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  • 1.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Hellsmark, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Mossberg, Johanna
    Research Institutes of Sweden (RISE), Division of Bioeconomy, Sweden.
    A Knowledge-based Perspective on System Weaknesses in Technological Innovation Systems2019In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 55-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on technological innovation systems (TIS) provides policymakers and other actors with a scheme of analysis to identify system weaknesses. In doing so, TIS analysis centres on which system weaknesses policy interventions should target to promote further development of a particular system. However, prior TIS literature has not sufficiently elaborated on what may constitute the conceptual roots of a ‘weakness’. We apply a knowledge-based perspective and propose that many—albeit not all—system weaknesses may root in four types of knowledge problems: uncertainty, complexity, equivocality, and ambiguity. Employing these as sensitizing concepts, we study system weaknesses by analysing data from a biorefinery TIS in Sweden. This analysis results in novel implications for the TIS literature and for achieving a better match between system weaknesses and the design of innovation policies.

  • 2.
    Cenamor, Javier
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Department of Management, University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    School of Social Sciences, Södertörn University, Södertörn, Sweden.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Entrepreneurship and Management, Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Addressing dual embeddedness: The roles of absorptive capacity and appropriabilitymechanisms in subsidiary performance2019In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 78, p. 239-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how subsidiaries can manage dual embeddedness with both local partners and a multinational enterprise. Specifically, we examine the role of absorptive capacity and appropriability mechanisms on subsidiary performance. We analyse how absorptive capacity and appropriability enable subsidiaries to successfully address knowledge challenges related to internal and external networks. We conducted an empirical analysis on a sample of 165 subsidiaries. Our results suggest that absorptive capacity has a direct, positive effect on subsidiary performance, which is greater in emerging countries. The study also found an indirect effect of absorptive capacity on subsidiary performance, which is mediated through appropriability mechanisms. These findings extend the literature on international networks, dual embeddedness and absorptive capacity.

  • 3.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences. House of Innovation, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences. University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Circular business model transformation: A roadmap for incumbent firms2019In: California Management Review, ISSN 0008-1256, E-ISSN 2162-8564, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 5-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve positive economic, environmental, and social benefits, many incumbent manufacturing firms attempt to apply circular economy principles to their business practices. However, these firms often struggle to change their existing linear business models to circular models because the steps required for successful transformation are still poorly understood. Based on a multiple case study of eight business model transformation journeys, this article proposes a roadmap for circular business model transformation. It provides a step-by-step process to enable circular transition, allowing companies to meet environmental, social, and financial objectives and proactively address sustainability.

  • 4.
    Sjöö, Karolin
    et al.
    Innovation & Green Transitions, The Swedish Agency for Growth Policy Analysis, Östersund, Sweden.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Demonstration projects in sustainable technology: The road to fulfillment of project goals2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 228, p. 331-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Publicly funded demonstration projects represent a critical intermediate step between basic R&D on the one hand, and large-scale commercialization of new sustainable technology on the other. However, these projects often suffer from various technical and nontechnical difficulties, frequently fail to meet objectives, and sometimes stall despite the best intentions of their facilitators. This paper reports on a multiple case study of 21 demonstration projects in the area of sustainable technology set in Sweden and offers two contributions. First, it maps the project-internal and external factors that allow or prohibit demonstration projects to reach their goals. Second, it suggests a process model outlining the key activities for setting up a new demonstration project. By doing so, the paper provides important implications for the process of developing and commercializing sustainable technologies. The escalating environmental crisis in particular underscores the need for new knowledge about how cleaner and more sustainable technologies can be applied.

  • 5.
    Reim, Wiebke
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Centre for Management of Innovation and Technology in Process Industry, Promote. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    GLOBAL IMPLEMENTATION OF CIRCULAR BUSIENSS MODELS – DECISION SUPPORT2019In: Spring Servitization Conference, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Circular business models have a huge potential to lead to economic, social and environmental benefits. But in order to archive this it is crucial to reach global implementation. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how firms can assess the potential and criteria for implementing circular business models in different global markets.

    Design/Methodology/Approach: To reach the stated purpose, we have adopted a quantitative research approach and undertaken 25 explorative interviews in three large Swedish manufacturing companies and their global service network.

    Findings: In this paper, a decision support tool to choose the appropriate circular business model for global implementation has been developed that facilitates the first steps towards circular business models implementation. It identifies eleven criteria that should be analysed to decide the appropriate circular business model.

    Originality/Value: Circular business models have not yet reached wide implementation. One reason is that they are often presented as one fits all solutions but this is not appropriate for global implementation. Therefore, the decision tree that is developed in this paper helps companies to choose the circular business model that is most appropriate for a specific product in a specific market.

  • 6.
    Cenamor, Javier
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Business Administration, School of Economics and Management, Lund, Sweden.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, School of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Hanken School of Economics, Entrepreneurship and Management, Helsinki, Finland.University of St. Gallen, Global Center Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Institute of Technology Management, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    How entrepreneurial SMEs compete through digital platforms: The roles of digital platform capability, network capability and ambidexterity2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 100, p. 196-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization offers unprecedented opportunities for entrepreneurial small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). However, many entrepreneurial SMEs lack resources and capabilities or suffer from inertia, which hampers these opportunities. This study investigates how entrepreneurial SMEs can enhance performance through digital platforms. Specifically, the study examines the effect of digital platform capability and network capability on entrepreneurial SMEs’ financial performance. The study also examines how exploitation and exploration orientations moderate this relationship. Based on analysis of 230 entrepreneurial SMEs, the results indicate that digital platform capability has a positive indirect effect on entrepreneurial SMEs’ performance via network capability. The study also shows that exploitation and exploration orientations negatively and positively moderate this effect, respectively. The results suggest that entrepreneurial SMEs can enhance their performance through digital platform capability by aligning this capability with their orientation. These findings thereby enrich the literature on entrepreneurial SMEs and capabilities. 

  • 7.
    Sjödin, David
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Centre for Management of Innovation and Technology in Process Industry, Promote.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Thorgren, Sara
    How Individuals Engage in the Absorption of New External Knowledge: A Process Model of Absorptive Capacity2019In: The Journal of product innovation management, ISSN 0737-6782, E-ISSN 1540-5885, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 356-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers a process model of how individuals engage in the absorption of new external knowledge. Data collection is centered on the experiences of knowledge workers in recognizing, assimilating, and applying external knowledge. The process model delineates how individuals engage in the absorptive capacity (AC) process through: (1) valuing knowledge potential by assessing the motivation to assimilate knowledge and by evaluating technological feasibility, which together constitute the recognition of value; (2) corroborating knowledge value by ensuring legitimacy and demonstrating a shared understanding of the business value in achieving knowledge assimilation; and (3) championing knowledge integration by lobbying for support and securing resources in order to integrate and apply the knowledge within the organization, ultimately ensuring that knowledge is exploited. The process model clarifies how an individual’s proficiency in external knowledge absorption activities can result in three possible outcomes: knowledge is exploited, knowledge is terminated, or knowledge gets “stuck” in limbo. These findings contribute to the AC literature by underscoring the pivotal role of individual engagements in recognition, assimilation, and application of external knowledge and add new elements and a process perspective to the understanding of the path from potential to realized AC. The paper also provides insights into how individuals and firms can better manage knowledge absorption in practice.

  • 8.
    Gama, Fabio
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Idea generation and open innovation in SMEs: When does market‐based collaboration pay off most?2019In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 113-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) largely depend on proficient idea generation activities to improve their front-end innovation performance, yet the liabilities of newness and smallness often hamper SMEs’ ability to benefit from systematic idea generation. To compensate for these liabilities, many SMEs adopt an open innovation approach by collaborating with market-based partners such as customers and suppliers. This study investigates the relationship between SMEs’ systematic idea generation and front-end performance and investigates the moderating role of market-based partnership for SMEs. Drawing on a survey of 146 Swedish manufacturing SMEs, this study provides two key contributions. First, the systematic idea generation and front-end performance relationship in SMEs is non-linear. Accordingly, higher levels of front-end performance are achieved when idea generation activities are highly systematic. Second, the returns from higher levels of systematic idea generation are positively moderated by market-based partnerships. Thus, external cooperation with customers and suppliers pays off most toward front-end performance when SMEs have highly systematic idea generation processes. These results indicate a contingency perspective on the role of external partnerships. They also have implications for research into the front-end of innovation and open innovation in the context of SMEs.

  • 9. Hullova, Dusana
    et al.
    Laczko, Pavel
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. House of Innovation, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm.
    Independent Distributors in Servitization: An Assessment of Key Internal and Ecosystem-related Problems2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Independent distributors (IDs), just as equipment manufacturers, have the potential to initiate a transition towards the provision of advanced services. However, the internal and ecosystem-related problems experienced by IDs during servitization differ due to their distinct organizational structure. The purpose of this study is therefore to uncover problems faced by servitizing IDs during transition towards provision of advanced services, a topic which is still scarcely covered in the literature. Using an abductive research approach, we identify three overarching groups of servitization problems specific to IDs: (1) conflicting interests of key stakeholders; (2) misalignment between distribution of managerial attention and servitization strategy; and (3) ineffective knowledge management within the ecosystem. To diagnose these problems, we propose a servitization-readiness decision tree that allows IDs to pinpoint hindering factors before embarking on a servitization journey. In so doing, we provide a starting point for identifying and describing criteria for assessing IDs' servitization readiness.

  • 10.
    Anokhin, Sergey
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Management and Entrepreneurship, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, United States;Department of Management, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russian Federation.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland;University of St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Södertörn university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chistyakova, Natalia
    Department of Management, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russian Federation.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Södertörn university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Industrial clusters, flagship enterprises and regional innovation2019In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 31, no 1-2, p. 104-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For a sample of all 88 counties in the State of Ohio over a 5-year period, this study documents the effect of flagship enterprises and concentrated industrial clusters on regional innovation. Consistent with the agglomeration arguments and the knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship, both appear to affect regional innovation positively. Additionally, regional educational attainment positively moderates the effect of industrial clusters on innovation. At the same time, flagship enterprises primarily affect regional innovation in regions with low education levels. Results are obtained with the help of conservative econometric techniques and are robust to the choice of alternative dependent variables and estimators. The findings have major policy implications and provide insights into alternative routes to encouraging regional innovation.

  • 11.
    Morgan, T.
    et al.
    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, United States.
    Anokhin, S.A.
    St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN, United States; Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russian Federation.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; University of St.Gallen, St.Gallen, Switzerland.
    Influence of market orientation on performance: the moderating roles of customer participation breadth and depth in new product development2019In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a greater number of B2B firms integrating customers into the new product development (NPD) process, how to utilize customer involvement in NPD is an important decision because it may be a double-edged sword carrying both bright and dark sides. Utilizing a sample of 193 B2B firms across various industries, we validate previous research that suggests market orientation positively influences NPD performance and subsequently examine how this relationship may either be enhanced or diminished contingent upon how customers are utilized in the NPD process. The results show that the market orientation–NPD performance relationship is enhanced by having customers participate in a greater number of activities throughout NPD (customer participation breadth) and diminished when customers are involved at deeper levels (customer participation depth). This research suggests that the exact involvement of customers is a critical decision and has clear implications for the dialogues about customer involvement and management of customer relationships.

  • 12.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Knowledge processing and ecosystem co-creation for process innovation: Managing joint knowledge processing in process innovation projects2019In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 135-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process innovation drives industrial competitiveness and sustainability but remains elusive since it requires co-creation and the sharing of idiosyncratic design knowledge in ecosystems of providers and customers of process equipment. This paper investigates how firms can manage knowledge processing through co-creation in joint process innovation projects. Analysis of cross-comparative case studies –including nine industrial ecosystem actors – identifies three types of technological challenge (complexity, novelty and customization) that creates knowledge-processing requirements (uncertainty, equivocality) during the value co-creation process. To manage these knowledge-processing requirements, this paper explains how three joint knowledge-processing strategies (joint problem solving, open communication and end-user involvement) help ecosystem partners make sense of the requirements and demands in process innovation. In this context, the procurement approach (such as contracting and relationship development) helps to facilitate higher levels of joint knowledge processing, drawing on the diverse knowledge of ecosystem actors to secure successful process-innovation outcomes. The present study contributes to the emerging literature on co-creation in process innovation by developing a framework that highlights the knowledge-processing dynamics in ecosystem relationships for process innovation. The implications for management extends to a practical tool that guides project managers in ensuring appropriate levels of joint knowledge processing among ecosystem actors.

  • 13.
    Nordqvist, Sofia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Knowledge types to progress the development of sustainable technologies: A case study of Swedish demonstration plants.2019In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 75-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge development and diffusion through demonstration plants are necessary to progress the development of sustainable technologies, yet current literature lacks detailed insights into which knowledge types are critical in facilitating this progress, and what the roles of different knowledge types are. We draw on knowledge-based theory and investigate four Swedish demonstration plants for advanced biofuels using case-study research. The findings underscore the need for and production of domain-specific, procedural and general knowledge to progress sustainable technology towards commercialization, with each type having a rather specific role and purpose. However, in the plants studied, there is a tendency to focus strongly on the generation of technical, domain-specific knowledge at the expense of procedural knowledge. This deficiency frequently creates problems since a lack of procedural knowledge on how to commoditize and commercialize technologies hinders efforts to move past the demonstration stage to large-scale commercialization. Based on these findings, the paper proposes novel approaches for dealing with these problems, and for managing knowledge more generally. 

  • 14.
    Gama, Fábio
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden;Department of Business Administration, Santa Catarina State University, Florianópolis, Brazil.
    Managing collaborative ideation: The role of formal and informal appropriability mechanisms2019In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 97-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative ideation is a key practice for innovation. Implementing suitable appropriability mechanisms during this collaborative ideation is a necessary yet difficult task. This difficulty owes to a high level of uncertainty and low level of codification because partners work on loosely defined concepts that may change during the collaboration. Firms can employ several appropriability mechanisms to protect their knowledge. Examples include patents, copyright, legal agreements, document management, lead time, secrecy and complexity. However, the best time to apply each mechanism remains unclear, and few empirical studies have explored this issue. This study is based on exploratory case studies of three manufacturing firms. The goal is to identify which appropriability mechanisms are pertinent at each phase of collaborative ideation and how they influence the effectiveness of protection. The results of the analysis lead to the development of a model describing the managerial practices that influence the effectiveness of protection. The results also lead to a set of research propositions to define when each appropriability mechanism is most likely to be used. Overall, this research contributes to the discussion of how to integrate formal and informal appropriability mechanisms for safe collaborative ideation. The paper concludes by discussing theoretical and managerial implications as well as directions for future research.

  • 15.
    Mostaghel, Rana
    et al.
    Division of Marketing and Strategy, School of Business Society and Engineering, Malardalen University, Sweden.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    School of Social Sciences, Sodertorn University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patel, Pankaj C.
    Villanova School of Business, Villanova University, Villanova, PA, USA.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, Department of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    Hultman, Magnus
    University of Leeds, Leeds University Business School, Maurice Keyworth Building, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Marketing and supply chain coordination and intelligence quality: A product innovation performance perspective2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a sample of 148 Swedish firms, this study investigates the complementary relationships between internal and external coordination and external intelligence quality to explain product innovation performance. The results show that, with increasing manufacturing-marketing coordination, higher market intelligence quality or higher supply chain intelligence quality are positively associated with product innovation performance. The complementary roles of internal and external coordination and intelligence quality have theoretical and practical implications.

  • 16.
    Lindvert, Marta
    et al.
    Department of Business, Economics and Law at the Mid Sweden University.
    Patel, Pankaj C.
    Department in the Villanova School of Business at Villanova University.
    Smith, Célina
    Strategy and Organization Department at the EMLYON Business School.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Hanken School of Economics .
    Microfinance Traps and Relational Exchange Norms: A Field Study of Women Entrepreneurs in Tanzania2019In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 230-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In interdependent social groups, microfinance traps occur when conflicts arise between borrowers' affective ties related to family needs and instrumental ties related to obligations toward their loan group. Thus, the social capital that facilitates microfinancing can lead to conflicting obligations toward business needs and economic obligations toward family. Building on an inductive field study among female entrepreneurs in Tanzania, we conceptualize microfinance traps. By using relational contract theory to interpret the qualitative data, we argue that microfinance traps can be reduced by balancing role integrity, preserving norms and reciprocity, and harmonizing the social matrix toward the family and loan group.

  • 17.
    van Gelderen, Marco
    et al.
    VU University Amsterdam,The Netherlands..
    Kibler, Ewald
    School of Business, Department of Management Studies/Entrepreneurship, Aalto University, Finland.
    Kautonen, Teemu
    School of Business, Department of Management Studies/Entrepreneurship, Aalto University, Finland; Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile..
    Munoz, Pablo
    University of Liverpool Management School,UK;Universidad del Desarrollo,Chile.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Mindfulness and Taking Action to Start a New Business2019In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mindfulness, meaning a receptive attention to and awareness of present events and experience, is reported to have a wide range of benefits, but it has been suggested that it could prove costly in terms of task performance. This article analyzes how dispositional mindfulness relates to taking entrepreneurial action. Based on two waves of survey data, we find that mindful individuals are less likely to engage in entrepreneurial action than less mindful individuals, but when they do start to act, they take as many actions as individuals who score low on trait mindfulness, and even more if they have entrepreneurial experience.

  • 18.
    Sköld, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, House of Innovation & Scania Research Center, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Freij, Åke
    Stockholm School of Economics, House of Innovation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    New entrant or incumbent advantage in light of regulatory change: A multiple case study of the Swedish life insurance industry2019In: European Management Review, ISSN 1740-4754, E-ISSN 1740-4762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When an industry is disrupted, the predominant view is that new entrants benefit at the expense of incumbents, who are pictured as slow‐moving, inert, and incapable to change. Based on a longitudinal multiple case study with data over a 15‐year period, we challenge this view. By studying the action responses of three incumbent firms and three new entrants to a major regulatory change in the life insurance industry, we find that both incumbents and new entrants can succeed if complementary assets are correctly managed. In particular, firms need to acquire and refine certain key assets needed for exploiting new business opportunities and, subsequently, need to enhance the value of their complementary assets by transforming them from generic to specialized and on to co‐specialized stages. These findings have theoretical implications for the literature on strategy and innovation management. In addition, we outline important managerial implications to transform complementary assets to stages with higher value.

  • 19.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Richtner, Anders
    Stockholm School of Economics, Department of Management & Organization.
    Brattström, Anna
    Sten K Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, Lund University.
    Magnusson, Mats
    IPD, School of Industrial Engineering and Management, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Björk, Jennie
    IPD, School of Industrial Engineering and Management, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Opportunities and Challenges in the New Innovation Landscape: Implications for Innovation Auditing and Innovation Management2019In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 151-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation auditing is a well-established practice used by managers to identify strengths and weaknesses in innovation. Existing audit frameworks fall short, however, because they neglect three major trends that currently transform the innovation landscape. These trends are as follows: 1) a shift from closed to more open models of innovation (“openness”), 2) a shift from providing physical products to industrial product–services (“servitization”), and 3) a shift from an analog to a highly digitalized world (“digitalization”). This article identifies new innovation practices, opportunities, and challenges that arise for manufacturing firms along these trends. The article proposes a revised innovation audit framework, which acknowledges these trends and supports innovation management in increasingly dynamic and competitive environments.

  • 20.
    Parida, Vinit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Burström, Thommie
    Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Visnjic, Ivanka
    ESADE Business School, Ramon Llull University, Spain.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, Finland;University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Orchestrating industrial ecosystem in circular economy: A two-stage transformation model for large manufacturing companies2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Making the transition to a circular economy is an important goal for society and individual companies, particularly in resource-intensive manufacturing industries. Yet the complexity and interdependencies of such an undertaking mean that no single company can achieve it alone and ecosystem-wide orchestration is necessary. Based on a qualitative study of six large manufacturing companies (ecosystem orchestrators) and their ecosystem partners, we develop a process model that describes the scarcely understood process of ecosystem transformation toward a circular economy paradigm. We provide evidence that ecosystem orchestrators achieve the transition toward a circular economy in two stages: 1) ecosystem readiness assessment and 2) ecosystem transformation. In each stage, specific and complementary mechanisms are deployed. The article elaborates on ecosystem transformation mechanisms and their purpose, use, and interdependencies in moving toward a circular economy paradigm.

  • 21.
    Antretter, Torben
    et al.
    University of St.Gallen, St.Gallen, Switzerland.
    Blohm, Ivo
    University of St.Gallen, St.Gallen, Switzerland.
    Grichnik, Dietmar
    University of St.Gallen, St.Gallen, Switzerland.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of St.Gallen, St.Gallen, Switzerland;Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Predicting new venture survival: A Twitter-based machine learning approach to measuring online legitimacy2019In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 11, article id e00109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research indicates that interactions on social media can reveal remarkably valid predictions about future events. In this study, we show that online legitimacy as a measure of social appreciation based on Twitter content can be used to accurately predict new venture survival. Specifically, we analyze more than 187,000 tweets from 253 new ventures’ Twitter accounts using context-specific machine learning approaches. Our findings suggest that we can correctly discriminate failed ventures from surviving ventures in up to 76% of cases. With this study, we contribute to the ongoing discussion on the importance of building legitimacy online and provide an account of how to use machine learning methodologies in entrepreneurship research.

  • 22.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Center for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Halmstad University .
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Löf, Anton
    Raw Materials Group, Stockholm.
    Ericsson, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Raw materials management in iron and steelmaking firms2019In: Mineral Economics, ISSN 2191-2203, E-ISSN 2191-2211, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper adds new knowledge on how raw materials should be managed in iron and steelmaking firms. While previous research has contributed significantly to how firms should deal with functional challenges related to raw materials, the understanding of Raw Materials Management from a holistic perspective is largely lacking, and extant research does not provide qualified advice to firms on this matter. This study provides such knowledge by drawing on insights from Höganäs AB, a world leader in ferrous powder metallurgy, and their efforts to identify key aspects and principles of raw materials management. Our elaboration of a more holistic view on raw materials management builds on two elements. First, we depict five external uncertainties and three internal conditions that impact firm-level raw materials management. Second, we present six critical capabilities that underpin proficient firm-level raw materials management. The paper concludes with a discussion of implications for both firms aiming to increase their raw materials proficiency and to future investigations into this important area.

  • 23.
    Sjödin, David
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, Department of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    University of Vaasa, Department of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    Relational governance strategies for advanced service provision: Multiple paths to superior financial performance in servitization2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of manufacturing companies to offer advanced services and achieve superior financial performance remains an open question in the servitization literature. One central question relates to how providers govern customer relationships to realize profits through servitization. This study addresses this question by unraveling the complex relations between advanced service provision, relational governance strategies, and the financial performance of manufacturing firms. Drawing on a dataset of 50 Swedish advanced service providers, this study uses a configurational comparative method—namely, fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA)—to identify the influence of configurations of governance conditions (i.e., service innovation, perceived switching costs, the attractiveness of alternatives, and explicit contracts) on firm performance. This study contributes through the identification of three alternative governance strategies that enable advanced service providers to benefit from service provision: 1) innovation governance strategy (high service innovation, low attractiveness of alternatives, and low use of explicit contracts); 2) relational governance strategy (high service innovation, high perceived switching costs, and low use of explicit contracts); and 3) market-based governance strategy (high service innovation, low perceived switching costs, high attractiveness of alternatives, and high use of explicit contracts). These results enrich the literature on servitization and advanced services by reflecting the need to apply diverse relational governance strategies. The results suggest multiple paths to superior financial performance.

  • 24.
    Parida, Vinit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Reim, Wiebke
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Reviewing Literature on Digitalization, Business Model Innovation, and Sustainable Industry: Past Achievements and Future Promises2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 2, article id 391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization is revolutionizing the way business is conducted within industrial value chains through the use of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, intensive data exchange and predictive analytics. However, technological application on its own is not enough; profiting from digitalization requires business model innovation such as making the transition to advanced service business models. Yet, many research gaps remain in analyzing how industrial companies can leverage digitalization to transform their business models to achieve sustainability benefits. Specifically, challenges related to value creation, value delivery, and value capture components of business model innovation need further understanding as well as how alignment of these components drive sustainable industry initiatives. Thus, this special issue editorial attempts to take stock of the emerging research field through a literature review and providing a synthesis of special issue contributions. In doing so, we contribute by developing a framework that communicates and sets the direction for future research by linking digitalization, business model innovation, and sustainability in industrial settings.

  • 25.
    Sirén, Charlotta
    et al.
    University of St.Gallen, Global Center Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Institute of Technology Management, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, Department of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    Patel, Pankaj C
    Villanova University, Villanova School of Business, Management and Operations, Villanova, United States.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of St.Gallen, Global Center Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Institute of Technology Management, St. Gallen, Switzerland;University of Vaasa, Department of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    Rushed and short on time: The negative effects of temporal planning and flexible pacing style on the entrepreneurial alertness–effectuation relationship2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the influence of entrepreneurs' temporal preferences on the alertness–effectuation association in the early opportunity creation process. Although temporal cognitions of planning and flexible pacing are generally beneficial in organizational settings, we ask whether they constrain effectuation efforts when there is increasing alertness. Using survey data from 92 entrepreneurs running Swedish ventures, we find that entrepreneurial alertness has a positive association with effectual decision making during opportunity creation. We find support for our predictions that temporal planning (the consideration of the temporal flow of task activities) and flexible pacing behavior (the adaptation of one's pace within social interactions) weaken the positive association between alertness and effectuation. We discuss the implications of our research for the literature on entrepreneurial alertness and effectuation and for the emerging literature on entrepreneurs' temporal preferences.

  • 26.
    Reim, Wiebke
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Sjödin, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Servitization of global service network actors: A contingency framework for matching challenges and strategies in service transition2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Servitization is a rising trend across manufacturing companies, but it is not achievable without the corresponding transition of the manufacturers’ service network. Despite the key role of service network actors, their servitization pathways are not widely understood. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to understand how diverse service network actors approach servitization under varying conditions. Findings are derived from an exploratory case study of eight service network actors for a global construction equipment manufacturer. The analysis reveals that service network actors face major capability-(lack of service provision capabilities, lack of service provision vision) and market-related challenges (unfavorable local conditions, low customer service readiness) that hinder their transformation. The analysis also reveals four unique servitization strategies (service extension, service benchmarking, digitalization, customer co-creation) that service network actors implement. A contingency framework is proposed to explain which challenges can be matched with which servitization strategies to achieve service network servitization. 

  • 27. Teräs, Jukka
    et al.
    Jokelainen, Kristiina
    Ejdemo, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Örtqvist, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Smart specialisation at the edge of Europe: Case study of sparesly populated areas in the Arctic2019In: Strategic Approaches to Regional Development: Smart Experimentation in Less-Favoured Regions / [ed] Iryna Kristensen, Alexandre Dubois and Jukka Teräs, New York: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28. Teräs, Jukka
    et al.
    Jokelainen, Kristiina
    Ejdemo, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Smart specialisation at the edge of Europe: Case study of sparesly populated areas in the Arctic2019In: Strategic Approaches to Regional Development: Smart Experimentation in Less-Favoured Regions / [ed] Iryna Kristensen, Alexandre Dubois and Jukka Teräs, New York: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Örtqvist, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    SMFs gränsöverskridande samverkan2019Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Söderholm, Patrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Hellsmark, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Environmental Systems Analysis, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Stockholm School of Economics, House of Innovation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansson, Julia
    Chalmers University of Technology, Maritime Environmental Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mossberg, Johanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, RISE Bioeconomy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Technological development for sustainability: The role of network management in the innovation policy mix2019In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 138, p. 309-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the key role of actor networks in progressing new sustainable technologies, there is a shortage of conceptual knowledge on how policy can help strengthen collaborative practices in such networks. The objective of this paper is to analyze the roles of such policies – so-called network management – throughout the entire technological development processes. The analysis draws on the public management and sustainability transitions literatures, and discusses how various network characteristics could affect the development of sustainable technologies, including how different categories of network management strategies could be deployed to influence actor collaborations. The paper's main contribution is an analytical framework that addresses the changing roles of network management at the interface between various phases of the technological development process, illustrated with the empirical case of advanced biorefinery technology development in Sweden. Furthermore, the analysis also addresses some challenges that policy makers are likely to encounter when pursuing network management strategies, and identifies a number of negative consequences of ignoring such instruments in the innovation policy mix. The latter include inefficient actor role-taking, the emergence of small, ineffective and competing actor networks in similar technological fields, and a shortage of interpretative knowledge.

  • 31.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    et al.
    University of Vaasa, School of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    Heimonen, Jesse
    University of Vaasa, School of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, School of Management, Vaasa, Finland.
    The nonlinear relationship between entrepreneurial orientation and sales growth: The moderating effects of slack resources and absorptive capacity2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 100, p. 100-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aims to advance the understanding of the complex and context-dependent relationship between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and firm sales growth by investigating the linearity assumption and assessing the moderating role of financial slack resources and absorptive capacity in the mature industry context. Departing from some recent EO studies, the analysis based on a dataset of 86 companies operating in the food manufacturing industry suggests that EO has a nonlinear relationship with sales growth. Moreover, the results suggest that in companies with high levels of slack resources, an increase in EO from low to moderate levels accelerates sales growth; however, to capitalize on the sales growth potential of high EO, a high absorptive capacity is also required. Thus, the present study demonstrates a nonlinear effect of EO on sales growth, and particularly from moderate to high levels of EO, the positive moderating effects of absorptive capacity and slack resources.

  • 32.
    Järvenpää, Anna-Therése
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Larsson, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The Transition from Design-Bid-Build Contracts to Design-Build2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose–For a number of years, the construction industry has seen an ongoing shift from design-bid-buildto design-build contracts. This transition in contract type entails changes for both the organizations and theindividuals involved. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how the client manages thetransition between the different contract types from an organizational change perspective in a project-ledorganization.

    Design/Methodology/Approach–A multiple case study of six infrastructure projects with DBcontracts, all managed by the Swedish Transport Administration, was conducted. The major source of data issemi-structured interviews with respondents from both the client and the contractors.

    Findings–Results suggest that the transition has resulted in a mix of design-bid-build and design-build ascontract type owing to issues when changing in a project-led organization. A change in vision also requires aconcomitant change in culture, systems and roles.

    Research Limitations/Implications–The study only includes cases from the Swedish transportinfrastructure sector, which limits the generalizability. Thefindings are also indicative owing to the smallnumber of cases.

    Practical Implications–Thefindings further our understanding of managing change in complexprojects, which might help practitioners to manage change in a more integrated way.

    Originality/Value–Thefindings enrich our understanding of the systemic change that a switch incontract types can have in inter-organizational complex projects such as transport infrastructure projects.Furthermore, it emphasizes the intricate task of change management in project-led organizations and itseffects on roles and responsibilities.

  • 33.
    Thorgren, Sara
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Caiman, Elin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The Role of Psychological Safety in Implementing Agile Methods across Cultures2019In: Research technology management, ISSN 0895-6308, E-ISSN 1930-0166, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overview: This paper emphasizes the cultural challenges of implementing Agile methods. We applied a psychological safety framework in an empirical case where Agile methods were implemented across workplace cultures, which helped define challenges related to psychological safety in three areas: (1) cultural differences related to attitudes toward inclusiveness, (2) cultural differences related to perceptions of and trust in collective responsibility, and (3) cultural differences related to openness in communication. These findings suggest that working across cultural boundaries adds to the challenges with Agile implementation found in other studies. 

  • 34.
    Lahti, Tom
    et al.
    Department of Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics.
    Halko, Marja-Liisa
    Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki.
    Karagozoglu, Necmi
    College of Business Administration, California State University, Sacramento.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Management and Organization, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki.Entrepreneurship and Innovation, University of St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Why and how do founding entrepreneurs bond with their ventures?: Neural correlates of entrepreneurial and parental bonding2019In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 368-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates why and how founding entrepreneurs bond with their ventures. We develop and test theory about the nature of bonding in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of 42 subjects (21 entrepreneurs and 21 parents). We find that entrepreneurs and parents show similar signs of affective bonding, that self-confidence plays a role in bonding style, and that the degree to which entrepreneurs include their ventures in the self and to which parents include their child in the self influences their ability to make critical assessments. Our findings suggest that bonding is similar for entrepreneurs and parents and that venture stimuli influence reward systems, self-regulatory functions, and mental factors that are associated with judgment.

  • 35.
    Parida, Vinit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. University of St.Gallen, Gallen, Switzerland.
    Why and how to compete through sustainability: a review and outline of trends influencing firm and network-level transformation2019In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reviews and discusses how to compete with sustainability by reviewing the literature about sustainability, business models, innovation, and networks. It is an introduction to the special issue on “innovative inter-organizational networks and sustainable economy: current trends and future opportunities” and a call for more research where we examine and outline ideas for how the new and rapidly spreading trends of digitalization, the circular economy, and servitization are force firms to develop new types of competitive advantages. We elaborate upon the transformation needs at firm-level capabilities and business models, as well as network-level changes through the formation of new ecosystems and new ways of engaging in co-creation with partners. These firm and network level transformation discussions are complimented with specific list potential areas for future academic research.

  • 36.
    Volker, Leentje
    et al.
    Department of Management in the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Kadefors, Anna
    Department of Real Estate and Construction Management, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    A case based comparison of the efficiency and innovation potential of integrative and collaborative procurement strategies2018In: Proceeding of the 34th Annual ARCOM Conference, ARCOM 2018 / [ed] Gorse, C. & Neilson, C.J., Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), 2018, p. 515-524Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate and compare in what ways different types of integrative and collaborative procurement strategies may enhance efficiency and innovation in public infrastructure projects. Further, implementation challenges are identified and discussed. Interview-based case studies were performed of ten infrastructure projects in Sweden and the Netherlands. The projects involve four types of collaborative procurement strategies - collaborative Design-Build (DB) contracts, Early Contractor Involvement (ECI) agreements, Design-Build-Maintain (DBM) contracts and Design-Build-Finance-Maintain (DBFM) contracts. The findings indicate that the duration of the collaboration is fundamental in setting the limits for innovation and that early involvement as well as long-term commitments open up for more innovation. Naturally, the potential for increased efficiency is higher than for innovation and also occurs in collaborations with limited duration. These integrated project approaches, however, still appear to be in an early stage of learning. For a public repeat client to realise the full potential of a new strategy, it is important to have a long-term perspective and capabilities to analyse and learn from the experiences.

  • 37.
    Nordqvist, Sofia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Actor roles, knowledge types and the role of patenting for progressing sustainable technologies: A case study of demonstration projects: 2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition towards a bioeconomy is one of the greatest challenges of our times, and dependent upon radical innovations and the replacement of fossil-based technologies with clean and more sustainable ones. This is however not done in a jiffy since key underlying process technologies are underdeveloped and also contradict with the prevailing socio-technical regime. This makes demonstration projects crucial for the development of new biorefinery technologies since such projects can reduce not only technical but also organizational and institutional uncertainties.

     

    Due to the complexity and costs of demonstration activities, they are typically performed in inter-organizational settings with actors from government, academia, research institutes and the industry. Such a constellation of actors often implies somewhat contradicting interests, for example regarding diffusion versus protection of knowledge that bring challenges for technological development. The overall purpose of the thesis is therefore to enhance knowledge about demonstration projects as knowledge generators contributing to the progression of sustainable technologies. The thesis builds upon case studies of biorefinery demonstration plants and investigates the processes of knowledge development and diffusion in order to contribute to bridging the valley of death between demonstration and commercialization of more sustainable technologies.

     

    Three papers are appended to the thesis. Paper I studies which key barriers that actors engaged in demonstration plants experience during technological development and suggest a role-typology to address those barriers. The second paper investigate knowledge production taking place in demonstration projects and suggests that there is an “imbalance” in production of domain-specific technical knowledge in relation to general and procedural knowledge on how to work with commercialization, which contributes to the problem of new technologies not making it past demonstration. The third paper seeks to address management of demonstration projects as protected spaces for emerging technologies. Those findings show that patenting strategies influence the formulation of expectations among actors that guides the creation of the social network as well as the experimental work and learnings taking place there in order for emerging technologies to develop further.

  • 38.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ericson, ÅsaLuleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Addressing societal challenges2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Kohtamäki, Marko
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Department of Management, University of Vaasa.
    Rabetino, Rodrigo
    Department of Management, University of Vaasa.
    Möller, Kristian
    Department of Marketing, Aalto University School of Business.
    Alliance capabilities: A systematic review and future research directions2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 68, p. 188-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to manage, integrate and learn from strategic alliances is essential in today's interconnected and globalized economy. Despite the managerial relevance of alliance capability, there remain several open questions related to the conceptualization of alliance capabilities, their antecedents, processes and outcomes, and future research needs. We address these issues through a systematic review of 94 articles from top-tier journals focused on alliance capabilities. This study makes three contributions. The study (1) defines the concept of alliance capabilities when operating in a dyadic relational context by reviewing the rich alliance capability literature, acknowledging and bridging the works conducted in different fields. We (2) identify the main processes, antecedents and outcomes of alliance capabilities and, through this analysis, pave the way for (3) the creation of a comprehensive research agenda to direct future research efforts. Overall, this study extends the existing literature by providing an integrative view of alliance capability research in various fields.

  • 40.
    Malmström, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Department of Management and Organization, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki.
    Bank lending and financial discrimination from the formal economy: How women entrepreneurs get forced into involuntary bootstrapping2018In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 10, article id e00096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of banks, their decision models, and their linkages with how entrepreneurs can act as providers to the formal economy have not been focused on much in entrepreneurship research. We explore the trend of transaction-based lending among banks on entrepreneurs’ engagement in informal economic activities (or involuntary bootstrapping activities) and how that relationship is moderated by gender. The results show that women entrepreneurs who encounter banks with transaction-based lending are forced to engage in much more informal economic activities compared to men, while this gender bias vanishes when entrepreneurs face banks with relation-based lending. We associate these results with gender stereotyping and suggest transaction-based lending to be costly for the development of formal economies.

  • 41.
    Ejdemo, Thomas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Örtqvist, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Befintliga och potentiella utvecklingsmöjligheter: Testnäring i Norrobotten2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Brattström, Anna
    et al.
    Sten K Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, Lund University.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Richtnér, Anders
    Stockholm School of Economics .
    Pfluger, Dane
    HEC, Paris .
    Can innovation be measured?: A framework of how measurement of innovation engages attention in firms2018In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 48, p. 64-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many firms manage the innovation process by using metrics. Yet, whether measurement supports or hinders innovation continues to be a topic of debate. To shed new light on this debate, this paper presents a conceptual framework of how measurement engages attention in firms. We draw on attention based theory and conceptualize innovation measurement as an attention-focusing device. We identify two ideal types of measurement practices. i) Directional Measurement: which is based on few and unidirectional metrics and encourages exploitative innovation efforts. ii) Conversational Measurement: which is based on multiple and ambiguous metrics and encourages exploration. We extend theory building in the technology and accounting literatures by theorizing the role of metrics and measurement for attention and by discussing the implications of such attentional engagement for innovation performance. In so doing, we engage closely with the managerial task of managing innovation while simplifying its conditions, thereby providing actionable advice.

  • 43.
    Kibler, Ewald
    et al.
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Kautonen, Teemu
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland;Universidad del Desarrollo, Chile.
    Cacciotti, Gabriella
    University of Warwick, Business School, UK.
    Obschonka, Martin
    Queensland University of Technology, QUT Business School, Australia.
    Can prosocial motivation harm entrepreneurs' subjective well-being?2018In: Journal of Business Venturing, ISSN 0883-9026, E-ISSN 1873-2003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship research on prosocial motivation has outlined its positive impact on well-being, but still little is known about its power, which may have deleterious personal consequences under certain conditions. In this study, we ask whether prosocial motivation can harm entrepreneurs' subjective well-being when they run a commercial venture. Embedded within a contingency perspective informed by self-determination theory, we build on longitudinal survey data to explain the effect of prosocial motivation on entrepreneurs' overall life satisfaction. Our analysis demonstrates that prosocial motivation has a negative effect on entrepreneurs' life satisfaction due to increased levels of stress. However, our findings show that the negative effect of prosocial motivation dissipates when perceived autonomy at work is high compared to when it is low. Overall, our research raises questions on the role of prosocial motivation for entrepreneurs' subjective well-being and, in particular, discusses its potential “dark side” in the context of commercial entrepreneurship.

    Executive summary

    Can there be a “dark side” in helping others? If so, how can we better understand under what conditions it emerges? Entrepreneurship research conventionally presents prosocial motivation as a positive driver for social venture creation and entrepreneurs' well-being. However, we have little knowledge about the consequences of prosocial motivation when we move outside the social entrepreneurship context. When prosocially motivated entrepreneurs lead a commercial venture, they face the difficult task of balancing the desire to help others with the financial requirements of the business. The challenge of simultaneously accomplishing commercial and prosocial goals can result in a stressful experience that is detrimental to the entrepreneur's well-being. In this study, we ask whether and under what circumstances prosocial motivation can harm entrepreneurs' well-being.

    Embedded in a contingency perspective informed by self-determination theory, this article expands our knowledge on the effects of prosocial motivation in the context of commercial entrepreneurship. We draw from original longitudinal survey data on 186 entrepreneurs in the United Kingdom to demonstrate that prosocial motivation causes entrepreneurs stress and through that stress has a negative effect on their life satisfaction. We also show that the negative effect of prosocial motivation diminishes when the degree of autonomy entrepreneurs perceive in the pursuit of daily work tasks is high. To explore the uniqueness of the entrepreneurial context, we run a comparative analysis with a sample of 544 employees. This analysis confirms that stress fully mediates the negative relationship between prosocial motivation and subjective well-being, but for employees, this negative effect disappears when their level of intrinsic motivation—the desire to expend effort based on enjoyment of the work itself—is high.

    Building on our findings, we generate several important contributions. First, we help develop an understanding of the “dark side” of prosocial motivation by demonstrating that under certain circumstances, the desire to help others can be detrimental to entrepreneurs' subjective well-being. Second, we expand knowledge about the link between prosocial motivation and well-being by considering the boundary conditions (perceived autonomy and intrinsic motivation) that influence the dynamics of their relationship. Third, we set the stage for further investigations that aim to clarify the relationship between motivation and perceived autonomy and its effect on personal outcomes across different work domains.

    The key insight of the study is that prosocial motivation creates a dilemma for entrepreneurs when operating a commercial business such that the desire to help others outside the context of immediate work tasks can harm their personal well-being. We also find that the perception of autonomy is key for commercial entrepreneurs to be able to realize their prosocial motivation without creating stressful situations. Extending our understanding of the conditions that shape the relationship between prosocial motivation and well-being among entrepreneurs would help in developing a more holistic notion of prosocial business venturing, one that includes the role of both commercial and social enterprising activities in contributing to personal and societal well-being.

  • 44.
    Sirén, Charlotta
    et al.
    University of St.Gallen, Global Center Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Institute of Technology Management.
    Patel, Pankaj C.
    Villanova University, Villanova School of Business, Management and Operations.
    Örtqvist, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Hanken School of Economics.
    CEO burnout, managerial discretion, and firm performance: The role of CEO locus of control, structural power, and organizational factors2018In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 953-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the possibility of burnout resulting from dynamics in firms' upper echelons, little if any work has focused on chief executive officer's (CEO's) burnout and firm performance. Drawing on managerial discretion theory, this article analyzes the influence of CEO burnout on firm performance and the moderating roles of the individual (CEO locus of control), structural power (CEO duality and CEO tenure), and organizational characteristics (size, age, and resource availability) related to managerial discretion. Using a sample of 156 CEOs in Swedish firms, we find a negative association between CEOs who report higher burnout and firm performance. Our results confirm that CEO duality and resource availability ameliorate and firm size exacerbates the negative association between CEO burnout and firm performance. Contrary to our expectations, CEO locus of control, CEO tenure, and firm age do not influence this relationship. We discuss the implications of our research for upper echelons theory and strategic leadership theory.

  • 45.
    Ejdemo, Thomas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Örtqvist, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Conceptualizing and Measuring Smart Specialization: A Literature Review and Empirical Test2018In: 21st Uddevalla Symposium, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Florén, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Critical success factors in early new product development: a review and a conceptual model2018In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 411-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on the front end in the New Product Development (NPD) literature is fragmented with respect to the identification and analysis of the factors that are critical to successful product development. The article has a two-fold purpose. First, it describes, analyses, and synthesizes those factors through a literature review of the research on the front end in NPD. Second, it conceptualizes a framework that features two types of success factors: foundational success factors (common to all the firm’s projects) and project-specific success factors (appropriate for the firm’s individual projects). The article makes recommendations for the management of this important phase of product development, discusses limitations of relevant previous research, and offers suggestions for future research. The article makes a theoretical contribution with its analysis and synthesis of the reasons for success in front-end activities and a practical contribution with its conceptual framework that can be used as an analytical tool by firms and their product managers.

  • 47.
    Mossberg, Johanna
    et al.
    CIT Industriell Energi AB, Chalmers Teknikpark.
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Hellsmark, Hans
    Energy and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Nordqvist, Sofia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Crossing the biorefinery valley of death?: A role-based typology for understanding actor networks ability to overcome barriers in sustainability transitions2018In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 27, p. 83-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pilot and demonstration plants (PDPs) play important roles in technological development; they represent bridges between basic knowledge generation and technological breakthroughs, on the one hand, and industrial application and commercial adoption, on the other. This paper addresses the importance of the actor networks around the PDPs at which different biorefinery technologies have been demonstrated and verified. The aim of the paper is to propose a role-based typology that can be used as an illustrative tool to facilitate a more generic analysis – and enhanced understanding – of PDP actor networks and their dynamics. For this purpose the paper investigates the barriers experienced by the actors in their joint efforts to further utilise and transform the PDPs into permanent test facilities after the initial technology verification and demonstration. To aid the analysis the actor networks surrounding four Swedish biorefinery PDPs are investigated. 

  • 48.
    Sjödin, David
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Centre for Management of Innovation and Technology in Process Industry, Promote. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Cenamor, Javier
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Digital Platforms to Enable Servitization: How leading manufacturers leverage digitalization to provide advanced services2018In: Management of Innovation and Technology, ISSN 2001-208X, no 3, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish manufacturing firms are increasingly adopting pioneering digital technologies and analytics to support advanced service provision in an attempt to achieve sustainable competitive advantages. This article explains how a platform approach to digitalization can help manufacturers achieve both customization and operational efficiency in advanced service provision across global markets.

  • 49.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Cenamor, Javier
    Department of Business Administration, School of Economics and Management, Lund University.
    Cavalli-Björkman, Harald
    re:newcell AB, Cardellgatan 1, SE-114 36 Stockholm.
    Hernell, Emma
    HUI Research, SE-103 29 Stockholm.
    Carlsson, Johan
    EVRY Sweden AB, Olof Asklunds Gata 10, 421 30 Västra Frölunda.
    Digital strategies for two-sided markets: A case study of shopping malls2018In: Decision Support Systems, ISSN 0167-9236, E-ISSN 1873-5797, Vol. 108, p. 34-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization is fundamentally changing the retailing ecosystem for shopping malls as digital and analogue elements get increasingly intertwined. We conceptualize shopping malls as two-sided markets whose primary function is connecting shoppers and retailers. By means of an interpretative case study, the article then presents an omnichannel strategy typology for how shopping malls can meet the evolving digitalization challenge. We identify three generic strategies labeled digital awaiter, digital data gatherer, and digital embracer. The paper provides implications for research in omnichannel strategies, digitalization, and two-sided markets by explicating different strategies that involve physical and digital resources, and different ecosystem agents, i.e., retailers and shoppers. It also provides insights for other organizations beyond retailing and which operate under a two-sided market regime.

  • 50.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Digitalization2018In: Addressing Societal Challenges / [ed] Editors Johan Frishammar Åsa Ericson, Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2018, p. 23-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization is a fundamental disruptive force triggered by FourthIndustrial Revolution and Internet of Things, which has changed theway we approach and think about business processes and activities.In this increasingly digital age, relationships between organizations(i.e. companies, governmental agencies, and others) and customersare being reshaped and new business models are being invented. Today,companies across industries need agility, speed, flexibility, andthe ability to pivot rapidly to pursue new business opportunities andkeep up with a fast-changing global business environment. Digitalizationemphasizes the importance of placing advanced technology atthe heart of all processes, products, and services. However, much ofthe promised value of digitalization for business and society has notyet been fully realized. Academia will play a vital role in developingthe required knowledge and skills at the individual, company, andsocial levels. LTU can contribute to digital transformation by upgradingteaching and research so that students and researchers learn,understand, and apply digitalization for business development, innovationmanagement, and social value creation.

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