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  • 1.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Törlind, Peter
    4I4I : Four I:s for Innovation: a book with easy to use methods and ideas to foster innovative product development2010Bok (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    A book with easy to use methods and ideas to foster innovative product development.

  • 2.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Johansson, Christian
    Assessment of team based innovation in a Product Service System development process2011Ingår i: Research into Design: Supporting Sustainable Product Development / [ed] Amaresh Chakrabarti, Bangalore, India: Research Publishing Services, 2011, s. 711-718Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is often measured based on how the product performs on the market. This makes it difficult to measure the performance of a team since the time to develop a product may take several years. In this paper we show the importance of creating a common ground and facilitation in a team, two aspects that is not easy measure, but should be assessed. We also discuss innovation on three interrelated organizational levels, the operational, which is the development team and in focus in this paper, the managerial and the strategic level. We found that companies need indicators to measure and/or assess performance on all three levels and thatmore research is needed to find the inter-links between the levels to prescribe measures and assessment points.

  • 3. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Löfstrand, Magnus
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Produkt- och produktionsutveckling.
    Design for versatility: the changing face of workspaces for collaborative design2005Ingår i: 15th International Conference on Engineering Design - ICED 05: 15 - 28 August 2005 / [ed] Andrew Samuel; William Lewis, Barton: Institution of Engineers, Australia , 2005Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In a fiercely competitive business climate, which is increasingly characterized by global alliances, partnerships and outsourcing agreements, companies struggle to decrease the negative impact of geographic distance on development efforts. The role of workspaces for collaborative design is gaining considerable attention, and there is currently an increasing interest in moving from individual tools or technologies to a more inclusive view of collaborative workspaces. This paper reports on the underlying motivation and justification for a new collaborative design studio at Luleå University of Technology, Sweden. The studio provides a rapid-response environment, in which the significance of issues raised through ethnographic observations of engineering work can be evaluated and solutions offered.

  • 4.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Larsson, Andreas
    Törlind, Peter
    Design thinking challenges in education2009Ingår i: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Margareta Norell Bergendahl, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2009, s. 89-100Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development processes are commonly represented in sequential models covering the necessary stages from planning to product rollout, while processes to take needs into the development activities show other aspects, namely that understanding needs requires, for a product developer, additional skills. In our curricula for engineering design education we apply some aspects of design thinking to bring together (a) business savvy, in terms of understanding people’s needs as market opportunities, and (b) product development process, in terms of team-based creativity and collaborative skills, with (c) the basic engineering knowledge. This is a demanding aim, much because the approaches, methods and mindsets differ widely from what the students are used to. Hence, in this paper we elaborate on our efforts to educate engineers in design thinking to provide insights into some challenges for engineering design.  Three key challenges are identified, (1) integrative approaches are not straightforwardly implemented, (2) training of ‘soft’ capabilities to provide a change in thinking, and (3) social competence to make use of design thinking.

  • 5.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Matzen, Detlef
    Technical University of Denmark, Engineering Design and Product Development.
    Tan, Adrian
    Technical University of Denmark, Engineering Design and Product Development.
    Educating engineering designers for a multidisciplinary future2007Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary companies on a global market are experiencing constantly changing business demands and increased competition. Increasing focus in product development is now put on issues like understanding users and their needs, the context where users’ activities take place and creating sustainable solutions (McAloone, et.al., 2007). In manufacturing companies, engineering designers play a significant role in realising what is captured in these words.Future engineering designers will hold wider responsibilities for such tasks (McAloone, et.al., 2007; Larsson, et.al., 2005), thus challenging current engineering design education. Educating engineering designers today significantly differs from traditional engineering education (McAloone, et.al., 2007). However, a broader view of design activities gains little attention. The project course Product/Service-Systems, which is coupled to the lecture based course Product life and Environmental issues at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and the master programme in Product Development at the Luleå University of Technology (LTU), Sweden, are both curriculums with a broader view than traditional (mechanical) engineering design. Based on these two representatives of a Scandinavian approach, the purpose in this presentation is to describe two ways of educating engineering designers to enable them to develop these broader competencies of socio-technical aspects of engineering design. Product Development at LTU A process, called Participatory Product Innovation (P2I) underpins the master programme Product Development and originates from the Design for Wellbeing (DfW) framework (Larsson, et.al., 2005). This is an inclusive framework which seeks to bring together business, human issues and technology in a comprehensive approach to support the creation of tomorrow’s innovations. A main principle is that many different disciplines should contribute to spur innovation by collaboration across disciplines (Larsson, et.al., 2007). The P2I process starting position is in Needfinding (Patnaik and Becker, 1999), were the students conduct observations and interviews to gain access to ualities in the users’ context. An identified challenge here is to keep people in view and not jump into conclusions, i.e., to understand a situation perceived by its actors as problematic and to widen the design space. Product/Service-Systems at DTU Besides the teaching of traditional engineering skills, the curriculum for the project course aims to build up multidisciplinary competences such as understanding the socio technical aspects of product design and synthesis of products and delivery systems. The students are assigned to redesign an existing physical product, such as a washing machine, and turn it into a product/service-system. The main objective for the project is that the resulting solution should have a substantially lower environmental impact whilst maintaining a similar functional performance as the initial product. The student teams are first guided through an analysis of the initial product’s product life cycle, yielding insights into four aspects of product design:1. indentification of current environmental impacts, 2. life phase systems the product encounters, 3. activities that involve the human actor (i.e. customer) and the product, 4. actor-network that support and supply these activities throughout the product’s life. Based on the analysis, goals are set for the improved solution and concepts are developed for a new product/service-system. This way the students are lead through engineering and socio-technical analysis tasks and thereby laying the foundation for their synthesis work in the concept development phase of the project. Concluding Remark By emphasising socio technical aspects in a process model or in a project course, the students are more likely to consider users, their context and sustainable solutions. This we see as essential competencies in product/service-system design and functional product development. References Larsson, A., Larsson, T., Leifer, L., Van der Loos, M., Feland, J. (2005), Design for Wellbeing: Innovations for People, In proceedings of 15th International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED 05, August 15-18, Melbourne, Australia.McAloone, T.C., Andreasen, M.M., Boelskifte, P. (2007), A Scandinavian Model of Innovative Product Development, In Proccedings of the 17th CIRP Design Conference, Springer-Verlag, Berlin. Patnaik, D., Becker, R. (1999), Needfinding: The Why and How of Uncovering People’s Needs, Design Management Journal, 10 (2), 37-43.

  • 6. Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Enabling technologies for distributed collaboration in functional product development2007Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 7. Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Examining creative collaboration in distributed and co-located design teams2007Ingår i: Design for society: knowledge, innovation and sustainability ; ICED '07 - Paris, 16th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 28 - 30 August 2007, Paris, France ; conference proceedings, Paris: Design Research Society, 2007Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development, including all its phases, is today performed to a greater extent in globally dispersed teams. This paper compares two creative design sessions early in the product development process, one co-located session and one distributed session. The workflow in the co-located session was fluid and natural, whereas in the distributed session, it was sometimes disturbed by limitations ofthe mediating technology. The major deficiencies of the technology are the limited support for shared drawing surfaces, for shared control of these surfaces and for creation of concepts. In the co-located session embodied representation were used to describe, communicate and build upon concepts. Due to the limitations of the technology, these types of communication were seldom used in the distributedsession.

  • 8.
    Parida, Vinit
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Johansson, Christian
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Exploring challenges for innovation-driven virtual enterprises2009Ingår i: Research into Design: Supporting multiple facets of product development / [ed] Amaresh Chakrabarti, Singapore: Research Publishing Services, 2009, s. 568-575Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have suggested virtual enterprises (VEs) as a promising new form of organization. VEs are created to gain several benefits, for example, risk-and-revenue sharing, entering new markets, etc. However, in this study we focus on increasing the innovation in the VE consortiums. Based on past experience and knowledge from related fields, we argue that VE consortiums in the Swedish industry are rare. Thus, this study highlights and explores the challenges, particularly four areas: networking capability, information and communication technology (ICT) usage, knowledge engineering, and team based innovation. These areas contribute to the facilitation of VE creation and its effective operation. Each of these areas is discussed and propositions are formed which will guide the future research. Finally, we have discussed the concept of innovation driven virtual enterprise that combines open innovation ideology with the virtual enterprise concept.

  • 9.
    Nergård, Henrik
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Sandberg, Stefan
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Produkt- och produktionsutveckling.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Functional product development: discussing knowledge enabling technologies2006Ingår i: Proceedings of Design 2006: 9th International Design Conference, May 15-18, 2006, Dubrovnik, Croatia, Zagreb: University of Zagreb , 2006, s. 587-593Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of functional products affects the business as a whole. The hardware will be offered to customers as one part incorporated in a total offer. The offer as a whole compromise services related to and/or designed into that hardware. The product development level will be affected, this emerging development process is called Functional Product Development (FPD). Computer tools to support decisions in engineering design are commonly used by design teams. Today, these tools are considered to be internal and support engineering specific knowledge. However, FPD insists on collaboration between companies to achieve additional knowledge. The purpose in this paper is to discuss new demands on computer tools to support decisions in FPD.

  • 10.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Bergström, Mattias
    Future ideation: creating ideas despite distance2010Ingår i: International Reports on Socio-Informatics (IRSI), ISSN 1861-4280, E-ISSN 1861-4280, Vol. 7, nr 1, s. 264-271Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Team-based innovation, which builds on the true collaboration and thinking together strategy are at the heart for most manufacturing companies today. This strategy builds on a multifunctional team to increase the innovation potential. Diversity builds up the multifunctionality within the team and is a prerequisite for coming up with new innovations. Efficient idea generation demands facilitation, one example is brainstorming, which is easily performed. However, brainstorming is often misused, as it is not applied properly. A successful brainstorm seems chaotic, team members use Post-It notes and/or a whiteboard to write and sketch down ideas. In engineering design, computer tools support many of the development team's tasks, but an interactive computer support for idea generation is not commonly used. Also, existing tools do not support the "physical" activities found in classical brainstorming, they are commonly based on the logics of documentation than actual facilitation of a creative process. The study in this paper is based on observations of design teams and the purpose is to set up and present a specification for an idea generation tool that is both facilitated and mimics the best aspects of physical brainstorming.

  • 11.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Getting physical: interacting with physical objects in distributed collaboration2005Ingår i: 15th International Conference on Engineering Design - ICED 05: 15 - 28 August 2005 / [ed] Andrew Samuel; William Lewis, Barton: Institution of Engineers, Australia , 2005Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 12.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Getting physical: tangibles in a distributed virtual environment2006Licentiatavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of products is an increasingly complex task, where companies do not have and do not want the in-house competence to manage the development of entire products. Consequently, companies outsource parts of product development projects to other companies or join in partnerships. There is also an industrial shift of focus towards offering a total offer, i.e. selling functions instead of products. The function provider will have the responsibility of the physical artefact throughout the lifecycle and also have the capacity to continually improve the customer value through innovations. Hence, the provider will be able to reengineer, reuse and recycle the physical artefact. This puts new demands on the product development process, in which the total offer is not being offered by a single company because there is simply too much risk in such a commitment. To supply a total offer companies must collaborate closer than before, by exchanging among other things, intellectual properties in new temporary organizations (i.e. extended enterprise), permitting each partner to thus focus on their core competence. The total offer commitment promotes intense collaboration. Partners in the extended enterprise will most likely be geographically dispersed; therefore, tools and methods for distributed collaborative work are becoming increasingly important. Physical artefacts still play a predominant role in the product development process, even though virtual prototyping is used in everyday operations. The tangibility of physical artefacts makes them easy to use in design discourse (e.g. in design reviews, prototype evaluation). When performing design in distributed teams, a need to share physical objects will inevitably occur. This thesis presents the development of a new solution for distributed collaborative work that focuses on physical objects instead of person to person video conferencing. The author studied a design team at a leading industrial company in Sweden that used mock-ups as an integral part of their design process. Insights of their interaction with physical artefacts provided the requirements for a new type of collaborative tool for distributed work. The presented system allows remote collaborators a first- person view of physical artefacts or environments, e.g. mock-ups. This licentiate thesis also presents how the design process changed with the introduction of the new tool, i.e. remote engineers can share their "virtual" CAD data simultaneously with the technician situated at the prototype, who shares his "physical" data with the engineers. The new tools also provided unexpected support for co-located meetings, enabling users to look behind panels and view items that were normally hidden from their sight.

  • 13.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Sonalkar, Neeraj
    Stanford University.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Blanco, Eric
    Grenoble Institute of Technology.
    Hicks, Ben
    University of Bath.
    McAlpine, Hamish
    University of Bath.
    Lessons learned and future challenges for design observatory research2009Ingår i: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Margareta Norell Bergendahl, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2009Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Video observation has been used for ethnographic studies for decades and is becoming more popular in engineering design research. This paper presents some of the lessons learned of using design observation in research. The paper focuses on the design and usage of physical environments designed specifically for design team observation – Design Observatories (DO). The paper argues that in the past DO focused on observation, whereas DO of the future will provide real time analysis and the possibility to intervene to improve the design activity. Five different types of studies are identified and categorized. Three different design observatories and the rationale for their design are described, as well as twelve design studies ranging from short experiments to long ethnographic studies in industry. Finally, the implications for design observatory research are presented – DO must support an iterative research approach, since design experiments are emergent and are not defined up front. There is a need for a more longitudinal capture of data and the emergence of robust coding schemes that enable machine coding needs to be supported.

  • 14.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Larsson, Madelene
    Nergård, Henrik
    Larsson, Tobias
    Renström, Boo
    Voxit.
    Needs as a basis for design rationale2008Ingår i: Design 2008: 10th International Design Conference, May 19-22, 2008, Dubrovnik, Croatia / [ed] Dorian Marjanovic; Mario Storga; Neven Pavkovic; Nenad Bojcetic, Zagreb: University of Zagreb , 2008, s. 281-288Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is based on data from a Swedish real-life industrial product development project for e-health care of elderly. The purpose in the paper is to discuss identification of user needs. Information about the elderly is transferred in recurrent meetings. Besides the perception that these meetings occupy time which could be spent giving care, the nurses find it problematic to convey such information to substitutes, as well as they have to rely on their memory. In this case, a Dictaphone device was a solution. Reports on practical activities of identifying user needs and how they affect decisions in product development are limited; one contribution of this paper is insights into such a case

  • 15.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Johansson, Christian
    Larsson, Tobias
    On the way to knowledge awareness in early design2007Ingår i: The future of product development: proceeding of the 17th CIRP design conference / [ed] Frank-Lothar Krause, Berlin: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2007, s. 607-616Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This work is part of a study where a descriptive and a prescriptive approach have been used. This paper deals with the descriptive part and discusses views on decision support in product development to identify factors of relevance to con-sider when designing computer-based decision support for total offers. Providing services in form of physical artefacts offered as ‘functions per unit’ is at the heart of total offers. The intention is to provide customers with functions in time and place ‘as-needed’, based on a life-cycle commitment. This new scenario is found in manufacturing industry in addition to a traditional view on selling hardware and providing aftermarket activities. Total offers gain access to possibilities to ‘design in’ value added characteristics into the physical artefact, e.g., maintenance, moni-toring, training and abilities to upgrade and/or remanufacture. Computer tools is commonly used to supply design teams with information which is relevant, correct and in time to support resolutions, yet to support a GO/NO GO decision for total offers contemporary tools seems to be insufficient. Relevant factors to take into consideration are to support learning and provide the decision makers with insights in a number of plausible ‘what-if’ scenarios to im-prove the solution space.

  • 16.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Probing for innovation: how small design teams collaborate2009Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Ongoing globalization is placing greater demands on industry. One strategy to stay competitive is to move from supplying only hardware to supplying total offers, e.g. thrust on wings or power by the hour. The total offer is a combination of a product and service, a product service system. This approach to the product development process focuses on the function of the offered system, i.e. functional product development. The function provider retains the ownership and responsibility of the function carrier, i.e. the hardware. This makes for greater risk, but also greater revenue. To deal with this new reality companies are collaborating to supply these types of total offer. Another aspect of retaining ownership of the function carrier is that through continuous innovations, companies can improve the product over the life cycle of the offer. In an industrial context, and often in a global setting, designing is primarily performed through collaboration in teams, e.g. a group of people possessing distinct competences respectively contributing to the task. Hence, with the deployment of a functional product development strategy, the team is given the challenge to collaborate as a global team, i.e. the individuals of the team are spread over a number of companies, sites and countries. Yet another challenge is to increase the innovation in the team. Consequently, with these diverse teams the ability to express thoughts, ideas and different point of views is important for team-based design. The team must not only solve a design task, but also understand and define the task. This kind of design is by default ill-defined and thus referred to as a ‘wicked problem’. However, it is in these wicked design tasks that new and breakthrough products are most likely to be found. But to reach the goal of innovation, the team must allow and embrace ambiguity, as well as act in a supportive environment. The purpose in this thesis is to illustrate activities in design teams when confronted with wicked design tasks. The focus is on how the team explores and communicates problems. The thesis also addresses how physical spaces affect the creative process. Insight into these issues will deepen the understanding of the design processes and enable development of new tools, models and methods, and thus improve the performance of team-based innovation. The cases are studied primarily through observations of small engineering design teams engaged in distributed and co-located collaborative work in early development. The research indicates that designers experience difficulties in communicating notions, such as ideas or thoughts, by solely relying on the usual approach of using sketches, writings and mere utterances. In team-based innovation, designers tend to use their own body, forming embodied representations, to fill in the blanks. Designers embody the future product, e.g. by envisioning themselves as the proposed product, or putting themselves in the users’ position to interact with a future product or both. Hence, the embodied representation becomes a form of prototyping. The designer occasionally incorporates an everyday object to add another dimension to this kind of prototyping activity. Normally, in the manufacturing industry, prototypes are refined and in a state of pre-production. Thus, they limit ambiguity and do not lend themselves to prompt designers to add new ideas. To support the team’s communication of ideas, the prototyping process has to allow the designers to explore the problem, change and propose new ideas, and aid their communicative and collaborative efforts. From the studies, a model derived for an iterative prototyping process in the early design phases is proposed. The model has its starting point in probing, which allows both the problem and the solution to be explored. Probing can incorporate a question, an idea, a concept, or an embodied representation. The design team acknowledges and interprets the probe, creating a shared or contrasted understanding. Still, it is in the differentiated and contrasted understanding that team members find the inspiration to ideate and create additional probing activities that provide for innovations. By looping this process numerous times, the understanding becomes shared and the product concept becomes more refined. However, the main value of the prototyping process is not the prototype per se, but rather the value in the process as such, since it allows the team to reflect in practice and experience through prototyping. The activities of a design team may be supported or hampered by the environment where the activities occur. A room and furniture, specifically designed to prompt a collaborative and creative mode, are suggested and demonstrated in this thesis. Insight from observing design activities in these creative environments provides a basis for further research.

  • 17. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Extern, LTU Business AB.
    Nergård, Henrik
    Larsson, Madelene
    Sverige.
    Project: NeedInn - Behovsdriven produktutveckling inom e-hälsa2006Övrigt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Huvudsyftet med NeedInn är att det påbörjar processen med att skapa en plattform för ett regionalt innovationssystem inom hälso- och sjukvården där näringslivet, forskningen samt samhället tillsammans och fokuserat skapar kritisk massa och förutsättningar för ekonomisk tillväxt.

  • 18. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för system- och rymdteknik, Datavetenskap.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Extern, LTU Business AB.
    Johansson, Christian
    Johansson, Pär
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Wenngren, Johan
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för system- och rymdteknik, Datavetenskap.
    Ylinenpää, Håkan
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Arbetsvetenskap.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Project: PIEp - Product Innovation Engineering Programme2011Övrigt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    PROJEKTSAMMANFATTNINGPIEp, Product Innovation Engineering Program är ett nationellt program som syftar till att stärka förmågan till innovativ produkt- och affärsutveckling. PIEp spänner över fältet från teori till praktik, från forskning om innovationssystem till proaktivt arbete för att stärka innovationskraft och därigenom uppnå en systemförändring inom forskning, utbildning och utveckling. PIEp skall pågå under tio år, 2007-2016 och engagera flera av Sveriges lärosäten och forskningsinstitut involverade i innovation och produktutveckling. PIEp leds och administreras vid KTH i partnerskap med Lunds Tekniska Högskola, Högskolan i Jönköping, Designhögskolan vid Umeå Universitet, Centrum för Teknik, Medicin och Hälsa, Luleå Tekniska Universitet, samt en rad företag och organisationer.

  • 19. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för system- och rymdteknik, Datavetenskap.
    Nergård, Henrik
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Extern, LTU Business AB.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Project: ProViking - Development of Functional Products in a Distributed Virtual Environment2007Övrigt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    This research programme proposes to investigate the development of Functional Products, the development of integration between hardware, software and service. The research will be carried out in close collaboration with industry and in four work packages, all focused on the development of Functional Products but targeting different aspects of it.

  • 20. Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Nergård, Henrik
    Larsson, Andreas
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Prompting innovation: dedicated places2008Ingår i: Proceedings: 2nd Conference on Nordic Innovation Research, December 3-4 2007; Luleå University of Technology / [ed] Håkan Ylinenpää, Luleå tekniska universitet, 2008, s. 161-173Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In our view, close collaboration in joint work meetings has gained limited attention from universities. Our vision for promoting innovative forms of academia-industry collaboration is to bridging meeting content, goal and physical domains to facilitate the meetings and everyday interactions of creative and innovative teams. This paper provides an outline of how an emerging approach for team innovation encourages a reorganization of research and development work, as well as provides a new rational for the design and use of collaborative work spaces. The opportunity to dedicate a room, i.e., a boiler room, for creative collaborative meetings occurred when our offices was going to be refurbished. The space, i.e., the physical constraints of the room, was given. Structurally, it is a typical squared room, nothing remarkable about that. However, by observing and talking about our own collaboration and meetings a set of needs was identified. For the boiler room these needs was captured in the words static and flexible. On the foundation of these words the boiler room has been furnish. A furniture FocIn-FocOut was designed to guide people into different modes. The rationale for the boiler room has been made visible and thereby, also the notion of place as a cultural phenomena.

  • 21.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Prototyping – a way to think together2009Ingår i: Research into Design: Supporting multiple facets of product development / [ed] Amaresh Chakrabarti, Singapore: Research Publishing Services, 2009, s. 450-457Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The descriptive study presented in this paper is based on the empirical data generated by observing a global student design team. Their prototyping process are described and discussed to feed input to the facilitation of team based innovation. The emerging of a shared design vision as early as possible is vital for the subsequent design activities, in particular for innovation projects. Every day items, body language and simple rough prototypes are used by the student team to communicate their ideas, to generate feedback on the ideas and to put forward new ideas. The study indicates that the process of doing rough prototypes enables designers to make their implicit understandings visible in such cases when the development starts from scratch, e.g., innovations. Thus, prototyping, i.e., the use of rough prototypes and body language etc, assist designers to collaborate and share experiences in early phases when no agreed upon design vision exists.

  • 22.
    Holmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Wenngren, Johan
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Cox, Charles
    Pennsylvania State University.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Setting up a research experiment: how does personal motivation affects problem setting?2011Ingår i: Research into Design: Supporting Sustainable Product Development / [ed] Amaresh Chakrabarti, Bangalore, India: Research Publishing Services, 2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative user oriented design activities are difficult experiences that need to be practiced. Doing so in a professional setting, but without prior experience, can and probably will jeopardize the whole project. So, it is important for design education to offer students the possibility to collaborate in student projects and to assign them to solve open-ended problems. However, it is of interest to find out how differing motivations for individuals affect their team’s ability to successfully meet user needs. This has been investigated in an experiment where students were categorised into two distinct models of design motivation. It was found that one of these models was more apt to manage user orientation in the design team. In this paper, the design of the experiment per se is outlined in order to invite more research within the area.

  • 23.
    Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Johanson, Mathias
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Produkt- och produktionsutveckling.
    Sharing the unshareable: distributed product review using tangibles2005Ingår i: Proceedings: 2nd International Forum on Applied Wearable Computing, IFAWC : March 17 - 18, 2005 in Zurich, Switzerland / [ed] Otthein Herzog; Michael Lawo, Berlin: VDE-Verlag , 2005, s. 161-175Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the ongoing globalization of businesses and the collaboration occurring between geographically dispersed organizations, distributed collaborative work using computer based support tools becomes increasingly important. When trying to perform design work while relying heavily on the use of physical artefacts such as early mock-ups, a need to share the unshareable, i.e. physical objects, will inevitably occur in a distributed setting. In an attempt to realize this, the authors studied a design team during their design reviews where a physical mock-up was used. A wearable conferencing unit (the Boblebee computer) was then developed to give remote collaborators a first person view of the mock-up using a head mounted video camera. With the Boblebee computer, remote collaboration with large tangible objects can successfully be realized. This paper relates experiences from the design of the system, and reports on early observations of its use.

  • 24. Bergström, Mattias
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Innovation och Design.
    Towards virtual co-location in functional product development2008Ingår i: Collaboration and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case studies / [ed] Paul Cunningham; Miriam Cunningham, IOS Press, 2008, s. 806-814Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The shift in industry towards Functional Product Innovation implies more collaborative efforts between the partners forming joint ventures, i.e. cross-company collaboration. Hence, new demands are put on collaborative technology. Insights into needs for both industry and collaborative design teams provide the possibilities for ‘virtual co-location' to be enhanced. Following a workshop format, the radical innovation workshop, industrial criterions for collaborative technology has been analyzed based on empirical data from five Swedish manufacturing companies. During the workshop three scenarios were put forward by the industry as most relevant; (1) the design review, (2) to on-site remotely collaborate with an expert and (3) the day-to-day communication. Based on these scenarios, three industrial criterions emerged, namely efficient collaboration, effortless setup of communication and the capability to create trust without touch. Technologies to support Functional Product Innovation seem to insist on meeting these criterions.

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