes learning easier. They argue for a healthy balance of Internet use for it to be health promoting. According to the students, good relationships increase well-being; and interactive technology can offer a way to socialize, provide a tool for meeting and making new friends, help when not feeling well and give support when encouraging classmates. We argue, based on the findings of the present study and previous research, that students need a combination of freedom and meaningful relationships with adults who have an empowered child perspective, to fully take advantage of the empowering effects of interactive technology. We suggest, as implications for practice, that teachers, school leaders and health care professionals find ways to act as partners using an appreciative process, asking questions on what works well, to make interactive technology an enabling technology to increase health literacy, thus improving health and well-being in students.

  • 28.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Health promotion through the life span with an intergenerational perspective: Like two peas in a pod2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Öhrling, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Prellwitz, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Health throughout the lifespan: The phenomenon of the inner child reflected in events during childhood experienced by older persons2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 31486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe and gain more knowledge of the phenomenon of the inner child, reflected in events during childhood experienced by older persons. Thirteen older persons aged 70 to 91 years old were interviewed. A hermeneutical phenomenological analysis of the data revealed two main themes: the inner child becomes visible and the inner child's presence through life. The participants' narratives showed that their understanding of the experiences included both positive and negative feelings, as well as ways to be creative, in which the inner child became visible. The participants' experiences indicated that the inner child was present throughout the lifespan, was found in challenges that occurred in life, and could turn something bad into something good. However, the presence of the inner child could also be a source for development throughout life and could interfere with the person. The findings from this study point to older persons' need to be recognized, acknowledged, and understood as a unique person living his or her own life. In addition, dimensions of well-being such as feeling safe, loved, supported, and creating space for fantasy and possibilities can be compared to the physical, mental, social, and existential dimensions of well-being found in WHO surveys and definitions of health. This calls for a holistic approach when caring for older persons.

  • 30.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Hälsa på hal is: Gränsöverskridande byggd miljö för god​ hälsa i kallt klimat2016In: Plan: tidskrift för planering av landsbygd och tätorter, ISSN 0032-0560, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Bykachev, Kirsi
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Tossavainen, Kerttu
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Kumpulainen, Kirsti
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Wilson, Philip
    University of Aberdeen.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Bjørvig, Siri
    University Hospital of North Norway.
    Borgen, Morten
    University Hospital of North Norway.
    Improving psychiatry services for children and adolescents with eHealth in peripheral areas2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Lögdberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Umeå University, Department of Culture and Media Studies, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Inside and outside: how young people outside the school system and labor market experience health2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Mitra, Dana L.
    et al.
    Pennsylvania State University, Department of Education Policy Studies, Penn State University.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Brezicha, Kristina
    Pennsylvania State University, Georgia State University.
    Maithreyi, R.
    Centre for Budget and Policy Studies, Maitri Bhavan, No. 4, Basavanagudi, Bengaluru, Karnataka.
    Serriere, Stephanie
    Pennsylvania State University, Division of Education, Indiana University Purdue University Columbus.
    Ironies of democracy: Purposes of education and the construction of citizens in Sweden, India and the United States2016In: Citizenship Teaching and Learning, ISSN 1751-1917, E-ISSN 1751-1925, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 191-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With relatively few comparative studies of civics curricula in diverse democratic contexts and world regions, this article considers how civic values are negotiated in national curricular policy texts. To explore the purposes of education and the construction of citizens in curricular documents, we layer two theoretical frameworks together - Biesta’s framework examining the purposes of education and Westheimer and Kahne’s framework examining the types of civic education. Looking at curricular frameworks from Sweden, India and the United States, we engaged qualitative content analysis to identify common themes of civic values across these nations: workforce preparation, positioning in society and democratic questioning. We found growing commonality of how ‘citizenry’ is increasingly being defined in terms of individual contributions to the larger enterprises of the nation and the global economy.

  • 34.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    “It’s important to take care of each other”: health promotion in schools based on Swedish schoolchildren’s experiences2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Bykachev, Kirsi
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Tossavainen, Kerttu
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Kumpulainen, Kirsti
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Wilson, Philip
    University of Aberdeen.
    Bjørvig, Siri
    University Hospital of North Norway.
    Borgen, Morten
    University Hospital of North Norway.
    Multi-professional collaboration and consultation: Improving child and adolescent psychiatry with eHealth2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Sjöblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    The child is the father of the man: what is health promoting when you look upon the inner child’s presence through life?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The power of appreciation: promoting schoolchildren’s health literacy2016In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 611-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore Swedish children’s positive experiences of health and well-being, and their thoughts on how health literacy can be promoted.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Totally, 121 schoolchildren between the ages of 10 and 14 from three schools in two municipalities in the northern part of Sweden shared their lived experiences through individual written reflections.

    Findings

    The phenomenological analysis resulted in one theme, appreciation as fuel for health and well-being, and four sub-themes: feeling a sense of belonging; being cared for by others; being respected and listened to; and feeling valued and confirmed. The understanding of the schoolchildren’s experiences of health and well-being and their thoughts on how health literacy can be promoted revealed that appreciation in different forms is the key dimension of their experiences of health and well-being.

    Practical implications

    The findings of this study point to the necessity of promoting health education that includes reflection and action-awareness of one’s own and others’ health as well as the competence to know how and when to improve their health. Such health education can contribute to the development of health literacy in young people, an essential skill for the twenty-first century.

    Originality/value

    This study’s originality is that the authors added the concepts of appreciative inquiry and student voice to the study of health literacy with children.

  • 38.
    Hertting, Krister
    et al.
    Center of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport, Halmstad University.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    The Youth Soccer Coaches’ Visions and Thoughts of Leader Support2016In: Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research, ISSN 2081-2221, E-ISSN 1899-4849, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 69-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Objectives: The European Commission has highlighted the use of sports as an important venue for engaging citizens in health-enhancing activities, physical activity, volunteerism and active citizenship. Coaching is a central component of sports for children and youth, but there is little research on the promotion of sports coaches' health. In the light of this gap, the aim of this paper was to elucidate youth soccer coaches' visions and thoughts regarding leadership support from clubs and soccer associations. Design and method: The study was based on an online questionnaire conducted with Swedish soccer coaches who coached children and young people between 6 and 18 years of age. In total, 1514 coaches received the online questionnaire via email and 764 coaches (50.5% of the sample) answered. Three hundred and seventy-five coaches answered the open question: 'How would you describe the support you, as a coach, would like to receive from clubs and associations?' Responses were analysed using method. Results: Four main themes emerged from the analysis: financial and other resources support, recognition of contribution, sense of belonging to a value-based association and positive coach development. Conclusion: We discuss the factors that support soccer coaches and how these can serve as health-promoting supports for coaches working with children and youth.

  • 39.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Active@school: Promoting Physical Activity with Interactive Technology by Empowering Schoolchildren2015In: Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region, Rovaniemi: Lapland University of Applied Sciences, 2015, p. 195-204Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Hertting, Krister
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    eHealth and eLearning Go Hand in Hand2015In: Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region, Rovaniemi: Lapland University of Applied Sciences, 2015, p. 43-51Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Sohlman, Eiri
    et al.
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi.
    Kostenius, CatrineLuleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.Johansen, Ole MartinDepartment of Education at UiT The Arctic University of Norway, campus Alta.Ryzhkova, InnaMurmansk State Humanities University.Merivirta, MinttuRovaniemi University of Applied Sciences.
    Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Sohlman, Eiri
    et al.
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Johansen, Ole Martin
    Department of Education at UiT The Arctic University of Norway, campus Alta.
    Ryzhkova, Inna
    Murmansk State Humanities University.
    Experiences of Cross-Border Collaboration to Promote Schoolchildren’s Health2015In: Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region, Rovaniemi: Lapland University of Applied Sciences, 2015, p. 323-328Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Let’s have a “school-rules-attitude”2015In: Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region, Rovaniemi: Lapland University of Applied Sciences. , 2015, p. 309-311Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Rutberg, Stina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Parent participation plays an important part in promoting physical activity2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 27397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although physical activity (PA) is an important and modifiable determinant of health, in Sweden only 15% of boys and 10%of girls aged 15 years old achieve the recommended levels of PA 7 days per week. Adolescents’ PA levels are associated withsocial influence exerted by parents, friends, and teachers. The purpose of this study was to describe parents’ experiencesof being a part of their adolescents’ empowerment-inspired PA intervention. A qualitative interview study was performedat a school in the northern part of Sweden. A total of 10 parents were interviewed, and the collected data were analyzedwith qualitative content analysis. Three subthemes were combined into one main theme, demonstrating that parents are oneimportant part of a successful PA intervention. The life of an adolescent has many options and demands that make it difficultto prioritize PA. Although parents felt that they were important in supporting their adolescent, a successful PA interventionmust have multiple components. Moreover, the parents noted that the intervention had a positive effect upon not only theiradolescents’, but also their own PA. Interventions aimed at promoting PA among adolescents should include measures tostimulate parent participation, have an empowerment approach, and preferably be school-based.

  • 45.
    Sohlman, Eiri
    et al.
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Johansen, Ole Martin
    Department of Education at UiT The Arctic University of Norway, campus Alta.
    Ryzhkova, Inna
    Murmansk State Humanities University.
    Together for Schoolchildren’s Health!: Arguments for Cross-border Collaboration to Promote Schoolchildren’s Health through ICT Applications in the Barents Region2015In: Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region, Rovaniemi: Lapland University of Applied Sciences, 2015, p. 27-33Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Activity: ArctiChildren project: A good example of giving voice and space to students in an international cross-border network2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Activity: Creating opportunities for diversity and unpredictability: inviting children to be co-researchers2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    ArctiChildren project: A good example of giving voice and space to students in an international cross-border network2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Creating opportunities for diversity and unpredictability: inviting children to be co-researchers2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Fun, feasible and functioning: Students’ experiences of a physical activity intervention2014In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe students’ experiences of participating in a physical activity (PA) intervention. Methodology: A purposive sampling was used; 14 students (four boys and 10 girls) were interviewed and the collected data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. Major findings: One main theme was identified: fun, feasible and functioning. The following two subthemes also emerged: the multi-component intervention fits several, but not all, and manageable measuring can also be motivating. The main theme elucidates that fun was an important factor for joining the study; the students also experienced he empowerment-inspired intervention and the data collection to be fun and feasible. According to the students, the intervention was functioning since they experienced that it increased their PA. Principal conclusions: An empowerment approach that includes forming partnerships with students is a promising avenue for developing PA interventions for schools, regardless of whether the person concerned is a parent, teacher, school nurse or physiotherapist, but one size will never fit all.

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