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  • 1.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Nguyen, Thanh Thuy
    Malmö Academy of Music.
    Arrival Cities: Hanoi2019In: Voices, Bodies, Practices / [ed] Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells., Leuven: Leuven University Press , 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter outlines the role of subjectivity and intersubjectivity in the creation of Arrival Cities: Hanoi, a piece of experimental music theatre with documentary film. The piece seeks a new format for politically informed theatre which is responsive to the challenges of a globalized society. A central concept for the dramaturgy was to make the individual memories of the performers a cornerstone for each situation. Hence, similarly to how the script in verbatim theatre is drawn from interviews with people’s experience of a real-life situation (Forsyth & Megson, 2009), the dramaturgy emerged, as it were, from the creation of situations that would evoke the lived experience of the performers. The stage is set up so that the three performers either play their instruments or tell stories in a position at the front of the stage, where three microphones on stands are placed. The storytelling was developed from memories of encounters with people in migration zones in Hanoi, but would even more draw on personal memories from the city.

    Arrival Cities: Hanoi aims to create a space where the boundary between fiction and documentary is dissolved.  While it has been essential to remain in what the performers perceive as the authentic experience in the storytelling, the audience cannot really know whether the stories told by the performers are authentic experiences or scripted dialogues. In  the piece, the documentary material forms part of a multi-layered narrative, without laying out the footage as a documentation. The storytelling places the performers on stage as individuals rather than as actors, an approach which is essential to the political aims with the production. This presence in the moment of performance accompanies the images of the street vendors and other people in the documentary.

    Empathy and the sharing of individual life stories became the central nodes in the making of Arrival Cities: Hanoi. It is a piece of music theatre without a script, but with a musical and dramaturgical structure. The role of the documentary is manifold. It is a means for a political engagement but also creates memories and images that can be shared and transformed in the performance. Intercultural music and theatre operate in a liminal space between traditions. Aesthetic choices are therefore difficult to negotiate. Without trust and empathy, these negotiations cannot reach beyond the surface. Intercultural collaboration always demands from each individual to give up a piece of the self. In ArrivalCities: Hanoi, composer, director, and performers were all engaged in such learning processes.

  • 2.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Gorton, David
    Royal Academy of Music, London.
    Austerity Measures I: performing the discursive voice2019In: Voices, Bodies, Practices / [ed] Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells., Leuven: Leuven University Press , 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter approaches the question of subjectivity in the musical practice of composer and performer through a discussion of the emergence of ‘voice’. Part 1 describes a theoretical model by which the subjectivities of performer and composer can be understood in terms of this emergence, arguing that a musician’s ‘voice’ is continually defined through interaction with cultural and psychological tools, such as scores, compositional systems, and musical instruments. These ‘voices’ are explored through the ways they combine within a collaboration to form a ‘discursive voice’. Part 2 presents an analysis of four video recordings made of Austerity Measures I for ten-string guitar by David Gorton, performed by Stefan Östersjö at the ORCiM Research Festival in 2014. This composition requires the solo guitar player to cut materials away across a series of repetitions, replacing them with silence. The analysis draws on quantitative measures of timing and performer movements, and qualitative measures of perceived phrasing structures and performance gestures. While each of these analytical methods alone provides some insight into the performance strategies in the recordings, in the shaping of phrases as materials are cut away, and the structural significance of bodily movement, a much richer understanding is sought through their combination. In doing so the analysis aims to shed light on the interrelations between the embodied knowledge of the performer and the musical structures in the score, and further, between the subjectivities of composer and performer unfolded through the composition and performance of Austerity Measures I. Ultimately this chapter aims to provide analytical evidence for the ‘discursive voice’ within the artistic practice of the authors.

  • 3.
    Högberg, Fredrik (Composer)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Baboon Concerto: for bassoon and orchestra2019Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Baboon Concerto is a orchstral work for bassoon soloist and full orchestra. It was commissioned by the Danish National Orchestra, Gothenburg Symhony Orchestra (GSO) and Swedish Radioo P2 as a part of Stora Solistpriset. It was first performed in Gotheburg by solosist Sebastian Stevensson and conductor Tung-CHieh Chuang.

  • 4.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Development of Prepared Student-Centred Musical Interpretational Response Seminars (PSCMIRS): A Participatory Action Research Project Within Higher Music Education in Sweden2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Kjekshus, Helge (Conductor)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Fading Time2019Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 6.
    Jullander, Sverker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Fantasia and Fantasy: Two Homonymic Genres of German Chorale-Based Organ Music2019In: A Festschrift for Prof. Kerala J. Snyder / [ed] Johan Norrback, Joel Speerstra and Ralph P. Locke, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2019, p. 1-21Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter deals with chorale-based organ works by German composers from the early 17th century to the late 19th century that have been given the title of fantasia or Fantasie, either by the composer or by later generations. The emphasis is twofold: the use of the term for baroque pieces, including the history of the label “chorale fantasia” for compositions of the north German baroque, and the emergence of the modern (“romantic”) chorale fantasy around the middle of the 19th century. The(im)possibility of a relationship between these two types of chorale-based works is also discussed.

  • 7.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Brooks, William
    University of York.
    Wells, Jeremy
    University of York.
    Footnotes2019In: Voices,. Bodies, Practices / [ed] Catherine Laws, William Brooks, David Gorton, Thanh Thủy Nguyễn, Stefan Östersjö, and Jeremy J. Wells., Leuven: Leuven University Press , 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the agencies of composer, performer and sound engineer respectively, and further of non-human agents such as score, instruments (widely defined), the concept of authenticity in the making of the premiere recording of William Brooks composition entitled Footnotes, composed  between 1983 and 1985, but never performed in its entirety before this recording by Stefan Östersjö. With the collaboration of Jez Wells, sound engineer, and William Brooks, a 45-minute LP was produced which aim to reconstruct the historical sound of certain musicians and recording technologies. The entire working process was documented on video and analysed using qualitative research methods. Early in their work it became evident to the three collaborators that the overall project required the construction of a set of different identities for six types of participant: guitar, guitarist; score, composer; hardware, engineer. This chapter—itself an intertangled multilogue of mutable voices—traces the construction of, distinction between, and eventual representation of, those identities in the final recordings, but most of all, through an analysis of the extended collaborative process.  

  • 8.
    Jullander, Sverker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Johann Sebastian Bach’s Clavierübung III: An exercise in musical form and symbolism2019In: Lutherske perspektiver på liturgisk musikk / [ed] Harald Rise, Oslo: Novus Forlag, 2019, p. 141-173Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses some of the different contexts of Clavierübung III, as well as its organization and content. Special attention is given to the title page of the original print and to the question of whether it is justified to describe the collection as an ‘organ mass’, as has often been done. The main purpose is not to present new findings or put forward new hypotheses, but to give an overview of the collection based on the present state of research.

  • 9.
    Myhr, David (Singer, Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Lucky Day tour of Japan 20192019Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [ja]

    90年代、日本でも一大ブームとなったスウェディッシュ・ポップシーンの中、デビューアルバム『No Sleep 'til Famous』からのシングル曲 "Monument of Me" でその存在を大きく知らしめたバンド The Merrymakers。続く2ndアルバム『Bubblegun』では Jellyfish の Andy Sturmer をプロデューサーに迎え "Saltwater Drinks" "Superstar" といったスマッシュヒットを連発。その後バンドは活動休止となるが、メンバーの David Myhr は PUFFY の "ハッピーバースデイ" "Boom Boom Beat" などの楽曲提供をはじめ、フジファブリックの4thアルバム『CHRONICLE』(ストックホルムにある David の所有スタジオ "monogram recordings" で録音)ではプロデューサーの一人として名を連ねるなど、日本の音楽シーンとのつながりも深い。また David 自身も2012年発表のアルバム『Soundshine』よりソロとしての活動をスタート。そして2018年、今や人気プロデューサーとして引っ張りだこの Brad Jones とタッグを組み、アメリカ・ナッシュビルで録音した2ndアルバム『Lucky Day』をリリース。今回そのアルバム発売に伴い、およそ7年ぶりとなる単独来日公演が実現。

  • 10.
    Östersjö, Stefan (Instrumentalist)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Karpen, Richard (Composer)
    University of Washington.
    Nam Mai/Strandlines2019Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The two pieces that form the content of this CD are cornerstones in the later work of the American composer Richard Karpen. They share a radical approach to musical composition, which has brought Karpen into in-depth collaborations with a number of musicians from very different traditions over the past fifteen years. With a wish to explore forms of musical creation emerging from the very fabric of the sounding material, rather than from the abstraction of the written score, this music is largely conceived through joint exploration, and through the concrete listening characteristic of electronic music composition.

    Strandlines, a large-scale piece for 6-string guitar and computer, was formational in this development. The piece was created in 2006 and 2007 through an extensive collaborative process, involving Richard Karpen and the guitarist Stefan Östersjö. There is no musical score for StrandlinesInstead, the composition is defined through its performed materials and a shared understanding for how these are developed in interaction with the live processing, programmed in Supercollider. Two previous works, Anterior View of an Interior with Reclining Trombonist(2002) for trombone and live electronics with Stuart Dempster and Aperture(2006) for viola and live electronics with Melia Watras explored these modes of creation. But in Strandlinesthe collaborative processes were furthered considerably and with more mindful intention. This is how Karpen describes the working  process:

    While this kind of experientially developed music has existed in many cultures, I am equally interested in developing the role of the composer/author. I’m drawn to the kinds of techniques that film director Mike Leigh uses for character and plot development in his films. Leigh works with his actors to create their characters through an organic and rigorous series of directed improvisation and reiteration until the actors fully embody their characters, their utterances, and the relationships between all of the interacting characters and situations within the environment of the work. Through this process the film becomes its own screenplay. In the case of my own explorations in this mode of composing, the music is itself the score.

    Strandlinesalso explores the extension of instrument and performer through live computer enhancement and processing. It is a work not so much for guitar as for guitarist, the merging of person and instrument. In the case of Strandlines, Stefan Östersjö’s integral role in the development of guitar material seems more about who he is as a performing artist than about the guitar.

    But what kind of work is Strandlines? The greater form is firmly fixed, but the individual details vary according to the different characteristics that define each section of the piece. This is a type of work that bears similarities to music in many extra-European traditions. Turning to Roland Barthes one may say that it is “a music that is not abstract or inward, but that is endowed, if one may put it like that, with a tangible intelligibility, with the intelligible as tangible”. However, while the identity of Strandlines may be similar to other complex, non-notated forms of music, such as an Indian raga, its stringent form and the overall sound of the work is coherent with the earlier compositions in Karpen’s output, thereby combining a performative identity with the structural complexity of contemporary western traditions.

    The working methods developed by Karpen and Östersjö in the making of Strandlineshave proved to be particularly fruitful in intercultural collaboration, and the second piece on the CD - Nam Maí, for three soloists, nineteen string instruments and film, composed for the The Six Tones and string players of the Seattle Symphony - is the outcome of extensive work in this domain.

    Nam Maíis the third and most ambitious work with the Six Tones employing these methods of collaboration with a larger group of performers. The first of these, based on the work on Strandlinesof Karpen and Östersjö led to the making of a piece of music theatre titled Idioms(2010-11). Here, The Six Tones, a trio consisting of Östersjö and two Vietnamese master performers - Ngô Trà My and Nguyễn Thanh Thủy - were joined by actors from Sweden, Vietnam and the USA.  The collaboration also involved the Swedish playwright and director Jörgen Dahlqvist who developed devising methods inspired by the making of Strandlines. Idioms was eventually followed by the making of Seven Stories, a feature-length dance film inspired by traditional Vietnamese Tuồng theatre subjects, which added choreographer Marie Fahlin to the artistic group.

    In the process of creating Seven Stories, a piece of traditional Vietnamese music became the central material in one scene, but at the same time, also gave rise to ideas for a new composition, for three soloists and orchestra. This traditional piece is often called Nam Máiand is commonly found in Tuồngtheatre, a Vietnamese form of theatre which shares common traits with Beijing opera. It is in the Aimode, which affords a grave and serious expression. Since Tuồngis dramatic theatre, normally also bent towards tragedy, this mode is rather common here. Nam Mái made its way into the collaboration between The Six Tones and Richard Karpen, in the morning of the second working day on the film Seven Stories. We had set out on a project which was to follow dogma-like rules: each scene should relate to a story from a specific play from Tuồng Theatre. Its choreography should be developed from gesture in this scene and the music should be created on the same day as the film was shot. The film was also to be a documentary of its own creation. The play for the second day was Đào Tam Xuân, the story of a female general whose husband was executed due to the ill doings of the queen, and subsequently, her son was killed when attempting to prevent the execution. We started the session by presenting music from Tuồng theatre to the artists involved. As the first piece, Nguyễn Thanh Thủy played Nam Mái, and we decided on the spot to use it for this scene. This is how Richard Karpen describes his encounter with the piece:

     

    I was immediately drawn in to Nam Mái. It was not a matter of simply “liking” the melody or being attracted to the musical qualities. In the case of Nam Mái, hearing it created an instant response in my thoughts and in my body. I heard it as if I had heard it before and it opened up a range of abstract memories and feelings. There is certain music that acts like a “carrier signal”, in fact I now think that this is exactly what Music mostly is in general. As our brains “process” musical “signals”, deep memory connections are triggered, as if we were searching for meaning, perhaps scanning memory in order to assemble an "image" in order to decode the carrier. It seems that emotional memory is where the brain finds the most effective set of pathways for decoding music and so our response is emotional. One could make the point that all sensory stimulation acts as a carrier that triggers memory. But we’re talking about music and my experience and analyses over many years is that music is an especially complex carrier signal that the brain processes by searching deep and wide across ”universal” and individual experience, not of music but of everything.

    A couple of weeks before the premiere, all artists got together in Seattle to create the solo parts and finalize the role of video and choreography. Some months before, Karpen had finished the score to the piece, which is through composed in the orchestral part, but leaving the staffs for the soloists blank, and also with a number of fermatas indicating the placement of cadenzas for one or more of the three soloists. The orchestral score is entirely drawn from the musical structures in Nam Mái and is organized in a manner which gives a certain set of freedom and constraints for the soloists.

    One could think of the orchestration in Nam Máia bit like a set design, providing a series of distinct scenes for the three solo instruments, or, as Richard Karpen put it in conversation with the conductor Stilian Kirov before the recording session with the Seattle Symphony: “think of the orchestral part as the music in a film and that the solo parts are the film”. Indeed, the score also obtained this function of a set in the working sessions in Seattle. With Karpen’s analogy then, we met to start making the film together, a bit like the filmmaker Mike Leigh would draw his actors together to start creating the script and the film through a collaborative process.

    In a recent book chapter on the function of trust in musical performance, Anthony Gritten reminds us of how “interaction without trust has no pragmatic means to get itself beyond microscopic, atomistic, local interactions and begin developing its own self-sustaining ecology”. The ecology created in the world of the work titled Nam Maí involves the agreements between Karpen and each musician on the specific shape of musical materials, of how they develop and relate to larger structures. Further, the musical form is drawn directly from the interaction between the three performers.

    This kind of trust is inherent to any of the compositional projects carried out by Karpen and various performers, especially over the past fifteen years. Certainly, a composition like Strandlineswould not have happened without the ecology of musical collaboration. But Nam Maíseems to make this dependence on trust even more underlined, perhaps because it involves more people and a collaboration across cultures. Trust is written into the score, not just through the absence of written instructions in the solo parts but also in the ways in which the orchestral score constitutes a fabric, clearly intended for the voice of three specific performers to join in, to align with, to resist, to develop its musical content. Ngo Trà My describes her experience of the collaboration with Karpen as a negotiation of individual license and a search for a space in which a common ground can be created:

    The way that Richard set the piece up, I can float freely in the material from Nam Mái, operating the playing techniques and the sonority of the đàn bầu. I know that I cannot fully understand the intentions that Richard had with the piece but I can still draw out my own story from my subjective experience of the music, so that my sound is brought together with the sonority of the entire piece, as if we were telling the same story. 

    Richard Karpen’s compositional output since the early 2000s points beyond old paradigms in Experimental western music, discovering new modes of musical creativity drawn from approaches to complexity more ancient than the invention of musical notation. The two compositions on this CD are the result of extensive collaborative exploration, where the voice of each participating artist is essential to the identity of the final work. 

  • 11.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Researching music streaming by using liquid sources2019In: Musikforskning idag 2019, Göteborgs universitet, 12–14 juni 2019: Program och abstrakt, Göteborg, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music streaming has colonised the market of recorded music. Recordings of music are

    transformed from traditional physical artefacts into numerous digital formats, which

    consequently implies different affordances of how the sound of the music may be mediated.

    Such digital formats keep evolving which means that how a particular recording sound is a

    rather undefinable matter over time. Also, cloud storage is replacing traditional archives of

    recorded music. This entails that sources can be swapped with new versions or taken out of

    the collections leaving little or no traces behind that it was there before. This digital milieu

    does, by these features, offer new challenges for research. This paper will present experiences

    and insights from the method used in my dissertation Liquid Streaming – the Spotify Way To

    Music where the affordances of musicking brought about by streamed music with the case

    example of Spotify was explored. For this purpose, digital sources like the Spotify program and

    sources found on the Internet were used as empirical grounds. The presentation will focus on

    issues concerning those two major roots by problematizing and conclude how it is possible to

    use agile software, like the Spotify streaming service program, as well as the Internet as

    sources of research. One major conclusion from this work is that liquid sources need to be

    saved as copies and followed longitudinally. My research also showed that sources changed

    content over time, updated, disappeared, change its resolution e.g. quality. In retrospect, it is

    clear how digital sources such as programs and sources on the Internet need to be

    problematized as sources for research in order to bring about trustworthiness to the research.

  • 12.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Researching Transformative Technology and its Affordance for Students within Higher Music Education2019In: Musikforskning idag: Göteborgs universitet 12-14 juni 2019, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the autumn 2018 a research project concerning Transformative Technology (TT) for the

    increase of wellbeing and the reduction of mental dissonance has been launched at the School

    of Music in Piteå. Seed money has enabled a pilot project where students within higher music

    education can use different types of TT. This poster will show the different types of TT used in

    the pilot project and some preliminary result from the user experiences. The technology in

    use are (i) the Heart Rate Variability (HRV) sensors and Heart Math application, (ii) the Muse

    headband and meditation app, (iii) the Soma Mat and Breathing Light developed at SICS and

    KTH, as well as the (iv) ARK-crystal developed at the Torus Tech lab. The purpose of the pilot

    study is to investigate how students respond to different kinds of sensors and actuators used

    in this TT and most importantly how the students find the technology transformable in regard

    to amplifying their well-being, empowering and refining their aesthetic resonance and

    diminishing stress and anxiety blocking them in their musical performance and development.

  • 13.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Gullberg, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Researching Transformative Technology and its affordance for students within Higher Music Education2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the autumn 2018 a research project concerning Transformative Technology (TT) for the increase of wellbeing and the reduction of mental dissonance has been launched at the School of Music in Piteå. Seed money has enabled a pilot project where students within higher music education can use different types of TT. This poster will show the different types of TT used in the pilot project and some preliminary result from the user experiences. The technology in use are (i) the Heart Rate Variability (HRV) sensors and Heart Math application, (ii) the Muse headband and meditation app, (iii) the Soma Mat and Breathing Light developed at SICS and KTH, as well as the (iv) ARK-crystal developed at the Torus Tech lab. The purpose of the pilot study is to investigate how students respond to different kinds of sensors and actuators used in this TT and most importantly how the students find the technology transformable in regard to amplifying their well-being, empowering and refining their aesthetic resonance and diminishing stress and anxiety blocking them in their musical performance and development.

  • 14.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    The Sorcerer’s Apprentice’s Apprentices in Piano Master Class: A Study of (at Least) Three Sides of Teaching and Learning of Musical Interpretation2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music has always been a performing art. However, it was first during the 19th century that the standard procedure within Western art music was formalised to the interpreter performing an interpretation—an artwork in its own, based on and related to the notated musical work. As such the interpretation can be analysed and valued, and the interpreter is thereby an artist.

    Musical interpretation is starting to become a rather well-researched phenomenon from the performing artist’s perspective, but hitherto little attention has been given to how musical interpretation is described, developed, and communicated within higher music education.

    Research shows that interpretation and the expressive aspects of music tend to be stepmotherly treated at the lower levels of education, e.g., in municipal music schools. Even in one-to-one teaching within higher education in Western art music, less attention is usually given to interpretation compared to technique, and the students’ practical playing is often emphasised. The discrepancy, found by teachers during lessons, between students’ practical playing and capacity for independent interpretation has been analysed as indicating that the students had not internalised the necessary skills.

    The aim of this compilation thesis—consisting of four articles and the ‘kappa’—is to describe teaching and learning of musical interpretation from both a teacher and student perspective within higher music education in Western art music. Contexts studied were delimited to one-to-one, master class, and prepared student-centred musical interpretational response seminar (henceforth abbreviated to PSCMIRS) teaching in Sweden. The following research questions were formulated to fulfil the aim:

    1. How do teachers and students describe and define musical interpretation? (Part study 1: qualitative semi-structured interviews [6 students and 4 teachers]; autoethnography. Part study 2: see below.)

    2. How do teachers and students see and describe their interaction while developing the student’s musical interpretation during lessons? (Part study 2: video documentation and stimulated recall [2 students, 1 master class teacher, and the students’ regular teacher (1)]; follow-up interviews [2 students and their regular teacher (1)]; field notes; scores annotated by the master class teacher. Part study 3 [planned participatory action research on PSCMIRS teaching].)

    3. What do these descriptions, definitions, and the interaction between teachers and students imply with regards to pedagogical, aesthetical, and philosophical values of higher music education?

    The theoretical framework consists of selections from the hermeneutical philosophy of Gadamer and Ricoeur including the concepts of pre-understanding, the interpreter’s horizon, and the fusion of horizons. Currently, poetry is used both as one of the methods for analysis and forms of (re)presentation. In addition, Jungian archetypes might be used as an analytical lens to further the understanding of the relationship(s) between student, teacher, musical work, and composer.

    Results—as presented in article 1 (in press) and 2 (in review)—indicate that both the student’s and the teacher’s definition of musical interpretation are of importance. They defined it as the process that results in a musical interpretation (mainly viewed as a practical performance) that should be positioned in the continuum between a non-interpretation and an over-interpretation. Conditions for learning of musical interpretation within the one-to-one context seemed to centre on the student’s achievement of a high level of autonomy. Three aspects appeared to affect this condition: (1) the student’s and the teacher’s view of what musical interpretation (as an activity) is, (2) experienced respectively acknowledged freedom of interpretation, and (3) (expectations on) the student’s explorative approach. Overall, honest and real dialogues where both the student and the teacher are open and feel secure enough to put something at risk seem to be a prerequisite for learning to take place.

    The expected outcome for the finished thesis is a multi-dimensional description and deepened understanding of the teaching, learning, and communication of musical interpretation within higher music education in Western art music, which hopefully will be beneficial in the future development of one-to-one, master class, and different forms of group teaching.

    At the conference, preliminary results including the interaction between teacher and student while developing the student’s musical interpretation during master class lessons (part study 2) and the research design of the planned participatory action research on PSCMIRS teaching (part study 3) will be presented.

  • 15.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    The Sorcerer’s Apprentice’s Apprentices in Piano Master Class: Teaching and Learning of Musical Interpretation Viewed Through a Philopseudian Lens2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Myhr, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    ”Top Ten of the Fab Four” and ”Abbey Road Live in Concert": West Coast Fab Fest, Vaasa2019Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 17.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Dahlqvist, Jörgen
    Teaterhögskolan i Malmö.
    Lindwall, Christer
    Topography of the (One): Reflections on Musical Time in Composition and Performance2019In: Aberrant Nuptials: Deleuze and Artistic Research / [ed] Paulo de Assis and Paolo Giudici, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2019, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses a composition for eleven-stringed alto guitar by the Swedish composer Christer Lindwall. Titled Topography of the (One), this piece may be understood as a meta-composition that reflects on the pre-conditions—both material and philosophical—for its stages of becoming. It thereby holds a special place in the compositional output of Lindwall, whose work has, since the late 1980s, been associated with the practices of New Complexity—composers such as Brian Ferneyhough and Richard Barrett. The conceptual nature of this composition, and its direct quotations from a series of contemporary French philosophers launched an interpretative process that led to a staging that would—as Steven Schick wrote in his discussion of the process of learning Ferneyhough’s Bone Alphabet—“shape and make inevitable an interpretive context which steers the piece in performance” (Schick 1994, 133). The first performance was to take place in a production titled “Words and Music” during the Transistor Festival in Malmö, Sweden, curated by the Swedish playwright and director Jörgen Dahlqvist. A dialogue was launched between Östersjö and Dahlqvist that resulted in a staging that focused entirely on the creation of a sonic framework for the performance. The dramaturgical means were the addition of electronic sound, first by the creation of an introductory tape part, and, second, by doubling up the recited fragments with sampled voice of the same performer, also creating a sonic questioning of the unity of the “one.”[1]The compositional strategies, launched by the composer’s philosophical reflections, in turn become the source for a series of observations regarding musical time, which we address by returning to Deleuze’s writing in Difference and Repetition(1994). 

  • 18.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    A Philosophic Poetic Inquiry of Three Aspects of Interpretation within Music Education Research: An Autoethnodrama in Four Acts2018In: European Journal of Philosophy in Arts Education, ISSN 2002-4665, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 7-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores three aspects of interpretation—musical interpretation of notated Western art music, hermeneutics (theoretical framework), and poetry (tool for analysis and representation)—based on ongoing music education research focusing on the learning of musical interpretation within the one-to-one context of higher music education. The broad philosophic poetic inquiry of interpretation has the form of an autoethnodrama containing both haiku and found poetry. Poetry is both used as a process of inquiry and as a means of representation. The autoethnodrama explores the author’s struggle with finding his cogito for conducting arts-based research and touches upon his personal history. Through the combination of autoethnodrama and a philosophic poetic inquiry, he finds a deeper understanding of musical interpretation, usage of poetry and autoethnodrama in research, as well as of his personhood. Concluding reflections on one possible way of interpreting the autoethnodrama in relation to teaching and learning of musical interpretation within higher music education are also presented.

  • 19.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Affordances of Music Streaming based on Exploratory Media Archaeology: A presentation of the completed PhD-project Liquid Streaming focusing the affordance of musicking for the public via the Spotify streaming service with an emphasis on method2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In my dissertation, I have accounted for the affordances of musicking brought about by streamed music with the case example of Spotify. In order to perform a study orbiting the realm of music streaming, mainly digital sources have been used; Internet sources and software program of the streaming service. In the presentation, I will focus on issues concerning those two major roots. Within the latter I will present, problematize and conclude how; the Internet can be used as a field of sources, and on what terms the Internet can be regarded as an Archive. Also, what alternatives researchers can depend on when practising research within the realm of the Internet. The sources have, over time, been shown to change content, update, disappear, change resolution or package, which means that digital sources such as source material as well as methodology operating in such a field need to be problematized. First of all, I will account for how a phenomenon such as the Spotify streaming service is a multidimensional feature where appearance and featured functions depend on a number of things such as geographical market zone, subscription zone, the digital device used for access, and previous user-generated history. Researching a platform based software program like this brings particular issues for the researcher. I will present how these issues have been recognised and managed in my research. Secondly, I will address Internet as a base for research. The Internet provides a plethora of available sources, and as such Internet brings the affordance of accessing a tremendous amount of data opening up for possibilities that were not available prior to digitalisation. For instance, interviews and talks by interesting people might be available on-line whereas the same persons may be difficult or impossible to reach in ordinary life. Contemporary culture on the Internet, characterised by free culture and shared content further supply massive amount of data to be researched. Further, many services on the Internet provide access to local archives where content can be searched for, and a great number of sources can be screened regarding particular content. The popular phrase: “Once on the Internet, always on the Internet” has been found to be a truth with modification. I will present four different examples of issues concerning using the Internet as an archive and how such issues can be tackled within research concerning questions of reliability and trustworthiness. The first (i) example is how content many times are personalised, why an "objective" or public view can be impossible to gain. Further, it can be impossible to gain access to how personalisation is conducted. The second (ii) example is how sources, such as music, can be limited to certain geographical restrictions and thus only accessed from certain IP-addresses for the researcher. The third (iii) example is how sources may be removed and deleted. This is the case with some personal information as individuals have a right to be forgotten. Another example is how documents from the government offices are removed when there is a new government in office. The fourth (iv) example addresses the issue where a source might remain on the Internet but presented in a different digital format than the original content.

  • 20.
    Westberg, Erik (Conductor)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Amor Vita Mors2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Fonogrammet Amor Vita Mors släpptes 18 oktober 2018 och innehåller över två timmar vokalmusik. Amor Vita Mors släppte endast digitalt men till fonogrammet producerades även en bok med texter, verkkommentarer och konceptkonst.

  • 21.
    Westberg, Erik (Conductor)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Arctic Male Voices: Life – premiärkonsert2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Konsert i Umeå stads kyrka den 18 november 2018 med den nybildade manskören Arctic Male Voices. Kören bildades på initiativ av Erik Westberg efter möjligheten att samarbeta i en workshop med The King´s Singers.

  • 22.
    Holmgren, Carl
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Arts-Based Research in the Area of Nordic Music Education – a Multi Modal Turn?: A Philosophical–Poetical Inquiry of Interpretation as Research Object, Theoretical Framework, and Tool for Analysis and Representation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Frödin, Kerstin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Champs d’étoiles: Studying gestural interaction in contemporary musical performance2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    As a performer, on recorders and historical oboes, I use my own artistic activity as research laboratory. My project, situated in a contemporary Western art music context, deals with questions related to the score and its impact on how musicians work with gestures and communication. A live music performance is a multimodal experience where several layers of communication are at work simultaneously, and where structural and emotional meaning is conveyed through embodied practice.

     

    Main Contribution 

    Qualitative analysis of gesture is an emerging practice, which has proven to efficiently provide insight into artistic process (Spissky, 2017, Östersjö, 2016). My research method builds on analysis of video documentation from which gestures and communication between musicians are categorized and coded. My method also includes stimulated recall sessions, music analysis and comparisons between rehearsals and concerts.

     

    The video documentation that will be presented here was collected from the rehearsal process and performances of Champs d’étoiles, a suite for baroque instruments by the Swedish composer Kent Olofsson, composed 2008 – 2016 for the ensemble ‘Lipparella’. The composition is multilayered, inspired by period music for the instruments but, is at the same time, clearly situated in a contemporary art music tradition.

    With a duration of more than 70 minutes, Champs d’étoiles has become a cornerstone in the repertoire of the ensemble, which has performed it on numerous occasions over the years.

     

    This long process has afforded the ensemble valuable insights, both on the micro level, such as bodies, movements and communication, and the macro level, such as events, productions and projects (Fleishman 2012). As a member of the ensemble studied, I approach the material from an insider perspective: that of my own embodied experience of the interaction within the group.

     

    Conclusion

    This unusually long and close collaboration between composer and ensemble has enabled us to further develop both these micro and the macro perspectives. Further, the insider research perspective, in combination with detailed analysis of the use of gestures and non-verbal communication in the ensemble, offers deeper insights than can be obtained merely through a rehearsal process. The new knowledge acquired through the research takes the work of the ensemble to a higher level that can be described as a verbalized collective awareness of the embodied perspective. The research thus provides refined tools that can feed back into the artistic process and the musical interpretation. 

  • 24.
    Jullander, Sverker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Commotio-inspildninger – en oversigt2018In: Organistbladet, ISSN 0107-2927, no 1, p. 6-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A presentation of recordings of Carl Nielsen's organ work "Commotio", with a list of recordings 1954–2016 and discussions on certain aspects of interpretation, mainly tempo issues.

  • 25.
    Westberg, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    En Himmelsk konsert2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 26.
    Ferm Almqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Ekberg, Niclas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Evolving musical Bildung in streaming media – Spotify as a case: Reflections upon a pilot study2018In: Vart är musiken på väg?: Perspektiv från forskning, bransch och politiker, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evolving musical Bildung in streaming media – Spotify as a case: Reflections upon a pilot study

    Cecilia Ferm Almqvist, Niclas Ekberg & Susanna Leijonhufvud (Luleå tekniska universitet)

    The presentation will share experiences of and reflections upon a pilot study based on stimulatedrecall interviews aiming to explore the meaning and function of streaming media as a facilitatorof musical Bildung. It can be stated that new technology has the possibility to provideinformation and education for everyone. Today, most people can access the same informationfor "free", which is interesting from a democratic perspective. Access to music in relation to thenew, transformed music industry has been studied from technological and economical 11perspectives. Even listening habits and listening frequencies, have been investigated throughanalyses of Big Data. Hence, we stated a need to reflect upon and discuss the meaning andfunction of streamed music in people's lives, taking as a starting point the affordances andconstraints of the music streaming services. Using Spotify as a case, based on phenomenologicalperspectives of Bildung, a cross disciplinary project was created. In the presentation we want toanswer share preliminary results from a pilot stimulated interview study. A netnographic orientedapproach where chosen, given its focus on distinguishing meanings and human practice in variedcontexts, and combined with shadowing and individual interviews, supported by stimulatedrecall. The participants gathered their user activities that took place during a limited period oftime, and also in what ways these were shared and expressed in varied social media. Thestimulated recall interviews were documented through the use of a web based videoconferenceapplication, transcribed and subjected to qualitative content analysis. The paper presentation aimsto share and discuss the use of methods as well as preliminary results, which hopefully cancontribute with insights when it comes to how streamed music functions, and can be usedconsciously, within the field of music education.

  • 27.
    Lundqvist, Mathias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    För kännedom2018Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Westberg, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Förklädd gud2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 29.
    Westberg, Erik (Conductor)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Förklädd gud: Sverige möter Israel2018Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Turné genom Israel 27 juni – 7 juli i samarbete med trombonisten tillika dirigenten Christan Lindberg och Israel Netanya Kibbutz Orchestra.

  • 30.
    Ihanus, Harri (Musician, Composer)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Johannesson, Tomas (Sound designer)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Media, audio technology and theater.
    Jazzkonsert med Jerry Bergonzi, Harri Ihanus, Renato Chicco, Andrea Michelutti: Universitet presenterar i Piteå2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 31.
    Myhr, David (Composer, Musician, Musical director, Singer, Instrumentalist)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    "Jealous Sun" (single)2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The song, which is the lead track of the upcoming album is called “Jealous Sun” and is a song I wrote together with the fantastic songwriter and artist, Bleu! I had had the melody lying around for years. Actually already since before my recording session in Abbey Road. Then producer Brad Jones to my surprise suggested deleting the verse, and instead let the pre-chorus should be my verse! Brad sure knows what he’s doing. Turned out great!

  • 32.
    Bäckman, Mikael (Musical director, Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Lundqvist, Mathias (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    John Henry @ New Orleansfestival: New Orleansfestival i Mannaminne2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 33.
    Westberg, Erik (Conductor)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Klanger från Norden och Baltikum2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 34.
    Kjekshus, Helge (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Klassisk i Börsen: Danser og Romanser2018Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Weissglas, Erik (Musical director)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Konsert i Cagliari, Italien: Erik Weissglas Jazzensemble2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 36.
    Sundkvist, Petter (Conductor)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Konsert Kalvfestivalen med Norrbotten NEO och Pierluigi Billone: Pierluigi Billone - Dike Wall (2012)2018Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ur programboken: Dike Wall, för slagverk och ensemble. I det antika Grekland var Dike (Δίκη) den moraliska rättvisans gudinna. Pierluigi Billones musik beskrivs ofta som

    arkaisk. Som minnande om en urkraft, en ockult stämma ur tidens djup. Och det går

    att följa dess klang genom studier av kultiska ritualer, genom schamanen, den tibetanske

    munken – genom antikens tragedier, men också i vår närhet; genom frijazzen, den

    Genom studiet av ritualen som form och tynande eller försvunna musikaliska praktiker är

    det möjligt att betrakta och förstå utvecklingen av den västerländska konceptionen av ljud på ett alternativt vis. Än idag går det i vissa (animistiska) utmarker att ta del av kulturer där konsten inte är en specifik profession, utan en integrerad del av tillvaron och som sådan en formande del, en del som hjälper till att förklara men också förnya verkligheten. Sensibiliteten, hanteringen av klang och överhuvudtaget hur kropp, ljud, rörelse, rum – helt enkelt människans tillvaro – gestaltar ett sammansatt förhållningssätt, som skulle kunna varit vårt, men som nu är stängt för oss inom ramen för vår traditions tänkande.

    Att försöka förstå och tränga in i avlägsna och relativt orörda kulturer, är ändå ett möjligt

    sätt att återupprätta en dialog med det förflutna, men också att bli varse djupare sediment i konsten – och därmed människans väsen. Det är att närma sig en möjlig plats, där dörren till Pierluigi Billones poetik står på glänt.

  • 37.
    Frödin, Kerstin (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Larson, Chrichan (Musician)
    Büchel, Alexandra (Musician)
    Nilsson, Ivo (Musician)
    Le Nouvel Amour: Das Orchester & Alexandra Büchel2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 38.
    Leijonhufvud, Susanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Liquid Streaming: The Spotify Way To Music2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis accounts for the liquid affordances of musicking via streamed music from the perspective of the end-user. The study is particularly analysing the case of Spotify, which has gained an extraordinary prominent position within the Swedish market. The point of departure is that music streaming has emerged in a time where there seems to be an increased space and need for a musical presence in everyday human life. This circumstance is then related to the phenomenon that music has an exceptional position for human beings.Music may affect the human body, empower physical activity as well as regulate moods and feelings. Whatever the musical experience might be, it is affected by previous musical socialisation including formal as well as informal music learning situations. These experiences per se found the base of future musical awareness and advancement. Moreover, as musical involvement, to such a large extent currently are given via streaming, it is most crucial to understand what kind of affordances streaming brings to a lifelong learning and its more or less organized arenas, of music. To investigate music streaming from the user’s point of view, Norman’s concept of affordance has been applied to numerous public sources that in different ways houses the Spotify way to music. Here, the concept of affordance reveals the idea of the user as the user is inscribed in the design. The Spotify software program, materials from Spotify employees, newspaper articles, statistics and reports concerning music streaming have been analysed according to actor-network theory (ANT) situated in, what Bauman regards contemporary society as, an interregnum of liquid time. The thesis initially accounts for the constitution of music streaming as a feature, revealing an intrinsic network of a company with its core of employees, its agile management and playful culture, but also necessary networked actors such as Internet Service Providers, manufactures of digital devices, software algorithms and music formats to mention a few. Economic Maecenas and legislators also constitute the streaming service intertwined with the main players of users and music. This multifaceted picture shows that to comprehend a music streaming actor, its whole network needs to be accounted for as its constitutes the actor. Also, as condition changes, actor changes, why also music streaming, as a feature, changes. Consequently, any music educator at various levels within the society, e.g. public radio, artists, teachers, peers, the user herself, or even the Spotify company need to consider the liquid situation as it has become fundamental for musical experiences and learning through this kind of media. The affordances of musicking are further analysed on the level of the service’s interface, e.g. the visual display of the music service by addressing a multimodal analysis of the social semiotics used to network users to music. This cross-section also shows to be liquid as the service both continuously updates as well as being customised which means that one view is not alike the other. This protean state and the liquid affordances it brings with it needs to be related and responded to by music educators. Finally, the thesis covers the affordance of musicking on behalf of the one who streams. Based on the fact that music is available in a plethora, the central feature of streaming services is to aid and guide users to music. In this realm, intelligent algorithms have started to be employed as cicerone. Algorithmic cicerone based on usergenerated data blend humans and machines into a hybrid lifeform when musicking. User-generated data is currently being refined via an increased human embodiment by the Internet of Things starting to close up on the one who streams. Technological embodiment of the human is starting to increase to also embrace a sensuous embodiment of the musicking human. A detected human heartbeat can consequently co-constitute musical recommendation for the streamer, a recommendation that in turn can affect the heartbeat. This evolution calls for a turn toward a renewed coalition between music and human. Music streaming has the affordances to constitute an advent of something newborn - a musical cyborg.

  • 39.
    Myhr, David (Instrumentalist, Musical director, Musician, Singer)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Live in Swedish Radio P4 Gothenburg2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Live performance (and interview) of "Jealous Sun" (solo acoustic) in Swedish Radio P4 Gothenburg. 

  • 40.
    Myhr, David (Instrumentalist, Musical director, Musician, Composer, Singer)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Live in Swedish Radio P4 Norrbotten2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Live performance in Swedish Radio P4 Norrbotten:

    "Jealous Sun"

    "Room To Grow"

    "The Perfect Place"

  • 41.
    Myhr, David (Musical director, Composer, Singer, Musician, Instrumentalist)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Lucky Day2018Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lucky Day is the new album from Swedish songwriter David Myhr. Recorded with Brad Jones in Nashville, the 10 song set features co-writes with Lojinx labelmates Bleu, Bill DeMain & Young Hines, among others. Available on heavyweight 180g LP, gatefold CD and digital download with bonus tracks on the CD only.

    Jones, who has helmed notable recordings by Josh Rouse, Hayes Carll and Jill Sobule, said: “My goal was to show David branching out from youthful power-pop to a more reflective, and more lasting sound.” Comparing Lucky Day to Myhr’s prior album Soundshine, Jones continues: “The idea was to create a warmer circle of sound around David, letting him sing in an easy and natural voice, to invite the listener into his world as it is now.” Ultimately, the album offers what Jones calls “a naturalistic kind of rehearsal-room energy.“

  • 42.
    Myhr, David (Singer, Instrumentalist, Musical director, Musician, Composer)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Lucky Day Promotional tour of Spain2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lucky Day Promotional tour (solo acoustic) in Spain:

    June 2, Live at Carabás, Burgos

    June 2, Live at El Límite, Villalba

    June 3, Live at Fotomatón Bar, Madrid

  • 43.
    Myhr, David (Composer, Instrumentalist, Musician, Singer, Musical director)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Lucky Day (song)2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Please allow me to present the title track of my new album: "Lucky Day"! Co-written with the album's co-producer Brad Jones who also sings harmony and plays the beautiful bass line. You will also be able to enjoy a lovely drum take (panned right!) from the album’s other co-producer Andreas Quincy Dahlbäck, as well as a soaring pedal steel from Theo Stocks, an acoustic guitar by guitar phantom Pat Buchanan and an Billy Preston-esque organ by Rickard Nilsson.  

  • 44.
    Jullander, Sverker (Musician, Arranger)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Lunch concert: Göteborg International Organ Academy2018Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Sundkvist, Petter (Conductor)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Marinens Musikkår - Julkonsert2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 46.
    Jullander, Sverker
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Martin Luthers egna toner och ord om musik2018In: Svensk tidskrift för musikforskning, E-ISSN 2002-021X, Vol. 100Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Recension av Mattias Lundbergs bok Martin Luthers egna toner och ord om musik. Skellefteå: Artos & Norma bokförlag. 144 s., ill., notex. ISBN 978-91-7777-032

  • 47.
    Lakso, Tommy (Musician, Composer, Arranger)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Suopanki Lakso, Yvonne (Lyricist)
    Luleå University of Technology, Professional Support, Universitetsbiblioteket.
    Munfado på 5 Folk Festival 2018: Meänkieli i ett musikaliskt möte med Fado.2018Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Sundkvist, Petter (Conductor)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    New Sweden - Silent Plan2018Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2009, Norrbotten NEO has annually produced concerts entitled New Sweden, which feature premieres of new works by Swedish composers that the ensemble has commissioned. A selection of those works have been recorded and this is the third installment in the New Sweden set of CDs. The first CD – Diptychon – was released in 2013 and the second - Empreintes digitales – was released in 2015.

    Originally, New Sweden was a settlement along the Delaware River in North America, from 1638-55. Acknowledging the mindset of the first settlers, the New Sweden CDs strive to honor pioneers who break new musical grounds.

    One of the first settlers in the New Sweden colony was the Lutheran priest Johannes Campanius. On his tombstone in Fröshult, Uppland you can read the oldest inscription in the Native American Lenape language: Umar Sachiman Chinsika hacking haro ankarop machis chuki (Here lies a great sachem who died in old age).

    This CD may be considered as a Campanius influenced intercultural inscription that travels through time and space, as well as a snapshot of today’s vibrant Swedish contemporary music scene.

    Petter Sundkvist

    Artistic Director, Norrbotten NEO, 2007-2012

  • 49.
    Sundkvist, Petter (Conductor)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Nordlyd III: Norrbotten NEO at KLANG – Copenhagen Avantgarde Music Festival, 5th of June 2018 at Koncertkirken Copenhagen.2018Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Norrbotten NEO and Conductor Petter Sundkvist performs the third part of the NORDLYD project - The sound of the Nordic languages, with focus on our mother tongue.  The project consists of three newly ordered pieces with the language as a focus. The three composers who have written music, which will include their own voices are Ylva Lund Bergner, Bergrún Snæbjörgdóttir and Bente Leiknes Thorsen from Sweden, Iceland and Norway. In addition, there is also a piece from Denmark, Bent Sørensen's trio Schattenlinie from 2010, and Per Mårtensson's Nemea's Secret, inspired by the story of the lion outside the city of Nemea in Greek mythology. The sixth piece of the programme is a world premiere of the Finnish Lauri Supponen's Gaz aux étages.

  • 50.
    Kjekshus, Helge (Musician)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Og i morgen skinner solen igjen: Konsert under Valdres Sommersymfoni 2018, Norge2018Artistic output (Refereed)
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