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  • 1.
    Poelzer, Gregory A
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    A view from the top: State perspectives on legitimacy and the mine development process2019In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 4, p. 32-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Legitimacy is typically given to an authority by a subject. In most cases, the state. However, different governance structures alter the role of the state and the support of some policy decisions rests on the actions of others. In mine development, government sits in an interesting position. As the permitting authority, government holds the responsibility for determining the paths companies must travel to open and operate a mine. At the same time, mining companies engage in extra-legislative activities to build public support and move the process forward. Therefore, the state may no long control the legitimacy of the mine development process. Conducting interviews with state officials in two jurisdictions, Saskatchewan, Canada and Norrbotten, Sweden, this study investigates whether legitimacy issues exist from the perspective of the authority. Focusing on participation, influence, transparency, accountability, and responsiveness, the study determines first if shared conceptions of these factors exists amongst officials and then whether they viewed the process operating in a manner that matches these shared conceptions. The most significant differences in views occurred in Norrbotten where the results on throughput legitimacy pointed to legitimacy issues from the perspective of the state, particularly with other government agencies.

  • 2.
    Mohedano Roldán, Alba
    et al.
    Department of Political Science, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Duit, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences. Department of Political Science, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schultz, Lisen
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Does stakeholder participation increase the legitimacy of nature reserves in local communities? Evidence from 92 Biosphere Reserves in 36 countries2019In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 188-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to investigate if stakeholder participation increases the legitimacy of nature reserves in the surrounding community. Most previous studies of the effects of stakeholder participation in natural resource management have relied on case studies, but in this paper we use a combination of panel data from a two-wave survey (2008 and 2013) of 92 Biosphere Reserves (BRs) in 36 countries and semi-structured interview data from 65 stakeholder respondents in a sub-sample of 10 BRs to systematically investigate the effects of stakeholder participation on the legitimacy of the natural reserve in the local community. The data cover four levels of stakeholder participation: (1) Information, (2) Implementation, (3) Involvement and (4) Representation. These levels roughly correspond to rungs on Arnstein’s ladder of participation, and the expected outcome is that the legitimacy of the nature reserve will increase in the surrounding local community as the degree of participation increases. However, findings suggest that there is no linear relationship between participation and legitimacy: climbing upwards on Arnstein’s ladder of participation does not uniformly enhance the level of legitimacy of the nature reserve in the local community. Instead, a practice-based form of participation is what seems to increase legitimacy.

  • 3.
    Havenhand, Jonathan N.
    et al.
    Department of Marine Sciences, Tjärnö Marine Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Filipsson, Helena L.
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Niiranen, Susa
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Troell, Max
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden;Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Crépin, Anne-Sophie
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jagers, Sverker
    Department of Political Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Langlet, David
    Department of Law, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Turner, David
    Department of Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Winder, Monika
    Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    de Wit, Pierre
    Department of Marine Sciences, Tjärnö Marine Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Anderson, Leif G.
    Department of Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ecological and functional consequences of coastal ocean acidification: Perspectives from the Baltic-Skagerrak System2019In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 831-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ocean temperatures are rising; species are shifting poleward, and pH is falling (ocean acidification, OA). We summarise current understanding of OA in the brackish Baltic-Skagerrak System, focussing on the direct, indirect and interactive effects of OA with other anthropogenic drivers on marine biogeochemistry, organisms and ecosystems. Substantial recent advances reveal a pattern of stronger responses (positive or negative) of species than ecosystems, more positive responses at lower trophic levels and strong indirect interactions in food-webs. Common emergent themes were as follows: OA drives planktonic systems toward the microbial loop, reducing energy transfer to zooplankton and fish; and nutrient/food availability ameliorates negative impacts of OA. We identify several key areas for further research, notably the need for OA-relevant biogeochemical and ecosystem models, and understanding the ecological and evolutionary capacity of Baltic-Skagerrak ecosystems to respond to OA and other anthropogenic drivers.

  • 4.
    Lundmark, Carina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Andersson, Klas
    Department of Education and Special Education, University of Gothenburg.
    Laikre, Linda
    Department of Zoology, Division of Population Genetics, Stockholm University.
    Monitoring the effects of knowledge communication on conservation managers' perception of genetic biodiversity: a case study from the Baltic Sea2019In: Marine policy, ISSN 0308-597X, Vol. 99, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the attention given to genetic biodiversity in international agreements such as the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) Strategic Plan and the Aichi Targets, previous research points at a “conservation genetics gap,” indicating that scientific insights into genetic biodiversity are poorly integrated into practical management. Both researchers and managers call for platforms for knowledge exchange between science and practice. However, few scientific studies on the potential effects of such knowledge transfer have been conducted. The present study is a follow-up to Lundmark et al. (2017), which identified significant effects of two forms of knowledge communication on conservation managers’ concerns and beliefs in regard to Baltic Sea genetic biodiversity. This study departs from Lundmark et al. (2017) and explores (a) whether the identified alterations in knowledge and beliefs persist over time, and (b) whether potential stability differs between different types of policy beliefs as well as between two types of knowledge communication (lecture and group deliberation). The results of this follow-up study show that the positive impacts on managers’ self-assessed knowledge remained, while the effects on policy beliefs largely had vanished a few months after the knowledge communication. Thus, changes in beliefs seem perishable, suggesting that continuity is more important than the form of educational efforts.

  • 5.
    Jagers, Sverker
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences. Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences. Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Crépin, Anne-Sophie
    The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Langlet, David
    Department of Law, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Havenhand, Jonathan N
    Department of Marine Sciences-Tjärnö, Tjärnö Marine Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Strömstad, Sweden .
    Troell, Max
    The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Filipsson, Helena L
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Galaz, Victor R
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anderson, Leif G
    Department of Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Societal causes of, and responses to, ocean acidification2019In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 816-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major climate and ecological changes affect the world's oceans leading to a number of responses including increasing water temperatures, changing weather patterns, shrinking ice-sheets, temperature-driven shifts in marine species ranges, biodiversity loss and bleaching of coral reefs. In addition, ocean pH is falling, a process known as ocean acidification (OA). The root cause of OA lies in human policies and behaviours driving society's dependence on fossil fuels, resulting in elevated CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. In this review, we detail the state of knowledge of the causes of, and potential responses to, OA with particular focus on Swedish coastal seas. We also discuss present knowledge gaps and implementation needs.

  • 6.
    Söderholm, Patrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Hellsmark, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Environmental Systems Analysis, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Stockholm School of Economics, House of Innovation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansson, Julia
    Chalmers University of Technology, Maritime Environmental Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mossberg, Johanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, RISE Bioeconomy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Technological development for sustainability: The role of network management in the innovation policy mix2019In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 138, p. 309-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the key role of actor networks in progressing new sustainable technologies, there is a shortage of conceptual knowledge on how policy can help strengthen collaborative practices in such networks. The objective of this paper is to analyze the roles of such policies – so-called network management – throughout the entire technological development processes. The analysis draws on the public management and sustainability transitions literatures, and discusses how various network characteristics could affect the development of sustainable technologies, including how different categories of network management strategies could be deployed to influence actor collaborations. The paper's main contribution is an analytical framework that addresses the changing roles of network management at the interface between various phases of the technological development process, illustrated with the empirical case of advanced biorefinery technology development in Sweden. Furthermore, the analysis also addresses some challenges that policy makers are likely to encounter when pursuing network management strategies, and identifies a number of negative consequences of ignoring such instruments in the innovation policy mix. The latter include inefficient actor role-taking, the emergence of small, ineffective and competing actor networks in similar technological fields, and a shortage of interpretative knowledge.

  • 7.
    Jagers, Sverker C.
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet, Gothenburg.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences. Göteborgs Universitet, Gothenburg.
    Nordblom, Katarina
    Göteborgs Universitet, Gothenburg.
    The evolution of public policy attitudes: Comparing the mechanisms of policy support across the stages of a policy cycle2019In: Journal of Public Policy, ISSN 0143-814X, E-ISSN 1469-7815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyse the importance of legitimacy on public policy support by comparing how drivers of public policy attitudes evolve across the policy process consisting of the input (the processes forgoing acquisition of power and the procedures permeating political decisionmaking), throughput (the inclusion of and interactions between actors in a governance system) and output (the substantive consequences of those decisions) stages. Using unique panel data through three phases of the implementation of a congestion tax in the Swedish city of Gothenburg, we find that legitimacy is indeed important in explaining policy support. Moreover, we find a lingering effect where support in one phase depends on legitimacy both in the present and in previous phases. Hence, our study takes us one step further on the road to understand the complicated dynamic mechanisms behind the interactions between policymaking, policy support, and the legitimacy and approval of politicians and political processes.

  • 8.
    Jagers, Sverker
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences. Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg.
    Martinsson, Johan
    Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences. Centre for Collective Action Research (CeCAR), University of Gothenburg.
    The impact of compensatory measures on public support for carbon taxation: an experimental study in Sweden2019In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 147-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at better understanding how, and to what extent, perceptions of a policy instrument’s distributional effects impact on policy support, focusing on the case of CO2 taxes on petrol in Sweden. Through a large-scale (N = 5000) randomized survey experiment with a 2 × 3 factorial design, the extent to which perceptions of fairness determine attitudes to a suggested increase of the Swedish CO2 tax is explored. Furthermore, the study considers whether these effects change with the level of the suggested tax increase, as well as whether negative sentiments can be alleviated by combining it with a compensatory measure in the shape of a simultaneous income tax cut financed by the revenues from the tax increase. The results show that a higher tax increase is both viewed as more unfair and enjoys weaker support. Furthermore, compensatory measures can be a powerful policy design tool to increase perceptions of the policy as fair, but the effect of compensation on policy support is conditioned by the individual’s left–right ideological position. Whereas people self-identifying to the right react favourably to compensatory measures, people self-identifying to the left become less supportive of a tax increase when combined with a simultaneous cut in income taxes.

  • 9.
    Harring, N.
    et al.
    Centre for Collective Action Research (CeCAR), Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Jagers, Sverker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences. Centre for Collective Action Research (CeCAR), Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences. Centre for Collective Action Research (CeCAR), Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    The significance of political culture, economic context and instrument type for climate policy support: a cross-national study2019In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 636-650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While many countries have pledged to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the choice of national climate policy measures demonstrates widespread variation. Although system of government, path-dependency and economic entanglements can explain a certain amount of variation in policy choice, research also points specifically towards the highly politicized nature of climate policy instruments and their sensitivity to public support as explanatory factors for cross-national differences. Previous studies hypothesize that various country-specific contextual factors determine both general preferences for environmental protection and the public’s preferences for different types of policy instruments. One suggestion is that countries’ prevailing political cultures have significant consequences for such public support. Another supposition is that, since countries differ in their economic dependency on climate detrimental industry such as fossil fuel production, this should be a significant factor determining both public attitudes and subsequent political decisions. This paper applies unique, original data from four countries with significant variation in (i) political-cultural contexts (Sweden and Norway vs New Zealand and Australia and (ii) economic dependency (Norway and Australia vs Sweden and New Zealand) to analyze how, and to what extent, these two contextual variables interact with, and moderate, the effect of individual-level factors on support for climate policy measures in the four countries. Furthermore, the paper explores variations in support for different types of CO2 taxes (directed towards individual consumers, industry, and fossil-fuel producers) in the four countries. Key policy insights Across contexts, public policy support is lower for taxes directed towards private consumption than for taxes directed towards industry, and the strongest for CO2 taxes on fossil fuel producing industry. Political culture and economic context influence the effect of individual-level factors on policy support. In a context of high economic dependency on the fossil-fuel industry, people are less likely to support the introduction of CO2 taxes. The effect of left-right ideology on policy support is sensitive to political-cultural context.

  • 10.
    Sandström, Annica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lundmark, Carina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Andersson, Klas
    Department of Education and Special Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    Department of Marine Sciences, Tjärnö Marine Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Strömstad, Sweden.
    Laikre, Linda
    Division of Population Genetics, Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Understanding and bridging the conservation-genetics gap in marine management2019In: Conservation Biology, ISSN 0888-8892, E-ISSN 1523-1739, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 725-728Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Linde, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Climate policy support under political consensus: exploring the varying effect of partisanship and party cues2018In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 228-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By creating attitudinal rifts among partisan voters, political polarization is

    expected to negatively affect chances of effectively mitigating climate change.

    While such expectations generally have found support, less attention has been

    paid to the opposite claim that political consensus should eliminate the

    partisan dimension in climate change politics. This study tests this claim by

    studying how party identification, and party cues specifically, affects public

    policy attitudes in a context defined by political consensus. Using data from a

    large online access panel in Sweden, party identification and party cues are

    shown to matter for policy attitudes even in a consensus context. This effect is

    not limited to certain issues but is found across a wide range of policies, and

    the effect of party cues, for a given issue, varies across parties. The implications

    of this study and areas for future work are discussed.

  • 12.
    Linde, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Communication and Cooperation: A Study of the Relationship Between Political Communication and Large-scale Collective Action2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates the importance of communication for individual cooperation in large-scale collective action dilemmas. In small-scale collective action, where participants have the possibility to meet face-to-face, communication has been shown to drastically increase levels of cooperation. These positive effects are generally believed to be related to the possibilities of exchanging mutual commitments, sharing strategic information, creating and enforcing shared norms, developing trust, and creating a common group identity that communication offers. In large-scale dilemmas, involving thousands or even millions of participants, possibilities for communication are highly restricted beyond the immediate social vicinity of individuals. Participants are therefore unable to reap the positive benefits of communication that are available at the small-scale. Furthermore, as the public goods on which individuals cooperate in large-scale dilemmas often are both distant and abstract in nature (climate change, ozone depletion, overpopulation), the role of communication as an informational-shortcut might be even greater in large-scale dilemmas. That is, individuals need information about the characteristics of the resource in question, the relevant set of other actors participating, and the individual costs and benefits of cooperation.

    To compensate for the lack of communication and first-hand information, individuals in large-scale dilemmas are generally assumed to rely on different forms of judgmental and behavioral ‘heuristics’ (e.g. generalized trust and internalized norms) to make cooperative decisions. In this thesis I focus on one type of heuristic that generally has been overlooked in research on collective action; the individual reliance on information from trusted elite sources. Specifically, I study the extent to which individuals use communications from political parties when making cooperative decisions. The aim of the thesis is thus to investigate the relationship between political communication and large-scale collective action, and how this relationship varies with individual and contextual factors. This is studied in the context of climate change mitigation, which is a typical case of large-scale collective action, characterized by the large number of anonymous actors, the negligible impacts and high costs of individual cooperation, and a general lack of face-to-face communication and first-hand information.

    Using a country comparative approach, and cross-sectional survey data, the results show that: 1) political communications both directly and indirectly (by shaping perceptions of collective efficacy and collective benefits) influences individuals’ cooperative/non-cooperative decisions, and that this effect goes beyond other individual level factors, e.g. ideology, income, education; 2) not only specific communications, but also perceptions of the overall political climate (degree of polarization and the average party stance) affects attitudes both directly and indirectly; 3) these effects are not isolated to certain environments, but (to varying degree) can be found across political contexts and parties. The results have important implications both practically for policy makers, by creating a deeper understanding of the formation of individual climate change attitudes, and theoretically, by creating a better understanding of how individuals make decisions in large-scale collective action dilemmas. Future research should both validate the results from this study using other research designs (e.g. longitudinal or multilevel data, experimental designs), and expand on them, for example by exploring how different sources of communication and different types of information interact and influence the reception of communication content. 

  • 13.
    Lindahl, Karin Beland
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Department of Political Science, Umeå University.
    Wiklund, Roine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Competing pathways to sustainability?: Exploring conflicts over mine establishments in the Swedish mountain region2018In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 218, p. 402-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural resource (NR) exploitation often gives rise to conflict. While most actors intend to manage collectively used places and their NRs sustainably, they may disagree about what this entails. This article accordingly explores the origin of NR conflicts by analysing them in terms of competing pathways to sustainability. By comparing conflicts over mine establishments in three places in northern Sweden, we specifically explore the role of place-based perceptions and experiences.

    The results indicate that the investigated conflicts go far beyond the question of metals and mines. The differences between pathways supporting mine establishment and those opposing it refer to fundamental ideas about human–nature relationships and sustainable development (SD). The study suggests that place-related parameters affect local interpretations of SD and mobilisation in ways that explain why resistance and conflict exist in some places but not others. A broader understanding of a particular conflict and its specific place-based trajectory may help uncover complex underlying reasons. However, our comparative analysis also demonstrates that mining conflicts in different places share certain characteristics. Consequently, a site-specific focus ought to be combined with attempts to compare, or map, conflicts at a larger scale to improve our understanding of when and how conflicts evolve. By addressing the underlying causes and origins of contestation, this study generates knowledge needed to address NR management conflicts effectively and legitimately.

  • 14.
    Jagers, Sverker
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Harring, Niklas
    Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Environmental management from left to right: on ideology, policy-specific beliefs and pro-environmental policy support2018In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 86-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to growing environmental challenges, the demand for effective management through pro-environmental policy measures is increasing. The effectiveness is, however, largely determined by the degree to which the policy measures are supported by the actors affected by them. A consistent finding in the literature is that ideology (or subjective positioning on the left–right dimension) affects environmental policy support, with left-leaning individuals being more pro-environmental. A major caveat with previous research is that it seldom makes a distinction between different kinds of policies. Therefore, we are concerned with investigating how different ideological positions affect attitudes towards different forms of environmental protection. Using unique survey data, we show that ideology is related to conceptions about the fairness and effectiveness of different policy tools, which in turn steer preferences. In that sense, this paper makes the discussion on the effects of ideological position on pro-environmental policy support more nuanced.

  • 15.
    Poelzer, Gregory A
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Extracting Legitimacy: Input, Throughput, and Output Legitimacy in the Mining Industry2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Legitimacy affects questions on constitutional design, international political regimes, and specific policy sectors. Although it permeates society at various levels, legitimacy becomes particularly crucial when decisions hold long-term or permanent consequences. In democratic societies, decisions on electoral reform or constitutional amendments typically include various checks and balances to increase the legitimacy of the outcome and similarly, on a smaller scale, resource development also undergoes of series of checks and balances to improve legitimacy. I investigate one such resource development, mineral extraction, to look at key factors of input, throughput, and output legitimacy in a policy sector with long-term or permanent outcomes.

    If the strength of the input legitimacy (democratic, participatory quality) is high, then a deficit of output legitimacy (decisions, outcomes) can be overlooked –and vice-versa. This interpretation of legitimacy focuses on the decision-making process and the outcomes, but with the active role companies take in mining operations it becomes critical to consider the non-state actors involved in the process. To address this additional piece of this equation, throughput legitimacy is utilized to analyze the effect of relationships in policy decisions. By looking at the quality of interaction, this thesis investigates where throughput fits within the three dimensions of legitimacy in the mining sector.

    Using interview and survey data from Sweden and Canada, this research in this thesis addresses both theoretical and empirical issues. Theoretically, the effect of multiple actors on the policy process legitimacy of policy processes are explored. Using the input, throughput, and output legitimacy trichotomy provides a basis through which to investigate the changes engendered by different governance arrangements and their effect on legitimacy. When support for policy also depends on activity outside the formal processes of government, the implications for legitimacy change –creating a new theoretical criterion. Empirically, the qualities and factors that affect the legitimacy of a process are identified. The findings of this thesis provide insight on future process designs; understanding the relationship between participation, interaction, and outcomes inresource development processes and the factors critical to legitimacy emerges and endures.

  • 16.
    Holmquist, Hanna
    et al.
    Division of Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Jagers, Sverker
    Department of Political Science and Centre for Collective Action Research (CeCAR), University of Gothenburg.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Svanström, Magdalena
    Division of Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Peters, Gregory M.
    Division of Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers University of Technology.
    How information about hazardous fluorinated substances increases willingness-to-pay for alternative outdoor garments: A Swedish survey experiment2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 202, p. 130-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many outdoor garments are impregnated to make them water and, in some cases oil repellent, but the impregnation agents can be hazardous to human health and the environment. Some examples of such hazardous impregnation agents include per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. To reduce the risks related to these fluorinated substances, a phase-out is necessary, and voluntary avoidance by consumers may be one way to make this happen. This experimental survey investigates the extent to which information about the hazardous properties of fluorinated substances affects consumer willingness-to-pay for alternative outdoor garments without hazardous chemicals. The experiment was conducted by means of a questionnaire distributed to more than 4000 Swedish respondents via the Laboratory of Opinion Research's Citizen Panel. The results show a generally high willingness-to-pay, and that the effects of providing information are higher when the price increase is high. This suggests that there is room for a price increase if the non-hazardous options are more expensive. This survey experiment indicates that the Swedish general public is ready for substitution to garments without hazardous fluorinated chemicals if the alternative provides an identical function. Information campaigns, however, will have limited ability to increase the willingness-to-pay for an alternative as it is already high. Despite the general willingness of the Swedish public to choose less hazardous options, legislative measures may potentially be the most effective action when supply chains are opaque and information to consumers is limited.

  • 17.
    Newell, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Implementing Wind Power Policy: Institutional Frameworks and The Beliefs of Sovereigns2018In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 72, p. 16-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the development of renewable energy remains prominent on the global policy agenda, international organizations and states have created policies intended to foster renewable energy development. With wind power projected to make the largest contribution to Europe’s renewable energy mix, the EU and EU member-states have attempted to create institutional frameworks favoring the development of wind power. In many cases, however, this has proven to be a necessary, but insufficient, condition for wind power development, making wind power policy an interesting case of policy implementation. Because of the inherently local nature of wind power development, the influence of local actors and institutions on the policy process must also be considered. This article suggests how a proposed theoretical development in the Advocacy Coalition Framework can be used to explain how concerns exogenous to local policy subsystems can affect local political decision-making and policy implementation. This approach is then used to examine the case of wind power development in Markbygden, Sweden and finds partial support for the effect of exogenous concerns on local political decision-making.

  • 18.
    Lim, Sijeong
    et al.
    Department of Political Science, University of Amsterdam.
    Duit, Andreas
    Department of Political Science, Stockholm University.
    Partisan politics, welfare states, and environmental policy outputs in the OECD countries, 1975–20052018In: Regulation and Governance, ISSN 1748-5983, E-ISSN 1748-5991, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 220-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on the burgeoning literature on the association between the welfare state and the environmental state, this study empirically examines how the politics of the former has affected the development of the latter. We suggest that the size of the welfare state shapes the calculus of environmental policy costs by partisan governments. A generous welfare state lowers the costs perceived by the left-wing government, as large redistributive spending allows the government to mitigate the adverse impact of the new environmental policy on its core supporters, industrial workers. A generous welfare state also implies diminished marginal political returns from additional welfare commitment by the left-wing government, which lowers the opportunity costs of environmental policy expansion. To the contrary, because of lower overall regulatory and taxation pressure, a small welfare state reduces the costs of environmental policy expansion as perceived by a right-wing government. Our theoretical narrative is supported in a dynamic panel data analysis of environmental policy outputs in 25 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development member states during the period 1975–2005.

  • 19.
    Linde, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Political communication and public support for climate mitigation policies: a country-comparative perspective2018In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 543-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding under what conditions individuals are willing to support policies aimed at mitigating climate change has important consequences for the legitimacy, costs, effectiveness, and longevity of any policy alternative. Given the politicized nature of climate change, one factor that has been found to be important in explaining public support is partisan political communication. It has, for example, been shown how political communication has important effects on public beliefs and attitudes regarding climate change. A lack of country comparative studies, together with methodological limitations in previous research, has, however, led to a limited understanding of how these processes work, especially in a comparative perspective. In this paper, the effects of political communication on public support for climate mitigation, and the cross-country variations of these effects, is studied. Specifically, this paper investigates: (1) to what degree individual policy attitudes varies across party lines, (2) to what degree variations in policy attitudes can be explained by the effect of party cues, and (3) to what extent the effect of partisanship and political communication varies across political contexts. Using original data from a country comparative online public opinion survey covering Australia, New Zealand, Norway and Sweden political communication is found to significantly influence public policy attitudes in all contexts studied, albeit to different degrees.

  • 20.
    Reusch, Thorsten B. H.
    et al.
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Marine Ecology.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Zandersen, Marianne
    Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Roskilde.
    The Baltic Sea as a time machine for the future coastal ocean2018In: Science Advances, ISSN 0036-8156, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, no 5, article id eaar8195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coastal global oceans are expected to undergo drastic changes driven by climate change and increasing anthropogenic pressures in coming decades. Predicting specific future conditions and assessing the best management strategies to maintain ecosystem integrity and sustainable resource use are difficult, because of multiple interacting pressures, uncertain projections, and a lack of test cases for management. We argue that the Baltic Sea can serve as a time machine to study consequences and mitigation of future coastal perturbations, due to its unique combination of an early history of multistressor disturbance and ecosystem deterioration and early implementation of cross-border environmental management to address these problems. The Baltic Sea also stands out in providing a strong scientific foundation and accessibility to long-term data series that provide a unique opportunity to assess the efficacy of management actions to address the breakdown of ecosystem functions. Trend reversals such as the return of top predators, recovering fish stocks, and reduced input of nutrient and harmful substances could be achieved only by implementing an international, cooperative governance structure transcending its complex multistate policy setting, with integrated management of watershed and sea. The Baltic Sea also demonstrates how rapidly progressing global pressures, particularly warming of Baltic waters and the surrounding catchment area, can offset the efficacy of current management approaches. This situation calls for management that is (i) conservative to provide a buffer against regionally unmanageable global perturbations, (ii) adaptive to react to new management challenges, and, ultimately, (iii) multisectorial and integrative to address conflicts associated with economic trade-offs.

  • 21.
    Lundmark, Carina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    The transforming capacity of collaborative institutions: belief change and coalition reformation in conflicted wildlife management2018In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 226, p. 226-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine the transformative capacity of top-down imposed collaborative institutions on participants’ beliefs and coordination patterns. First, do collaborative arenas enhance learning in terms of belief change and belief convergence among participating actors? Second, what types of beliefs are changed and, third, how are changes in beliefs reflected in the formation of coalitions? To answer these questions, a longitudinal study encompassing three collaborative decision-making arenas in the highly adversarial system for wildlife management in Sweden is performed. The empirical analysis indicates both stability and change within the new management system that confirms, as well as challenges, the theoretical assumptions guiding the analysis. While beliefs overall are rather stable, we note, surprisingly, how some participants’ more normatively oriented policy core beliefs have been slightly modified over time. A more expected result was that these adjustments in normative policy core beliefs were accompanied by a reformed coalition structure within the studied decision-making arenas. The study contributes to our understandings of policy beliefs and coalitions in conflicted policy areas; it underlines the mixed results of collaborative institutions found in previous research; yet, lends a modest support in favor of the transformative capacity of collaborative institutions.

  • 22.
    Poelzer, Gregory A.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Ejdemo, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Too Good to be True?: The Expectations and Reality of Mine Development in Pajala, Sweden2018In: Arctic Review on Law and Politics, ISSN 1891-6252, E-ISSN 2387-4562, Vol. 9, p. 3-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to achieve legitimacy, reality must match expectations. Resource development projects, such as mining, often force small communities to make difficult decisions regarding which projects to support or reject based on whether their expectations regarding the development of a mine manifest in reality. To make this assessment, this study looks at the factors that contributed to the legitimacy of a mine in northern Sweden, focusing on the community of Pajala, where a new mine opened in 2012. We conducted interviews with local residents representing different interests that aimed to draw out what legitimized or delegitimized the mine. From these interviews, we determined that economic factors weighed most heavily in generating support for the mine. Subsequently, in order to determine if these economic expectations matched reality, we examined economic performance data on the municipality. We found that many of the factors identified in the interviews related to local outcomes and that these matched closely with economic changes associated with the mine. Given the largely positive perceptions of the mine, the congruence between economic expectations and reality validate this support from the community. Thus, our results provide insight into the factors that affect legitimacy at the local level.

  • 23.
    Ekström, Linda
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University.
    “What´s positive about positive rights?": Students’ Everyday Understandings and the Challenges of Teaching Political Science2018In: Journal of Political Science Education, ISSN 1551-2169, E-ISSN 1551-2177, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A review of research into teaching and learning in political science education concludes that this literature emphasizes student outcomes and "show and tell" descriptions of pedagogical interventions (Craig 2014). The present study instead aims to open the "black box" of conceptual learning in political science, illustrating the ambiguous role that everyday understandings of core concepts may play in the learning process. Starting from the conceptual change literature, we present findings on how everyday understandings influence learning regarding the concepts of "positive rights" and "anarchy," resulting in various learning difficulties. The results suggest that teaching needs to explore and explain differences in meaning between scientific and everyday understandings.

  • 24.
    Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Centre for Collective Action Research, Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg.
    Jagers, Sverker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Why do people accept environmental policies?: The prospects of higher education and changes in norms, beliefs and policy preferences2018In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 791-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pressing problems of environmental degradation are typically argued to require coordination, primarily through state intervention. Social scientists are struggling to understand how attitudes toward such state interventions are formed, and several drivers have been suggested, including education. People with university degrees are assumed to have certain values as well as the analytical skills to understand complex issues such as climate change. By using a unique panel data-set with students in different university programs (economics, law and political science), this study provides a better understanding of whether and how education affects environmental policy acceptance. One important finding is that university studies generate variation in support and scepticism toward different types of policy measures. For example, economics students tend to develop more positive attitudes toward market-based policy measures. This indicates a potential for education to increase the societal support often hindering the implementation of such policy tools.

  • 25.
    Lindahl, Karin Beland
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Department of Political Science, Umeå University.
    Sténs, Anna
    Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies, Umeå University.
    Alternative pathways to sustainability?: Comparing forest governance models2017In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 77, p. 69-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Morf, Andrea
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, University of Gothenburg.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Jagers, Sverker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Balancing sustainability in two pioneering marine national parks in Scandinavia2017In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 139, p. 51-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though marine protected areas (MPAs) have become central instruments in the endeavour towards sustainable development, our knowledge on how different institutional designs influence outcomes is limited. Using a comparative case study design, this paper explores the interplay between institutional arrangements and management outcomes in two adjacent yet institutionally slightly differing MPAs, encompassing a shared marine trench and a partially inhabited archipelago landscape – namely the Koster Sea National Park in Sweden and the Outer Hvaler National Park in Norway. How can differences in the institutional designs governing the two parks, be linked to differences in sustainability outcomes? What lessons can be learnt for the design of MPAs? The study shows that institutional design influences management outcomes in some respects but not in others. Differences in overall management systems had no noticeable effects on sustainability outcomes and how they were perceived, while the differing objectives of the parks and how they are made operational seem to have affected the outcomes. But they have also influenced actors' expectations and their assessment of outcomes. According to this study, conservation arrangements can be broadened beyond mere nature protection. However, the study also underlines the challenges of locally adapted and participatory institutional designs and emphasises the importance of taking users’ varying expectations related to social and economic values into account throughout the whole process. The establishment of national parks is no guarantee for broader sustainable development per se; this also requires resources and proper embedding and integration with relevant sectors and tiers in the overall management system.

  • 27.
    Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Goytia, Susana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lundmark, Carina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Nysten-Haarala, Soili
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Pettersson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Söderasp, Johanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Stage, Jesper
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Challenges in Swedish hydropower: politics, economics and rights2017In: Research Ideas and Outcomes, E-ISSN 2367-7163, Vol. 3, article id e21305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two systems working in parallel have contributed to implementation difficulties in Swedish water governance. While the old system is designed to be predictable and stable over time, the new system is intended to be transparent and holistic, guided by the principles of Integrated Water Resource Management. The paper disentangles the challenges in Swedish water governance and proposes a blueprint for future research. The proposed research project is unique in the sense that it explores the imbalances between the new and the old water governance systems from a multi-disciplinary perspective, elaborating upon the clashes between the traditional, nationally based regulatory system and the new holistic water governance system from legal, political and economic perspectives.

  • 28.
    Sandström, Annica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Morf, Andrea
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Fjellborg, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Coalitions, learning and negotiation in the formation of new marine protection areas2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Bodin, Örjan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholm University, Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Collaborative Networks for Effective Ecosystem-Based Management: A Set of Working Hypotheses2017In: Policy Studies Journal, ISSN 0190-292X, E-ISSN 1541-0072, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 289-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecosystem-based management (EBM) represents a comprehensive approach to better govern the environment that also illustrates the collaborative trend in policy and public administration. The need for stakeholder involvement and collaboration is strongly articulated, yet how and for what purposes collaboration would be effective remains largely untested. We address this gap by developing and evaluating a set of hypotheses specifying how certain patterns of collaborations among actors affect their joint ability to accomplish EBM. Content analyses of management plans drawn from five EBM planning processes in Sweden are combined with analyses of the collaborative networks through which these plans have been developed. Our results indicate that system thinking and the ability to integrate across different management phases are favored by collaborations between different kinds of actors, and by project leaders being centrally located in the networks. We also find that dense substructures of collaboration increase the level of specificity in the plans in regards to explicating constraints on human activities. Having many collaborative ties does however not enhance the overall level of specificity. Our results also show that different network characteristics can give rise to similar EBM outcomes. This observed equifinality suggests there is no single blueprint for well-performing collaborative networks. 

  • 30.
    Sandström, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Political Science, Umeå University.
    Lindahl, Karin Beland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sténs, Anna
    Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies, Umeå University.
    Comparing forest governance models.2017In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 77, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Sevä, Mikael
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Decisions at Street Level: Assessing and explaining the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive in Sweden2017In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 74-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the role of street-level bureaucrats in water management and examines what factors influence the implementation of the programme of measures that are part of the European Water Framework Directive. The impact of two factors - the bureaucrats' policy understandings and their implementation resources - on implementation is examined through a qualitative case study at sub-national level in Sweden. The results verify the critical role of these bureaucrats as only one-third make decisions, or take action, based on the programme of measures. The results further suggest that the bureaucrats' understandings of how coherent the policies are, and whom they consult in cases of uncertainty, are important. The implementing bureaucrats perceive policy as coherent and have rich networks of advice, including responsible government authorities, while the non-implementing bureaucrats experience significant policy incoherencies and have sparse advice networks. Thus, policy-makers can support implementation by adjusting policy and by improving existing, and organizing new, resources to provide these bureaucrats with guidance

  • 32.
    Lundmark, Carina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Andersson, Klas
    Department of Education and Special EducationUniversity of Gothenburg.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Laikre, Linda
    Department of ZoologyStockholm University.
    Effectiveness of short-term knowledge communication on Baltic Sea marine genetic biodiversity to public managers2017In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 841-849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to assess the impact of two forms of short-term knowledge communication – lectures and group deliberations – on public managers’ policy beliefs regarding genetic biodiversity in the Baltic Sea. Genetic biodiversity is a key component of biological variation, but despite scientific knowledge and far-reaching political goals, genetic biodiversity remains neglected in marine management. Previous research highlights lack of knowledge as one explanation to the implementation deficit. This multidisciplinary study builds on the identified need for an improved knowledge-transfer between science and on-going management. A basic knowledge package on genetic biodiversity in the Baltic Sea was presented as either a lecture or a deliberative group discussion to two separate samples of public managers who are involved in Baltic Sea and other biodiversity management at the regional level in Sweden. The empirical findings show that the communicated information has an impact on the public managers’ beliefs on genetic biodiversity of the Baltic Sea. Lectures seem more efficient to transfer knowledge on this theme. Those who received information through a lecture strengthen their confidence in area protection as a management tool to conserve genetic diversity. They were also more convinced of the obligation of authorities at national and regional level to take on larger responsibility for genetic conservation than those managers who participated in deliberative discussion.

  • 33.
    Jagers, Sverker
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg.
    How Exposure to Policy Tools Transforms the Mechanisms Behind Public Acceptability and Acceptance: The Case of the Gothenburg Congestion Tax2017In: International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, ISSN 1556-8318, E-ISSN 1556-8334, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 109-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing body of literature suggests that acceptance of environmental policy instruments tends to change along with increased experience of the same. Among the more popular examples of this are the growing number of congestion-pricing initiatives emerging around the world; in several cases the acceptability of these projects among the public has been relatively low before implementation, but then acceptance has increased as experience of the project has grown. The question is just how, and in particular, why? I.e., what is it really that experience does to people's propensity to accept initially quite unpopular measures? In this article we analyze how the relationship between political trust, policy-specific beliefs and public support for policy tools is moderated or affected by people's personal experiences of those policy tools. On the basis of the experience of previous research, we test the way in which policy-specific beliefs, institutional trust and the legitimacy of the political decision-making process affect public attitudes toward a policy tool. In addition—and consistent with other studies—we expect these effects to be significantly reduced post-implementation, as people gain first-hand experience of a policy tool. More specifically, we theorize that the often emphasized process legitimacy is only valid as a factor driving support before implementation, and that the effect of general institutional trust is replaced by the level of trust specific to the implementing institutions after the introduction of the policy tool. We tested these hypotheses using a natural experiment; i.e., by studying public attitudes toward the introduction of congestion fees in the Swedish city of Gothenburg both before and after their introduction. By doing so, we were able to comprehensively analyze both the drivers behind public sentiments toward congestion charges and how these mechanisms transform as people are exposed to the costs and benefits of the policy tool in practice. Among other things, we found that with regard to fairness and environmental effectiveness, there is a clear symmetry in our results. The level of acceptance increased most noticeably among those who experienced that the environment was improved by the implemented tax, or that the system turned out to be fairer than expected. However, the opposite is also the case. Thus, among those experiencing that the environment was not improved, or that the system appeared to be less fair than expected, the level of acceptance decreased significantly after implementation. These results may have important policy implications.

  • 34.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Is genetic diversity used in marine management today?: A study of policy, implementation and platforms for knowledge transfer2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation is based on a multi-disciplinary study on the role of geneticbiodiversity in the governance of Baltic Sea Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Theaim of the study has been threefold:1) to review how genetic biodiversity is dealt with in international- and nationalpolicies and in regional management plans governing the MPAs,2) to explore possible explanations to the attention, or lack of attention, given togenetic biodiversity in the management of MPAs, and3) to evaluate the effectiveness of different forms of knowledge transfer,between science and conservation managers, on the topic of genetic biodiversityin marine conservation.

  • 35.
    Newell, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Locating Wind Power Policy: The Mechanics of Policy Subsystem Interactions2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation investigates the drivers behind political decision-making and the policy outcomes resulting from political decisions. It is proposed that in policy processes where political decisions are made at multiple levels or across multiple policy subsystems, policy outcomes can be understood in terms of the mechanisms (i.e. the processes or means) of interaction between multiple policy subsystems within which political decisions are made,resulting in more or less policy alignment between political decisions and policy outcomes. Policy network theory and policy subsystem theory are used separately as the basis forderiving two potential explanations for the mechanics of policy subsystem interactions. Because political decision-making authority in the wind power policy process in most Western democratic countries is spread across multiple policy subsystems, and because there has been significant variation between wind power policy outcomes between these countries, wind power policy processes in European Union countries are used as an empirical point-of-departure for exploring and illustrating the mechanics of policy subsystem interaction. A survey of the research on wind power development is used to illustrate and explore preliminary empirical indications of support for a framework derived from policy network theory. The case of political decisions made in Sweden over the past twenty years related to wind power development and production is used to illustrate and explore preliminary empirical indications of support for an explanation of policy subsystem interactions derived from the Advocacy Coalition Framework proposed here, as well as to explore the drivers of political decisions. This dissertation therefore contributes to understanding how policy subsystems interact. The dissertation contributes theoretically to the literature on policy processes generally, as well as to network/network management theory, and to the Advocacy Coalition Framework/policy subsystem theory. It also contributes to understanding two strategically chosen, embedded cases within the broader case study of political decision-making in the wind power policy process in Sweden.

  • 36.
    Matti, Simon
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lundmark, Carina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Ek, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Managing Participation: prospects for learning and legitimacy-creation in Swedish water management2017In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 99-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article evaluates whether the participatory arrangements in Swedish water management following from the European Union's Water Framework Directive contribute to legitimacy by increased learning and knowledge-generation. In contrast to most evaluations of collaborative arrangements, we use a three-tiered approach analyzing actors, processes and structures jointly, which allows us to more fully consider the merits and challenges facing this new management system. Based on original data collected from the Water councils in one of five Swedish Water Districts, we conclude that the prospects for learning and legitimacy-creation in Swedish water management are favorable. Despite the absence of decision-making power, a majority of the participants find the management system overall positive and meaningful, as new knowledge is collected and distributed through the Water councils. Thus, the management processes seem to work in favor of reaching the overarching goal of internal legitimacy, i.e. among the participating stakeholders. The main challenge, following our data, is for the new management system to serve as an arena for broad public involvement. As long as only a small number of stakeholders partake in the Water councils, the potential for creating external legitimacy for this new governance system is limited.

  • 37.
    Newell, David
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Network management and renewable energy development: An analytical framework with empirical illustrations2017In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 23, p. 199-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The promotion of renewable energy is an essential component of energy and climate policies, but it is increasingly recognized that the transition toward an increased use of renewable energy sources constitutes a complex socio-political process. Policy is manifested in multi-actor networks beyond formal hierarchies and must therefore build on a comprehensive empirical understanding of the local collaboration processes that make investments in renewable energy projects possible. The objectives of this article are to: (a) propose an analytical framework within which the local development processes leading to renewable energy investments can be understood, in particular emphasizing the management of the relevant actor networks; and (b) provide empirical illustrations of the framework based on existing research. The article argues that, based on network management theory, some network structures can be expected to be more successful than others in facilitating renewable energy development, and we recognize the ways in which networks and their structure tend to be placed within certain institutional contexts of rules. By consulting selected research on wind power development at the local level we illustrate the added value of the proposed framework, and outline the seeds of a future research agenda.

  • 38.
    Carlsson, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Policy Science at an Impasse: A Matter of Conceptual Stretching?2017In: Politics and Policy, E-ISSN 1747-1346, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 148-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    La ciencia política, particularmente el enfoque de la red de políticas, está experimentando un aumento de nuevos estudios y conceptos. La abundancia del es resultado del ineludiblemente enfoque multidisciplinario de la ciencia política y de nuestra ambición de superar el análisis tradicional de la ciencia política. Sin embargo, los conceptos del campo se están desarrollando con tanta rapidez que el surgimiento de los nuevos híbridos y mutaciones amenazan con confunidr y sobre-complicar en lugar de proporcionarnos claridad, y como consecuencia la mejora acumulativa y el desarrollo de la teoría se ven obstaculizados. Estas consecuencias imprevistas están íntimamente asociadas con errores de estiramiento conceptual, es decir, utilizando conceptos valiosos con un significado claro para referirse a fenómenos inaplicables, haciendo mal uso y disminuyendo el valor de nuestras herramientas conceptuales. En la ciencia política, esto es también el caso de las herramientas analíticas centrales, marcos conceptuales, modelos y teorías. Por lo tanto, aunque la formulación de políticas puede ser desordenada, si esperamos escapar de la supuesta parálisis en la ciencia política, no podemos permitirnos tolerar las inexactitudes actuales del estiramiento conceptual.

  • 39.
    Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Centre for Collective Action Research, Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Jagers, Sverker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Public support for pro-environmental policy measures: Examining the impact of personal values and ideology2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 5, article id 679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the relationship between two major explanations of the formation of positive attitudes towards environmental policy measures. Ideological orientation and personal values have, in theory, significant overlaps in the sense that they collect general and cross-situational sentiments used to understand and evaluate a wide range of political issues. However, in the empirical literature, although they independently have been shown to have rather significant effects on pro-environmental policy attitudes, they are rarely tested together in order to explore whether they capture the same basic mechanisms. In this article, two data sets from Sweden are used to demonstrate both that ideological orientation and personal values independently affect pro-environmental policy support, as well as that these effects differ across different policy types.

  • 40.
    Söderberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Wårell, Linda
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Resurseffektiva städer: Framgångsrika lokala energisamarbeten2017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Laikre, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Sandström, Annica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lundmark, Carina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Safeguarding adaptive potential of Baltic Sea marine biodiversity: ways forward to address identified shortcomings in MPA governance2017In: Book of abstracts: BONUS SYMPOSIUM: Sciencedelivery for sustainable use of theBaltic Sea living resources, Tallinn, Estonia, 17-19. October 2017, 2017, p. 54-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Suopajärvi, Leena
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Lapland, Rovaniemi.
    Ejdemo, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Klyuchnikova, Elena
    Institute of the Industrial Ecology Problems of the North, Kola Science Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Murmansk region.
    Korchak, Elena
    Luzin Institute of Economic Problems, Kola Science Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Murmansk region.
    Nygaard, Vigdis
    Northern Research Institute (NORUT), Alta.
    Poelzer, Gregory A.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Social impacts of the “glocal” mining business: case studies from Northern Europe2017In: Mineral Economics, ISSN 2191-2203, E-ISSN 2191-2211, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mining is a global business with international networks of production and consumption, but mineral deposits are place specific and the impacts of mining projects are mostly experienced locally. Hence, mining is an example of a glocal phenomenon par excellence: global processes are realized in local communities and environments. This paper discusses the social impacts of mining in eight communities situated in Northern Europe. The data consist of 85 semi-structured interviews conducted in 2013 and 2014. Using a qualitative approach and starting from the bottom-up, the analyses identified three impact frames that combined individual experiences and meanings expressed in the interviews. The first impact frame focuses on environmental justice. Environmental impacts are corporeal, cognitive, and emotional, as they affect the real life of people living in the vicinity of the mine. The main finding is that environmental “bads” are experienced locally in the North, whereas the economic “goods” go to mining companies and consumers in the “South.” The second impact frame looks at the loss of livelihoods and the cultural way of life. Mining is seen as a threat, especially to reindeer herding and nature-based practices. In the areas where mining is a new industry, the activity is seen as antithetical to those small-scale activities of a local economy. The third impact frame centers on experiences and concerns about the dependency of a community on a single industry. When the fortunes of local communities are dependent on international business and the fluctuations of global markets, the residents feel that they have no power to influence the developments and can thus only adapt.

  • 43.
    Jagers, Sverker
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Linde, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Martinsson, Johan
    Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg, Statsvetenskapliga Institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Testing the Importance of Individuals’ Motives for Explaining Environmentally Significant Behavior2017In: Social Science Quarterly, ISSN 0038-4941, E-ISSN 1540-6237, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 644-658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveThis article explores how different motives affect behavior, and attempts to explain how the causal chain of values and beliefs forms our understanding of and motives for private-sphere environmentally significant behaviors (ESBs). As a point of departure, we postulate that traditional models focusing primarily on individual-level motivation as a driver for ESB should benefit significantly from making a distinction in the dependent variable between: (1) behaviors that are explicitly pro-environmental, judging both by their outcomes and the individual's stated motives for undertaking them; (2) behaviors that have a positive environmental impact but that are connected to motives other than environmental ones; as well as (3) behaviors where both environmental and other motives coincide as drivers for ESB.MethodsIn order to answer our research questions, we use survey data collected from a random sample from the Swedish population register. The main dependent variable is the self-reported frequency of 12 different kinds of nonactivist, private-sphere behaviors. We employ ordinary least square regressions to analyze the explanatory strength of individual-level motivational factors for ESB when taking stated motives for behavior into account.Results and ConclusionThe results support our main assumption that to explain drivers for ESB, stated motives should be taken into account. For all of the 12 ESBs in the survey, a considerable share of the respondents do not perceive or motivate behavior as pro-environmentalism at all, and others provide multiple motives for their behavior, combining, for example, economic or health with environmentalism. Furthermore, when analyzing the relationship between a scientifically well-established model aspiring to explain pro-environmental behavior, and individuals’ behavioral perceptions and their stated behavior, we find that the explanatory power of this model is clearly sensitive to people's stated motives.

  • 44.
    Lindahl, Karin Beland
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sténs, Anna
    Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious studies, Umeå University.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Department of Political Science, Umeå University.
    Johansson, Johanna
    Department of Political Science, Umeå University.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University.
    Ranius, Thomas
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU)), Uppsala.
    Roberge, Jean-Michel
    SLU, Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå.
    The Swedish forestry model: More of everything?2017In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 77, p. 44-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “The Swedish forestry model” refers to the forest regime that evolved following the 1993 revision of the Swedish Forestry Act. It is key to Swedish forest politics and used to capture the essence of a sustainable way of managing forests. However, the ideas, institutions and practices comprising the model have not been comprehensively analyzed previously. Addressing this knowledge gap, we use frame analysis and a Pathways approach to investigate the underlying governance model, focusing on the way policy problems are addressed, goals, implementation procedures, outcomes and the resulting pathways to sustainability. We suggest that the institutionally embedded response to pressing sustainability challenges and increasing demands is expansion, inclusion and integration: more of everything. The more-of-everything pathway is influenced by ideas of ecological modernization and the optimistic view that existing resources can be increased. Our findings suggest that in effect it prioritizes the economic dimension of sustainability. While broadening out policy formulation it closes down the range of alternative outputs, a shortcoming that hampers its capacity to respond to current sustainability challenges. Consequently, there is a need for a broad public debate regarding not only the role of forests in future society, but also the operationalization of sustainable development.

  • 45.
    Matti, Simon
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Newell, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Values, beliefs and elite decision-making: The case of the Markbygden wind power development2017In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outputs of political processes, i.e. policy, reflect rational cost-benefit calculations and power relationships, but are also shaped by the values and beliefs of policy actors, i.e. sovereigns, involved in the decision-making process. Values and beliefs affect how rational analyses and power relationships are understood and valued by sovereigns. This article suggests that understanding sovereigns’ values and beliefs is, however, necessary but insufficient for understanding concrete policy outputs, particularly in complex policy processes characterized by conflicting interests and values. In such cases, sovereigns are forced to prioritize among their values and beliefs. This article proposes a framework for studying how sovereigns prioritize among their values and beliefs. This framework is then used to study a complex policy process ridden with conflicts of interest and value-conflicts, which highlights the value and necessity of studying sovereigns, their values and beliefs, as well as the prioritizations they make among those values and beliefs.

  • 46.
    Newell, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Wind Power Policy Implementation: The Beliefs of Sovereigns, Policy Outputs and Policy Impacts2017In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As energy security, climate change and other environmental concerns remain prominent on the global agenda, international organizations and states have created policies intended to foster the development of renewable energy. With wind power projected to make the largest contribution to Europe’s renewable energy mix, the EU and EU member-states have created an institutional framework designed to that favor the development of wind power. While some states have been successful in reaching their renewable energy goals, others have been less so. This article seeks to understand the reasons why states are successful in achieving their intended policy outcomes despite the inherent difficulties in implementing policy. Using the Advocacy Coalition Framework as a point-of-departure, this article will explore the relationship between the beliefs of national lawmakers, policy outputs and policy impacts, as well as how these relationships can help explain wind power policy implementation.

  • 47.
    Carlander, Anders
    et al.
    Department of Psychology and Center for Finance, School of Business, Economics, and Law, University of Gothenburg.
    von Borgstede, Chris
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg.
    Jagers, Sverker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sundblad, Eva-Lotta
    Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment.
    A bridge over troubled water: public participation as a possibility for success in water management2016In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 1267-1285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public participation in local water councils is one method to involve different actors in the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive. In this study we investigate which beliefs explain why the public participate and also how motives to participate are related to willingness to comply with decisions related to the water management framework. In total 910 respondents answered a web survey regarding their participation in the council work. Structural equation modelling was conducted with willingness to comply and motives to participate as the main dependent latent constructs. Other included latent constructs were perceived need for change, fairness, trust, and social- and personal norms. The results show that motives to participate did not have an effect on willingness to comply. Perceived need for change had indirect effects on nearly all latent constructs in the model and personal norms and social norms (through personal norms) had an effect on willingness to comply. The results are discussed in the context of water management methods.

  • 48.
    Sandström, Annica
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lundmark, Carina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Jansson, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Institute of Marine Research, Bergen.
    Edman, Mari
    Stockholm University, Department of Zoology, Division of Population Genetics, Stockholm University.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholm University, Department of Zoology, Division of Population Genetics, Stockholm University.
    Assessment of management practices regarding genetic biodiversity in Baltic Sea marine protected areas2016In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1187-1205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine, and tentatively explain, how genetic bio- diversity is handled in the management of Baltic Sea Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Genetic biodiversity is critical for species’ adaptation to changing environmental condi- tions and is protected by international agreements. Nevertheless, recent research indicates that genetic biodiversity is neglected in marine environments and in the management of MPAs. This study focuses on Sweden and Finland, which together govern a substantial part of Baltic Sea MPAs, and builds on in-depth interviews with regional conservation man- agers that are responsible for establishing and managing these areas. The empirical findings confirm that genetic biodiversity is absent, or plays a minor role, in contemporary MPA management. The findings also provide several possible explanations to this situation: unclear understandings of formal policy, lack of resources, deficient knowledge base, and the managers’ own policy beliefs. Policy makers and high-level managers need to consider these aspects in their efforts to protect biodiversity.

  • 49.
    Söderberg, Charlotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Complex governance structures and incoherent policies: implementing the EU water framework directive in Sweden2016In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 183, no 1, p. 90-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary processes of environmental policymaking in general span over several territorial tiers. This also holds for the EU Water Framework Directive system of environmental quality standards (EQS), which are part of a complex multi-level institutional landscape, embracing both EU, national and sub-national level. Recent evaluations show that many EU member states, including Sweden, have not reached the ecological goals for water in 2015. Departing from theories on policy coherence and multi-level governance, this paper therefore analyses Swedish water governance as a case to further our understanding of policy implementation in complex governance structures: how does policy coherence (or the lack thereof) affect policy implementation in complex governance structures? To answer this question, the paper maps out the formal structure of the water governance system, focusing on power directions within the system, analyses policy coherence in Swedish water governance through mapping out policy conflicts between the EQS for water and other goals/regulations and explore how they are handled by national and sub-national water bureaucrats. The study concludes that without clear central guidance, ‘good ecological status’ for Swedish water will be difficult to achieve since incoherent policies makes policy implementation inefficient due to constant power struggles between different authorities, and since environmental goals are often overridden by economic and other societal goals. Further research is needed in order to explore if similar policy conflicts between water quality and other objectives occur in other EU member states and how bureaucrats handle such conflicts in different institutional settings. This study of the Swedish case indicates that the role of the state as a navigator and rudder-holder is important in order to improve policy implementation in complex governance structures – otherwise; bureaucrats risk being lost in an incoherent archipelago of ecological, social and economic goals.

  • 50.
    Lindahl, Karin Beland
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Wiklund, Roine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Fjellborg, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Fjällnära Gruvdrift?: Konflikter om vägar till hållbarhet2016Report (Other academic)
1234567 1 - 50 of 309
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