Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 23 av 23
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Cities in time, temporary urbanism and the future of the city2019Ingår i: Journal of Urban Design, ISSN 1357-4809, E-ISSN 1469-9664, Vol. 24, nr 1, s. 158-163Artikel, recension (Refereegranskat)
  • 2.
    Chapman, David
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Winter City Urbanism: Enabling All Year Connectivity for Soft Mobility2019Ingår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, nr 10, artikel-id 1820Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores connectivity for soft mobility in the winter season. Working with residents from the sub-arctic city of Luleå, Sweden, the research examines how the interaction between the built environment and winter season affects people’s use of the outdoor environment. The research questions for this study are, 1) how do residents perceive the effects of winter on an areas spatial structure and pattern of streets and pathways? and 2) what enablers and barriers impact resident soft mobility choices and use of the public realm in winter? Methods used were mental mapping and photo elicitation exercises. These were used to gain a better understanding of people’s perception of soft mobility in winter. The results were analysed to identify how soft mobility is influenced by the winter season. The discussion highlights that at the neighbourhood scale, residents perceive that the winter alters an areas spatial structure and pattern of streets and pathways. It was also seen to reduce ease of understanding of the public realm and townscape. In conclusion, it is argued that new and re-tooled town planning strategies, such as extending blue/ green infrastructure planning to include white space could help better enable all year outdoor activity in winter cities.

  • 3.
    Chapman, David
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Arctic Risk in Urban Spaces (ARUS): Report of meeting 16th & 17th January 20182018Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Report from the ARUS workshop in Abisko Research Station of the 16th and 17th January 2018. The workshop was used to develop a project agenda and key issues around changing risks in the Arctic public realm. Whilst this workshop was exploratory, the aim was to identify design challenges to urban space that climate change could bring for soft mobility.  The objective was to develop a research strategy that can develop ways to adapt Arctic settlements to these new environmental risks. The goal is to grow these agendas into research applications and funded research.

  • 4.
    Larsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Changing risks to outdoor activity in the Arctic: Resilience to climate-related community change2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Arctic communities have over generations evolved lifestyles that fit with working and living with local conditions and seasonal variations. With climate change, however, comes evolving and unknown weather’s that these communities need to adapt too. These environmental changes may present new risk and unexpected outcomes to outdoor activity that communities will need to address.

    In subarctic regions, pedestrians encounter a variety of road or pavement surface conditions, such as snow, ice, melting ice or mixed icy and snowy surfaces.  Slips and falls are a significant cause of work- and leisure-time accidents. The costs for medical care of fall-related injury treatment is high. Fear can also result in physical inactivity which is a significant population health concern worldwide. 

    This presentation highlights the traditional risks associated with outdoor activity in winter and how they are changing with climate change. It does this through the analysis of survey responses about the use of outdoor public space. The survey is from 1) 344 people in the city of Luleå Sweden (Dfc climate classification area), and 2) 325 responses from people living in Dfb and Dfc climate areas across the world, e.g. Canada.

    At a societal level, this change suggests that new forms of sustainable development and public policy are needed. These could help reduce costs and pressures on the health services by creating safer and more walkable arctic communities. Here costs and benefits related to inactivity and injury are high and affect both the individual and society as a whole.

  • 5.
    Larsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Outdoor human environments: the changing face of climatic barriers to soft mobility and gathering in winter communities2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In Arctic regions, generations have evolved lifestyles that fit with working and living with local conditions and seasonal variations. With emerging climate changes new risks appear and prior individual experiences based on preconceptions of risk may not remain valid. In everyday life, soft-mobility is required in varying conditions, such as ice and snow covered surfaces, darkness, extreme weather conditions. Inability to detect environmental clues to risk is a critical aspect for injury. Also, fear and activity avoidance lead to an increased risk of physical inactivity, a significant population health concern worldwide. Methods: An explorative survey, on subjective ratings of barriers to 1) soft mobility and 2) the use of outdoor public space in winter was performed. The EAMQ –Climate survey, tailored for climatic sensitive urban design research, include dimensions of distance, ambient and terrain, and a range of weather conditions found in winter, such as sun, coldness, wind, ice and ground surface properties (ice, snow, slush). Respondents were 1) 344 people in Northern Sweden, and 2) 361 people in Canada and Scandinavia. Results: The results highlight that rain, icy surfaces and darkness are today’s most significant barriers to soft-mobility in winter. For the use of outdoor public spaces, the most significant barriers were slushy and icy surfaces, rain precipitation and darkness. Conclusions: The traditional risks associated with outdoor activity in winter are changing with climate change. Future urban design and planning for safer and more walkable winter cities need to consider a more extensive pallet of weather conditions.

  • 6.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    The street, a quintessential social public space2018Ingår i: Journal of Urban Design, ISSN 1357-4809, E-ISSN 1469-9664, Vol. 23, nr 1, s. 163-164Artikel, recension (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 7.
    Chapman, David
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Updating winter: the importance of climate-sensitive urban design for winter settlements2018Ingår i: Arctic Yearbook, ISSN 2298–2418Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores winter settlement urban design principles to begin to identify climate related conditions that are affecting soft mobility (walking and cycling) in these communities.

    Winter communities have evolved lifestyles and means that fit with working and living with local conditions and seasonal variations. With climate change, however, comes evolving weather’s that these communities need to adapt too. These changes may present new risks and unexpected challenges to outdoor soft mobility in the community.

    Public policy highlights physical inactivity as a major health concern. For these communities, winter has always limited outdoor soft-mobility. Here, we understand that in winter outdoor activity can be reduced by weather and fear of accidents.

    People’s understanding of the barriers and enablers to soft mobility are also often based on experience and ability to detect environmental clues. To help winter communities maximise the opportunities for outdoor soft mobility and the wellbeing benefits this can bring, built environments need to be designed with an understanding of climate change. 

    This study explores barriers and enablers to soft mobility in winter and discusses them in light of climate change and human wellbeing. It is argued that established principles of urban design may require re-evaluation if we want to increase outdoor soft mobility in winter. Increases in physical activity could help reduce costs and pressures on health services by creating safer and more walkable communities. The paper concludes by suggesting that communities should focus on more context based winter urban design principles that account for ongoing climate change.

  • 8.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Urban design of winter cities: Winter season connectivity for soft mobility2018Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    All across the world the form of the built environment is playing a crucial role as enabler or inhibitor for urban outdoor activity such as soft mobility. Urban form can make it more attractive for people to be mobile outdoors and playing a role in the public life, or it can put people off venturing outside. For winter cities, a question for urban design is how we can design environments that are attractive for outdoor activity in the winter season as well as summer and additionally how will climate change influence these aspects.

    The reason for studying this is the importance of understanding how, in relation to urban form, weather, seasonal variations, and climate change influences human outdoor activity. In this study the focus on outdoor activity is problematised around the concern that people spend a low percentage of their time outdoors in winter conditions. For society, the problem is that this trend and the related low levels of physical activity are associated with a range of health issues.

    To study this the main question for this research is what attracts and hinders soft mobility during the winter season and how can this knowledge underpin new considerations about urban design for connectivity in winter cities? To address this, the research methods focused on document studies, surveys, mental mapping, photo elicitation and semi-structured discussions.

    The study works at three scientific levels. Firstly, it seeks to understand the interrelationship between the built environment and people’s outdoor activity in winter. Secondly, it attempts to understand how connectivity for soft mobility in winter is being affected by weather and climate change. Thirdly, it seeks new ways of thinking about how the urban form can be designed to increase outdoor soft mobility in winter.

    The discussion and conclusions focused on the argument that in winter settlements, the winter season can alter spatial patterns and settlement organisation. Here it was argued that in these settlements the winter season can be an aspect of urban morphology and can be part of the process of shaping the public realm and its connectivity for soft mobility in winter.

  • 9.
    Chapman, David
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Climatic barriers to soft-mobility in winter: Lulea, Sweden as case study2017Ingår i: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 35, s. 574-580Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban form can moderate the effects of weather on human movement. As such, the interrelationship between built environment, weather and human movement is a critical component of urban design. This paper explores the impacts of weather on non-motorised human movement (soft-mobility). Throughout we look at soft-mobility from the citizen’s perspective and highlight the barriers to soft-mobility in winter.

    The aim of this study was to test the traditional pallet of winter city urban design considerations. Those of solar-access, wind and snow management and explore other weather and terrain conditions that act as barriers to soft-mobility in winter. This study is based on survey responses from 344 citizens in the sub-arctic area of Sweden. Outcomes from the research highlight that rain, icy surfaces and darkness are today’s most significant barriers to soft-mobility in winter.

    Results from this study link changing barriers to soft-mobility in winter with climate change. The paper concludes that future urban design and planning for winter cities needs to consider a wider pallet of weather conditions, especially rain.

  • 10.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    By Design, from design guidance to built form2016Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the planning policy era of By Design: Urban design in the planning system: towards better practice through the lens of Planning Policy Guidance 1 (PPG1): General Policy and Principles and Planning Policy Guidance 3: Housing. The paper explores the objectives of urban design, as set out in By Design against PPG1’s objective to promote higher standards of urban design and PPG3’s objective to revise housing densities. Research takes a systematic approach to reviewing the evidence base available for the production of By Design and analyses density targets and urban design objectives against generic housing types of the day and four housing led development schemes delivered during the policy period. The paper argues that on density grounds, only two of the researched generic housing types delivered the density targets prescribed by PPG3, requiring the development industry to bring forward new models of development. The case study analysis establishes that the industry was able to adapt to the objectives of By Design with selected developments delivering the urban design objectives set out in By Design and density standards of PPG3. The paper concludes by arguing that whilst ‘By Design’ was extinguished as policy in 2012, its design objectives are still valid and may be relevant to new emerging dimensions related well-being as part of; Ease of movement and seasonal climate change as part of; Quality of the public realm.  

  • 11.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Urban Designer: Myth or Reality?2015Ingår i: Plan: tidskrift för planering av landsbygd och tätorte, ISSN 0032-0560, Vol. 69, nr 4, s. 42-47Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 12.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Neoliberal Urbanism and its Contestations, Crossing Theoretical BoundariesJenny Ku¨ nkel and Margit MayerPalgrave Macmillan, 248 pp. ISBN 978-0-2302-7183-82014Ingår i: Journal of Urban Design, ISSN 1357-4809, E-ISSN 1469-9664, Vol. 19, nr 4, s. 567-568Artikel, recension (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 13.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Berglund, Lotta
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    Project: Health on thin ice - urban planning for good helth in cold climates2014Övrigt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Stadsplaneringen i kallt klimat och dess betydelse för god hälsa diskuterades när forskare från Sverige, Norge och Finland träffades på Wibergsgården, Luleå tekniska universitet (LTU), i slutet av februari. -Vi har en het idé om god hälsa i kallt klimat, säger Catrine Kostenius, biträdande professor i hälsovetenskap vid Institutionen för hälsovetenskap.Tillsammans med Kristina Nilsson, professor i arkitektur, LTU, var hon värd för evenemanget tillsammans med projektledare Mia Tossavianen.Den tvärvetenskapliga forskargruppen har deltagare från LTU, Trondheim Norwegian University of Science och Oulu University i Finland.Samarbetet mellan forskargrupperna i Hälsopromotionsgruppen och Arkitektur har gjort ett pilotprojekt med innevånare och yrkesverksamma inom stadsplanering och hälsovård i Luleå och Pajala kommuner.De har nu gått samman med forskarkollegor från Finland, Norge och Sverige, och nästa steg är att använda delade kunskaper och erfarenheter från att utveckla en metod för att planera stadsmiljön för god hälsa i kallt klimat.- Det känns väldigt spännande att samarbeta med våra grannländer för utbyta goda erfarenheter och med förenade krafter utveckla användbara metoder som kombinerar hälsa och stadsplanering, säger Kristina Nilsson.

  • 14. Carmona, Matthew
    et al.
    Tiesdell, Steve
    Heath, Tim
    Oc, Taner
    Public Places – Urban Spaces: The Dimensions of Urban Design2010Bok (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Public Places Urban Spaces 2e is a thorough introduction to the principles of urban design theory and practice. Authored by experts in the fields of urban design and planning, it is designed specifically for the 2500 postgraduate students on Urban Design courses in the UK, and 1500 students on undergraduate courses in the same subject. The second edition of this tried and trusted textbook has been updated with relevant case studies to show students how principles have been put into practice. The book is now in full colour and a larger format, so students and lecturers get a much stronger visual package and easy to use layout, enabling them to more easily practically apply principles of urban design to their projects. Sustainability is the driving factor in urban regeneration and new urban development, and the new edition is focused on best sustainable design and practice

  • 15.
    Cowan, Rob
    et al.
    Urban design skills.
    Adams, Scott
    Urban design skills.
    Chapman, David
    Urban design skills.
    Qualityreviewer: Appraising the design quality of development proposals2010Bok (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Preface Foreword Planning for quality How to use Qualityreviewer Part A: Qualityreviewer Understand the place Understand the proposal Understand the implementation Make the decision Qualityreviewer at a glance Part B: Thinking about design and quality Using diagrams Six sets of design qualities Part C: Quality reviewer in the planning process Pre-application discussions Effective design statements Outline and full planning applications Beyond assessment Appendices

  • 16.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    York New City Beautiful: Toward an Economic Vision2010Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 17.
    Cowan, Rob
    et al.
    Urban design skills.
    Chapman, David
    Urban design skills.
    Adams, Scott
    Urban design skills.
    Huxford, Robert
    Urban Design Group and Esther Kurland of Urban Design London.
    Capacitycheck: Urban design skills appraisal2008Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 18.
    Cowan, Rob
    et al.
    Urban Initiatives.
    Hill, Daniel
    Urban Initiatives.
    Campbell, Kelvin
    Start with the park: Creating sustainable urban green spaces in areas of housing growth and renewal2005Bok (Refereegranskat)
  • 19.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    The Modern City Revisited Thomas Deckker (ed.)2003Ingår i: Urban Design Quarterly, ISSN 0266-6480, nr 85, s. 42-43Artikel, recension (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 20.
    Chapman, David
    Glasgow School of Art.
    ‘Compacte-stadsbeleid’ is dead: long live the Dutch compact city2002Ingår i: MacJournal, ISSN 1355-3046, nr 5, s. 48-57Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 21.
    Carmona, Matthew
    et al.
    The Bartlett School of Planning, University College London.
    Punter, John V.
    Department of City and Regional Planning, Cardiff University.
    Chapman, David
    The Bartlett School of Planning, University College London.
    From Design Policy to Design Quality: The treatment of design in community strategies, local development frameworks and action plans2002Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 22.
    Chapman, David
    Bartlett School of Planning University College London .
    Patterning the Dutch Compact City2001Licentiatavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    A major challenge to town planners in Britain is to help fulfil current and future housing need in a sustainable manner and avoid excessive development land take.

    This thesis therefore establishes what future development models are currently under debate and undertakes extensive research into Governments preferred option the 'Compact City'. Research focuses on empirical data for sustainable development and arguments for/against a policy of urban intensification.

    On conclusion that research alone fails to provide a sufficient basis for promoting a policy of 'Compact Cities', research emphasis was placed on the Dutch planning system, which has promoted such a policy for over a quarter of a century. Dutch experience was used to answer many unresolved arguments surrounding the 'Compact City' and an investigation was undertaken into how the Dutch have made this policy successful.

    In light of the fact that Dutch experience has shown that high quality urban housing is fundamental to attracting residents back to cities, an investigation of current UK generic housing models was undertaken and these were tested against sustainable density research and UK/Dutch design advice. On comparison it was established that many failed both tests and it was established that additional housing types could be required under a policy of 'Compact Cities'. An alternative development brief for additional housing models was therefore developed and this brief was investigated through the design of three alternative housing types.

    In final conclusion it was proposed that the Dutch treatment of density could provide a model for future planning in England and their design principles could aid the creation of alternative urban housing types.

  • 23.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och naturresurser, Arkitektur och vatten.
    The potential of ephemeral interventions1997Ingår i: Mac Journal, ISSN 1355-3046, s. 35-39Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
1 - 23 av 23
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf