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  • 1.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Envisaging ‘Our’ Nation: Politicized Affects in Minority Language Literature2019In: Children's Literature in Education, ISSN 0045-6713, E-ISSN 1573-1693, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 142-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on two forms of cognitive studies to examine how a minority language literature endeavours to form feelings of in-group belonging. The minority in focus are the Tornedalingar: Swedish nationals who live near the Torne River which marks the border with Finland. The official language of the Tornedalingar is “Meänkieli” which literally translates as “our language”. The first part of the paper draws on the work of Sara Ahmed to show that emotions are both embodied and culturally specific, the second half of the paper takes this argument a step further, drawing on studies of children’s poetry by Karen Coats and Debbie Pullinger to show how the rhythmical patterns of Meänkieli poetry entrain children into a culturally specific sense of belonging.

  • 2.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Palo, Annbritt
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Manderstedt, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Protest and Apology in the Arctic: Enacting Citizenship in Two Recent Swedish Films2019In: Humanities, ISSN 2076-0787, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, Sweden enjoys a positive international reputation for its commitment to human rights issues, for instance, in relation to the recent migrant crisis. Abuses committed by the Swedish state against certain ethnic groups within the country are less well known, both within and beyond its borders. These included systematic attempts to curtail the use of indigenous and local languages, thereby causing communicative and ideological rifts between children and their parents. These policies were enacted through the school system from the 1920s until the 1970s, and particularly affected people living in the Arctic region where the national borders are disputed. In this article, we examine two twenty-first-century films set during this era, featuring feisty female characters responding to the school policy. Elina: As though I wasn’t there is a children’s film created by people “outside” the cultural group represented; and Sámi Blood features an adolescent protagonist (and her older self), created by “insiders” of the cultural group represented. In both films, the female protagonists’ relative lack of agency within the state school system is contrasted with their powerful connections to the Arctic landscape. We seek to examine how these films contribute to the work of apology, beginning with a public acknowledgement of the wrongs of the past. Whilst one of the films concludes with a celebration of the female protagonists’ agency, the other proffers a more ambiguous portrayal of power in relation to culture, nationality, and identity.

  • 3.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Twenty-First-Century Feminisms in Children's and Adolescent Literature2019In: Children's Literature, ISSN 0092-8208, E-ISSN 1543-3374, Vol. 47, p. 253-238Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    A Corpus-based Study of Lexis in L2 English Textbooks2018In: Journal of Language Teaching and Research, ISSN 1798-4769, E-ISSN 2053-0684, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 463-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    espite the fact that textbooks are central in foreign language learning, only limited research has explored to what extent L2 textbooks support language learning and whether the content in them is relevant from a vocabulary perspective. This study investigates the vocabulary in seven English textbooks used in Swedish primary schools. A corpus has been constructed based on the words in the textbooks. By means of a concordancing software tool, the material has been analyzed by comparing the vocabulary between the books and to words on the New General Service List and in the VP-Kids corpus. The analysis shows that many words in the textbooks occur only occasionally in common everyday language use. It also demonstrates that there is great variation in the number and selection of words across the books indicating that there does not seem to be a common thought behind word selection in textbooks used in Swedish schools.

  • 5.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Children’s Literature in ‘Our Language’2018In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 56-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Fjällström, Eva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Knorn, Steffi
    Uppsala University.
    Staffas, Kjell
    Uppsala University.
    Varagnolo, Damiano
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Developing Concept Inventory Tests for Electrical Engineering: Extractable Information, Early Results, and Learned Lessons2018In: 2018 UKACC 12th International Conference on Control (CONTROL), 2018, p. 436-441, article id 8516766Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper suggests a method for developing, implementing and assessing a concept inventory test for electrical engineering students (CITE). The aim of this test is to help students better understand and learn core concepts, plus increase their awareness about links between the different courses and other themes of the program. Our and other experiences show that students often struggle to understand and use fundamental concepts, and how these relate to the various courses. This issue is probably due to the fact that traditional exams mainly focus on assessing procedural tasks (e.g., directly solving specific problems following step-by-step approaches). The investigated programs at Uppsala University (UU) and Luleå Uni-versity of Technology (LTU), nonetheless, have no tool for collecting quantitative data on how students develop conceptual knowledge throughout the programs, and thus no means to obtain an holistic view about their learning process. The here proposed methodology thus describes how to develop tests that would not only provide students with valuable feedback on their progression, but also equip teachers and program boards with high-end data for pedagogical and course development purposes. Besides illustrating the developmental methodology, the paper includes reactions and remarks from students on what the tests would provide and what would motivate them to take it.

  • 7.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    From Superman to Social Realism: Children's Media and Scandinavian Childhood by Helle Jensen (review)2018In: Children's Literature Association Quarterly, ISSN 0885-0429, E-ISSN 1553-1201, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 231-234Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Öqvist, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Gardelli, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lindström, Lisbeth
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Improving learning outcomes in the Swedish school system2018In: Addressing Societal Challenges / [ed] Editors Johan Frishammar Åsa Ericson, Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2018, p. 53-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack lustre performance of Swedish compulsory schoolsover the past few decades does not need to define its future.As this report will show, the main challenges facing the Swedisheducation system do not stem from a lack of resources.The effective implementation of research based innovationsand improvements in organization could tackle many of thesystemic weaknesses in the education system, thereby ensuringa brighter future. By addressing existing difficulties in theteaching and delivery of the curriculum and ensuring pupilswho are at risk are able to flourish, learning outcomes will beimproved. This, in turn, will reduce inequality, thereby improvingthe life-opportunities of young people and maintaining thehigh standard of living enjoyed in Sweden.

  • 9.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human and technology.
    "Learn to blend in!": A corpus-based analysis of the representation of women in mining2018In: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion, ISSN 2040-7149, E-ISSN 2040-7157, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 698-712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim of this study is to contribute with increased knowledge about gender in mining by exploring how women are discursively represented in texts produced by actors in the international mining arena.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study combines corpus linguistic methods and discourse analysis. It implies a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses, where the former is used as the point of departure for the latter, and where the material analysed is chosen on the basis of certain selected search phrases. The source for the study is the web, and the search engine used for the retrieval of data is WebCorp Live, a tool tailored for linguistic analysis of web material.

    Findings

    The analysis reveals that although the overarching theme in the women-in mining discourse is that women are needed in the industry, the underlying message is that women in mining are perceived as problematic.

    Practical implications

    The study shows that if mining is to change into a modern industry, the inherent hyper-masculine culture and its effects on the whole industry needs to be problematised and made evident. To increase the mere number of women, with women still heavily underrepresented, is not enough to break gender-biased discrimination.

    Originality/value

    The research contributes with new knowledge about gender in mining by using a method, which so far has had limited usage in (critical) discourse analysis.

  • 10.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Vikström, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Palola Kirby, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Secondary School Students' Understanding of and Strategies for Vocabulary Acquisition: A Phenomenographic Approach to Language Learning2018In: Journal of Language Teaching and Research, ISSN 1798-4769, E-ISSN 2053-0684, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 895-904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on vocabulary learning have provided valuable knowledge of what it means to know a word and how people learn. Few studies have focused on what students’ understanding of word knowledge and vocabulary acquisition can contribute with in a language-learning context. Considering the vital importance of vocabulary in language learning, this study explores students’ experiences of word knowledge and vocabulary learning with a point of departure in phenomenographic research. By interviewing a group of Swedish secondary school students about their understanding of word knowledge and what strategies they employ to learn new words in English, categories of description emerged showing that although the majority of the students reported that they perceive word knowledge as contextual, they primarily employ decontextualised strategies when studying vocabulary. This discrepancy seems to be closely connected to how vocabulary is tested and assessed in school. 

  • 11.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Carnality in Adolescent Literature2017In: Edinburgh Companion to Children’s Literature / [ed] Clémentine Beauvais and Maria Nikolajeva, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2017, p. 90-101Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Critical Plant Studies and Children’s Literature2017In: Edinburgh Companion to Children’s Literature / [ed] Clémentine Beauvais and Maria Nikolajeva, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2017, p. 274-280Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Fältholm, Ylva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Gender diversity and innovation in mining: corpus-baseddiscourse analysis2017In: International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1756-6266, E-ISSN 1756-6274, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 359-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to gain increased knowledge about gender diversity and innovation in mining by analyzing how women are discursively represented in relation to these two concepts, and in doing so establish how diversity management is received and communicated in the industry.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study is based on analysis of texts including references to gender diversity and innovation in mining found on the web. The tool used to retrieve the data has been WebCorpLive, a tool designed for linguistic analysis of web material.

    Findings

    Although increased female representation is communicated as a key component in the diversity management discourse, based on the idea that diversity increases innovation and creativity, closer analysis of texts on diversity and innovation in mining shows that what women are expected to contribute with has little explicit connection with innovation.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study contributes with increased knowledge about diversity management by providing an example of how it is received in a traditionally male-dominated industry.

    Practical implications

    Our findings indicate that for diversity management to have a real effect in mining, it needs to be based on gender equality and social justice motives, rather than on a business case rationale – the principal motive today. To enable this change stereotypical gender patterns, as shown in this study, need to be made visible and problematized among policy makers, practitioners and actors on all levels of the industry.

    Originality/value

    The study contributes with new knowledge about gender in the mining industry previously not attended to by using a method which so far has been sparsely used in discourse analysis, although pointed out as promising.

  • 14.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Hands on Reading: The Body, the Brain and the Book2017In: The Embodied Child : Readings in Children’s Literature and Culture / [ed] Roxanne Harde, Lydia Kokkola, London and New York: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 191-206Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the New London group coined the term ‘New Literacies’ to describe the activities involved in making sense of on-line digital texts, there has been considerable debate about the extent to which this form of reading differs from traditional book reading. A broad array of studies demonstrate that reading print-on-paper texts are better for memory recall after reading (Mangen, Walgermo & Brønnick, 2013), for digesting complex information (Stoop, Kreutzer & Kircz, 2013a, 2013b), and for immersing oneself in a story (Mangen 2013b; Mangen & Kuiken 2014). Digital texts, on the other hand, are only superior for “quick information gathering, communication and navigation” (Stoop, Kreutzer & Kircz, 2013a, 2013b). The reasons for these differences are not yet clear, but the physical ways in which our bodies perform literate acts and how our brain processes materials provides a means by which to examine this phenomenon.

    This paper begins by summarising existing research on how the brain responds to these different environments, and how the bodily movements that surround these acts of literacy differ. It will conclude with a proposal that changing how children use their bodies when they are reading might improve comprehension.

  • 15. Pavlik, Anthony
    et al.
    Bird, Hazel Sheeky
    Newcastle University.
    Introduction: Maps andMapping in Children’s and Young Adult Literature2017In: Children's Literature in Education, ISSN 0045-6713, E-ISSN 1573-1693, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Simplified Minds: Empathy and Mind-Reading in Christopher Paolini’s Inheritance Cycle2017In: Affect, Emotion, and Children’s Literature: Representation and Socialization in Texts for Children and Young Adults / [ed] Elizabeth Bullen, Kristine Moruzi and Michelle Smith, London and New York: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 96-112Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theory of Mind or mind-reading, that is, our ability to accurately assess what another person is thinking and feeling and to anticipate how they may respond as a result is a life skill which can be developed by reading fiction. Fiction allows readers to gain direct insights into the thoughts, feelings and motivations of complex characters. In addition to developing the readers’ mind-reading skills, mind-reading is an activity which appears in many works of fiction, especially fantasy, where magical means enable authors to create varying degrees on insight into the minds of others. This chapter begins with Simon Baron-Cohen proposal that we exist along a bell-curve of empathy: most people cluster at the centre with autistic persons towards the negative end and highly empathetic persons at the upper end. Christopher Paolini’s Inheritance-cycle is then used to illustrate Baron-Cohen’s research, as it places key characters along the bell-curve. These characters all have magical powers, and their non-human dimensions enable Paolini to map the limits of empathy, demonstrating the dangers of both a lack of empathy and hyper-empathy. In doing so, Paolini enables readers to explore the limits of empathy. The chapter concludes by considering how Paolini manipulates the readers’ empathy, encouraging them to admire behaviours they are likely to condone in real life.

  • 17.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Student teacher cognition: Beliefs about foreign language learning and teaching2017In: Encuentro: Revista de Investigación e Innovación en la Clase de Idiomas, ISSN 1989-0796, Vol. 26, p. 22-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates Swedish student teachers’ beliefs about seventeen commonly held views on language learning and language teaching. Their beliefs were surveyed by means of a questionnaire distributed before and after the students had taken part in their first English methodology course. The answers given to eleven of the statements are presented and discussed in this article. These statements were chosen for analysis because they are directly concerned with the teaching and learning of a second language (L2) in a classroom setting. The results show that many of the beliefs displayed by the participating student teachers go against the results of previous research within the field of second language acquisition (SLA), but also that some beliefs had started to change after the completion of the methodology course. In some cases, however, a more explicit focus would be needed in methodology courses for student teachers to be more capable in their future profession.

  • 18.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Valovirta, Elina
    The University of Turku.
    The Disgust that Fascinates: Sibling Incest as a Bad Romance2017In: Sexuality & Culture, ISSN 1095-5143, E-ISSN 1936-4822, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 121-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares the discourse of sibling incest evident in a corpus offiction with the discourse found in clinical, sociological and criminal literature.Whereas the former prima rily regards the coupling as a bad romance, the latterpresents the idea that it is unequivocally harmful. This discrepancy between the twodiscourses surrounding sexual relationships between brothers and sisters speaks toliterary fiction’s need for thwarted romances for the purposes of the literary market.A more detailed look into three novels from the corpus, Tabitha Suzuma’s For-bidden (2010), Donna Tartt’s The Secret History (1992) and Pauline Melville’s TheVentriloquist’s Tale (1997) shows how this logic of sibling incest as a bad romanceworks in practice.

  • 19.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The Embodied Child: An Introduction2017In: The Embodied Child : Readings in Children’s Literature and Culture / [ed] Roxanne harde, Lydia Kokkola, London and New York: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Harde, Roxanne
    et al.
    Augustana Faculty of the University of Alberta.
    Kokkola, LydiaLuleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The Embodied Child: Readings in Children’s Literature and Culture2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Embodied Child: Readings in Children’s Literature and Culture brings together essays that offer compelling analyses of children’s bodies as they read and are read, as they interact with literature and other cultural artifacts, and as they are constructed in literature and popular culture. The chapters examine the ideology behind the cultural constructions of the child’s body and the impact they have on society, and how the child’s body becomes a carrier of cultural ideology within the cultural imagination. They also consider the portrayal of children’s bodies in terms of the seeming dichotomies between healthy-vs-unhealthy bodies as well as able-bodied-vs-disabled, and examines flesh-and-blood bodies that engage with literary texts and other media. The contributors bring perspectives from anthropology, communication, education, literary criticism, cultural studies, philosophy, physical education, and religious studies. With wide and astute coverage of disparate literary and cultural texts, and lively scholarly discussions in the introductions to the collection and to each section, this book makes a long-needed contribution to discussions of the body and the child.

  • 21.
    Pavlik, Anthony
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Viewing the Great War through American Series Fiction for Boys (1914–18)2017In: The Lion and the unicorn, ISSN 0147-2593, E-ISSN 1080-6563, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 186-203Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Lidström Brock, Malin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Writing Feminist Lives: The Biographical Battles over Betty Friedan, Germaine Greer, Gloria Steinem, and Simone de Beauvoir2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book draws attention to the controversy that surrounds Betty Friedan, Germaine Greer, Gloria Steinem, and Simone de Beauvoir’s lives and the important role that their life stories have played in their feminist writing. Directly and indirectly, the four women have contributed to battles over feminism’s meaning through autobiographically informed political writing. Inevitably, therefore, their biographers are also participants in these battles, yet not always on the same side as their subjects. Writing Feminist Lives introduces a further fold of nuance into considerations of biography and feminism by showing that the biographers of the four women have made methodological choices that reflect their loyalty to, or their scepticism towards, competing ideological definitions of the exemplary feminist life. 

  • 23.
    Korkka, Janne
    et al.
    University of Turku.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Valovirta, Elina
    University of Turku.
    “An autobiography in which I do not appear”: The seductive self in the poetry of Robert Kroetsch2016In: English Studies: A Journal of English Language, ISSN 0013-838X, E-ISSN 1744-4217, Vol. 97, no 5, p. 510-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses selected works by the Western Canadian writer Robert Kroetsch (1927–2011) within the context of the biography battles which peaked during the 1990s. Kroetsch played a critical role in the formation and honing of a distinctive Prairie literary tradition in Canada, and we discuss a series of his poetic and other works published from the 1970s to 2010 which resonate with concerns raised within life-writing and life-writing criticism in the nineties. We focus on the almost obsessive concern with the relationships between self and other, and the seemingly contradictory denial of a stable self which mark the life writing debate of the decade; both evident in all of Kroetsch's writing. Raising the relation between space and selfhood to the fore, the article argues that Kroetsch's work not only questions our ability to know another through writing, but even to know the self. At the same time, we argue that the glimpses of a seemingly stable, autobiographical self that emerge in his writings speak to the seductiveness of gaining insights into the machinations of another person's mind, tempting Kroetsch again and again to ponder writing “an autobiography in which I do not appear”.

  • 24.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    An ‘Invisibling’ view of a Northern Landscape: Inga Borg’s Plupp Series2016In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 42-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Becoming native?: The wisdom of plants in Magaret Engle’s the surrender tree2016In: International Research in Children's Literature (IRCL), ISSN 1755-6198, E-ISSN 1755-6201, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 35-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper situates Margaret Engels’ collection of poems that form a novel, The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba's Struggle for Freedom (2008), in both the historical context it depicts (The various wars against Spain 1850-1899) and the emerging field of human-plant studies (HPS). Noting that Cuba’s indigenous population was destroyed by genocide and imported illnesses, the paper suggests that the island itself, as portrayed in Engels’ poetry, has colluded in human politics and played an active role in determining who can lay claim to Cuban nativity. Human-plant studies provide a rationale for suggesting that, in Engels’ The Surrender Tree, the flora of the island determines the progress of the Wars of Independence. This argument is extended to crystals, which also ‘grow’ but which are not deemed to be ‘living’, to suggest that, in The Surrender Tree, it is not the people who choose their nation and fight for its independence or to maintain Cuba’s connection to an empire of nations, but rather that the island itself chooses its people.

  • 26.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    EFL textbooks for young learners: A comparative analysis of vocabulary2016In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 47-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports the findings of a comparative analysis of two English teaching course book series which are widely used in school years 4–6 in Sweden: Good Stuff and New Champion. The analysis comprises comparisons of the vocabulary component in the teaching materials and examines the extent to which words – adjectives, nouns and verbs – recur in the books, whether there is a common core of words in the two series and, finally, whether vocabulary in the two teaching materials corresponds with accepted measures of English high-frequency words. The study shows that variation in vocabulary is considerable in individual books, within a series and between the two series; all textbooks contain a high proportion of one-time and low-frequency words. As a result, it is difficult to pin down a common core vocabulary. The study further shows that even though many words do correspond to general high-frequency words, as much as one-third are not found among the 2,000 most frequent English words.

  • 27.
    Nordlund, Marie
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Forshäger, Kristin
    Luleå kommun.
    Lundqvist, Catarina
    FoUI, Norrbottens kommuner.
    Åström, Ingela
    Luleå kommun.
    En spirande modell: Examensarbetet som en framgångsfaktor för samverkan universitet och verksamhet - exemplet Spira förskola2016Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna studie är att identifiera och synliggöra framgångsfaktorer i ett 3-årigt universitets- och kommun­gemensamt projekt kring studenters praxisnära examensarbeten. Studien är en kvalitativ undersökning som huvud­sakligen vilar på fenomenografisk grund där intervjuer har genom­förts med fyra kategorier av aktörer involverade i samarbetsprojektet: studenter, förskolepedagoger, förskole­chef och universitetslärare. Alla intervjuade uppvisar en positiv inställning till det projekt de deltagit i och kan alla se fördelar med sitt deltagande. De framgångsfaktorer som identi­fierats kan sammanfattas i ett antal nyckelord: delaktighet, engagemang, forskningsanknytning, handledningsgrupper, kontinuitet, starkt ledar­skap, verksamhets­förankring och verksamhets­utveckling. Faktorerna är generaliserbara och kan appliceras också på andra samarbeten mellan universitet och verksamhet. Liknande samverkansprojekt kan därför bli en viktig del av t.ex. kommuners arbete med att säkra den framtida kompetens­försörjningen och därmed också stärka verksamhetens vetenskapliga grund.

  • 28.
    Yarova, Aliona
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Haunted by Humans: Inverting the Reality of the Holocaust in Markus Zusak’s The Book Thief2016In: Papers: Explorations into Children's Literature, ISSN 1034-9243, E-ISSN 1837-4530, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 54-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how the magic realist strategy of inversion facilitates the representation of the reality of the Holocaust in Markus Zusak’s YA novel The Book Thief. Inversion is achieved by representing the events from the perspective of the other-worldly character, Death. Death provides the child reader with a means to unfold historical events by gradually opening up the layers of inverted reality. The layers examined are supernatural as natural, humans as ghosts, the real as surreal, and finally, on the deepest level of inversion, readers interpret life during the Holocaust as death. It is not the fantastic that causes fear or horror, but the real: war, violence and human hatred. The technique of inversion overturns beliefs about reality, normalcy and humanity. Focusing on the reversal of the real and the magical this paper explores the ways in which Death’s inverted narrative helps the young reader to discover the humanity of the humans who were dehumanized by the war, while still pointing to the inhumanity of genocide.

  • 29.
    Lidström Brock, Malin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Mad, Bad or (Just) Sad?: Recent Biofiction of Zelda Fitzgerald2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Naughty Boys and Sexy Girls: The Representation of Young Individuals in a Web-Based Corpus of English2016In: Journal of English Linguistics, ISSN 0075-4242, E-ISSN 1552-5457, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 318-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although stereotypical gender patterns have been reported in a number of studies over the last forty years or so, and attempts to address gender-biased representation have been made, males and females are still represented differently in modern English-speaking societies. Further research uncovering gender-marked language and biased gender structures is therefore needed. The study presented here is a contribution to the still small, but nevertheless growing number of studies employing corpora to study the discourse of gender. The focus of the study is the representation of young individuals in a previously unexplored one-hundred-million-word web corpus of English, the New Model Corpus (NMC). Following earlier work on collocation and gender, the aim of this paper is to explore what verbs collocate with the lemmas girl and boy as subject and object and what words modify them in a worldwide corpus of English. The purpose is to reveal how these two lemmas pattern with other words, and in doing so point at cultural and social meanings embodied in the representation of girls and boys.

  • 31.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    "Only Connect!”: Creating Connections when Reading Fiction and Digital Texts2016In: Encuentro: Revista de Investigación e Innovación en la Clase de Idiomas, ISSN 1989-0796, Vol. 24, p. 59-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper draws on work within neuroscience as well as literacy education and cognitive literary studies to examine differences between the deep reading of traditional narratives and the reading of digital media. Since game-playing, hyper-links and extended novel reading can affect how the brain develops, teachers need to understand how they can enable their pupils to develop the neural pathways that make flexibility of reading style possible. This means engaging with the impressive array of research available within the neurosciences on learning to read. The particular facility examined is connectivity. The nature of instant access to anyone who is on-line and the use of hyperlinks are contrasted with the connectivity with fictional others proffered by the deep reading of novels, specifically fantasy series. The article concludes by calling for more sustained classroom reading as well as support for digital literacies.

  • 32.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The relevance of lexi: A corpus-based study of L2 English textbooks2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Vocabulary acquisition and the textbook: What opportunities are there for young learners?2016In: ITL. Institut voor toegepaste linguistik, ISSN 0019-0829, Vol. 166, no 2, p. 199-228Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Why I no longer work with Holocaust Literature2016In: Religious Studies and Theology, ISSN 0829-2922, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This vividly written reflection on research content, dissemination of knowledge, the researcher’s selfhood and ethical choices at a career point at which the author’s work is highly recognized and speaking invitations abound is a personal account of her decision to leave the field of Holocaust studies. Kokkola explains how she used elements from her own life story to find the empathy needed to engage with the research material, whilst highlighting the dangers of drawing such parallels. She concludes by exposing how the Holocaust has been leveraged for political and economic purposes to negate the other genocides and to promote a simplified view of saviour nations and idealized victims.

  • 35.
    Hansson, Heidi
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Norberg, Cathrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    “Winter Feeds It”: Cold and the Construction of Good and Evil in Susan Cooper’s The Dark Is Rising2016In: The Lion and the unicorn, ISSN 0147-2593, E-ISSN 1080-6563, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 62-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Yarova, Aliona
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    “You Are a Mysterious Animal, You Know”: Eco-philosophy in Sonya Hartnett’s The Midnight Zoo2016In: Barnboken, ISSN 0347-772X, E-ISSN 2000-4389, Vol. 39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In non-realist children’s literature, animals tend to be employed as a means of representing human issues to the extent that the animal qualities of the animal can become invisible. Despite this trend, literary animals can also inform readers about animal issues along with the metaphoric message they supposedly carry. In Sonya Hartnett’s The Midnight Zoo, the role of animals is twofold: firstly, animals metaphorically represent human relationships – more specifically the bigotry towards the Roma as ‘other’ – and, secondly, the animals directly stand for the actual animals who are mistreated according to the same principle: for their ‘otherness’ to humans. This article adopts an eco-philosophical perspective to examine how The Midnight Zoo effectively intertwines human intolerance of other humans (the Roma) with human actions towards animals to suggest that humans treat the (natural) world as the Nazis treated the Roma during World War II.

  • 37.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Activity: She walk to school every morning: Hur svårt kan det vara att sätta ett s på verbet?2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Activity: Word of the year: Vad orden berättar om världen2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Fjällström, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Aesthetic and efferent reading in the EFL classroom2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Aktivitet: National Forum for English Studies2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Nordlund, Marie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Aktivitet: National Forum for English Studies2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    American Environmental Literature 1782–18472015In: International Research in Children's Literature (IRCL), ISSN 1755-6198, E-ISSN 1755-6201Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Yarova, Aliona
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Beyond Human: Escaping the Maze of Anthropocentrism in Peter Dickinson’s Eva2015In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 38-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Images of human-animal-machine mergers – “cyborgs” in Donna Haraway’s terminology – are ways of exploring the human/non-human dichotomy and embracing non-human features as empowering: the cyborg supposedly enables humans to achieve their full potential by going beyond anthropocentric boundaries. Alternatively, the cyborg may not result in the empowerment of humans; on the contrary, it may lead to the complete loss of humanity. This article examines the interior conflict of the cyborg-protagonist in Peter Dickinson’s Eva (1988). Eva is subjected to life-saving experimental surgery during which her mind is transplanted into the body of a chimpanzee, and speak only by using a keyboard. Eva-the-cyborg explores the limits of human identity. Although she is expected to move beyond her human identity, perspective and body, Eva rejects these assumptions. Drawing on Judith Halberstam’s notion of “queer failure” (2011), this article argues that Eva’s failure to achieve a balance between her human and non-human selves is a creative act which defeats humankind’s daring attempt to control the universe using scientific and technological achievements.

  • 44.
    Lidström Brock, Malin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Biographical Fiction: The Case of Virginia Woolf in Manhattan2015In: “Biography”: Popular Culture Association and American Culture Association National Conference, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. April, 2015., 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Children's Literature and Learner Empowerment: Children and Teenagers in English Language Education. Janice Bland. London, New Delhi, New York and Sydney: Bloomsbury, 2013. 298 pages.2015In: International Research in Children's Literature (IRCL), ISSN 1755-6198, E-ISSN 1755-6201, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 93-95Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Fjällström, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Cultural understanding and cultural bumbs in Swedish Adolescents' responses to Rushdie's Good Advice is Rarer than Rubies2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Fjällström, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Emeralds, rubies and gems of reader engagement2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Brock, Malin Lidström
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Philomena and Ireland’s Mother-and-baby Homes2015In: The Leaving of Ireland: Migration and Belonging in Irish Literature and Film, Bern: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015, p. 47-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines the portrayal of Ireland's mother-and-baby homes in the generally well-received film Philomena and the account on which the film is based, the British journalist Martin Sixsmith's portrayal of Philomena Lee's life and search for her son, who had been given up to an American couple for adoption under coercive circumstances. Enforced adoptions have long been a part of Irish life that was silenced within official discourse, just as the women themselves were silenced under a blanket of shame and denial within a form of patriarchal nationalism. Cultural representations such as film and trauma biography will of course tend towards certain structures of storytelling that reveal in dramatic form the deep emotional wounds inflicted on the survivors, yet are often challenged by an official discourse as shallow and untrustworthy. This controversy draws attention to other conflicts and paradoxes that can operate when there are attempts to give a voice to the silenced or marginalized, yet such efforts have begun a process of forcing a re-evaluation of Ireland's narratives of nationhood through the twentieth century

  • 49.
    Fjällström, Eva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Kokkola, Lydia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Resisting focalisation, gaining empathy: Swedish Teenagers Read Irish Fiction2015In: Children's Literature in Education, ISSN 0045-6713, E-ISSN 1573-1693, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 394-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resisting the will to empathise with a focalised character is assumed to be difficult for young readers, yet empirical evidence on how they actually respond is limited. This paper combines recent insights gleaned from cognitive literary studies with a small-scale empirical study of thirty-five Swedish adolescents reading an Irish short story in order to investigate how teenagers respond to a text which is strongly focalised through a single character. The students were asked to rewrite the events in the story from another character’s point of view. Their texts were coded and analysed, as were follow-up interviews with six students. The findings indicate that Swedish-speaking teenage readers rarely have difficulty resisting focalisation, but they often struggle with irony.

  • 50.
    Farkas, Zita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The Legitimacy of Literary Opinion2015In: Algal Research, ISSN 2211-9264, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
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