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  • 1.
    Lööw, Joel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Initiatives for increased safety in the Swedish mining industry: Studying 30 years of improved accident rates2019In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 117, p. 437-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates safety-related developments in the Swedish mining industry over a 30-year period, from the 1980s to the 2010s. It studies what may have contributed to lowering the accident frequency rates and improvement of safety more broadly in the industry. On this basis, interviews were conducted with informants from mining companies. This material was supplemented with a workshop with mining health and safety representatives and documents relating to the subject. The results are divided into four main themes, showing that from the 1980s and onwards, lowered rates and general safety improvements followed in the wake of technology development. This was complemented by a more direct focus on organisational aspects of safety beginning in the early 2000s. Still the effectiveness of the individual measures is not clear; while they theoretically have an effect, causality is hard to show. In other words, the improvements may not necessarily depend on the specifics of these initiatives. Given this, the article discusses the different initiatives in-depth, and gives suggestions for future research and industry action. This includes recommendations for approaching safety holistically and the development of new proactive indicators.

  • 2. Berglund, Leif
    et al.
    Johansson, Maria
    Nygren, Magnus
    Samuelson, Björn
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Occupational accidents in Swedish construction trades2019In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to anazlye accidents occurring in the Swedish construction industry focusing specifically on the situation in the individual trades. The article includes all occupational accidents with at least one day of absence from work that were reported to the Swedish Social Insurance Agency for the year of 2016. The results, focusing on accident cause, injured body parts, as well as accidents per weekday, month and age, show that although the trades share commonalities regarding occupational accidents a number of trade-specific problem areas stand out. With this in mind, conclusions are drawn regarding the situation in each respective trade and suggestions are made for future studies focusing on accidents in construction industry trades.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Jan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Berglund, Leif
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Rask, Kjell
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Samuelson, Björn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Occupational safety in the construction industry2019In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    The paper is a research review focusing on occupational safety in the construction industry.

    OBJECTIVE

    The purpose is to present research that highlights the areas of occupational safety and risks and to identify areas where research is lacking.

    METHODS

    326 articles from scientific journals, mainly covering the construction industry in Europe, Canada, USA, Australia and Japan have been studied. The findings are presented under 11 categories: accident statistics; individual factors; legislation and regulations; ethical considerations; risk management; leadership, management, organization; competence; safety design; cost-benefit calculations; programs and models; and technical solutions.

    RESULTS

    The research is dominated by initiatives from researchers and government authorities, while the construction industry only appears as the object for the research. There is a scarcity of research on integrated systems encompassing subcontractors, as well as a lack of research with sociological perspectives on accidents. Furthermore, only a few studies have applied a gender perspective on safety in construction, i.e. there is a need of further research in this particular area.

    CONCLUSIONS

    A range of initiatives have been taken to increase safety in the construction industry and the initiatives are mainly reported to be successful. There are some cultural differences, but basically researchers present similar results regardless of country.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Jan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Lööw, Joel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Attracting young people to the mining industry: six recommendations2018In: International Journal of Mining and Mineral Engineering, ISSN 1754-890X, E-ISSN 1754-8918, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 94-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present workforce in the mining industry is ageing, and mining companies have difficulties recruiting young people who are not particularly interested in working in the industry. Simultaneously, mining companies tend to rely on contractors that offer volume flexibility and expertise, often in a combination that is economically appealing. This makes recruitment and development of the whole of the mining workforce complex. To recruit the right workforce, mining companies and their contractors need to cooperate and improve their knowledge about both attractive and repelling work features so that they can make wiser strategic decisions based on facts. On the basis of a Swedish context, we discuss different aspects of attractive workplaces and summarise our 'lessons learned' in six recommendations dealing with general health and safety issues, work organisation, competence development, gender equality, social responsibility and outsourcing.

  • 5.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Safety management on multi-employer worksites: Responsibilities and power relations in the mining industry2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this thesis is on the division of legal responsibilities for occupational safety management on multi-employer worksites in the mining industry. The empirical basis is a study conducted between 2013 and 2016 consisting of interviews and observations focusing on primarily managers, supervisors, coordinators and safety specialists from a Swedish mining company and a number of its contractors. Besides this, interviews were also conducted with an inspector from the Swedish Work Environment Authority (SWEA) and workshops were arranged involving industry representatives. Additionally, a document analysis was performed focusing on work organization, safety and regulatory matters. The theoretical framework focuses mainly and broadly on the consequences of inter-organizational complexity and power relations between organizations and between social actors.

    The results show that three key aspects characterize the division of legal responsibilities for safety management: 1) the main responsibility for managing safety is employer-specific and cannot be shared (e.g. between two separate companies) and entails specific formal tasks that must be performed, 2) everyone involved on multi-employer worksites has an extended duty to communicate and cooperate across companies in safety-related matters, and 3) the responsibility for coordinating work and broader safety measures is connected to one specific employer, usually the main client company itself by virtue of the work being conducted within its facilities. Although seemingly straight-forward in the legal demands being placed on specific actors, the matter of the division of responsibilities and what they should entail in practice had been a specific focus area for the mining company, as well as for the mining industry trade association and SWEA from an even broader perspective. The mining company had also taken a number of initiatives with the ambition to clarify these issues on their own multi-employer worksites in accordance with the legal requirements. As for the relations between the mining company and the contractors, these were characterized by an asymmetry of power with a difference between being affiliated to the company or a contractor in terms of the status and rights each affiliation entailed. This ultimately had an impact on contractor managers’ and supervisors’ ability or willingness to communicate with the client on safety-related issues.

    The conclusions of the thesis are divided into two main themes. The first theme, undermined conditions for employer responsibility, highlights that the main employer responsibility for managing safety may become eroded on multi-employer worksites, something that can be viewed from three distinct but interrelated perspectives: 1) the core-periphery structure characterizing multi-employer worksites, 2) how the different legal responsibilities relate to each other and the power asymmetry between organizations, and 3) the relations between the social actors involved in formal safety management in practice. The second theme, client company initiatives and blurring boundaries, underlines that the ambition of the mining company to clarify responsibilities meant that other issues related to power relations became downplayed or unaddressed. The dominant position that the company and, by extension, its managers, coordinators, etc., typically had also led to them occasionally intervening in the internal processes of the contractors, highlighting the importance of considering the consequences of blurred organizational boundaries due to longstanding outsourcing arrangements.

    An overall conclusion can be drawn that the dynamic, unfolding relations between the client and its contractors complicate the division of and adherence to legal responsibilities for safety management. This is a particular challenge facing policy and regulatory development going forward, not only in relation to the mining industry but on multi-employer worksites in general where workplace safety is especially important to consider.

  • 6.
    Berglund, Leif
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Rask, Kjell
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Samuelsson, Björn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Risker och säkerhetsarbete i byggbranschen: En kunskapssammanställning baserad på internationell forskning2017Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Berglund, Leif
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Rask, kjell
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Samuelsson, Björn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Risker och säkerhetsarbete i byggbranschen: En kunskapssammanställning baserad på internationell forskning2017Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Nygren, Magnus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Jakobsson, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Andersson, Eira
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Safety and Multi-employer Worksites in High-risk Industries: An Overview2017In: Relations Industrielles - Industrial Relations, ISSN 0034-379X, E-ISSN 1703-8138, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 223-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, workplace safety in high-risk industries is explored in relation to outsourcing and multi-employer worksites. Relevant industries in this case are those that traditionally have been high-risk due to hazards in the physical work environment and the occurrence of unsafe work processes and practices, such as construction, mining and petroleum production. After conducting a comprehensive literature review, we compile a number of key terms and concepts that have been the subject of interest among researchers and divide them into three broad categories: 1- contract work characteristics; 2- structural/organizational factors and conditions; 3- cultural conditions. We conclude by discussing the results in terms of challenges for safety in these shared work settings as well as suggest directions for future research.

  • 9.
    Lööw, Joel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Säkerhet i svensk gruvindustri: 30 år av sänkta olycksfallsfrekvenser - och den fortsatta vägen framåt2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we investigate the accident trend and safety initiatives within the Swedish mining industry during the past 30 years, and suggest focus areas to further increase workplace safety.

    The study has four parts. In the first part we investigate international research with focus on safety in the mining industry generally and accidents specifically. We also examine the question of measurability and safety indicators. In the second part, we analyse the statistics that are available through relevant statistics providers. The third part contains an interview study with representatives from two Swedish mining company that focused on the technical, organisational and structural changes and initiatives that may have contributed to the declining rate of accidents in the past 30 years. In the fourth part, we analyse the results and make suggestions for further focus-areas suitable for a main study. With this, we intend to lay the foundation for a roadmap for the mining industry’s future efforts to further improve the accident rate in the industry and to subsequently develop a proposal for a full-scale innovation project, where these issues are developed, concretised and analysed deeper.

    In the study, we clarify, through the use of both document and interview studies, the direct and indirect measures two different companies in the Swedish mining industry have implemented in order to reduce accident frequency. These studies provide an insight into how the direct (e.g. safety programmes) and indirect (e.g. automation) initiatives may have contributed to lower accident rates.

    An additional aspect that we cover is how the Swedish mining industry is described by public statistics, how these statistics can be used to e.g. evaluate the work environment and safety initiatives in further studies, as well as the degree to which these statistics can be used as an indicator for e.g. the working environment. This was investigated by examining the most relevant statistics providers: The Swedish Work Environment Authority, Statistics Sweden, SveMin, AFA Insurance, and the Geological Survey of Sweden.

    The results show that the accident rate within the Swedish mining industry has dropped significantly over the past 30 years and that this drop can be attributed to extensive changes in technology and requirements for systematic work environment management and new forms of organization. This applies to both investigated companies. The industry is still in need of evaluation of the relative impact of these changes as well as how the different factors have influenced each other. In the research, too, there is an obvious knowledge gap.

  • 10.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Lööw, Joel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Segerstedt, Eugenia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Challenges in obtaining a social licence to mine2016In: AusIMM Bulletin, E-ISSN 1034-6775, Vol. 6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Lööw, Joel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Segerstedt, Eugenia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    How to Get a Social Licence to Mine2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to discuss socially sustainable development in the mining industry and the communities surrounding the mines. The discussions are based on results from a prestudy and literature review on mining and sustainable development conducted during 2013–2014 at Luleå University of Technology in Sweden. ‘A social licence to mine’ is important for the mining industry, but the social dimension is a relatively underdeveloped dimension when it comes to sustainable development in general and the mining industry in particular, one reason probably being the lack of effective methods for capturing social impacts. The mining industry and the surrounding communities face many challenges that provide both possibilities and obstacles to socially sustainable development; eg aspects such as gender, work conditions and cultural aspects. For example, a strong mining workplace culture and community identity can createstrong cohesion but also lead to excluding certain groups, rejecting new ideas and reinforcing obsolete values. Other challenges include recruitment, as well as health and safety in relation to an increased use of fly-in-fly-out, contractors and automation of mining. Some challenges relate to the effects of fluctuations in the mining market. There is a lack of research that links attitudes, policies and activities within companies to their impact on the wider community, and vice versa. Future research should also include the development of methods and indicators for social sustainability relevant for mining – in other words: how do mining companies get ‘a social licence to mine’?

  • 12.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Segerstedt, Eugenia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Johansson, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Edman, Ida
    Luleå tekniska universitet (student).
    Åkerlund, Amanda
    Luleå tekniska universitet (student).
    Mining and Sustainable Development: Gender, Diversity and Work Conditions in Mining2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish mining companies and surrounding mining communities face many challenges when it comes to social sustainable development. For example, a strong mining workplace culture and community identity can create both strong cohesion but also lead to exclusion of certain groups, rejection of new ideas and reinforce traditional, masculine values. Other challenges include recruitment, as well as health and safety in relation to an increased use of contractors and automation of mining. The social dimension is relatively underdeveloped in studies of sustainable development in general and the mining industry in particular. This report reviews research on social sustainable development and mining with a special focus on (1) diversity of lifestyles, (2) gender, and (3) work conditions. Swedish and international research is reviewed and knowledge gaps are identified. All three areas of research can be regarded as relatively mature and they give important contributions to ourunderstanding of social sustainable development in relation to the mining sector even if they not always explicitly refer to it as such. There is a lack of research that links attitudes, policies and activities within companies to their impact on the wider society, and vice versa. Future research should also include the development of methods and indicators for social sustainability relevant for mining.

  • 13.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Veckopendlingen i Malmfälten: Omfattning och förutsättningar i gruvindustrin2014Report (Other academic)
1 - 13 of 13
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