Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Pamidi, Taraka Rama Krishna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Process Intensification by Ultrasound Controlled Cavitation2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Process industries are cornerstones in today’s industrialized society. They contribute significantly in the manufacturing of various goods and products that are used in our day-to-day life. Our society’s paradigm of consumerism accompanied by a rise in global population drives an ever increasing demand for goods. One of many strategies developed to satisfy these demands and at the same time improve production capabilities is known as process intensification. As an example, this can be accomplished by implementation of devices using the principle of hydrodynamic and acoustic cavitation. High-intensity cavitation in the ultrasonic range can change the physical and chemical properties of a wide range of substances and hence, improve the production rate or quality.

    Despite the generally accepted benefits of hydrodynamic and acoustic cavitation, applications in the process industry are yet limited. The reasons are that the method requires extensive optimization, which depends on multiple process parameters and encounters problem in the implementation on a larger scale. Scalable cavitation reactor concepts for industrial applications need to meet challenges like stability and robustness, energy efficiency and high flow rates. This thesis focuses on the methodology for the design and optimization of a flow through cavitation reactor.

    An ultrasound reactor concept has been developed and tested for two different applications: i) Fibrillation processes typical for paper and pulp industry; ii) Metal leaching of mineral concentrates. Simulations were carried out using a commercially available software for multiphysics modeling which combines acoustics, structural dynamics, fluid dynamics and piezoelectrics. However, the optimization procedure requires extensive experimental work in parallel with multi-physical simulations. In general, the application leads to hydrodynamic initiation of small gas bubbles in the fluid to be excited and collapsed by high-intensity ultrasound. This transient collapse of the cavitation bubbles provides both mechanical and chemical effect on materials.

    The developed reactor has a power conversion efficiency of 36% in batch mode and is well suited for a scale-up. In flow-through mode, the cavitation effect improves extensively and provides stable results. Energy efficiency requires hydrodynamic initiation of cavitation bubbles, high acoustic cavitation intensity by multiple excitation frequencies adapted to the optimized reactor geometry, as well as optimal process pressure and temperature with respect to the materials to be treated. The impact of flow conditions and hydrodynamic cavitation is significant and almost doubles the yield at the same ultrasonic power input.

    In the case of fibrillation of cellulose fibers, results obtained indicate that generated cavitation intensity changes the mechanical properties of the fiber wall. In the case of leaching, experiments show that six hours of exposure gave a 57% recovery of tungsten from the scheelite concentrate at 80°C and atmospheric pressure. Future research will focus on different types of excitation signals, extended reactor volume, increased flow rates and use of a higher process temperature. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-09-04 10:00
  • 2.
    Pamidi, Taraka Rama Krishna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Johansson, Örjan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Löfqvist, Torbjörn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Comparison of Different Concepts of UltrasoundReactors Using Numerical Simulations2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Sonochemical reactors are used for process intensification based on efficientenergy transfer due to ultrasound in order to cause transient cavitation in the medium.Ultrasonic reactors are extensively used for numerous applications due to their differentfeatures. The process of ultrasound cavitation can be defined as generation, growth andviolent collapse of microbubbles under ultrasonic irradiation which can release a highamount of energy in a small volume. The released energy causes a sudden increase intemperature and pressure which thereby can lead to extensive process intensification. Thepresent work deals with the evaluation of two different configurations of ultrasound reactorsusing both numerical modeling and experimental verification. The evaluation is based onprediction of the pressure distribution, verified by foil tests and with calorimetric method.The two reactors were developed to be used for the treatment of cellulose fibers to improveenergy efficiency in the fibrillation process. The goal is to optimize cavitation intensityand minimize the coupling loss factors. The development and evaluation of these two reactorconcepts aim to improve the design methodology for a scalable flow through reactor conceptwith high yield and energy efficiency

  • 3.
    Johansson, Örjan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Pamidi, Taraka Rama Krishna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Löfqvist, Torbjörn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Design of a high-intensity ultrasound reactor2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design, and optimization of ultrasonic reactors are important objectives in sonochemical processing. The recent expansion of the use of ultrasonic reactors in various research areas all faces the problem of scaling up from laboratory results to industrial purposes. A traditional ultrasonic reactor usually has several issues, such as low effectiveness as well as complex and unstable system performance, which all are unfavorable for efficient sonochemical processing. This study addresses these issues and investigates a new flow type ultrasonic reactor designed to generate transient cavitation as the main source for ultrasound. Some important factors like pressure, material, flow and geometry are considered in the design. Numerical optimization as well as experimental investigations are performed to reach an optimized, energy-efficient and controlled ultrasound cavitation reactor. Results from numerical modeling are used for acoustic optimization of the reactor, which is driven with three transducers mounted radially in the reactor wall with 120° spacing. The final reactor is excited with dual frequencies a total of 9 sonotrodes. The reactor is intended to be used in studies of pre-treatment of cellulose fibers aiming at developing an alternative, energy efficient fibrillation process and for ultrasound leaching of minerals.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Örjan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Pamidi, Taraka Rama Krishna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Löfqvist, Torbjörn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Design of a high-intensity ultrasound reactor2017In: IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Computer Society, 2017, article id 8091660Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design, and optimization of ultrasonic reactors are important objectives in sonochemical processing. The recent expansion of the use of ultrasonic reactors in various research areas all faces the problem of scaling up from laboratory results to industrial purposes. A traditional ultrasonic reactor usually has several issues, such as low effectiveness as well as complex and unstable system performance, which all are unfavorable for efficient sonochemical processing. This study addresses these issues and investigates a new flow type ultrasonic reactor designed to generate transient cavitation as the main source for ultrasound. Some important factors like pressure, material, flow and geometry are considered in the design. Numerical optimization as well as experimental investigations are performed to reach an optimized, energy-efficient and controlled ultrasound cavitation reactor. Results from numerical modeling are used for acoustic optimization of the reactor, which is driven with three transducers mounted radially in the reactor wall with 120° spacing. The final reactor is excited with dual frequencies a total of 9 sonotrodes. The reactor is intended to be used in studies of pre-treatment of cellulose fibers aiming at developing an alternative, energy efficient fibrillation process and for ultrasound leaching of minerals

  • 5.
    Johansson, Örjan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Löfqvist, Torbjörn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Pamidi, Taraka Rama Krishna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Design of high-intensity ultrasound reactor2017In: IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Computer Society, 2017, article id 8092948Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design and optmiziation of ultrasonic reactors are important objectives in sonochemical processing. The recent expansion of the use of ultrasonic reactors in various research projects all faces the problem of scaling up laboratory results for industrial use. A traditional ultrasonic reactor usually has several issues, such as low effectiveness and complex and unstable system performance, which all are unfavorable for efficient sonochemical processing. This study adresses these issues and investigates a new flow type ultrasonic reactor designed to generate transient cavitation as the main source for ultrasound for sonochemical processing. This study proposes the principle of the flow type ultrasonic reactor design to generate transient cavitation. The objective of this work is to design an ultrasonic reactor with a new geometry. The idea is to improve process efficiency based on resonance enhanced ultrasound controlled cavitation

  • 6.
    Johansson, Örjan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Pamidi, Taraka
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Khoshkhoo, Mohammad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Minerals and Metallurgical Engineering.
    Sandström, Åke
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Minerals and Metallurgical Engineering.
    Sustainable and energy efficient leaching of tungsten(W) by ultrasound controlled cavitation2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The project aims to use ultrasound controlled cavitation to achieve a more energy efficient leaching process. Locally, collapsing cavitation bubbles cause an extremely high pressure, shock waves and high temperature, which provide an opportunity to perform the leaching process at a much lower temperature than in an autoclave (20 bar overpressure and 220 ° C). The results show that the method works, but that a higher static pressure and thus temperatures are necessary to achieve a leaching recovery rate corresponding to today's autoclave technology. Another process parameter of importance is flow control and the initiation of cavitation bubbles that occur through a geometrically optimized nozzle (orifice plate). Numerical and experimental adaptation of the developed reactor with respect to the leaching conditions (Sodium hydroxide and Scheelite concentrate), required more time than expected. Best test results show that an energy supplement with ultrasonic controlled cavitation of 104 kWh / kg increases the leaching recovery by 21%. The leaching reagent temperature 60° C was determined regarding available reference data and was thought to be close to optimum for intensive cavitation in atmospheric pressure. Optimum temperature relates to the leaching reagent, vaporization temperature, density, boiling point, surface tension, and viscosity. Generally, for leaching is that higher temperatures are required to increase the chemical reaction rate (requires overpressure). The modified reactor principle provides stable results and is possible to scale up. Higher cavitation intensity for shorter finishing time and higher recovery rate require advanced flow induction, multiple excitation frequencies adapted to the optimized reactor geometry, as well as optimal process pressure and temperature.

  • 7. Vijigiri, Vipul
    et al.
    Pamidi, Taraka Rama Krishna
    Ultrasound induced cavitation and resonance amplification using adaptive feedback Control System2014Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Acoustic cavitation in fluids using high powered ultrasound has been of great interest in industries and biomedical engineering. The need for high-intensity focused ultrasound (sound with frequencies between 20 kHz to 10 MHz) and modeling of such systems has drawn great attention in engineering. Ultrasound excitation has found recent application in terms of replacing the existing dynamic mechanical systems that use high energy with low levels of efficiency. The proposed thesis work focuses on an application of acoustic cavitation and on adaptive control of resonance amplification to be used in the paper pulp industry. The primary objective is to keep a system of coupled and tuned resonances stable, and by that obtain high cavitation intensity in a water filled beaker. The secondary aspect is to numerically model and experimentally evaluate a prototype beaker, where the adaptive control scheme is implemented to attain high and stable cavitation intensity. The characteristic control parameters (excitation frequency and amplitude) can be adjusted to the fluid condition in the beaker (reactor) by a feedback control from a pressure sensor inside the beaker. The aim of this feedback loop is to keep the resonance phenomena stable with respect to an adaptable frequency. In this application, the resonance amplification is mainly used to generate and control cavitation at a frequency that corresponds to a range of beaker natural frequencies. The results of the development process show that high cavitation intensity can be achieved by ultrasound induced power. The electric power input required to achieve high cavitation intensity is relatively low and resulted in high energy efficiency. The results of the study will be used for an application for fibrillation of cellulose fibers to further improve energy efficiency in paper pulp industry.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf