Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 354
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Development of Prepared Student-Centred Musical Interpretational Response Seminars (PSCMIRS): A Participatory Action Research Project Within Higher Music Education in Sweden2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Researching Transformative Technology and its affordance for students within Higher Music Education2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the autumn 2018 a research project concerning Transformative Technology (TT) for the increase of wellbeing and the reduction of mental dissonance has been launched at the School of Music in Piteå. Seed money has enabled a pilot project where students within higher music education can use different types of TT. This poster will show the different types of TT used in the pilot project and some preliminary result from the user experiences. The technology in use are (i) the Heart Rate Variability (HRV) sensors and Heart Math application, (ii) the Muse headband and meditation app, (iii) the Soma Mat and Breathing Light developed at SICS and KTH, as well as the (iv) ARK-crystal developed at the Torus Tech lab. The purpose of the pilot study is to investigate how students respond to different kinds of sensors and actuators used in this TT and most importantly how the students find the technology transformable in regard to amplifying their well-being, empowering and refining their aesthetic resonance and diminishing stress and anxiety blocking them in their musical performance and development.

  • 3.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    The Sorcerer’s Apprentice’s Apprentices in Piano Master Class: A Study of (at Least) Three Sides of Teaching and Learning of Musical Interpretation2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music has always been a performing art. However, it was first during the 19th century that the standard procedure within Western art music was formalised to the interpreter performing an interpretation—an artwork in its own, based on and related to the notated musical work. As such the interpretation can be analysed and valued, and the interpreter is thereby an artist.

    Musical interpretation is starting to become a rather well-researched phenomenon from the performing artist’s perspective, but hitherto little attention has been given to how musical interpretation is described, developed, and communicated within higher music education.

    Research shows that interpretation and the expressive aspects of music tend to be stepmotherly treated at the lower levels of education, e.g., in municipal music schools. Even in one-to-one teaching within higher education in Western art music, less attention is usually given to interpretation compared to technique, and the students’ practical playing is often emphasised. The discrepancy, found by teachers during lessons, between students’ practical playing and capacity for independent interpretation has been analysed as indicating that the students had not internalised the necessary skills.

    The aim of this compilation thesis—consisting of four articles and the ‘kappa’—is to describe teaching and learning of musical interpretation from both a teacher and student perspective within higher music education in Western art music. Contexts studied were delimited to one-to-one, master class, and prepared student-centred musical interpretational response seminar (henceforth abbreviated to PSCMIRS) teaching in Sweden. The following research questions were formulated to fulfil the aim:

    1. How do teachers and students describe and define musical interpretation? (Part study 1: qualitative semi-structured interviews [6 students and 4 teachers]; autoethnography. Part study 2: see below.)

    2. How do teachers and students see and describe their interaction while developing the student’s musical interpretation during lessons? (Part study 2: video documentation and stimulated recall [2 students, 1 master class teacher, and the students’ regular teacher (1)]; follow-up interviews [2 students and their regular teacher (1)]; field notes; scores annotated by the master class teacher. Part study 3 [planned participatory action research on PSCMIRS teaching].)

    3. What do these descriptions, definitions, and the interaction between teachers and students imply with regards to pedagogical, aesthetical, and philosophical values of higher music education?

    The theoretical framework consists of selections from the hermeneutical philosophy of Gadamer and Ricoeur including the concepts of pre-understanding, the interpreter’s horizon, and the fusion of horizons. Currently, poetry is used both as one of the methods for analysis and forms of (re)presentation. In addition, Jungian archetypes might be used as an analytical lens to further the understanding of the relationship(s) between student, teacher, musical work, and composer.

    Results—as presented in article 1 (in press) and 2 (in review)—indicate that both the student’s and the teacher’s definition of musical interpretation are of importance. They defined it as the process that results in a musical interpretation (mainly viewed as a practical performance) that should be positioned in the continuum between a non-interpretation and an over-interpretation. Conditions for learning of musical interpretation within the one-to-one context seemed to centre on the student’s achievement of a high level of autonomy. Three aspects appeared to affect this condition: (1) the student’s and the teacher’s view of what musical interpretation (as an activity) is, (2) experienced respectively acknowledged freedom of interpretation, and (3) (expectations on) the student’s explorative approach. Overall, honest and real dialogues where both the student and the teacher are open and feel secure enough to put something at risk seem to be a prerequisite for learning to take place.

    The expected outcome for the finished thesis is a multi-dimensional description and deepened understanding of the teaching, learning, and communication of musical interpretation within higher music education in Western art music, which hopefully will be beneficial in the future development of one-to-one, master class, and different forms of group teaching.

    At the conference, preliminary results including the interaction between teacher and student while developing the student’s musical interpretation during master class lessons (part study 2) and the research design of the planned participatory action research on PSCMIRS teaching (part study 3) will be presented.

  • 4.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    The Sorcerer’s Apprentice’s Apprentices in Piano Master Class: Teaching and Learning of Musical Interpretation Viewed Through a Philopseudian Lens2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Burkart, Patrick
    et al.
    Texas A&M University.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    The Spotifyication of public service media2019In: The Information Society, ISSN 0197-2243, E-ISSN 1087-6537, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 173-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates contemporary cultural policy reforms enabled by paid digital media distribution services, taking the case of the integration of Spotify into the Swedish public media system. Specifically, it reflects on the conflicts arising over the prioritization of digital distribution over cultural preservation, during the gradual substitution of the Spotify digital services for the services provided by the traditional material media archive, the Grammofonarkivet. It considers the factors influencing changes in the Swedish cultural policy environment and the nature of the complaints and human rights claims made by employees of the Grammofonarkivet to UNESCO regarding its structural transformation. It also postulates a “Spotification” model of public service media emerging in Sweden but potentially affecting other countries with public media systems served by traditional media archives.

  • 6.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    A Philosophic Poetic Inquiry of Three Aspects of Interpretation within Music Education Research: An Autoethnodrama in Four Acts2018In: European Journal of Philosophy in Arts Education, ISSN 2002-4665, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 7-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores three aspects of interpretation—musical interpretation of notated Western art music, hermeneutics (theoretical framework), and poetry (tool for analysis and representation)—based on ongoing music education research focusing on the learning of musical interpretation within the one-to-one context of higher music education. The broad philosophic poetic inquiry of interpretation has the form of an autoethnodrama containing both haiku and found poetry. Poetry is both used as a process of inquiry and as a means of representation. The autoethnodrama explores the author’s struggle with finding his cogito for conducting arts-based research and touches upon his personal history. Through the combination of autoethnodrama and a philosophic poetic inquiry, he finds a deeper understanding of musical interpretation, usage of poetry and autoethnodrama in research, as well as of his personhood. Concluding reflections on one possible way of interpreting the autoethnodrama in relation to teaching and learning of musical interpretation within higher music education are also presented.

  • 7.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Affordances of Music Streaming based on Exploratory Media Archaeology: A presentation of the completed PhD-project Liquid Streaming focusing the affordance of musicking for the public via the Spotify streaming service with an emphasis on method2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In my dissertation, I have accounted for the affordances of musicking brought about by streamed music with the case example of Spotify. In order to perform a study orbiting the realm of music streaming, mainly digital sources have been used; Internet sources and software program of the streaming service. In the presentation, I will focus on issues concerning those two major roots. Within the latter I will present, problematize and conclude how; the Internet can be used as a field of sources, and on what terms the Internet can be regarded as an Archive. Also, what alternatives researchers can depend on when practising research within the realm of the Internet. The sources have, over time, been shown to change content, update, disappear, change resolution or package, which means that digital sources such as source material as well as methodology operating in such a field need to be problematized. First of all, I will account for how a phenomenon such as the Spotify streaming service is a multidimensional feature where appearance and featured functions depend on a number of things such as geographical market zone, subscription zone, the digital device used for access, and previous user-generated history. Researching a platform based software program like this brings particular issues for the researcher. I will present how these issues have been recognised and managed in my research. Secondly, I will address Internet as a base for research. The Internet provides a plethora of available sources, and as such Internet brings the affordance of accessing a tremendous amount of data opening up for possibilities that were not available prior to digitalisation. For instance, interviews and talks by interesting people might be available on-line whereas the same persons may be difficult or impossible to reach in ordinary life. Contemporary culture on the Internet, characterised by free culture and shared content further supply massive amount of data to be researched. Further, many services on the Internet provide access to local archives where content can be searched for, and a great number of sources can be screened regarding particular content. The popular phrase: “Once on the Internet, always on the Internet” has been found to be a truth with modification. I will present four different examples of issues concerning using the Internet as an archive and how such issues can be tackled within research concerning questions of reliability and trustworthiness. The first (i) example is how content many times are personalised, why an "objective" or public view can be impossible to gain. Further, it can be impossible to gain access to how personalisation is conducted. The second (ii) example is how sources, such as music, can be limited to certain geographical restrictions and thus only accessed from certain IP-addresses for the researcher. The third (iii) example is how sources may be removed and deleted. This is the case with some personal information as individuals have a right to be forgotten. Another example is how documents from the government offices are removed when there is a new government in office. The fourth (iv) example addresses the issue where a source might remain on the Internet but presented in a different digital format than the original content.

  • 8.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Arts-Based Research in the Area of Nordic Music Education – a Multi Modal Turn?: A Philosophical–Poetical Inquiry of Interpretation as Research Object, Theoretical Framework, and Tool for Analysis and Representation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ferm Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Ekberg, Niclas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Evolving musical Bildung in streaming media – Spotify as a case: Reflections upon a pilot study2018In: Vart är musiken på väg?: Perspektiv från forskning, bransch och politiker, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evolving musical Bildung in streaming media – Spotify as a case: Reflections upon a pilot study

    Cecilia Ferm Almqvist, Niclas Ekberg & Susanna Leijonhufvud (Luleå tekniska universitet)

    The presentation will share experiences of and reflections upon a pilot study based on stimulatedrecall interviews aiming to explore the meaning and function of streaming media as a facilitatorof musical Bildung. It can be stated that new technology has the possibility to provideinformation and education for everyone. Today, most people can access the same informationfor "free", which is interesting from a democratic perspective. Access to music in relation to thenew, transformed music industry has been studied from technological and economical 11perspectives. Even listening habits and listening frequencies, have been investigated throughanalyses of Big Data. Hence, we stated a need to reflect upon and discuss the meaning andfunction of streamed music in people's lives, taking as a starting point the affordances andconstraints of the music streaming services. Using Spotify as a case, based on phenomenologicalperspectives of Bildung, a cross disciplinary project was created. In the presentation we want toanswer share preliminary results from a pilot stimulated interview study. A netnographic orientedapproach where chosen, given its focus on distinguishing meanings and human practice in variedcontexts, and combined with shadowing and individual interviews, supported by stimulatedrecall. The participants gathered their user activities that took place during a limited period oftime, and also in what ways these were shared and expressed in varied social media. Thestimulated recall interviews were documented through the use of a web based videoconferenceapplication, transcribed and subjected to qualitative content analysis. The paper presentation aimsto share and discuss the use of methods as well as preliminary results, which hopefully cancontribute with insights when it comes to how streamed music functions, and can be usedconsciously, within the field of music education.

  • 10.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Liquid Streaming: The Spotify Way To Music2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis accounts for the liquid affordances of musicking via streamed music from the perspective of the end-user. The study is particularly analysing the case of Spotify, which has gained an extraordinary prominent position within the Swedish market. The point of departure is that music streaming has emerged in a time where there seems to be an increased space and need for a musical presence in everyday human life. This circumstance is then related to the phenomenon that music has an exceptional position for human beings.Music may affect the human body, empower physical activity as well as regulate moods and feelings. Whatever the musical experience might be, it is affected by previous musical socialisation including formal as well as informal music learning situations. These experiences per se found the base of future musical awareness and advancement. Moreover, as musical involvement, to such a large extent currently are given via streaming, it is most crucial to understand what kind of affordances streaming brings to a lifelong learning and its more or less organized arenas, of music. To investigate music streaming from the user’s point of view, Norman’s concept of affordance has been applied to numerous public sources that in different ways houses the Spotify way to music. Here, the concept of affordance reveals the idea of the user as the user is inscribed in the design. The Spotify software program, materials from Spotify employees, newspaper articles, statistics and reports concerning music streaming have been analysed according to actor-network theory (ANT) situated in, what Bauman regards contemporary society as, an interregnum of liquid time. The thesis initially accounts for the constitution of music streaming as a feature, revealing an intrinsic network of a company with its core of employees, its agile management and playful culture, but also necessary networked actors such as Internet Service Providers, manufactures of digital devices, software algorithms and music formats to mention a few. Economic Maecenas and legislators also constitute the streaming service intertwined with the main players of users and music. This multifaceted picture shows that to comprehend a music streaming actor, its whole network needs to be accounted for as its constitutes the actor. Also, as condition changes, actor changes, why also music streaming, as a feature, changes. Consequently, any music educator at various levels within the society, e.g. public radio, artists, teachers, peers, the user herself, or even the Spotify company need to consider the liquid situation as it has become fundamental for musical experiences and learning through this kind of media. The affordances of musicking are further analysed on the level of the service’s interface, e.g. the visual display of the music service by addressing a multimodal analysis of the social semiotics used to network users to music. This cross-section also shows to be liquid as the service both continuously updates as well as being customised which means that one view is not alike the other. This protean state and the liquid affordances it brings with it needs to be related and responded to by music educators. Finally, the thesis covers the affordance of musicking on behalf of the one who streams. Based on the fact that music is available in a plethora, the central feature of streaming services is to aid and guide users to music. In this realm, intelligent algorithms have started to be employed as cicerone. Algorithmic cicerone based on usergenerated data blend humans and machines into a hybrid lifeform when musicking. User-generated data is currently being refined via an increased human embodiment by the Internet of Things starting to close up on the one who streams. Technological embodiment of the human is starting to increase to also embrace a sensuous embodiment of the musicking human. A detected human heartbeat can consequently co-constitute musical recommendation for the streamer, a recommendation that in turn can affect the heartbeat. This evolution calls for a turn toward a renewed coalition between music and human. Music streaming has the affordances to constitute an advent of something newborn - a musical cyborg.

  • 11.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    The Sorcerer’s Apprentice’s Apprentices in Piano Master Class: Learning of Musical Interpretation from a Three Generational-Perspective2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Allan, Jon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Media, audio technology and experience production and theater.
    The Sound of Streamed Music2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    …the majority of consumers seem to be unaware of this, or of the audio quality

    they’re missing out on! They spend endless hours experiencing audio at sub-

    128kbps bit rates, at the mercy of whoever uploaded the material, without

    knowing what it should sound like, without realising how bad it sounds, and

    unaware of the artefacts they’re hearing that shouldn’t be there.

    The quote stems from a journalist writing in the music recording magazine of Sound on Sounds

    and highlights issues concerning on-line music and the affordance such music brings for the

    listeners. Currently, music may be accessed via real-time streaming, accessed in complex

    conglomerates side by side with other types of content via computers, mobile phones, tablets,

    televisions, car stereos and soon to be accessed via new technology housed by the Internet of

    Things (IoT). Up until now, the technology of streaming has focused on access, robustness,

    interoperability between devices and extensive additional service augmenting the realm of

    musicking. Issues of the musical sound qualities and how aspects of sound quality interplay with

    the affordance of listening have more or less been neglected in favour of accessibility. From what

    we have learned from scholars accounting for digital formats and bit reduction as well as

    compression of dynamics in sound, there are some aspects concerning this field that is missing

    and as it seems neglected for the masses of music consumption.

    The development of smart technology orbiting music has just recently returned to issues of high

    fidelity and home stereo equipment. This development could be interpreted as a renaissance for

    the affordance of music listening. However, the quality of sound, which embeds the music, is

    not solely depending on the recording, the mix or the mastering engineers. It also depends on

    the adaptation of sound streams for the final playback device. In addition to these traditional

    delimiting nodes of sound quality, streamed music is constituted by numerous things and aspects

    such as broadband access, broadband capability, the robustness of the broadband system, the

    digital format and the velocity of transmission.

    This presentation, which is a part of a larger research project focusing the streaming company of

    Spotify as an actor of musical Bildung, will outline a suggestion for a designed method where

    different categories of participators will be selected to research the affordance of sound qualities

    of streamed music. Affordance of listening should be understood as the nexus between sound

    engineering and music cognition bridged by music education. The research should focus

    traditional aspects of perception and cognition but also socialisation that constitutes taste and

    preferences, and finally educational aspects as conceptualisation, learning and awareness. Four

    main themes are emphasised in this presentation; (i) developing methods to describe and measure

    sensation quantities when it comes to describing sound quality and the affordance of perceptual

    coding, (ii) selecting various types of listeners regarding age, gender, music educational

    background when studying stimulus quantities of streamed music, (iii) using the listeners preferred

    music to complement music from a control sample of tunes, and (iv) attributes used to

    communicate quality of sound and music within various communities.

  • 13.
    Ferm-Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Vinge, John
    Norway Academy of Music, Oslo.
    Väkevä, Lauri
    Sibelius Academy of the University of the Arts Helsinki.
    Zandén, Olle
    Linnæus University, Sweden.
    Assessment as learning in music education: the risk of ‘criteria compliance’ replacing ’learning’ in the Scandinavian countries2017In: Research Studies in Music Education, ISSN 1321-103X, E-ISSN 1834-5530, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 3-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent reforms in England and USA give evidence that teaching methods and content can change rapidly, given a strong external pressure, for example through economic incentives, inspections, school choice and public display of schools’ and pupils’ performances. Educational activities in the Scandinavian countries have increasingly become dominated by obligations regarding assessment and grading. A common thread is the demand for equal and just assessment and grading through clear criteria and transparent processes. Torrance (2007) states that clarity in assessment procedures, processes and criteria has underpinned widespread use of coaching, practice and provision of formative feedback to boost achievement, but that such transparency encourages instrumentalism. He concludes that the practice of assessment has moved from assessment of learning, through assessment for learning, to assessment as learning, with assessment procedures and practices coming completely to dominate the learning experience and ‘criteria compliance’ replacing ‘learning’. Thus, formative assessment, in spite of its proven educational potential, threatens to be deformative (Torrance, 2012). In the article we will explore to what extent and how this development is visible in two cases, presenting music education in one Norwegian and one Swedish compulsory school setting. Three thematic threads run through this exploration: quality, power and instrumentalism. 

  • 14.
    Ferm, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Hentschel, Linn
    Umeå universitet.
    Mars, Annette
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Nyberg, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Wachenfeldt, Thomas von
    Umeå universitet.
    Collaborative learning as Common Sense: Structure, Roles and Participation Amongst Doctoral Students and Teachers in Music Education – Beyond Communities of Practice2017In: Visions of Research in Music Education, ISSN 1938-2065, Vol. 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article communicates an investigation of how collaborative learning is constituted in a PhD-course, namely Collaborative learning in music educational settings. The course was organized and run in a way that aimed to investigate, develop and encourage collaborative learning among students and teachers in the third circle. Material produced and analysed included log-books, assignments, peer-response, after-thoughts, and a Facebook discussion-thread. The results are presented as descriptions of the constituent parts of collaborative learning occurring in the “rooms” of the course. The results show the importance of structure as well as awareness when it comes to roles and kinds of participation.

  • 15.
    Ferm-Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Ekberg, Niclas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Allan, Jon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Media, audio technology and experience production and theater.
    Burkhart, Patrick
    Evolving Bildung in the Nexus of Streaming Services, Art andUsers : Spotify as a Case 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The changed landscape of media, with digital distribution as a keyfactor, creates new conditions for people’s access to cultural expressions. This has mainly been studied through technical and financial perspectives, focusing on the record industry, file sharing, human–technology interaction, and click frequency. New questionsare necessary for an understanding of what functions streamed musicand art expressions can have in people’s lives, and how companies such as Spotify relate to these functions.The aim of the study is to explore Bildung in the nexus of streaming services, art and users, with Spotify as a case study. Research questions: How and to what extent do technical, legal, economic, and ethical factors control possibilities for meaningmaking in the interaction between streaming media such as Spotify, arts, and human beings? How does the quality of art/music distributed through streaming influence opportunites for Bildung? How do users make meaning in the specific contexts? To what extent is the user involved in her own Bildung via the algorithms making up the participation?

    To achieve this aim and address the research questions an interdisciplinary study is needed, which makes it possible to understand the complex phenomena of a streaming media platform in relation to Bildung. Technicians and researchers from the humanities and social sciences will approach the research problem and form a holistic understanding of streaming media in relation to human beings, art, and technology. Hence, combinations of methodological approaches are required. Big-data analysis will provide access to how varied demographics use Spotify. The Spotify users’ activities, experiences of streaming media interactions, and meaning-making will be accessed through qualitative netnographical observations, shadowing, and interviews. Sound quality analysis will clarify what aesthetic values are involved in the most appreciated listening experiences, which will be related to Bildung.

  • 16.
    Bäckman, Mikael
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    How does playing chromatic affect my diatonic playing & vice versa2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Ferm-Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Christophersen, Catharina
    Bergen University College, Grieg Academy.
    Inclusive arts education in two Scandinavian primary schools: a phenomenological case study2017In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies indicate that ideas related to special education could influence the way arts education is performed and motivated in schools. Further investigation is therefore required in order to raise awareness of how perspectives on inclusion can serve as a starting point for arts education, and vice versa. This article takes it starting point in an ethnographic double case study of arts education practices. Data were collected during the school year 2013/2014 in two Scandinavian schools (for pupils aged 6–13) with an articulated commitment to the arts. The methods used for data collection were observation and interviews. The material was analysed from a phenomenological point of view, and the analysis showed a predominantly holistic view of inclusion in the two schools. Five dimensions of inclusion were identified through the analysis: providing arts education for allbeing connected to something largerallowing access to different forms of expression and communicationestablishing preconditions for holistic inclusion, and developing special arts education. The results indicate that these schools have made considerable progress in developing an inclusive arts learning environment. Results also suggest that a holistic inclusive view of education encourages a functional and vivid arts education for ‘all’, both inside and outside the classroom.

  • 18.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Liquid streaming  : an actor-network analysis of streamed music with the case of Spotify   2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently music streaming services are starting to dominate the music industry. Streaming out rule physical records as well as digital download, and by doing so music streaming has contributed to shift ownership of artefacts with access to ditto. This presentation aims to describe the affordances and surplus values that are connected to such an access service taking the Swedish founded company of Spotify as a case example. By employing Zygmunt Bauman’s concept of Liquid Modernity as a way to comprehend contemporary society in an encounter with Bruno Latour’s Actor-Network Theory (ANT) I will show how and in what ways accessed music streaming indeed are an networked actor of a liquid nature.

     

    The presentation will focus one main part of my forthcoming thesis Liquid Music Streaming, namely the actor – the Spotify streaming service. According to the ANT analysis, the feature of music streaming needs a number of networked actors in order to act as a music-streaming actor. Foremost music streaming needs an actor e.g. a company that can create a practice of musicking. The analysis of the Spotify Company and its service shows in summary how the company management structure is agile with autonomous working squads that constantly update the service based on user-generated data. Hence the Spotify music streaming are a runaway object, to use Yrjö Engeström’s terminology, a result of subject’s activity and impossible to master or overview from any single point of lookout. Secondly, music streaming needs the actor of distribution channels to reach its primary final cause – the end-user. Distribution of musical goods, e.g. musical files, are networked by Internet Service Providers (ISP) as well as providers of digital devices, the right holders of music and political jurisdictions. Besides these major actors the service is associated to yet other services and products, developers and public institutions, not to forget the end-user. These entities are not solid and static but constantly changing and reshaping. The conclusion will present the Spotify streaming service as an liquid actor that are inescapably intertwined and dependent on several other liquid actors in order to preform its liquid service of streaming.

     

  • 19.
    Bäckman, Mikael
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    One Lick - Two Harps: How can practicing the chromatic harmonica make me a better diatonic player and vice versa?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Ferm Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Benedict, Cathy
    University of Western Ontario .
    Kanellopoulos, Panagiotis A.
    University of Thessaly.
    Pedagogical encounters in music: Thinking with Hannah Arendt2017In: European Journal of Philosophy in Arts Education, E-ISSN 2002-4665, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 6-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper employs aspects of Hannah Arendt’s thought to explore different but interrelated questions that haunt contemporary music education. We see the importance of a return to Arendt now more than ever as we find ourselves, three authors in three different countries, trying to contribute to democratic music education practices and to researching the conceptual base of such practices, in countries where technocratic approaches to policy development prevail. More specifically in this article we address the following questions: how can we re-think the political and creative dimensions of music education pedagogies in the face of recent educational policy trends? How can we go beyond linearity in our everyday educational encounters? How can we create forms of music education practice and research that induce a continuous interplay between acting and thinking? We pursue these questions through reference to three specific forms of music education practice: research seminars for PhD-students and senior researchers, pre-service music teacher education, and teaching music improvisation. In the first part of the paper, Cecilia Ferm-Almqvist elaborates upon how Hannah Arendt’s thinking influences our teaching, taking an on-going research seminar in music education as an example of a common place. In the second part, Cathy Benedict writes of ‘meeting’ Arendt and coming to an awareness of how Arendt can help us interrogate practices we have come to assume as ‘the right ones’. Seeking to create together with her students an epistemological space of appearance she challenges common teaching strategies that seem to ‘work’. Working within a teacher preparation program she comes to realize that students must also reflect on these moments so as to name what has occurred; thus they need to engage in acts of performative listening, setting aside their own desire and need to speak and be heard first. Finally, in the third part, Panagiotis (Panos) A. Kanellopoulos raises the complex issue of how we should respond to the current deluge of entrepreneurial approaches to creativity, its use value, and its role in education. Based on the proposition that acts of musical improvisation belong to the realm of action, Kanellopoulos revisits Arendt’s notion of conservatism with the aim of outlining a possible way through which contemporary improvisation pedagogy might be re-thought. Taken together these three sets of reflections serve to offer a framing of Arendt’s thinking for music educators in different contexts, showing how Arendt's ideas might serve as a fertile ground for thinking over our own teaching, our curricular decisions, and the choices we daily make over space and time that connect us through our distinctness.

  • 21.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Pianostuderandes lärande av musikalisk interpretation inom enskild huvudinstrumentundervisning på högskolenivå : 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Musik har alltid varit en utövande konstform. Först under 1800-talet formerades standardförloppet inom västerländsk konstmusik till att interpreten framför en interpretation – ett konstverk i sig baserat på och relaterat till musikverket; interpretationen kan analyseras och värderas, och interpreten är en konstnär. Inom konstnärlig forskning undersöks de kreativa aspekterna av musikalisk interpretation från ett utövarperspektiv, men från musikpedagogiskt håll har hittills föga uppmärksamhet ägnats åt hur dylika färdigheter beskrivs, utvecklas och kommuniceras. Musikpedagogiska studier visar att interpretation och musikens expressiva aspekter sällan behandlas på kulturskolenivå, och att det även på högskolenivå – i synnerhet för instrumentalister inom västerländsk konstmusikalisk tradition – fokuseras mer på teknik än på interpretation. I enskild instrumentalundervisning på högskolenivå läggs betydande vikt vid studenternas spel, och härmning – vilket studenterna ofta är bra på – är vanligt förekommande. Studier visar en diskrepans mellan praktiskt spel och förmåga till självständig interpretation, vilket antyder att färdigheterna inte har internaliserats. Syftet med studien – den första delstudien inom mit tavhandlingsarbete – är att öka förståelsen för lärande av interpretation av västerländsk konstmusik inom ramen för enskild huvudinstrumentundervisning på högskolenivå i Sverige. För att besvara syftet formulerades följande forskningsfrågor: 1. Hur beskriver studerande respektive lärare musikaliskinterpretation? 2. Hur beskriver studerande respektive lärare förutsättningar förlärande av musikalisk interpretation? Vårterminen 2016 genomfördes kvalitativa halvstrukturerade intervjuer med 10 personer med piano som huvudinstrument (4 lärare, 6 studerande) fördelade mellan 3 institutioner för högre musikutbildning i Sverige. Analysen har hermeneutisk ansats med utgångspunkt i Gadamersoch Ricoeurs filosofi. Jag kommer att presentera en preliminär schematisk modell för förutsättningar för utveckling av interpretation där bland annat följande faktorer är betydelsefulla: definition av interpretation, uppfattad tolkningsfrihet och självförtroende som interpret; förekomst av och förhållningssätt till musiklyssning; relationen mellan teknik och interpretation; utveckling av ett utforskande förhållningssätt.

  • 22.
    Wedin, Anna (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Holmberg, Leo (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Bäckman, Mikael (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Lundqvist, Mathias (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Johannesson, Tomas (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Media, audio technology and experience production and theater.
    Ramblin' Minds: 30-årsjubileum2017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 23.
    Wedin, Anna (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Holmberg, Leo (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Bäckman, Mikael (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Lundqvist, Mathias (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Johannesson, Tomas (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Media, audio technology and experience production and theater.
    Ramblin' Minds Kalott Jazz och Blues festival Tornio (Fi)2017Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Wedin, Anna (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Holmberg, Leo (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Bäckman, Mikael (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Lundqvist, Mathias (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Ronny Eriksson & Ramblin' Minds Sollefteå Bluesförening 10-årsjubileum2017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 25.
    Almqvist, Cecilia Ferm
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    The Music Teacher in the Nexus of Art Origin2017In: Finnish Journal of Music Education, ISSN 1239-3908, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 45-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artists are not born – they become. Artists are created by art, art that they have created. This twisted helix is conceptualised as ‘the origin of art’ by Heidegger. If an artist is to originate within musical educational settings, we claim that the musical educator has an inevitable role to play in this art origin. The problem of the investigation at hand are a question of how the educator can relate to this involvement; guiding the student toward the nexus of this origin without standing in the way for the originating of art nor to become a part of the origin of art as a part of the artist’s artistry. The complex phenomenon consisting of relations between art, student(s) and teacher are investigated, and in order to understand how teachers can organize their teaching towards an artistry achievement of their students, we seek to explore a number of phenomenological concepts; Heidegger’s notion of a work of art, the idea of Lifeworlds, musical intersubjectivity, responsibility in asymmetrical relationships and finally, dwelling. The conclusion are that teacher can relate to this situation in three different modes; (i) by enriching the Lifeworld of the student, (ii) by preparing for the unexpected to occur and (iii) direct the intentionality towards the nexus of artness originating instead of the artness itself.

  • 26.
    Bjerstedt, Sven
    et al.
    Lund University, Malmö Faculty of Fine and Performing Arts.
    Fossum, Hanne
    Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Örebro University.
    Lonnert, Lia
    Lund University, Malmö Faculty of Fine and Performing Arts.
    The musical present: A polyphonic philosophical investigation2017In: Nordisk musikkpedagogisk forskning: årbok 17 / [ed] redaksjon: Eva Georgii-Hemming..., Oslo: Norges musikkhøgskole , 2017, Vol. 17, p. 9-39Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can music education be enriched by the concept of time? This article is based on the assumption that the present moment, the musical ‘now’, is of the utmost importance not only to the musical performer or listener but to the musical learner and teacher as well. It aims at a philosophical discussion and conceptual clarification of a number of issues of time that are considered to be crucial to music education through a presentation and discussion of thoughts and concepts put forward by four selected philosophers: Augustine, Edmund Husserl, Mikhail Bakhtin, and Paul Ricoeur. It is suggested that reflecting upon time may significantly challenge and develop students’ ways of thinking about music connected to different actions within several fields of music education. For instance, Augustine’s analysis of time offers important perspectives on practising, remembering, and performing music. Husserl’s philosophy of time constitutes the stream of consciousness, which leads to an understanding of the comprehension of tonality. Discussions of Bakhtin’s concepts of utterance and chronotope demonstrate that the need for experiencing and understanding music arguably poses a challenge for current music education in schools with regard to its predominant ways of dealing with time. With reference to Ricoeur’s analysis of time and narrative, it is suggested that musicians’ need for multi-directedness in the musical present calls for a rich learning ecology framework. In conclusion, it is argued that reflection on musical practice in general would benefit from taking the shape of polyphonic philosophical investigations.

  • 27.
    Ferm-Almqvist, Cecilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    The risk of unequal gender role conservation: Informal ensemble playing from the perspective of an upper secondary female guitarist2017In: 21st Century Music Education: Informal Learning and Non-Formal Teaching Approaches in School and Community Contexts / [ed] Ruth Wright, Betty Anne Younker and Carol Beynon, London Ontario: Canadian Music Educators' Association, 2017, p. 21-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Andersson, Ninnie
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Ferm-Almqvist, Cecilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    To offer dance as aesthetic experience and communication among people 65+2017In: NNMPF 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Högberg, Fredrik (Editor, Arranger, Designer, Author of introduction, etc., Sound designer, Videographer)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education.
    Ubbe & Markus Bästa: 30 låtar och sånglekar för förskolan, lågstadiet och särskolan2017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett musiktryck med sånger samt handledningsinstruktioner för särskolan, lågstadiet, m.fl.

  • 30.
    Nyberg, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Att följa musiklärare på en bedömningsresa: etiska och metodiska överväganden kring ett deltagande aktionsforskningsprojekt i musikpedagogik2016In: Ett dussin russin!: Tolv texter om deltagarbaserade verksamheter i utbildning och forskning, Stockholm: Runö utbildnings- och utvecklingscentrum , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Utbildningsväsendet i Sverige har under senare år varit föremål för vad som kan beskrivas som en politisk reformiver. I takt med samhällsutvecklingen i övrigt har kraven på skolan att kunna påvisa en effektiv verksamhet ökat. Dessa krav handlar i utbildningsdebatter och media nästan uteslutande om sjunkande resultat i internationella så kallade kunskapsmätningar. Den universella lösningen har från de flesta håll beskrivits som att på ett tydligare sätt mäta elevers kunskaper. Detta har också framhållits som ett sätt att kontrollera kvaliteten på lärares arbetsinsatser. För att kunna möta de ökade kraven på redovisning och utveckla sin verksamhet utifrån pedagogiska behov behöver lärare inte bara få komma till tals, utan också få möjlighet att utbyta erfarenheter. Av den anledningen krävs ett väl utvecklat professionellt yrkesspråk – något som visat sig vara en brist inom det musikpedagogiska fältet. Som en del i ett långsiktigt kvalitetsarbete har sju musiklärare verksamma på gymnasiets estetiska program utvecklat sin bedömningskompetens genom att planera, delta i och genomföra ett forsknings- och utvecklingsprojekt där deltagande aktionsforskning använts som metod och förhållningssätt. Musiklärarnas begreppsliggöranden ligger också till grund för ett avhandlingsprojekt i musikpedagogik. I detta kapitel presenteras etiska och metodiska överväganden kring denna musiklärarnas bedömningsresa.

  • 31.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Conforming Spheres: Limitations in Higher Music Education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presentation wants to visualize and create an interactive discussion about the legitimation of higher music education within popular music – its obstacle and potentials as an institution of plurality within a university context.There are some well-known conditions that are more or less tabooed and sometimes act as sources for the noncompliance in institutional flexibility. The schools of music are traditionally constructed by three; at least, “biotopes” of definable thinking and acting from which students, personnel and management have experience of and are recruited from. These fields are the conservatoire tradition, the Free Church’s organizations (perhaps mainly in Sweden), and the recycling system of musicians/teachers inside music institutions on different levels of education. This trinity of spheres brings on shared experiences of expertise, social training and familiarity but also exclusion, non-equality, self-righteousness, anti-intellectual preferences and conventional preferences. This is not by any sense exclusive for higher music education but in a faculty that could facilitate innovative expressions, self-independence and global engagement – why not go for it!Circumstances above results in the fact that even if popular music (in a broad sense) is the essence of music activities in the conservatories in Sweden, the learning contexts are still predictable bosoms for music students all the way from voluntary music school (during elementary school years), through aesthetic gymnasia, pre-educations like folk high schools, straight forward to the School of music to, perhaps, a teacher education for elementary school and voluntary music school. As a consequence of this recycling situation the plurality and differences that e.g. Biesta, 2006 highlights as necessary, can perhaps be linked more to genre expansion than to democratic and existential content.

  • 32.
    Ferm-Almqvist, Cecilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Cross roads, crossing borders, and meetings in the common world: A sociological phenomenological view on cross boundary research – Spotify as a case2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation will enlighten and discuss the need and challenges of border-crossing research, when complex phenomena that include art, technology and Bildung are to be investigated. A developing project Evolving Bildung in the nexus of streaming services, art and users - Spotify as a case will function as a starting-point for a reasoning regarding what constitutes border-crossing research, and what dilemmas as well as new meeting points that appear in a process where border crossing is at stake. Material to make an analysis possible was gathered during a lunch-to-lunch symposium where scholars from music education, musicology, psychology, media and communication, English literature, management, Big-data, and sound engineering met and discussed collaboration in relation to the mentioned project. The material was analyzed from a sociological phenomenological perspective. The result of the analysis shows the challenges with, and importance of, meetings in the common world to make border-crossing research possible, at the same time as a belonging to a specific scientific world defines a researcher. Concepts, methods, attitudes, and theories have to, at least to some extent, be redefined based upon new common agreements. Such a process demands researchers to occasionally leave their own “truths” and be open and curios in the common world.

  • 33.
    Ferm-Almqvist, Cecilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Cultural Citizenship through aesthetic communication in Swedish schools: democracy, inclusion and equality in the face of assessment policies2016In: European Journal of Philosophy in Arts Education, ISSN 2002-4665, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 68-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current Swedish society differences are growing regarding who has the right to learn and use artistic forms of expression. Where a citizen comes from, socially and geographically, more and more determines her tools for handling life. A variety of steering documents state that all Swedish youths should have the right to learn and use artistic forms of expression. At the same time the demands on equal assessment and grading are growing stronger in Sweden, which force teachers to put efforts on documentation and grading, instead of musical learning. The aim of this article is to present and discuss possibilities for pupils to develop Cultural Citizenship through music in the school situation where different views of equality are competing. This article discusses to what extent it is possible to conduct democratic inclusive music education towards Cultural Citizenship in the current time of increased demands of documentation, assessment and grading. To come close to the phenomena of Cultural Citizenship in music educational settings, and to offer theoretical tools for understanding and reflection, the to some extent contradictory political and educational philosophies of Hannah Arendt was used. The philosophical exploration implies a need of teachers’ authority and responsibility when it comes to an agreed upon view of the musical world, and ways to organize meetings with that world in inclusive ways in schools towards a functional Cultural Citizenship.

  • 34.
    Ferm Almqvist, Cecilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Examensarbete inom ramen för ämneslärarprogrammet: ett rundabordssamtal med musik som case2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I slutet av vårterminen 2016 examinerades de första ämneslärarna i musik inom ramen för de nya lärarutbildningarna som startades hösten 2011. Som avslutande kurs genomför studenterna ett självständigt arbete i musik på avancerad nivå, vilket vid de flesta institutioner med ämneslärarexamen i musik inneburit förändringar vad gäller tillexempel ämnesinriktning, ansvarsfördelning, och krav på handledarkompetens. I Vejbystrandsgruppen, som är ett nätverk med fokus på praktiknära musikpedagogisk forskning, ingår tolv medlemmar varav de flesta arbetar antingen med genomförande och examination av nämnda examensarbeteskurser, eller i (gymnasie- och kulturskole-)praktiken som kollegor till de blivande musiklärarna. Frågor som lyfts i nätverket, och som vi vill lyfta ytterligare med detta rundabordssamtal är: 1) Hur förbereds studenterna genom sin utbildning för att genomföra ett examensarbete på 30hp i musik på avancerad nivå? 2) Vilka kunskaper och erfarenheter har eller bör studenterna ha utvecklat under examensarbeteskursens gång som de tar med sig ut i arbetslivet? Teman som anknyter till dessa frågor är musikpedagogik i UVK- och inriktningkurser, praktiknära forskning, multimodala uttryck, och möjliga sätt att organisera examensarbeteskursen. Vi ser det som värdefullt att diskutera dessa frågor och teman med kollegor engagerade i lärarutbildning, såväl med estetisk ämnesinriktning, men också med fokus på hur estetiska ämnen kan finnas i förberedelser för och genomförandet av examensarbeteskurser. Efter en kort introduktion kommer några av Vejbystrandsgruppens medlemmar dela med sig av erfarenheter från respektive institution och därefter leder Cecilia Ferm Almqvist en diskussion kring bordet och ämnet.

     

  • 35.
    Bäckman, Mikael (Musical director)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    John Henry: En resa i populärmusikens rötter2016Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    John Henry, bandet som leds av Mikael Bäckman, genomförde en turné i Norrbottensmusikens regi under januari månad 2016.

    Följande repertoar framfördes:

    1 Oklahoma Stomp (S. Cooley)

    2 Katy Dear (trad)

    3 Gold Watch and Chain (trad)

    4 Bubbles in My Beer (C. Walker)

    5 Hey Good Looking (H. Williams)

    6 Jackson (J. Cash)

    7 On the Road Again (W. Nelson)

    8 Walkin After Midnight (D. Hecht & A.Block)

    9 With Body and Soul (B. Monroe)

    10 Sugar Moon (B. Wills)

    11 Hey Brother (Avici).

    Programmet spelades följande datum och orter:

    18/1 Kulturens Hus, Luleå

    19/1 Folkets Hus, Övertorneå

    20/1 Forum, Älsbyn

    21/1 Medan, Arvidsjaur

    22/1 Folkets Hus, Voullerim

    28/1 Kaleido, Piteå

  • 36.
    Hällis, Björn
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Juuso Engström, Maria (Singer)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Konsert med Samuel Ljungblahd tillsammans med Guns for Hire och On Duty Gospel2016Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vid Samuel Ljungblahds konsert den 27 februari 2016 på Storstrand, Piteå, deltog bl.a. Björn Hällis (trummor), Maria Juuso Engström (sång) samt Robert Svensson (Keyboard). Konserten som varade ca 90 minuter innehöll material från Ljungblahds samtliga 4 skivor (se URL till artistsida på Spotify). Konserten var slutsåld vilket betyder ca 500 personer i publiken.

    Samuel Ljungblahd har varit verksam inom gospel och soul i många år. Han har bland annat synts i tv-serien ”Så ska det låta” och sjungit med en lång rad körer genom åren. Den Umeåbaserade artisten har också varit sångare i husbandet i ”Let’s dance”. Youtube-klippet där han golvar giganten Kirk Franklin med sin sånginsats blev en enorm framgång i gospelkretsar. Han fick ett större genombrott hos den breda allmänheten när han sjöng på prinsbröllopet härom året. I fjol släpptes hans fjärde album, ”The Psalmist”.

    Storstrand är en ekumenisk kristen kurs- och lägergård. Fastighetsägare är Evangeliska fosterlands-stiftelsen (EFS) i Norrbotten men Storstrand drivs av Storstrandsföreningen, en sammanslutning av ett antal kristna föreningar från olika samfund i Piteå kommun. Bland samarbetspartners finns Bilda, Sensus och Piteå kommun.

  • 37.
    Ferm-Thorgersen, Cecilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Music education and Technology: The need and challenges of cross-boundary research – Evolving bildung through streaming media as a case2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Ferm-Thorgersen, Cecilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Music in Future Schooling: Towards Conservation or Reconstruction of Curriculum Structures and Rationale? :A Swedish Holistic Perspective2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Ferm, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Johansen, Geir
    Norges Musikkhøgskole.
    Juntunen, Marja-Leena
    Sibeliusakademien.
    Music teacher educators’ visions of music teacher preparation in Finland, Norway and Sweden2016In: International Journal of Music Education, ISSN 0255-7614, E-ISSN 1744-795X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 49-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigate the assumptions, ideals and beliefs of 12 professors who teach the courses in instrumental teaching and classroom music teaching, called instrumental Musikdidaktik and classroom Musikdidaktik. Drawing on Hammerness’ concept of teachers’ vision we concentrate on the professors’ visions of good teaching, an ideal graduate, and their subject as a whole as well as how those visions can be extended to denote some of the teaching traditions at play. This was examined by individual interviews that constituted one part of a varied set of data collection strategies. The professors’ visions were not necessarily consistent with those of their colleagues. Still they were strongly related to, steered, and limited by established teaching traditions. We suggest that vision might constitute a functional concept among music teacher educators and that clear program visions should be formulated in music teacher education institutions through collective collegial work.

  • 40.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Music Teachers as Conscious Cosmopolites2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A music teacher student 2013 will meet children born 2040, during their career. Scandinavian as well as the rest of the worlds university curriculum have an elusive picture of what kind of learning contexts they will have to design when meeting the “Millennium children” and who can blame them? What we can do is to facilitate an institutional consciousness expansion in how to assist student music teachers developing sustainable skills for acting flexible in future, unfamiliar and multicultural contexts. This collaboration with “the other” has to go beyond music genre and subcultural identities and interact with societal changes and needs. Institutions are not in its essence flexible and new or alternative music styles will probably always be “pedagogizied” to fit in educational settings. The informal and socialising “rules of the conservatoire game” is still stronger than the millennium voice of internationalisation and collaboration in global communities. Globalization can become a kind of new renaissance. It is a paradigm shift that directs toward a circulatory worldview. “The others” will be in our lives no matter what. The question is – how do we want to respond to that. With fear or dialogue?The university as a whole is also in an era of “paradigmatic transition” (Santos, 2012, p8). It is ”confronted with strong questions for which it has so far provided only weak answers”. Or as Kemp resonates, “The great theme in political debate and within political movements, national as well as international, have since the end of 90th been the phenomena globalization. It is this globalisation that gives the idea of a cosmopolitan new actuality. But, as earlier said, it has not reached our institutions of learning and education. Many of our teachers within compulsory school are still blind for the fact” (Kemp, 2005 p29). When discussing the position of the university in the new world order, Santos (2012) raises the question whether the university can successfully reinvent itself as a centre of knowledge in a globalizing society with many other centres. The question of legitimation of university educations in future society is of great importance when it comes to global artistic expressions like music.

  • 41.
    Juuso Engström, Maria (Musician, Composer)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Måste jag välja?2016Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Turnén "Måste jag välja?" genomfördes under v. 44 2016 i samarbete med Norrbottensmusiken. Man besökte högstadium/gymnasium i Kiruna och Arjeplog samt hade offentliga konserter i Arvidsjaur och Arjeplog.

    Det var en föreställning med temat indentitet och att leva med flera kulturer i sitt liv, den samiska och den svenska. Musiken var orginalmusik med texter på svenska, samiska och engelska.

    Medverkande:

    Peter Tikkanen (keyboard)

    Andreas Öberg (trummor)

    Andreas Eriksson (gitarr)

    Erik Gustafsson (bas)

    Maria Juuso Engström (sång och text)

    Repertoar:

    Rotlös

    Text & musik: Maria Juuso Engström

     

    Čuoja čappa litna jietna

    Text: Paulus Utsi

    Musik: Maria Juuso Engström

     

    Vem kan säga?

    Text & musik: Maria Juuso Engström

     

    Up to the mountain / Bájas varrai

    Text & musik: Patti Griffin

    Översättning: Maria Labba

     

    Don´t break

    Text & musik: Maria Juuso Engström

     

    Sánit lea dušše sánit

    Text: Maria Juuso Engström/ Maria Labba

    Musik: Maria Juuso Engström

     

    Where should I go / Gosa Vaččit

    Text & musik: Maria Juuso Engström

     

    Àrvećalmmit

    Text: Maria Juuso Engström / Maria Labba

    Musik: Maria Juuso Engström

     

    Jag vill känna glädje

    Text & musik: Maria Juuso Engström

     

    Ingenting syns

    Text & musik: Maria Juuso Engström

  • 42.
    Ferm-Thorgersen, Cecilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Nordic research focusing composition education in relation to primary and secondary schools: What do we know and what do we have to investigate further?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the focus on composition, as a part of compulsory and upper secondary music education, has become more clearly outspoken and valued in steering documents lately in the Nordic countries, the need of research has increased. The aim of the symposium is to give a picture of what is going on within the Nordic network when it comes to composition education research in schools, and connect that to existing curricula, as well as to music teacher education. After a short introduction of the situation mentioned above, six examples of ongoing or recent research will be shortly (11 min) presented, and connected to the theme of the symposium. In the end Jon-Helge Sætre will draw lines between the existing perspectives and findings, teaching and learning practices in Nordic schools, the field of music education research, and to what is needed to be investigated further according to his view of the situation (11 min). Finally a discussion between the participants and the audience will take place. Claiming semiotic space with classroom composing: meeting the challenge of the new Finnish national core curriculum Juha Ojala & Lauri Väkevä This conjoint presentation is based on the philosophical-theoretical rationale and practical cases described in our book Säveltäjäksi kasvattaminen ("Educating a composer”; Finnish National Board of Education 2013) that collected together Finnish practices of classroom composing under the theoretical frame of semiotic pragmatism. In the rationale of the book, we portrayed composing as a key practice in building musical lives. Instead of mere creative production of listenables, composing can be seen as quintessential way of claiming semiotic space in the social-cultural realm of sonic actions and transactions. Through several examples of Finnish classroom composing, we argue that such perspective can help us to build a comprehensive view of composing-based music pedagogy that is not stuck to genre-based distinctions between creative approaches, nor restricted to the specific agendas of teaching methods. This, we maintain, is the best way to realize the democratic and inclusive goals of the new Finnish core curriculum for the comprehensive school music. Some key findings from a PhD-study on composition education: The Dynamics of Collaborative Creative Music-Making: Reflection-in-action, facilitation and interaction Tine Grieg Viig This Ph.D.-project focuses on the educational perspectives of collaborative processes where children and young adolescents compose music together with professional artists. The study aims at making a contribution to an on-going discussion of creative processes in the field of music education. Through asking how creative competencies in creative music-making can be taught, learned and developed, this research is based on three case studies where professional artists and children collaborate in creative processes composing music. Interviews with focus groups and leaders of the projects, observations and video-recordings of the creative process along with the musical material make up the empirical data in all the cases. Through a sociocultural perspective on learning and interaction, important foci in the study are the reflection-in-action and facilitation of the creative process through scaffolds and dynamic interaction. The findings point at the important role of an expanded repertoire in these processes, as a basis for the reflection in- and through the musical material in for example aesthetic, artistic and structural modes of reflection-in-action. This includes a discussion of the facilitator role, and the different modes an experienced leader of composition workshops utilizes in the scaffolding of creative collaborative practices. Passed and now intertwining when learning is at stake. - Composing and learning in a musical theatre project Annette Mars This contribution presents a study investigating musical learning among 9th grade adolescents in a Swedish lower secondary school. The adolescents collaboratively composed songs for a self-written musical, which they taught to their peers. The purpose of the study was to explore the ways adolescents acquire musical knowledge in this specific setting. A sociocultural perspective was employed; and the method used was observation and interviews with the adolescents. The results demonstrated that the adolescents’ choice of tools when learning and peer teaching composition, were the same as their teachers’. The written score was distinct in all their musical learning, suggesting the dominance of the written paradigm. In conclusion, in order to support students’ musical learning, music teachers need to know how to create possibilities for peer teaching, and when to interfere and guide the adolescents in a Zone of Proximal Development. Composing with iPads in a 7th-grade music classroom Marja-Leena Juntunen Based on a recent study, this presentation discusses a case in which a music teacher in a Finnish lower secondary-level school explored the possibilities of using iPads in a 7th-grade music classroom (compulsory general music course) searching for opportunities for creative and integrated experimentation with movement, music and technology. The iPads were used to facilitate creative activities and production that included music and movement improvisation and composition, combined with a video recording, and its subsequent editing to match the composed music. The project was facilitated by the teacher’s willingness to incorporate mobile devices in the music classroom in a way that integrated bodily activities and creative production with the use of technology. The case has been examined from three perspectives: students’ experiences, development of agency, and embodied learning. In the presentation, the results of the study will be discussed shortly. Loose control, listen to each other, and create – understanding cooperative music making from a chiasmic perspective Cecilia Ferm Thorgersen In order to create democratic milieus for creative musical group work, relations between individuals and the musical world should be investigated. One way of coming close to the interaction between subjects and music in such environments is to use philosophy as a tool for understanding. In the current article the philosophy of flesh and chiasm as developed by Merleau-Ponty in his later works, is used to acquire knowledge about cooperative composition. Chiasm means criss-crossings between the perceiving and the perceived, self and other, and language and meaning. The aim of the study was to describe and understand the phenomenon of cooperative composing from a pupil’s point of view. The experiences of five 15 years old pupils involved in a New music project constitute the access to the phenomenon. Themes that describe the phenomenon of cooperative composing showed to be: To embody new areas, Intertwinement of ideas, The function of language and symbols in chiasmic communication, Challenges and wonders, and To grow into the field of contemporary composition. Exploring the boundaries of musical meaning making: Using a graphic programming environment to develop higher order thinking in composition Peter Falthin In music composition, manner and methods are often integral to the aesthetic position in which a piece is conceived. This is not to say that choice of method and tools will bring with them a predestination for musical form and expression but rather that a composition as a whole comprises also the process of its making. This paper will discuss some aspects of composition learning that has surfaced in different studies by the author concerning students first encounter with computer programming as a means for composition and development of musical thinking. Some critical issues are connected to, attitude that to varying degree can be sceptical or curious, difficulties to evaluate materials and ideas due to unfamiliarity with the medium, lack of cultural context which can be both confusing and liberating and the indirectness of the medium putting demands on a composer to operate on meta-levels when planning for structures, sound design, playing activities, expression and communication. Results show that the challenge is sometimes positively experienced, and there are several cases where this has meant a turning point for musical reconceptualization far beyond the scope of the original project. Other times the experience is more problematic and seems to cause anxiety and a sense of lack of orientation. The difference does not necessarily correspond with the ability to reach solid musical results in the sense of being able to realize one’s ideas. A number of questions emerge around the role of experience and attitude to learning and thinking in music composition and how it can be dealt with. What do we know and what is to be investigated further? Jon-Helge Sætre Will be formulated upon a reading of and reflection upon the short presentations sent to Jon-Helge in beforehand.

  • 43.
    Mars, Annette
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    När kulturer spelar med i klassrummet: En sociokulturell studie av ungdomars lärande i musik2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Avhandlingen undersöker ungdomars lärande i musik utifrån ett sociokulturellt perspektiv. De två delstudierna är genomförda med en teoretisk utgångspunkt som gör gällande att människor lär sig musik i samspel med andra människor samt att de använder sig av medierande verktyg i de lärsituationer de deltar i, vidare involveras den proximala utvecklingszonen, samt muntlig och skriftlig lärandekultur. Eftersom lärande inte endast sker i skolmiljö utan överallt där individer gemensamt skapar kunskap har de empiriska studierna genomförts både utom och inom skolan som institution. Genom att studera ungdomar som musicerar och skapar musik tillsammans, och i interaktion med sina lärare, har deras medvetna eller omedvetna val av medierande verktyg för musikaliskt lärande i olika kontexter synliggjorts. Syftet med den samlade studien är att synliggöra, beskriva och analysera musikaliskt lärande så som det blir synligt bland ungdomar i högstadieålder, inom ramen för grundskolans verksamhet och i frivilligverksamhet ur ett sociokulturellt perspektiv. Studiernas metodologiska grund återfinns i musiketnologisk teoribildning och i avhandlingen beskrivs hur musiketnologi och musikpedagogik förhåller sig till varandra. De valda metoderna utgjordes av observationer och intervjuer, vilka dokumenterades med videofilm och fältanteckningar. Analysarbetet genomfördes med kvalitativ analysmetod i fem olika steg, där stegen delvis skiljde sig åt i de två delstudierna.I studie I visade resultatet att elevernas musik- och lärandekultur framträdde när de lär och undervisar andra. Vidare framträdde ungdomarnas kulturella bakgrund genom deras val av verktyg för lärande och samlärande. Ungdomarna verkade vara mer benägna att ändra sitt sätt att undervisa andra än att ändra metoderna för sitt eget musikaliska lärande. Resultaten i studie II visade att musikläraren skapade ramar som eleverna kunde förhålla sig fritt till, vilket gjorde eleverna såväl trygga som fria. Musiklärarens sätt att organisera undervisningen liksom hans pedagogiska kompetens möjliggjorde elevernas musikaliska lärande och musikskapande. När eleverna skulle komponera och samspela använde musikläraren sig av flera olika verktyg i sin undervisning. Vidare synliggjordes hur en skriftlig lärandekultur genomsyrade de pedagogiska valen. I studie II visade resultaten att elevernas val av verktyg när de lär och undervisar sina kamrater var desamma som deras lärare använde. En skriftlig lärandekultur blev synlig i hur eleverna använde verktyg och artefakter för att lära och skapa musik tillsammans. Implikationerna av delstudie II kan sammanfattas med att musiklärare behöver veta hur möjligheter för lärande i grupp skapas, samt när elever behöver lärarens kunskap och vägledning för att befinna sig i en proximal utvecklingszon.Resultatet i den samlade studien visar på vikten av en musiklärare som inte bara har gedigen ämneskunskap utan också har kunskap om vilka medierande verktyg och artefakter elever behöver i varje specifik situation, samt kan bedöma vilka kunskaper elever redan har och vilken utveckling som är möjlig. När elever arbetar tillsammans i grupp för att lära verkar betydelsen av lärarens kunskap och pedagogiska förmåga vara avgörande för att en god miljö för lärande och utveckling ska kunna skapas. Vidare framkom att lärande i muntlig och skriftlig lärandekultur skiljde sig åt vad gällde verktyg och artefakter. Ungdomarna i de båda lärandekulturerna använde en bred repertoar av verktyg och artefakter på primär och sekundär nivå, medan läraren använde artefakterna på sekundär och tertiär nivå. I en skriftlig lärandekultur tyder resultatet på att verktyg och artefakter hade sitt ursprung i någon form av skriftlighet och de användes för att förklara hur musiken skulle framföras. I en muntlig lärandekultur utgjordes artefakten av den klingande musiken och de medierande resurserna användes för att förklara vad musiken ville förmedla.

  • 44.
    Mars, Annette
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Paneldiskussion om pedagogik och digitala verktyg2016In: Paneldiskussion om pedagogik och digitala verktyg, Lund, 2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Mars, Annette
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Past and present intertwining when learning is at stake: composing and learning in a musical theatre project2016In: International Journal of Education and the Arts, ISSN 1529-8094, E-ISSN 1529-8094, Vol. 17, no 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study investigating musical learning among 9th grade adolescents in a Swedish lower secondary school. The adolescents collaboratively composed songs for a self-written musical, which they taught to their peers. The purpose of the study was to explore the ways in which adolescents acquire musical knowledge in this specific setting. A sociocultural perspective was employed, and the methods used were observations and interviews with the adolescents. The results demonstrated that the adolescents’ choice of tools when learning and teaching their peers were the same as those used by their teacher. The written score was distinct in all their musical learning, suggesting the dominance of the written paradigm. In conclusion, in order to support musical learning, music teachers need to know how to create opportunities for peer teaching and leaving the students to themselves, and when to interfere and guide the adolescents into their Zone of Proximal Development.

  • 46.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Piano students’ development of general interpretative skills in one-to-one tuition within higher music education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composers (and compositions) within western art music need an intermediary performer (the interpreter) in order to make the work audibly accessible for the listener. Musical interpretation is becoming a rather well researched phenomenon from the performing artist's perspective, but little attention has been given to how such general interpretative skills are developed and communicated within higher music education.The aim of this study is to describe the learning of general interpretative skills from a teacher's and student's perspective within the one-to-one context of higher music education. The following research questions were formulated to fulfill this aim:1. How do teachers and students describe and define musical interpretation and the development of general interpretative skills? (Qualitative interviews with students and teachers.)2. How do teachers and students see and describe their interaction while developing the students’ general interpretative skills during lessons?(Video documentation and stimulated recall with students and teachers.)3. What do these descriptions, definitions, and the interaction between teacher and student imply with regards to pedagogical, aesthetical, and philosophical values within higher music education?The expected outcome is a description of students’ learning of general interpretative skills within higher music education, which hopefully will be beneficial in the development of one-to-one tuition.

  • 47.
    Wedin, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Bäckman, Mikael (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Johannesson, Tomas (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Media, audio technology and experience production and theater.
    Ronny Eriksson och Ramblin' Minds - SM-veckan2016Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under SM-veckan 2016 i Piteå arrangerades en konsert med Ronny Eriksson och Ramblin' Minds av Alligator musikförening / Piteå Kommun. Konserten framfördes fredag den 29 januari på Krokodil.

    Repertoar

    • Borde ha tänkt mig för
    • Livet
    • I min bil
    • Farfars gård
    • Vem lurar vem
    • Jag tycker synd om mig
    • Det knallar och det går
    • Skuld
    • Om och om och om igen
    • Skam, skam, skam
    • Det liknar fan sa Holger
    • Vischan blues
    • Det mesta rår nog spriten för
    • Gråtvals
    • Hur blåst kan man bli
    • Ronny Erikssons mardröm
    • Tiggarlåten
  • 48.
    Ferm-Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Zandén, Olle
    Department of Music and Art, Linnaeus University, Linnéuniversitetet.
    Swedish music teachers’ relations to an assessment reform: a national view: Specific focus on documentation demands and teachers’ autonomy2016In: Bulletin of empirical music education research, ISSN 2190-3174Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate Swedish compulsory school music teachers’ relations to a curriculum reform with specific focus on changes in teaching, documentation demands and professional autonomy. The research questions are: To what extent and in what ways have Swedish music teachers adapted to the new compulsory school curriculum (Lgr11)? What changes in documentation demands and practices are reported? To what extent do Swedish music teachers perceive a change in their professional autonomy during the implementation of Lgr11? To answer these questions, a survey was constructed and a random sample of 200 schools was drawn from the 3,252 Swedish schools with pupils in year 6 that were registered at that time by the Swedish National Agency of Education. The survey was completed by 201 music teachers at the 171 schools that agreed to participate, and it generated both quantitative and qualitative data. The findings are presented according to the following themes: Adaptation to the new curriculum, Approach to curriculum, Changes in documentation demands and practices, Possible causes for increased documentation, Documentation’s place in planning and teaching, and Perception of change in professional autonomy. The main outcomes state that the national criteria for grading rather than the aims of the curriculum are steering the teachers in their planning, performance and evaluation of teaching. The implications for practice is that teachers have to claim a space for discretionary power in order to be able to run their classrooms in ways that harmonise with both their conceptions of quality and with the documentation and grading demands.

  • 49.
    Ferm-Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Wennergren, Ann-Christine
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Utveckling av responskompetens: seminariet som träningsarena2016In: Det goda seminariet: Forskarseminariet som lärandemiljö och kollegialt rum / [ed] Marie Cronqvist & Alexander Maurits, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2016, p. 133-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Nyberg, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    You are seldom born with a drum kit in your hands: Music Teachers’ Conceptualizations of Knowledge and Learning Within Music Education as an Assessment Practice2016In: Systemic Practice and Action Research, ISSN 1094-429X, E-ISSN 1573-9295, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 235-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to an increased demand for evaluation and accountability, the focus on assessment in public education has become stronger. Already leading to teachers’ depro- fessionalization, another risk is assessment leading to criteria compliance and becoming a tool for measuring teaching quality. Those whose learning is affected are thereby not only students, but also teachers. One major factor to restore professionalism and focus assessment on learning is to change practitioners’ ways of thinking and not only their behaviour. Therefore, a group of seven music teachers and a researcher in music education have carried out a research and development project using participatory action research as approach as well as method. This article explores and presents these upper secondary school music teachers’ conceptualizations of musical knowledge, learning and educational communication working with peers. Using Deweyan pragmatism as a lens to interpret the qualitative data, the results show that while a professional language does exist, the music teachers’ conceptual- izations of musical knowledge and learning and educational approaches differ. A key aspect for the teachers to develop their professional language, concepts and assessment practices is the teachers’ opportunities to communicate—both factual as well as perceived.

1234567 1 - 50 of 354
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf