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  • 1.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Demolition, dislocation and documentation in transforming mining towns2020In: Cultural heritage compensation: Approaches to transformation of sites with cultural values and architectural qualities / [ed] Rönn, Magnus; Grahn Danielson, Benjamin, Gothenburg: Chalmers University of Technology , 2020, p. 175-196Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates approaches towards conservation of the historic buildingsand historic environments in the largescale urban transformations ofMalmberget and Kiruna in northernmost Sweden, and how these can beunderstood as mitigation measures for negative impact on historic valuesand architectural qualities caused by the mining activities. Both towns werefounded at the turn of the 19th century, to enable mining the rich iron oredeposits in the region. Currently, subsidence caused by mining is affectingthe built environments, because the iron ore reaches beneath the settlements.Both towns are designated heritage sites of national interest for the purposeof conserving the cultural environment, and both have conservation plansadopted by the respective local councils. In Kiruna, there are listed buildings,and many buildings are protected in detailed development plans.The mining company is obliged to compensate for damage it causes. However,compensations primarily cover economic values, and focus on replacingfunctions, not heritage values. Mitigation measures for negative impact onhistoric values and architectural qualities can mainly be considered as constitutingrelocation of some of the historic buildings, and documentation ofthe built environments that will be demolished. An alternative strategy tocompensation for the loss of historic environments seems to be to redefinethe built heritage and its significance. ‘Heritagisation’ processes are takingplace, in which some of the historic buildings are reaffirmed as representingsignificant built heritage, and thus are being relocated, while the major bulkof historic buildings, many that have had formal protection, are instead beingdismissed as heritage. Thus, ‘de-heritagisation’ is taking place, as the historicvalues of these buildings are considered to be non-significant, they lose theirprotection, and are ultimately being demolished.

  • 2.
    Larsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Perceived impact of meteorological conditions on the use of public space in winter settlements2020In: International journal of biometeorology, ISSN 0020-7128, E-ISSN 1432-1254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to assess the impact of meteorological conditions on the use of public space in Scandinavia and Canada. Between September 21 and December 18, 2017, a cross-sectional online survey ‘EAMQ-Climate: space’ was distributed via web-based platforms. Survey responses were received from 361 residents (258 people from Scandinavia and 103 from Canada). The relative impact of the meteorological determinants on the use of public space was calculated, and a factor analysis was performed. Disparities between Canada and Scandinavia as well as between the climate zones represented were analysed using ANOVA. Overall results showed that the most significant meteorological enablers for the use of outdoor public spaces in winter were solar gain, snowfall and snow-covered surfaces. The main barriers were slush-covered and icy surfaces, rainfall and darkness. Wind and cold were conditions with less influence. The impact of rain and ice, however, differed between climatic zones. It was also established that, when addressing the meteorological impact on avoiding the use of public spaces in winter, it is vital to discriminate between conditions related to a) the ground surface and b) ambient conditions, as well as the particular significance of c) snow and sun, and d) darkness. For the design of public space in winter cities, we conclude that designers need to focus on a wider range of weather conditions than sun, wind and cold, and include snow, rainfall, slushy and icy ground and poor visibility. The study suggests that winter public space has a higher climatic design requirement to be successful than streets and pathways that are mainly used for soft mobility.

  • 3.
    Volchko, Yevheniya
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Norrman, Jenny
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Lars O.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Markstedt, Anders
    WSP, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Mossmark, Fredrik
    Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), Göteborg, Sweden.
    Bobylev, Nikolai
    Saint Petersburg State University, Institute of Earth Sciences, Saint Petersburg, Russia.
    Tengborg, Per
    Rock Engineering Research Foundation (BeFo), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Subsurface planning: Towards a common understanding of the subsurface as a multifunctional resource2020In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 90, article id 104316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to powerful trends in technology, resource and land supply and demand, socioeconomics and geopolitics, cities are likely to increase use of the subsurface in the near future. Indeed, the subsurface and its appropriate use have been put forward as being of crucial importance if we are to achieve resilient and sustainable cities. In recent years, quite apart from being seen primarily as a construction basis to provide physical space for infrastructure and to create a better surface living environment, the subsurface has been recognised as a multifunctional natural resource, one which provides physical space, water, energy, materials, habitats for ecosystems, support for surface life, and a repository for cultural heritage and geological archives. Currently, the subsurface is often utilised according to the “first-come-first-served” principle, which hinders possibilities to take strategic decisions on prioritisation and optimisation of competing subsurface uses, as well as fair inter- and intragenerational distribution of limited natural resources. Taking a broad international perspective, this paper investigates the subsurface as a multifunctional resource from five focal points: (1) what professionals with different backgrounds mean when using different terms related to the subsurface; (2) how professionals describe the subsurface and its multiple resources, functions and services; (3) how planning of subsurface use is supported in policy and regulations; (4) how the subsurface is included in the planning process; and (5) frameworks that can support decision-making on responsible use of the subsurface. The study reveals that the subsurface must be recognised (not only by scientists but also by decision- and policy-makers and other stakeholders) as a precious and multifunctional resource requiring careful planning and sensitive management in accordance with its potential and its value to society. Utilisation of the different subsurface functions to yield services requires careful planning and a framework to support decision-makers in achieving a balance between utilisation and preservation, and between the subsurface functions themselves in the case of outright utilisation. Further, to facilitate the necessary change towards transdisciplinary work settings in the planning process and form a platform for knowledge exchange and capacity building, there is an urgent need for a common language, i.e. mutually understandable terminology, and a common understanding, i.e. an all-inclusive view on the subsurface as a complex multifunctional resource.

  • 4.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Cities in time, temporary urbanism and the future of the city2019In: Journal of Urban Design, ISSN 1357-4809, E-ISSN 1469-9664, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 158-163Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Chapman, David
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Climate change and human behaviour: Understanding modal choice in a rapidly urbanising Arctic2019In: Adaptation to Climate Change, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This poster explores the human dimension of non-motorised transport, i.e. soft-mobility in Arctic communities. Empirical results are used to show how people’s modal choice in the European Arctic is being influenced by climate evolution and human-made climate change. From these results, it is possible to conceive new visions of the how to design the outside environments of Arctic settlements that can better enable people to move around in Arctic communities with reduced reliance on vehicles. At the societal level, this research will help reduce energy consumption and pollution from transport.

  • 6.
    Lidelöw, Sofia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Örn, Tomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Luciani, Andrea
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Energy-efficiency measures for heritage buildings: a literature review2019In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 45, p. 231-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The energy performance of heritage buildings is attracting growing interest in research and practice. Accordingly, as shown by our literature review, increasing numbers of articles on energy-efficiency measures for heritage buildings are being published in peer-reviewed journals. However, there is no overview of how energy efficiency and heritage conservation have been approached in the studies. To address this gap we categorized and assessed the identified studies in terms of two key elements of such investigations: energy analysis and analysis of cultural heritage values. Most of the studies evaluate and propose measures to reduce the operational energy use of single heritage buildings, and fewer have applied a broader system perspective. Moreover, the underlying notion of the buildings’ cultural heritage values seems to have been derived mainly from international conventions and agreements, while potentially significant architectural, cultural and historical factors have been rarely discussed. Our findings highlight that, when considering energy improvements, cultural heritage values should be more explicitly articulated and analysed in relation to established conservation principles or methodologies. Besides further scientific study, this point to the need of designing best-practice approaches that allow transparency and knowledge sharing about the complex relationships between energy efficiency and heritage conservation of buildings.

  • 7.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Förändringar i Kirunas byggda kulturmiljö2019In: Tornionlaakson vuosikirja / Tornedalens årsbok 2018-2019 / [ed] Kallio-Seppä, Titta, Tornio: Tornionlaakson kuntain toimikunta / Tornedalsrådet , 2019, p. 35-51Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Larsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Berggård, Glenn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Rosander, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Gait speed with anti-slip devices on icy pedestrian crossings relate to perceived fall-risk and balance2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 14, article id 2451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important to find criteria for preventive measures and appropriate assistive devices to reduce pedestrian injuries and increase walking in winter. Reducing the rate of falls on icy surfaces and improving people’s ability to safely cross a street in winter conditions by achieving an adequate walking speed, for example, need to be considered. This study explores pedestrian perceptions of fall risk, balance, and footfall transitions while using different designs for anti-slip devices on ice and snow-covered ice and relates these to measures of gait speed and friction. Trials were performed with nine pedestrians testing 19 anti-slip devices on ice and ice covered with snow. Laboratory tests of the dynamic coefficient of friction (DCOF) on plain ice were also performed. The findings suggest that there was conformity in the participants’ perceptions of good balance and low fall risk for one-fifth of the devices (three whole-foot designs and one design with built-in spikes). We also found that gait speed on icy pedestrian crossings is related to perceived fall-risk and balance control, but not to DCOF of the anti-slip devices.

  • 9.
    Abarkan, Abdellah
    et al.
    Blekinge tekniska högskola.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Berggård, Glenn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Svane, Örjan
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Lyssna på forskningen: Den visar på avregleringens problem2019In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 10/21/2019Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Megaprojects and the limits of ‘green resilience’ in the global South: Two cases from Malaysia and Qatar2019In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the climate change discourse in urban planning emphasises resilience as a key concept to deal with issues such as climate mitigation and adaptation, and urban health. What we have termed in this article ‘green resilience’, the coalescence of technological solutions and resilience thinking to solve cities’ ecological issues, is constantly gaining traction in urban planning research. However, green resilience often fails to take into account the socio-political and spatial processes that pertain to the exploitation of land for urban development particularly in the global South. Based on our latest research on two urban megaprojects, in Johor-Singapore (Malaysia) and Doha (Qatar), in this article we build a critique of green resilience and urbanism by leveraging research in the fields of environmental humanities and urban planning. © Urban Studies Journal Limited 2019.

  • 11.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Norrbotten's Technological Megasystem2019In: TICCIH Bulletin, ISSN 1605-6647, Vol. 85, p. 3-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Luciani, Andrea
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Norrbotten's Technological Megasystem as a heritage discourse: paradoxes and controversies2019In: / [ed] Maria Alessandra Segantini, London, 2019, Vol. 2, no 15, p. 292-300Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Norrbottens technologisches Megasystem2019In: Industriekultur, ISSN 0949-3751, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 27-29Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Omvärdering av kulturarv: Gruvstaden Kiruna i förändring2019In: Tidsskrift for kulturforskning, ISSN 1502-7473, E-ISSN 2387-6727, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 35-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kiruna, a mining town in northernmost Sweden, is being relocated so the mining company LKAB can continue mining the iron ore deposits that extends underneath the settlement. Kiruna is also a designated heritage site since the 1980s, with a large number of protected buildings. This article investigates how political decisions and negotiations between LKAB and the authorities affects heritagisation processes during the urban transformation. The analysis is based on planning documents, media reporting, and observations. Results show there is a strong authorised heritage discourse in Kiruna, which is reaffirmed through the urban transformation, in which some historic buildings – mainly representing the mining company’s history – are highlighted as significant and will be moved. Simultaneously, other parts of the built heritage are being dismissed and eventually demolished.

  • 15.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Predatory cities: unravelling the consequences of resource-predatory projects in the global South2019In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we outline a framework to study what we have termed "Predatory Cities", using the artificial offshore island of The Pearl in Qatar as a case study. By focusing on the nexus between urbanisation and resources, we will argue that the master-planning of new cities in the booming global South implies both the access and cheap exploitation of a set of, on the one hand, intangible and, on the other hand, tangible resources that exceed the traditional boundaries. Our point of departure is that the cheap appropriation and exploitation of alien architecture images and resource networks for the making of new, master-planned cities has become a necessary, but highly unsustainable, strategy to survive an increasingly competitive global offering of new destinations.

  • 16.
    Gyurkovich, Mateusz
    et al.
    Institute of Urban Design, Faculty of Architecture, Cracow Uni versity of Technology, Poland.
    Sotoca, Adolfo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Quality of Social Space in Selected Contemporary Multifamily Housing Complexes in Poland's Three Biggest Cities2019In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Physics (IOP), 2019, Vol. 471, no 8, article id 092009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The investment boom in multi-family residential buildings observable in Polish metropolises at the turn of the 20th century seems to have slowed down. Due to the growing difficulty in obtaining and repaying mortgages, potential customers have become more demanding. Users' needs come first once again, including the need to dwell in beautiful surroundings. Developers implementing projects of multi-family housing estates in different scales more and more often pay attention not only to the floor area, but also to the aesthetics of new buildings. Many housing estates put into use in Poland in recent years are as good in this respect as their contemporary western counterparts. Quality of workmanship and finishing standards of buildings and their immediate surroundings increase, too. This study covers examples of new housing investments, regarded as prestigious, from Poland's three biggest cities (Warsaw, Cracow, Lodz), implemented in 10 recent years. The goal was to verify by means of a comparative analysis whether their architectural quality has changed compared to previous years. Does it mean that beautiful residential architecture comes into being? Is it a common phenomenon? Is life comfortable in beautiful, prestigious housing estates? Do they form real, efficient habitats, or only bedroom communities, or are they another type of investment? What are the relations of contemporary multi-family estates with the urban tissue in light of the growing spatial chaos in Poland's biggest cities? According to the study results, in recent years Poland saw more and more multi-family housing estates, attractive in their contemporary form, furnished with well-tended and carefully arranged social – predominantly green – spaces. Alas, due to a limited number of services they are usually closed enclaves, often fenced. Frequently they lack sufficient services necessary for proper functioning of the housing environment: trade, education (nursery and primary schools), healthcare, basing on the existing overloaded city infrastructure. Therefore, their contribution to building of sustainable spatial structures is limited, not to mention such obvious drawbacks as lack of continuity of the public domain in the form of public greenery systems, pedestrian routes, or squares. Responsibility for this situation goes not only to designers and investors of such complexes, but mostly to local authorities, whose goal should be to maintain spatial order in cities. These are still, however, single islands on the sea of mediocre dense residential architecture. Growing transport-related problems result from scarcity of appropriate road infrastructure and limited municipal investments in public transport and education / sports services, which do not balance the increase of developers' residential investments. One of the basic causes of this situation is the aforementioned crisis of spatial planning, observable in the three cities included in the study.

  • 17.
    Larsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Berggård, Glenn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Rosander, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Safe community walking with anti-slip devices: The changing face of barriers to soft mobility in winter communities2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Luciani, Andrea
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Lidelöw, Sofia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Bhattacharjee, Shimantika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Fire Engineering.
    Örn, Tomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    The Challenge of Energy Efficiency in Kiruna’s Heritage Buildings2019In: Cold Climate HVAC 2018: Sustainable Buildings in Cold Climates / [ed] Johansson D., Bagge H., Wahlström Å., Cham: Springer, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The town of Kiruna, founded in 1900 in the northernmost part of Sweden, is nowadays in the middle of an impressive urban transformation: due to the impacts of mining activities a large part of the city center has to be moved or rebuilt. Among the buildings to be moved and kept in use are some of the so-called ‘Bläckhorn’ timber houses, designed by Gustaf Wickman in the early 20th century as residential units for the workers of the mining company LKAB and part of the original core of Kiruna. This has raised several questions on the sustainability of renovating historic buildings in a sub-arctic climate. In order to explore the challenge of increasing the energy efficiency of the Bläckhorn houses, data on their constructional and historical features as well as their thermal and energy performance have been collected. The paper addresses the following issues. Historic buildings are often blamed for their poor energy efficiency without considering their usually high constructional quality. What do we know about the real performances of these buildings? Energy retrofits in non-monumental and inhabited historic buildings are often guided by practical and operational needs rather than by their heritage significance. Can a value-based approach affect the improvement of energy efficiency? In a subarctic climate, even simple interventions can help to save a considerable amount of energy in historic buildings. To which extent the energy performances of the Bläckhorn houses could be increased without affecting their heritage values?

  • 19.
    Chapman, David
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Toward an Integrated Model for Soft-Mobility2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 19, article id 3669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key urban design challenge is to create built environments that encourage outdoor activityall year round. This study explores a new model for soft-mobility that places the interaction betweenthe urban form, the seasonal climate and climate change, and the individual at the center of people’ssoft-mobility choices, or in more general, their modal choice. The research methods used werecomparative studies of documents, surveys, mental mapping, and photo elicitation. These studieswere undertaken to research people’s outdoor activity in the built environment during the winterseason of a cold climate settlement. The results were analyzed against the three-dimensions of themodel. In the discussion it is argued that in places with significant climate variation, the interactionbetween the urban form, the season, and the individual together influence soft-mobility choices. Inturn, these interactions influence people’s level of outdoor activity and the individual health benefitssuch activity can aord. In conclusion, it is highlighted that all three dimensions of the model are in aconstant state of change and evolution, especially in relation to planning and development processesand climate change.

  • 20.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Markstedt, Anders
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Institutionen för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad.
    Ericsson, Lars O
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Institutionen för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad.
    Norrman, Jenny
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering.
    Volchko, Yevheniya
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering.
    Öberg, Maria
    Trafikverket.
    Undermarken måste utnyttjas mer effektivt: Planering på djupet2019In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no Augusti, fredag 2, p. 5-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Öberg, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Undermarksplanering: Svensk praxis utifrån valda projekt2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was carried out as part of the research project Sustainable use of the subsurface (2017–2019). The project aims to support the sustainable use of the underground space, and to clarify new possibilities for how underground matters can be integrated into urban planning.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how planning processes for facilities and other underground operations are carried out in Sweden, how the interaction between planning above and below ground works, how underground information is handled in different types of projects, and indicate opportunities for improvement.

    The report is based on studies of a number of completed underground projects, where public planning documents have been examined and interviews with people who have had insight into the projects have been carried out. The study has identified a number of suggestions that could help improve the planning process for underground planning:

    Systematic and accessible information

    • Collect geoscientific information (including interpretations) from all underground projects in a common database.
    • Ensure that project owners and clients submit geoscientific information to such a common database.
    • The information should be archived and made searchable digitally with regard to confidential information.
    • The archives should be managed so that relevant material remains available for the appropriate length of time.

     

    Cooperation

    • Create a good collaboration climate early in the project, with relevant stakeholders.
    • Support harmonization of the application of regulations between municipalities.

     

    Strategic work

    • A coherent planning for land use above and below land at the various stages of the planning process.
    • Sub-regional resources in a regional perspective are highlighted in regional planning documents.
    • Managing target conflicts at an early stage by making them visible in both national and regional and local planning.
    • Ensure that the right level of information is developed for the various stages of the planning processes.
  • 22.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Varför är det så ont om Q?2019In: Hållbar renovering ur ett helhetsperspektiv: En antologi från forskarmiljön SIRen / [ed] Olander, Stefan; Mjörnell, Kristina; Femenias, Paula; Helsing, Elisabeth; Wallentén, Petter, SIRen , 2019, p. 115-119Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Chapman, David
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Winter City Urbanism: Enabling All Year Connectivity for Soft Mobility2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 10, article id 1820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores connectivity for soft mobility in the winter season. Working with residents from the sub-arctic city of Luleå, Sweden, the research examines how the interaction between the built environment and winter season affects people’s use of the outdoor environment. The research questions for this study are, 1) how do residents perceive the effects of winter on an areas spatial structure and pattern of streets and pathways? and 2) what enablers and barriers impact resident soft mobility choices and use of the public realm in winter? Methods used were mental mapping and photo elicitation exercises. These were used to gain a better understanding of people’s perception of soft mobility in winter. The results were analysed to identify how soft mobility is influenced by the winter season. The discussion highlights that at the neighbourhood scale, residents perceive that the winter alters an areas spatial structure and pattern of streets and pathways. It was also seen to reduce ease of understanding of the public realm and townscape. In conclusion, it is argued that new and re-tooled town planning strategies, such as extending blue/ green infrastructure planning to include white space could help better enable all year outdoor activity in winter cities.

  • 24.
    Chapman, David
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Arctic Risk in Urban Spaces (ARUS): Report of meeting 16th & 17th January 20182018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Report from the ARUS workshop in Abisko Research Station of the 16th and 17th January 2018. The workshop was used to develop a project agenda and key issues around changing risks in the Arctic public realm. Whilst this workshop was exploratory, the aim was to identify design challenges to urban space that climate change could bring for soft mobility.  The objective was to develop a research strategy that can develop ways to adapt Arctic settlements to these new environmental risks. The goal is to grow these agendas into research applications and funded research.

  • 25.
    Hidman, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Attractiveness in Urban design2018In: Nordic Journal of Architectural Research, ISSN 1236-6064, E-ISSN 1893-5281, Vol. 3, p. 7-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Hidman, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Attractiveness in Urban Design: A study of the production of attractive places2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research project investigates the production of attractive places, through theory form and everyday life. The research study was originally sprung from practical questions regarding the extensive use of the term attractiveness in urban planning and design. What is the term intended to address? How is the term understood in local contexts? How is the term transformed to built environments? The term is rarely scrutinized and criticized and the understanding of the term, its meaning and implications is diverse. Starting from critical urban theory, the research project critically scrutinizes the term and contrasts it with local citizens perspectives of attractive towns. The research project proceeds from the idea of that places are produced not only by planning and urban design professionals, but also by people living in and visiting a place (Lefebvre, 1991). The research question addressed is How is the term attractiveness in built environments understood and designed in the perspectives of architects/urban designers and local citizens, and how can the term be explained to inform future planning of attractive urban environments?

    The research design consists of four sub-studies to investigate planning and local perspectives of attractiveness, its presentations and urban forms. The research design was set up in Kiruna and Gällivare, two mining towns in the sparsely populated Swedish north. These towns are undertaking major urban transformations due to the mining activities. Both municipalities explain the transformation processes as opportunities to become more attractive for people to settle as permanent residents. The term was investigated through discourse and qualitative content analysis, whilst the local citizen perspective was investigated through urban living labs.

    The conclusion was that the urban planning and design sphere of place production defines the term attractiveness according to their challenges. The term addresses the contemporary situation of place competition where places compete about labour, companies and capital on a global market (Harvey, 1989; Brenner et al. 2014). A discourse of attractiveness can be formulated to focus on three interest areas: urban economics, social wellbeing, and urban townscapes. The term can further be explained as an approach of reinventing places as attractive through urbanization and agglomeration.

    The local citizens idea of attractiveness is produced through societal challenges, local opportunities as well as practical experiences. The production of attractiveness is affected partly by everyday experiences and partly by assimilated knowledge about the place and society, from among others media reporting and official urban planning documents. As produced through knowledge, pedagogical processes also affect the idea of attractiveness. Physically, the attractive town is described as a place someone has cared of designing, including a legible town plan, locally distinct character, clear borders between built up areas and nature, and coherent connections between neighbourhoods.

    Some reflections drawn from the studies. In order to create truly attractive places, the term attractiveness should be inclusive to perspectives of local citizens. There are, among others, an ethical concern and a potential in this statement. The ethical consideration is that the term attractiveness has different meanings by different communities and individuals; the use of the term is persuasive with the potential to hide agendas seen as attractive according to only some viewpoints. On the other hand there is a potential in acknowledging attractiveness as being produced by everyone practicing place; it opens possibilities for a more diverse and inclusive term with richer ideas of attractive places.

  • 27.
    Movilla Vega, Daniel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Sotoca, Adolfo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gyurkovich, Mateusz
    Cracow Univ Technol, Fac Architecture, Inst Urban Design, Krakow, Poland.
    Building Narkomfin House in Moscow: Lessons from the Weimar Republic2018In: Teka Komisji Urbanistyki i Architektury, ISSN 0079-3450, Vol. 176, p. 177-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the scenario of instability and change that characterised the USSR during the 1920s, the group of constructivist architects led by Moisey Ginzburg were tackling the problem of the lack of housing for workers in large Soviet cities. The solutions provided by Ginzburg’s team were developed under the aegis of the Soviet platforms OSA and Stroykom. They were conducted in three successive stages culminating in the building of the Narkomfin House. However, the architectural modernity achieved in Narkomfin was associated to the advancements in the housing building sector made by their European contemporaries. This article analyses the actual connections between the building of this Moscow prototype and Western models that were beginning to be developed in Europe, especially in Germany. This conception repositions the research conducted by Ginzburg’s team within a process of complex and critical assimilation that integrated the new modern Western techniques. 

  • 28.
    Larsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Changing risks to outdoor activity in the Arctic: Resilience to climate-related community change2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arctic communities have over generations evolved lifestyles that fit with working and living with local conditions and seasonal variations. With climate change, however, comes evolving and unknown weather’s that these communities need to adapt too. These environmental changes may present new risk and unexpected outcomes to outdoor activity that communities will need to address.

    In subarctic regions, pedestrians encounter a variety of road or pavement surface conditions, such as snow, ice, melting ice or mixed icy and snowy surfaces.  Slips and falls are a significant cause of work- and leisure-time accidents. The costs for medical care of fall-related injury treatment is high. Fear can also result in physical inactivity which is a significant population health concern worldwide. 

    This presentation highlights the traditional risks associated with outdoor activity in winter and how they are changing with climate change. It does this through the analysis of survey responses about the use of outdoor public space. The survey is from 1) 344 people in the city of Luleå Sweden (Dfc climate classification area), and 2) 325 responses from people living in Dfb and Dfc climate areas across the world, e.g. Canada.

    At a societal level, this change suggests that new forms of sustainable development and public policy are needed. These could help reduce costs and pressures on the health services by creating safer and more walkable arctic communities. Here costs and benefits related to inactivity and injury are high and affect both the individual and society as a whole.

  • 29.
    Catalini, Anna
    et al.
    College of Arts, University of Lincoln.
    Nour, ZeinabFaculty of Fine Arts, Helwan University.Versaci, AntonellaFaculty of Engineering and Architecture, University “Kore” of Enna.Hawkes, DeanCambridge, UK.Bougdah, HocineCanterbury School of Architecture, University for the Creative Arts.Sotoca, AdolfLuleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.Ghoneem, MahmoudArchitecture Department, Faculty of Fine Arts, Helwan University.Trapani, FerdinandoUrban Planning, Architecture, Palermo University.
    Cities' Identity Through Architecture and Arts: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Cities' Identity through Architecture and Arts (CITAA 2017), Cariro, Egypt,  May 11-13, 20172018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every city has its unique and valuable identity, this identity is revealed through its physical and visual form, it is seen through the eyes of its residents and users. The city develops over time, and its identity evolves with it. Reflecting the rapid and constant changes the city is subjected to, Architecture and Arts, is the embodiment of the cultural, historical, and economical characteristics of the city. This conference is dedicated for the investigation of the different new approaches developed in Architecture and Contemporary arts. It will focus on the basis of urban life and identities.

    It will discuss the examples and tendencies in dealing with urban identities as well as the transformation of cities and urban cultures mentioned in terms of their form, identity, and their current art. Contemporary art, when subjected to experiments, continues to be produced in various directions, to be consumed and to put forward new ideas. Art continuously renews itself -from new materials to different means of communication, from interactive works to computer games, from new approaches to perceptional paradigms and problems of city and nature of the millennium.

  • 30.
    Öberg, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nilsson, Kristina L
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Johansson, Charlotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Complementary governance for sustainable development in transport: the European TEN-T Core Network Corridors2018In: Case Studies on Transport Policy, ISSN 2213-624X, E-ISSN 2213-6258, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 674-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When implementing major European transport corridors, such as the Core network corridors (CNC) which is a part of the European Trans-European Network for Transports (TEN-T), the number of stakeholders affected is huge. A governance framework for the CNC’s implementation was introduced in EU Regulation No. 1315/2013, and is now being enacted. Sustainable development and stakeholder involvement are crucial areas in the implementation. This interview study investigated the need for complementary governance, here meaning governance in addition to the governance framework set in the regulation. The interviews involved 23 individuals from the Baltic Sea Region, who are affiliated to the four categories public authority, infrastructure organisation/company, private company and other organisation. The results confirm the importance of an inclusive approach. Further, the results showed a need to ensure that all three social, economic and ecological dimensions of sustainability are considered. Summarising the interview results, four areas for attention in the further CNC implementation process were identified: more and directed information, extended involvement of private sector transport stakeholders, extended involvement of regional and local stakeholders, and involvement of stakeholders located geographically outside the immediate corridor. Complementary governance can be a tool to address these areas, as governance structures and processes can involve stakeholders and steer towards desired outcomes. The interviewees own ideas for complementary governance are presented in this paper.

    The CNC implementation is currently an on-going process and these results will be further utilised in the process, as a basis for stakeholder discussions of changes in practice.

  • 31.
    Löfgren, Sofia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Johansson, Charlotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Considering landscape in strategic transport planning2018In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 65, p. 396-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The implementation of transport infrastructure plans often has significant impacts on landscapes, especially where new roads and railroads are built. Key decisions regarding the building of new transport infrastructures are often made on a strategic level, where the long-term development of a region is determined, and before the infrastructure project actually begins. In this paper we build on previous advances in Strategic Environmental Assessment theory by linking the process-related issues of the integration of these assessments in general to landscape issues in particular; we use a multiple case study of Swedish transport planning.

    Results of this study indicate that the particular planning processes we looked at failed to carry out strategic landscape assessments and integrate landscape assessments in the planning process. We conclude that this can be explained by the flawed procedure of assessing landscape, the unhelpful structuring of SEA reports and by process-related issues. The idea of applying a holistic understanding of landscape, in line with the ELC, was notably absent from the studied cases. The lack of consideration of landscape as a whole can be attributed to poor use of dissipated and fragmented knowledge about landscapes as well as weaknesses in the assessment procedure. Our results indicate that the traditions of EIA are still prevalent in the practice of SEA, despite the fact that SEA theory has moved away from EIA-based methodology to become a tool for integrating environmental concerns into decision-making and for paying close attention to strategic decision processes.

  • 32.
    Del Curto, Davide
    et al.
    Politecnico di Milano.
    Joppolo, Cesare Maria
    Politecnico di Milano.
    Luciani, Andrea
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Valisi, Luca Pietro
    Politecnico di Milano.
    Energy efficiency and preservation of 20th century architecture: The case of the Urbino University Colleges2018In: Conference Report. The 3rd International Conference on Energy Efficiency in Historic Buildings (EEHB2018), Visby, Sweden, September 26th to 27th, 2018., 2018, p. 182-190Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper follows the discussion on the energy efficiency of heritage buildings by dealing with the task of preserving 20th century buildings and making them more sustainable. It is confirmed that a thorough analysis of each case is needed, since the cultural value of modern heritage risks being overwhelmed by the effort to improve its energy efficiency. The Urbino University Colleges are a masterpiece of the 20th century. They were designed by architect Giancarlo de Carlo, built between 1962 and 1983 and still host 1000 students. A conservation plan was outlined in 2016 with the aim of developing the long-term and sustainable preservation of such a huge complex. A specific goal in terms of sustainability was lowering the heating costs to save funds for conservation activities. The efforts were thus to balance building conservation, energy efficiency and users’ comfort. A thermal analysis, an energy retrofit design, a test on a pilot site, a comparison between before and after, are the tools that have been used to achieve this objective. Results provide some operational indications to merge conservation and sustainability in a 20th century heritage building.

  • 33.
    Örn, Tomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Energy efficiency in heritage buildings: Conservation approaches and their impact on energy efficiency measures2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The impeding climate change challenge urges for a reduction of energy use in the built environment. Buildings account for nearly 40% of the total energy use and about 35% of the greenhouse gas emissions in Europe. EU member states are required to improve the energy efficiency of the existing building stock, for example by sharpening building regulations and developing enforcement schemes. Since energy efficiency retrofits can affect irreplaceable values in heritage buildings, heritage buildings are often excluded from mandatory demands aiming at reducing the energy use in buildings. However, saving energy have gradually become embraced by the conservation community and heritage buildings with are seen as part of the solution.

    This licentiate thesis discusses the methods to identify heritage significance in a building and how the underlying theory determines different scenarios in a energy retrofitting process. The choice of conservation theory and conservation approach will affect the success the energy retrofitting process and determine how much the energy use that can be reduced. This thesis therefore suggests a framework to understand the different interpretation of the impacts that one could exert either by having an Objectivistic or Relative conservation value approach.. Based on this framework, a decision-support tool is developed to further detail the impacts of such approaches for different energy measures.

    Other results show that a majority of reviewed research publications focused on the operational energy in a building and only a few were concerned with energy use over the entire life- cycle of a building. These analyses are used to evaluate where most energy savings can be made, and often pinpoint weak spots in the building’s envelope or technical system. If it was mentioned at all, the influence of cultural and historical factors on energy efficiency measures as applied to heritage buildings tended to be assessed only briefly. Indeed, the majority does not describe conservation principles or even mention the methodology used – if any – for assessing or defining heritage values. Instead, researchers often show an explicit (sometimes an implicit) understanding of conservation as essentially something that is not destructive of original construction material and hence the authenticity of a building.

    This licentiate thesis is a compilation thesis, consisting of one separate sub-study, one literature review and an extended cover essay. The study is oriented towards a Swedish and European context, especially when it comes to climate conditions and discussions on building regulations and the theory and practice of architectural conservation. It addresses the growing research field of energy efficiency in heritage buildings and the thesis aims to contribute to an increased understanding on how the process of assessment and evaluation of heritage significance in buildings affects the making of heritage buildings more energy efficient. The main research question is: How do different approaches for assessing and evaluating heritage significance in buildings affect possible technical energy saving measures in heritage buildings?

  • 34.
    Öberg, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Johansson, Charlotta M.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Expected benefits and drawbacks of Baltic Sea European transport corridors: implications for complementary governance of TEN-T Core network corridors2018In: Cogent Business & Management, E-ISSN 2331-1975, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 1423870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, stakeholders’ expected benefits and concerns are presented regarding the development of Core Network Corridors (CNCs) within the European transport initiative, the Trans-European Network for Transports. An interview study was conducted with 23 stakeholders from different parts of the society in the Baltic Sea area. The results show that stakeholders have a range of expectations, both positive and negative, for the development of the CNC. Stakeholders’ views were sorted into three categories based on the gathered data: matters that are already regulated; unregulated matters that often include vaguely defined responsibilities and require diverse stakeholder engagement for improvement; and matters for which there are concerns about negative outcomes. The results indicate (a) a need for cost-effective complementary governance, here described as additional governance measures to those regulated in the initial framework, (b) that a wider group of stakeholders than is currently involved is needed in the on-going implementation process. Additional regional and local level stakeholders, within and outside of the CNC, and private businesses, would enhance the benefits and/or mitigate negative implications of the developed CNCs, (c) an openness for complementary governance in the on-going CNC implementation process. This openness needs to be considered when developing models for policy packaging.

  • 35.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Sandberg, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Johansson, Tim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Wenngren, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Food on the Roof: Developing an IT platform to visualize and identify suitable locations for roof farming in cold climates2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this project was to explore the possibility to smartly integrate food production in cold urban environments. The main objective was to sketch an intelligent platform to guide a comprehensive, city-wide approach to urban farming in winter cities and assist city stakeholder.

    We have worked with large databases related to energy consumptions, performances, building stock and size, solar radiation, and so forth. The challenge for us was to integrate big data in a manner that is easy to understand and visualize for all audiences while matching the ambitions of local stakeholders for urban farming.

    Urban farming (UF) has social, economic, and environmental benefits: socially UF will bring people closer to nature and it can become a source of education for local schools and community; economically, UF targets the rapidly growing market of premium, fresh, biological food that is proudly produced locally and can be sold to local restaurants and other customers; environmentally, UF will decrease our reliance from far away and poorly controlled food chains, while decreasing environmental costs for transportation.

  • 36.
    Chapman, David
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Agneta, Larsson
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    HUMAN DIMENSIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE: Outdoor Human Environments: the changing face of climatic barriers to soft mobility and gathering in winter communities2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Luciani, Andrea
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Lidelöw, Sofia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Bhattacharjee, Shimantika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Fire Engineering.
    Örn, Tomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Improving the energy efficiency of built heritage in cold regions: Issues and opportunities2018In: Conference Report. The 3rd International Conference on Energy Efficiency in Historic Buildings (EEHB2018), Visby, Sweden, September 26th to 27th, 2018. / [ed] Tor Broström, Lisa Nilsen and Susanna Carlsten, 2018, p. 182-190Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Ebrahimabadi, Saeed
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Johansson, Charlotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Microclimate assessment method for urban design: A case study in subarctic climate2018In: Urban Design International, ISSN 1357-5317, E-ISSN 1468-4519, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 116-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in climate-sensitive urban design has grown in recent decades. Nevertheless, there are various difficulties associated with such an approach. One of these is the lack of simple comfort assessment tools. This paper presents a method for microclimate assessment that is composed of a wind comfort analysis and a microclimate assessment based on measuring a combination of solar access and wind velocity. The study includes analysis of a proposed urban project situated in Kiruna, a Swedish town located in the subarctic region of the country. The results from the simulations were then overlaid to produce combined microclimate maps for three specific dates: winter solstice, spring equinox and summer solstice. The maps illustrate relative microclimate differences between areas in the proposed project based on combinations of wind/lee and sun/shadow conditions. The outcomes showed that only a small proportion of the area studied had favourable microclimate conditions at the winter solstice and spring equinox. The thermal comfort Index OUT_SET* was calculated for the summer solstice in the study area. Comparisons between the spatial distribution of OUT_SET* values and the microclimate assessment map showed a large degree of correlation. The method is intended to be a simple and representative evaluation of microclimate

  • 39.
    Larsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Outdoor human environments: the changing face of climatic barriers to soft mobility and gathering in winter communities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In Arctic regions, generations have evolved lifestyles that fit with working and living with local conditions and seasonal variations. With emerging climate changes new risks appear and prior individual experiences based on preconceptions of risk may not remain valid. In everyday life, soft-mobility is required in varying conditions, such as ice and snow covered surfaces, darkness, extreme weather conditions. Inability to detect environmental clues to risk is a critical aspect for injury. Also, fear and activity avoidance lead to an increased risk of physical inactivity, a significant population health concern worldwide. Methods: An explorative survey, on subjective ratings of barriers to 1) soft mobility and 2) the use of outdoor public space in winter was performed. The EAMQ –Climate survey, tailored for climatic sensitive urban design research, include dimensions of distance, ambient and terrain, and a range of weather conditions found in winter, such as sun, coldness, wind, ice and ground surface properties (ice, snow, slush). Respondents were 1) 344 people in Northern Sweden, and 2) 361 people in Canada and Scandinavia. Results: The results highlight that rain, icy surfaces and darkness are today’s most significant barriers to soft-mobility in winter. For the use of outdoor public spaces, the most significant barriers were slushy and icy surfaces, rain precipitation and darkness. Conclusions: The traditional risks associated with outdoor activity in winter are changing with climate change. Future urban design and planning for safer and more walkable winter cities need to consider a more extensive pallet of weather conditions.

  • 40.
    Gard, Gunvor
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Berggård, Glenn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Rosander, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Pedestrians perceptions of community walking with anti-slip devices: an explorative case study2018In: Journal of Transport and Health, ISSN 2214-1405, E-ISSN 2214-1405, Vol. 11, p. 202-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk of falls on slippery surfaces during wintertime is a public safety problem in the Nordic region in the Arctic. The aim of this case study was to explore pedestrians perceptions of walking safety, balance, slipping risk, priority for own use and subjective criteria for a well functioning anti-slip device. An experimental set-up was utilised in which nine pedestrians tested 19 anti-slip devices by simulating walking in realistic traffic situations on four different surfaces. The pedestrians favoured devices with a high number of friction points, distributed under the whole sole (in-built) or forefoot (sandpaper). Also, a whole-foot device with a high number of spikes received high ratings in all aspects measured except in balance enabling properties. Identified subjective criteria were safe foothold, comfort, enabling a normal gait, stability, silence, and predictability. The results indicate that both anti-slip properties and balance enabling properties of the device need to be considered for safe community walking

  • 41.
    Morata, Berta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    The Northbothnian Technological Megasystem: Urbanization, territorial metabolism and political ecologies2018In: Urbanism & Urbanization: On Reproduction: Re-Imagining the Political Ecology of Urbanism / [ed] Michiel Dehaene, David Peleman, Ghent University, 2018, p. 87-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planetary Urbanization (Brenner, Shmid, 2011) opens up a radical shift in analysis from urban form to urbanization process, as suggested through the radical hypothesis of the complete urbanization of society, put forward by Henri Lefebvre four decades ago. This situation means, that even spaces that lie well beyond the traditional city cores and suburban peripheries, have become integral parts of the worldwide urban fabric. Political-economic spaces can no longer be treated as if they were composed of discrete, distinct, and universal “types” of settlement.

    Under such scope, in every region of the globe, erstwhile “wilderness” spaces are being transformed and degraded through the cumulative socio-ecological consequences of unfettered worldwide urbanization. In this way, the world’s oceans, alpine regions, the equatorial rainforests, major deserts, the arctic and polar zones, and even the earth’s atmosphere itself, are increasingly interconnected with the rhythms of planetary urbanization at every geographical scale, from the local to the global. These spaces become critical for urban development (and moreover, for urban political ecology debate). For that, Sweden is a paradigmatic case study where the urbanization of the southern part of the country is sustained upon an extremely intensive appropriation of natural resources from the North (Sörling 1988), (Tidholm 2014).

    Norrboten, the northernmost land of Sweden, is a paradigm for territorial metabolism where a complex combination system of mining industry urbanization shaped the area. Thus becoming the connecting concept of Norrbotten Technological Megasystem NTM (Hansson,  1990) [fig.1], it’s key actors: natural resources, mining, transport, H2O, energy, military infrastructure, mining communities, the indigenous Sami. Today the nature of industry remains the same, the social, political and economic leverage NTM exerts over the region is absolute; the economic profit, financial stability and wealth of the Swedish state take precedence over the environment. However, much of the industrial paradigm that underpinned its implementation is now under a severe change; as the global economy is facing an era of human development where resources, metals, minerals and energy will be more critical than ever, a renewed urban and territorial framework is urgently needed. The set of relations between environment and communities is currently under an unprecedented revision based on socio-environmental reflections.

    This short paper will pose for discussion how heavy territorial infrastructure respond to the changing metabolism that is following after the short-term appropriation of resources so characteristic of industrial development in northern Europe. By critical graphic comparative analysis and trans-scalar research by design (Barcelloni & Cavalieri, 2015), the thesis will empirically investigate these processes to be able to cope with the debate on infrastructural adaptation through political ecology perspective.

  • 42.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    The street, a quintessential social public space2018In: Journal of Urban Design, ISSN 1357-4809, E-ISSN 1469-9664, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 163-164Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    The town reassembled: authenticity and transformation in Kiruna, Sweden2018In: Authentic Reconstruction: Authenticity, Architecture and the Built Heritage / [ed] John Bold, Peter Larkham, Robert Pickard, New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, 1, p. 237-252Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Blomqvist, Kajsa
    RISE.
    Jahnke, Marcus
    RISE.
    Molnar, Stefan
    RISE.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    de Fine Licht, Karl
    RISE.
    Öhrling, Therese
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    Tillgänglighetsdesign för stadens utveckling2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det offentliga rummet: stadens gator, parker, byggnader och torg likväl som den kultur och sociala kontext som en viss stad har, skulle kunna utformas för att vara tillgängligt, användbart, inkluderande, attraktivt och välgörande för människan i betydligt större utsträckning än vad som görs idag. 

    Troligtvis är det inte medveten diskriminering som ligger bakom mindre god design av det offentliga rummet, utan snarare okunskap om vad som kan och behöver göras. Fram tills dess människor befinner sig i en situation där de på något sätt själva är hindrade från att delta på lika villkor är det svårt att inse hur mycket det offentliga rummet påverkar oss. Det kan vara mindre hinder i form av ojämnt underlag som gör det svårt att ta sig fram för vissa, medan det omöjliggör framfart för andra. Det kan vara miljöer som vissa upplever som “vanliga” medan andra upplever sig djupt otrygga eller utestängda från desamma. Med andra ord är det offentliga rummets utrymmen där vi lever, jobbar och leker knutna till vart vi går och vad vi gör eller vart vi inte går eller gör. 

    Av den anledningen anser vi att det finns behov av att utveckla konkreta metoder och handgripliga råd för att arbeta med mer medveten utformning av fysisk miljö: tillgänglighetsdesign. Tillgänglighetsdesign används här genomgående som ett brett begrepp för design av lösningar som upplevs trygga, användbara, inkluderande, attraktiva och välgörande. Vi utgår från en designpraktik som stödjer tanken att miljön måste vara tillgänglig för alla grupper i samhället. I det förstudieprojekt som beskrivs i kommande kapitel har av den anledningen en kartläggning skett med utgångspunkt i ett helhetsgrepp på tillgänglighetsdesign, det vill säga att motverka diskriminering och främja lika rättighter och möjligheter oavsett kön, könsöverskridande identitet eller uttryck, etnisk tillhörighet, religion eller annan trosuppfattning, funktionsnedsättning, sexuell läggning eller ålder. 

    Förstudien har omfattat kartläggning av normkritiska perspektiv, lagar och riktlinjer kring fysisk tillgänglighet, social hållbarhet och tillgänglighet, universell och inkluderande design, samt inhämtning av inspiration från arkitektur, form och designområdet. Det har även omfattat identifiering av goda exempel från runt om i landet på vad tillgänglighetsdesign i bred bemärkelse kan omfatta och intervjuer med personer som arbetat med detta. Vi vill rikta ett stort tack till er som bidragit till arbetet. 

    Vår avsikt är att de principer som utformats i förstudien för tillgänglighetsdesign ska diskuteras, användas och uppdateras vid all stadsutveckling. På så sätt kan vi åstadkomma ett helhetsgrepp på tillgänglighetsdesign och åstadkomma socialt hållbara, attraktiva och tillgängliga platser och miljöer runt om i landet. 

  • 45.
    Luciani, Andrea
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Del Curto, Davide
    DAStU, Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Towards a resilient perspective in building conservation2018In: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, ISSN 2044-1266, E-ISSN 2044-1274, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 309-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the cross-fertilisation process between the concept ofresilience and building conservation. The authors discuss how the conservation field can address new issuesposed by climate change and whether the concept of resilience plays a role within the framework ofsustainable building conservation.Design/methodology/approach – Starting from the use of resilience as a “travelling concept”, differentinterpretations of the term emerging from different fields are compared and interrelated in order tounderstand how this concept can impact future research in building conservation.Findings – In addition to summarising recent developments in conservation theory with a special focus onhow sustainability has influenced the field, this work also suggests some lines of research where resiliencecould foster interdisciplinary approaches to building conservation and presents some controversial outcomes.Originality/value – The paper raises a discussion on how the concept of resilience could renew the field ofbuilding conservation, helping contemporary society to address the challenges of climate change.

  • 46.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Towards resource-integrated urbanism: Rethinking cities through the resource-urbanization nexus (RUN)2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resources in their various forms are at the basis of our urban economies. The extraction, alongside with the distribution, processing and disposal, of resources, being them natural, energy, or human, is a main driver for planetary urbanization. However, under a market-led economic regime, which is characterized by boom and bust cycles, the space produced by the resource-extraction economic model is from time to time discarded with huge environmental and social losses world wide. While recent concerns about climate change and urban resilience have emphasized resource efficiency i.e. consume less and use better each unit of resource, we think that this target alone isn't sufficient to truly transform society towards a more resilient horizon. We need to rethink the resource-urbanization nexus (RUN) and the way it affects our lifestyle and cities. In this article, we suggest resources in its various forms (natural and human) be intimately integrated with humanity and its built environment. To articulate such a vision, we discuss our two latest research projects that deal respectively with energy districts and resource regions in northern Sweden. Methodologically, we deploy assemblage thinking, global production network of resources, and critical urban theory and political ecology as the main pillars of our framework.

  • 47.
    Gyurkovich, Mateusz
    et al.
    Institute of Urban Design, Faculty of Architecture, Cracow University of Technology.
    Sotoca Carcia, Adolfo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Towards the Cracow metropolis: a dream of a reality? a seclted issues2018In: Czasopismo techniczne, ISSN 0011-4561, E-ISSN 2353-737X, Vol. 115, no 2, p. 5-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cracow, the former capital of Poland and currently the second-largest Polish city, dreams of becoming the most important metropolis – not only of the Lesser Poland region, but also of the entire southern and south-eastern part of Poland. This paper, based on long-term research and field studies, also refers, in part, to the “Model of the Spatial Structure of Cracow” research programme, which was conducted at the Institute of Urban Design of the CUT under the guidance of M. Gyurkovich with collaboration with A. Sotoca, between October 2016 and July 2017. This is the background against which the selected issues of spatial transformations that took place within the city limits and that influence the urban morphology of Cracow, will be presented against. The type of spatial structure that can currently be observed in Cracow, does not bring to mind an association with the urban form of a European Metropolis. Can the contemporary attempts to create a polycentric urban organism- that can compete with other, well-organised ones, internationally, ever be successful? Will the dream of the Cracow Metropolis ever come true?

  • 48.
    Chapman, David
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Rizzo, Agatino
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Updating winter: the importance of climate-sensitive urban design for winter settlements2018In: Arctic Yearbook, ISSN 2298-2418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores winter settlement urban design principles to begin to identify climate related conditions that are affecting soft mobility (walking and cycling) in these communities.

    Winter communities have evolved lifestyles and means that fit with working and living with local conditions and seasonal variations. With climate change, however, comes evolving weather’s that these communities need to adapt too. These changes may present new risks and unexpected challenges to outdoor soft mobility in the community.

    Public policy highlights physical inactivity as a major health concern. For these communities, winter has always limited outdoor soft-mobility. Here, we understand that in winter outdoor activity can be reduced by weather and fear of accidents.

    People’s understanding of the barriers and enablers to soft mobility are also often based on experience and ability to detect environmental clues. To help winter communities maximise the opportunities for outdoor soft mobility and the wellbeing benefits this can bring, built environments need to be designed with an understanding of climate change. 

    This study explores barriers and enablers to soft mobility in winter and discusses them in light of climate change and human wellbeing. It is argued that established principles of urban design may require re-evaluation if we want to increase outdoor soft mobility in winter. Increases in physical activity could help reduce costs and pressures on health services by creating safer and more walkable communities. The paper concludes by suggesting that communities should focus on more context based winter urban design principles that account for ongoing climate change.

  • 49.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Urban design of winter cities: Winter season connectivity for soft mobility2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    All across the world the form of the built environment is playing a crucial role as enabler or inhibitor for urban outdoor activity such as soft mobility. Urban form can make it more attractive for people to be mobile outdoors and playing a role in the public life, or it can put people off venturing outside. For winter cities, a question for urban design is how we can design environments that are attractive for outdoor activity in the winter season as well as summer and additionally how will climate change influence these aspects.

    The reason for studying this is the importance of understanding how, in relation to urban form, weather, seasonal variations, and climate change influences human outdoor activity. In this study the focus on outdoor activity is problematised around the concern that people spend a low percentage of their time outdoors in winter conditions. For society, the problem is that this trend and the related low levels of physical activity are associated with a range of health issues.

    To study this the main question for this research is what attracts and hinders soft mobility during the winter season and how can this knowledge underpin new considerations about urban design for connectivity in winter cities? To address this, the research methods focused on document studies, surveys, mental mapping, photo elicitation and semi-structured discussions.

    The study works at three scientific levels. Firstly, it seeks to understand the interrelationship between the built environment and people’s outdoor activity in winter. Secondly, it attempts to understand how connectivity for soft mobility in winter is being affected by weather and climate change. Thirdly, it seeks new ways of thinking about how the urban form can be designed to increase outdoor soft mobility in winter.

    The discussion and conclusions focused on the argument that in winter settlements, the winter season can alter spatial patterns and settlement organisation. Here it was argued that in these settlements the winter season can be an aspect of urban morphology and can be part of the process of shaping the public realm and its connectivity for soft mobility in winter.

  • 50.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Authenticity and relocation of built heritage: the urban transformation of Kiruna, Sweden2017In: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, ISSN 2044-1266, E-ISSN 2044-1274, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 110-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose –This article investigates how different notions about the conservation of builtheritage develop in a situation of structural change that demands either the demolition orrelocation of a large number of historic buildings.Design/methodology/approach – The analysis is based on a case study of the on-going urbantransformation of the Swedish mining town Kiruna. The investigation was based on the textanalysis of urban planning documents and media reporting, which was used to distinguishstakeholders’ positions towards conservation based on authenticity aspects.Findings – The conservation goals of the urban planning process are unclear and thestakeholders have conceptually different views regarding which parts of the town’s builtheritage are of significance, which negatively affects the ability to make well informed,transparent and intelligible management decisions. Stakeholder views on the management ofbuilt heritage span from the relocation of a few, single historic buildings to maintaining theintegrity of the town as a heritage site by moving a significant number of buildings.Research limitations/implications – The Kiruna case, being exceptional because conservationin situ is impossible, has the potential to highlight the relation between single historic buildingsand the integrity of an urban heritage site, as well as implications for conservation on theurban scale.Originality/value – This investigation contributes to knowledge of built heritage in situationsof structural change, which is of concern for planning and conservation practice. Currently,many urban areas are under pressure of transformations or destruction

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