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  • 1.
    Shao, Jiajia
    et al.
    CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Beijing Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Energy and Sensor, Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.College of Nanoscience and Technology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Willatzen, Morten
    CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Beijing Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Energy and Sensor, Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.College of Nanoscience and Technology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Wang, Zhong Lin
    CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Beijing Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Energy and Sensor, Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.College of Nanoscience and Technology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China.School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    3D mathematical model of contact-separation and single-electrode mode triboelectric nanogenerators2019In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, E-ISSN 2211-3282, Vol. 60, p. 630-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a set of finite-sized charged planes (FSCP), a simple time-dependent three-dimensional spatial model for the electric potential and electric field in an inhomogeneous medium composed of dielectric materials and metal contacts is proposed and used to assert triboelectric nanogenerator operation. Solving the problem of FSCP makes the three-dimensional spatial model relevant for practical TENG applications and allow for accurate and reliable results. Connecting the metal contacts to an electric resistance, Kirchhoff's law is used to derive a first-order time-dependent differential equation for the mobile charges on the metal contacts and the displacement current. Specially, the displacement current (Maxwell's displacement current) in a TENG equals to the conduction current in the external circuit is obtained. We then consider two important types of triboelectric nanogenerators: the contact-separation (CS) mode and the single-electrode (SEC) mode. A forced movement of the dielectric materials and/or the metal contacts leads to currents flowing in the system and a time-varying electrical potential, and therefore the generation of electrical power. Then, new and more accurate capacitance equations for CS and SEC modes of TENGs are extracted. Several examples of energy harvesting scenarios are finally analyzed.

  • 2.
    Chen, Jun
    et al.
    College of Science, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, P. R. China .
    Li, Fanzhu
    Key Lab Beijing City Preparat & Proc Novel Polyme, State Key Lab Organ Inorgan Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, P. R. China.
    Luo, Yanlong
    College of Science, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, P. R. China .
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Ma, Xiaofeng
    College of Science, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, P. R. China .
    Zhang, Meng
    Institute of Chemical Industry of Forestry Products, CAF, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    Boukhvalov, D. W.
    College of Science, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    Luo, Zhenyang
    College of Science, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    A self-healing elastomer based on an intrinsic non-covalent cross-linking mechanism2019In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 7, no 25, p. 15207-15214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthesis and comprehensive examination of a polyurethane (urea) elastomer that self-heals based on intrinsic dynamic non-covalent bonds (van der Waals and hydrogen) are reported. The dynamic non-covalent bonds include hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces. The difference in the previous approach in which hydrogen bond self-healing materials introduced dense quadruple hydrogen bonds at the ends or branched chains poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) diol was used as the soft segment of the polyurethane (urea) material, and strong van der Waals forces were provided by the large number of carbonyl groups in its main chain; hydrogen bonds were formed by urethane bonds, urea bonds, and the carbonyl groups on PPC. The mechanical properties and healing efficiency of the self-healing polyurethane (urea) elastomer were studied. In situtemperature-dependent infrared and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LNMR) measurements were combined with molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the self-healing mechanisms. The results of the studies on the self-healing polyurethane demonstrate that the dynamic cross-linking between hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces is the basic driving force for the self-healing ability of the material, and temperature is the key factor that affects hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. The effect of crystallization on the self-healing ability of the material was also studied. The molecular dynamics simulation results also demonstrate interplay between van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds at different temperatures.

  • 3.
    Björling, Marcus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    DLC and Glycerol: Superlubricity in Rolling/Sliding Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication2019In: Tribology letters, ISSN 1023-8883, E-ISSN 1573-2711, Vol. 67, no 1, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low friction is one of the most important parameters for the development of machine components and machines with high efficiency. Many of the common machine components of today such as gears, rolling element bearings and cam-followers are defined by their non-conformal contacts leading to high-contact pressures, typically 1–4 GPa. The lubrication of such contacts is usually called elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL). Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings and glycerol have individually been shown to produce low friction in boundary, mixed and full film lubrication. A few studies have been conducted using both glycerol and DLC-coated surfaces to achieve even lower friction in pure sliding boundary-lubricated contacts. However, the literature is lacking studies of how the combination of glycerol and DLC performs in non-conformal rolling/sliding contacts where many common machine components operate. Such a study is presented in this article where a ball-on-disc test rig is used to investigate the performance of the combination of DLC and glycerol at pressures up to 1.95 GPa at various entrainment speeds and slide-to-roll ratios. The investigation shows that the DLC-glycerol combination provides very low friction values, in some cases, below the superlubricity threshold of 0.01, possibly shown for the first time at such high pressure in a non-conformal rolling/sliding contact. The low friction mechanism in full film lubrication is a combination of the low pressure-viscosity and high temperature-viscosity sensitivity of glycerol in combination with thermal insulation of the DLC coating and is presented as thermally assisted liquid superlubricity.

  • 4.
    Zhang, Yumeng
    et al.
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Zhu, Wei
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Li, Jiahui
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Zhu, Yudan
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Wang, Anran
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Li, Wei
    European Bioenergy Research Institute (EBRI), Aston Institute of Materials Research (AIMR), Aston University, Birmingham, England, UK.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Effects of ionic hydration and hydrogen bonding on flow resistance of ionic aqueous solutions confined in molybdenum disulfide nanoslits: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations2019In: Fluid Phase Equilibria, ISSN 0378-3812, E-ISSN 1879-0224, Vol. 489, p. 23-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a novel two-dimensional material that has attracted considerable attention because of its excellent properties. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of different kinds of alkali metal ions (Li+, Na+, and K+) on the flow resistance of ionic aqueous solutions confined in MoS2 nanoslits under shearing. Three slit widths (i.e. 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0 nm) were investigated. Simulation results showed that the friction coefficient followed the order of K+ < Na+ < Li+. The friction coefficient decreased with the increasing of slit width. Unique confined spatial distributions of different types of ionic aqueous solutions led to different confined ionic hydrations for different cations. These differences lead to different orientations of surrounding water molecules and then form different hydrogen bond (HB) networks. The friction coefficient was greatly dependent on the number of HBs per water; i.e., the larger the number of HBs formed, the lower was the flow resistance.

  • 5.
    Zhu, Wei
    et al.
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Zhang, Cheng
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Zhu, Yu-dan
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    An, Rong
    Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, Nanjing University of Science & Technology, Nanjing, China.
    Lu, Xiao-hua
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Shi, Yi-jun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Jiang, Sheng-yu
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Molecular insights on the microstructures of nanoconfined glycerol and its aqueous solutions: The effects of interfacial properties, temperature, and glycerol concentration2019In: Journal of Molecular Liquids, ISSN 0167-7322, E-ISSN 1873-3166, Vol. 291, article id 111238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we conducted molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effects of rutile–liquid and graphene–liquid interfacial properties, glycerol concentrations (i.e., 10%, 40%, 70%, and 100% molar contents), and temperature (i.e., 180, 273, and 320 K) on the microstructures of nanoconfined glycerol and its aqueous solutions. Results indicated that the effect of interfacial properties on the spatial and orientation distributions of nanoconfined glycerol and water molecules was more prominent than that of temperature. In glycerol aqueous solutions, water and glycerol molecules localized into two distinct layers on the hydrophilic rutile surface but partially mixed with each other near the hydrophobic graphene surface, because water molecules near the hydrophobic surface exhibited more random orientations and formed more hydrogen bonds with glycerol molecules than those near the hydrophilic surface. Moreover, interface introduction and increased temperature drastically reduced the hydrogen bonding ability of water molecules in glycerol aqueous solutions. The addition of glycerol molecules can break hydrogen bonds between water molecules and inhibit water crystallization in glycerol aqueous solutions. Temperature and glycerol concentration exerted limited effects on the hydrogen bonding ability of water molecules on hydrophilic surfaces in glycerol aqueous solutions. Meanwhile, the presence of a hydrophilic surface can effectively decelerate hydrogen bond breakage induced by increasing temperature or by decreasing glycerol contents

  • 6.
    Yu, Qiangliang
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China.
    Zhang, Chaoyang
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China.
    Dong, Rui
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Wang, Yurong
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Bai, Yanyan
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Jiaying
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Qilu University of Technology (Shandong Academy of Sciences), Jinan, China.
    Cai, Meirong
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China.
    Zhou, Feng
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China.
    Novel N, P-containing oil-soluble ionic liquids with excellent tribological and anti-corrosion performance2019In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 132, p. 118-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two oil-soluble ionic liquids N, N-trimethyl-N-hexadecyl ammonium bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (NP-16))and 1,2-bis-NN-dimethyl-N-cetylammonium bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (NP-16-2-16) have been synthesized and investigated as a potential friction reduction and anti-wear lubricant additive with anti-corrosion properties. The results indicate that the addition of 1.0 wt % NP-16 into PAO10 can significantly reduce friction coefficient and improve its anti-wear performance under RT and 100 °C. The performance is obviously better than that of traditional additives ZDDP and tricresyl phosphate. PAO10 + 1.0 wt % NP-16 even outperformed the PAO10 with about 40% lower friction and 2 orders of magnitude less wear. The analysis results of SEM, EDS and XPS show that an FePO4 or nitrogen-containing tribofilm is formed on the friction interface when NP-16 and NP-16-2-16 are selected as additives, which play a key role in reducing friction and wear.

  • 7.
    Wu, Jian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, China.
    Mu, Liwen
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Feng, Xin
    Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, China.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, China.
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Poly(alkylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide)-Based Polymerized Ionic Liquids: A Potential  High-Performance Lubricating Grease2019In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 6, no 5, article id 1801796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymers prepared from ionic liquids are widely called polymerized ionic liquids (PILs). Compared to monocationic and dicationic ILs, PILs have higher molecular weights, charge, and greater intermolecular interactions, which make PILs have a higher possibility to generate better lubricity. PILs of poly‐alkylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (PImC6NTf2) is studied herein. Dicationic ILs of 1,1′‐(pentane‐1,5‐diyl)‐bis(3‐butylimidazolium) bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BIm5‐(NTf2)2) is used as additive to decrease the crystallization temperature of PImC6NTf2. Lubricity of PImC6NTf2 and PImC6NTf2+BIm5‐(NTf2)2, as well as BIm5‐(NTf2)2 for comparison is evaluated under severe conditions, i.e., 3.0 to 3.5 GPa and 200 °C. The rheological study suggests that PImC6NTf2 can be classified into grease. Tribological test results show that PImC6NTf2 has much better antiwear property than BIm5‐(NTf2)2, especially at 3.5 GPa. Adding 4% BIm5‐(NTf2)2 to PImC6NTf2 is able to reduce friction under high pressure. At 200 °C, PImC6NTf2 exhibits excellent lubricity. The mixture of 96%PImC6NTf2+4%BIm5‐(NTf2)2 shows even better antiwear property than neat PImC6NTf2 and exhibits the highest friction reducing property among the ILs at 200 °C. It is speculated that the robust strength of PILs and strong adhesion between PILs and solids are key factors in achieving the excellent antiwear property.

  • 8.
    Lan, Xiaoyu
    et al.
    College of Science, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    Ma, Xiaofeng
    College of Science, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    Wang, Lei
    College of Science, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Gu, Qun
    Department of Chemistry, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Edinboro, United States.
    Wu, Linlin
    College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    Gu, Xiaoli
    College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, P. R. China.
    Luo, Zhenyang
    College of Science, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing , P. R. China.
    Self-Assembly of Diblock Copolymers Containing Thermo- and Photoresponsive Lower Critical Solution Temperature Phase Behavior Polymer with Tunable Assembly Temperature in an Ionic Liquid Mixture2019In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 11229-11236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work prepared a type of diblock copolymer with thermo- and photosensitivity in ionic liquids (ILs). P(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (compatible with ILs) was prepared as one segment, while butyl acrylate (BA) and 4-phenylazophenylmethacrylate (AzoMA) were copolymerized as another segment P(AzoMA-r-BA) with stimuli responsiveness. The diblock copolymer showed tunable lower critical micellization temperature (LCMT) in two mixed imidazole ionic liquids. The value of LCMT depends on not only the conformation status of the azo group in copolymers but also the azo group content in copolymers and mixed ratio of ionic liquids. Based on this tunable LCMT, photoinduced micellization/demicellization can be achieved near room temperature by alternate irradiation with visible and ultraviolet light, and it is totally reversible.

  • 9.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. The University of Akron, Akron, USA.
    Ma, Xiaofeng
    Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Guo, Xiaojing
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, PR China.
    Chen, Minjiao
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Ji, Tuo
    The University of Akron, Akron, USA.
    Hua, Jing
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    The University of Akron, Akron, USA.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Structural strategies to design bio-ionic liquid: Tuning molecular interaction with lignin for enhanced lubrication2019In: Journal of Molecular Liquids, ISSN 0167-7322, E-ISSN 1873-3166, Vol. 280, p. 49-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin strengthened ionic liquids (ILs) have shown high potential to be used as high performance green lubricants. Strengthened lignin-ILs molecular interaction is an effective approach to improve their lubrication properties. The molecular interactions of ILs’ cation and anion containing different functional groups with lignin and efficiency on the lubricating properties have rarely been studied yet. In this work, a series of novel green lubricants with dissolved lignin in [Choline][Amino Acid] ([CH][AA]), [Tetramethylammonium][Glycine] ([N 1111 ][Gly]) and [Tetrabutylammonium][Glycine] ([N 4444 ][Gly]) ILs have been synthesized and their tribological properties were systematically investigated. The longer alkyl chain in cation without reciprocal H-bond interaction between ILs’ cation and anion has the positive effect on the anti-wear properties. In addition, the less steric effect and more negative natural charges of amino acid anion synergistically contribute to the stronger H-bond interaction between lignin and choline base ILs, which enhances lubrication film strength and thus resulting in the better tribological property of ILs/lignin green lubricants. Specifically, the wear volume loss of the steel disc lubricated by [N 4444 ][Gly] with the addition of 15% lignin is only 12% of the one lubricated by pure [N 4444 ][Gly]. This work presents a method to tune molecular interaction between lignin and ILs via the structural design of ILs’ cation and anion, which are revealed as the key factor that bridges the individual components and improves overall lubricating properties. 

  • 10.
    Wang, Hongdong
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. Applied Materials Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois , United States.
    Liu, Yuhong
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Liu, Wenrui
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Kunpeng
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Li, Jinjin
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Ma, Tianbao
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Levent Eryilmaz, Osman
    Applied Materials Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, United States.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Erdemir, Ali
    Applied Materials Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, United States.
    Luo, Jianbin
    State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Superlubricity of Polyalkylene Glycol Aqueous Solutions Enabled by Ultrathin Layered Double Hydroxide Nanosheets2019In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 11, no 22, p. 20249-20256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It was previously proved that the existence of a large amount of hydrogen ions in water-based lubricants can easily lead to a superlubric state; however, it was also shown that these hydrogen ions could cause severe corrosion. As part of a large family of attractive clays, layered double hydroxides (LDHs) possess excellent tribological properties in water-based lubrication systems. In the present work, two different kinds of LDHs are dispersed in polyalkylene glycol (PAG) aqueous solutions, in two distinct forms: ultrathin nanosheets (ULDH-NS) of ca. 60 nm wide and ca. 1 nm thick (single or double layer) and nanoparticles (LDH-NP) of ca. 19.73 nm wide and ca. 8.68 nm thick. We find that the addition of ULDH-NS greatly shortens (as much as 85%) the running-in period prior to reaching the superlubricity regime and increases the ultimate load-bearing capacity by about four times. As compared to the fluid film thickness of the lubricating PAG solution, their ultrathin longitudinal dimension will not impair or influence the fluid film coverage in the contact zone. The analysis of sliding solid surfaces and the atomic force microscope microscale friction test demonstrate that the adsorption of ULDH-NS enables the sliding solid surfaces to be polished and protected because of their relatively weak interlayer interaction and increased adhesion effect. Owing to their superior tribological properties as lubricant additives, ultrathin LDH nanosheets hold great potential for enabling liquid superlubricity in industrial applications in the future.

  • 11.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA.
    Wu, Jian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Chen, Minjiao
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Two important factors of selecting lignin as efficient lubricating additives in poly (ethylene glycol): Hydrogen bond and molecular weight2019In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 129, p. 564-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin, one of the most abundant natural polymers, has been successfully used as an effective lubricant additive with high value. The chemical structure of lignin is very diverse and strongly affected by both the source of lignin (i.e. plant species) and the lignin extraction process. In this work, a series of lignin from different biomass sources (hard or soft wood) and extraction process (organosolv with or without acid catalyst) has been successfully incorporated into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and fortified lubricating properties were achieved. The effects of different lignin on the rheological, thermal and tribological properties of the lignin/EG lubricants were systematically investigated by different characterization techniques. Lignin in PEG significantly improves the lubricating property, where a wear reduction of 93.8% was observed. The thermal and lubrication properties of the PEG lubricants filled with different kinds of lignin are tightly related to the synergistic state of hydrogen bonding and molecular weight distribution. Lignin with broader molecular weight distribution and higher hydroxyl content shows better adhesion on metal surfaces and strengthened lubricating film, which could be used as the efficient lubricating additives. This work provides a criterion for selecting appropriate lignin as the efficient lubricant additive and accelerates the application of lignin.

  • 12.
    Wu, Jian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Huang, Xianzhu
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Berglund, Kim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    Key Laboratory of Material and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    CuO nanosheets produced in graphene oxide solution: An excellent anti-wear additive for self-lubricating polymer composites2018In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 162, p. 86-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, graphene oxide is used as template to produce CuO nanosheets, which solves aggregation and dispersion problems of CuO nanosheets resulting in improved lubricating performance. SEM and AFM studies show that CuO nanosheets are present in fusiform flake shape with a thickness, width and length of around 13, 400 and 1000 nm, respectively. CuO nanosheets were added to the carbon fibers reinforced Polytetrafluoroethylene (CF/PTFE) to study their lubricating performance. It is interesting, from fractured surfaces of composites, to find that CuO nanosheets enhance the interface properties between carbon fibers and PTFE. The wear resistance property of CF/PTFE is remarkably improved after filling CuO nanosheets. For example, the wear rate is reduced by 51% after filling 1.5 wt % CuO nanosheets. The wear resistance improvement effect of CuO nanosheets is much better than that of commercial CuO nanogranules and CuO nanorods. Worn surfaces and counter-surfaces studying indicates that CuO nanosheets can not only prevent the rubbed-off of PTFE or the detachment of CF, but also improve the properties of transfer films, which greatly reduce the adhesive wear and abrasive wear.

  • 13.
    Li, Yiling
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Xi, Yinhu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Estimation of rolling friction coefficients in a tribosystem using optical measurements2018In: Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, ISSN 0036-8792, E-ISSN 1758-5775, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 680-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This paper presents a method to measure the rolling friction coefficient in an easy and fast way. The aim is to measure the rolling friction coefficient between a small steel ball and a cylindrical aluminum surface.

    Design/methodology/approach

    An analytical model of the tribosystem of a freely rolling ball and a cylindrical surface is established. The rolling friction coefficient is evaluated from images recorded by a high-speed camera. The coefficient between a 1.58 mm diameter steel ball and a cylindrical aluminum surface is measured. A background subtraction algorithm is used to determine the position of the small steel ball.

    Findings

    The angular positions of the ball are predicted using the analytical model, and good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical results.

    Originality/value

    An optical method for evaluating the rolling friction coefficient is presented, and the value of this coefficient between a small steel ball and a cylindrical aluminum surface is evaluated.

  • 14.
    Li, Jiahui
    et al.
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Zhu, Yudan
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Zhang, Yumeng
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Gao, Qingwei
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Zhu, Wei
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    Key Laboratory of Material and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Extra low friction coefficient caused by the formation of a solid-like layer: A new lubrication mechanism found through molecular simulation of the lubrication of MoS2 nanoslits2018In: Chinese Journal of Chemical Engineering, ISSN 1004-9541, E-ISSN 2210-321X, Vol. 26, no 12, p. 2412-2419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a novel two-dimensional material that exhibits potential application in lubrication technology. In this work, molecular dynamics was used to investigate the lubrication behaviour of different polar fluid molecules (i.e., water, methanol and decane) confined in monolayer MoS2 nanoslits. The pore width effect (i.e., 1.2, 1.6 and 2.0 nm) was also evaluated. Results revealed that decane molecules exhibited good lubricating performance compared to the other two kinds of molecules. The friction coefficient followed the order of decane < methanol < water, and decreased evidently as the slit width increased, except for decane. Analysis of the spatial distribution and mobility of different confined fluid molecules showed that a solid-like layer was formed near the slit wall. This phenomenon led to the extra low friction coefficient of confined decane molecules

  • 15.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Wu, Jian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Chen, Minjiao
    Vahidi, Alireza
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Lignin from Hardwood and Softwood Biomass as a Lubricating Additive to Ethylene Glycol2018In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 23, no 3, article id 537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethylene glycol (EG)-based lubricant was prepared with dissolved organosolv lignin from birch wood (BL) and softwood (SL) biomass. The effects of different lignin types on the rheological, thermal, and tribological properties of the lignin/EG lubricants were comprehensively investigated by various characterization techniques. Dissolving organosolv lignin in EG results in outstanding lubricating properties. Specifically, the wear volume of the disc by EG-44BL is only 8.9% of that lubricated by pure EG. The enhanced anti-wear property of the EG/lignin system could be attributed to the formation of a robust lubrication film and the strong adhesion of the lubricant on the contacting metal surface due to the presence of a dense hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network. The lubricating performance of EG-BL outperforms EG-SL, which could be attributed to the denser H-bonding sites in BL and its broader molecular weight distribution. The disc wear loss of EG-44BL is only 45.7% of that lubricated by EG-44SL. Overall, H-bonding is the major contributor to the different tribological properties of BL and SL in EG-based lubricants.

  • 16.
    Yin, Xiang
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University.
    Wu, Jian
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University.
    Li, Chang
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    Key Laboratory of Material and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Right Way of Using Graphene Oxide Additives for Water-Lubricated PEEK: Adding in Polymer or Water?2018In: Tribology letters, ISSN 1023-8883, E-ISSN 1573-2711, Vol. 66, no 3, article id 103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water-lubricated polymer is attracting more and more interest from the industry. Adding nanoparticles is considered to be an effective way to improve the tribological performance. In this work, water-lubricated Polyetheretherketone (PEEK)-steel contacts were employed as the objects of study. A careful comparative study was made by investigating the effect of adding graphene oxide (GO) into water or into PEEK. Results show that adding GO into water can significantly reduce the wear and friction coefficient of pure PEEK, which is much more effective than adding GO into PEEK. Under the lubrication of GO aqueous dispersion, the wear of PEEK remains very low even under a harsh condition where the pressure reaches 50 MPa and the linear sliding speed is 0.7 m/s. Neat PEEK and GO/PEEK composites in pure water exhibit serious wear under this harsh condition. The excellent lubricating properties of GO aqueous dispersion are attributed to GO nanosheets entering into solid contacts, which can not only form a protective layer on steel counterpart repairing the worn surface, but also strongly adhere to the PEEK matrix resulting in an in situ-formed GO coating and prevent the scratch by steel counterpart.

  • 17.
    Wu, Jian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Mu, Liwen
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Lu, Xiaohua
    Key Laboratory of Material and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Synthesis of hollow fullerene-like molybdenum disulfide/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites with excellent lubricating properties2018In: Carbon, ISSN 0008-6223, E-ISSN 1873-3891, Vol. 134, p. 423-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, bubble-on-plate structure is realized on hollow IF-MoS2/reduced graphene oxide (HIF-MoS2/RGO) nanocomposites. HIF-MoS2 nanocages templated with the generated ammonia (NH3) are connected to RGO through the interlayered MoS2. The as-prepared HIF-MoS2/RGO is added into an ionic grease to study the tribological behavior of HIF-MoS2/RGO. For comparison, commercial grade MoS2 nanoparticles, single RGO or HIF-MoS2 or their physical mixture are also studied. Tribological results show that, compared with other additives, HIF-MoS2/RGO nanocomposites have the best anti-wear properties especially under higher load of 3.0 GPa. The wear reduction of HIF-MoS2/RGO reinforced grease under 2.5 GPa and 3.0 GPa reached 67% and 96%, respectively. In addition, HIF-MoS2/RGO reinforced grease achieves much lower and stable friction coefficient (0.079, the value of neat grease is 0.098) under 3.0 GPa. HIF-MoS2/RGO reinforced grease maintains very low friction coefficient and wear up to 4.1 GPa, while the normal MoS2 and RGO show high wear at the pressure up to 3.0 GPa. It is proposed that HIF-MoS2 nanocages on RGO act as rolling balls during friction resulting in better separation of steels.

  • 18.
    Yu, Qiangliang
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Wang, Yurong
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Huang, Guowei
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Ma, Zhengfeng
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Cai, Meirong
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Zhou, Feng
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Liu, Weimin
    State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Lanzhou.
    Task-Specific Oil-Miscible Ionic Liquids Lubricate Steel/Light Metal Alloy: A Tribochemistry Study2018In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 5, no 19, article id 1800791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to increase the solubility of ionic liquids in base oils and to improve the lubricating performance of light alloys, two new ionic liquids comprised of sulfonate base anion and phosphonium based cation are designed and synthesized. The difference between these two ionic liquids is the cation: One has only one organophosphate group (P88816DOSS) and the other has two organophosphate group (P888PDOSS). The copper strip corrosion test is used to evaluate the anticorrosion properties of new developed ionic liquids. Tribological properties of the ionic liquids are investigated by an optimal SRV-IV oscillating tribometer. The results indicate that the new designed ionic liquids show very good solubility in traditional mineral-based oils. P88816DOSS and P888PDOSS show excellent friction reduction, antiwear performance accompanied with effective anticorrosion properties for the mineral base oil. Surface analysis results show that the superior properties of P88816DOSS and P888PDOSS are attributed to surface chemical reactions between ionic liquids and light metal.

  • 19.
    Wu, Jian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University.
    Mu, Liwen
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Chen, Yifeng
    Key Laboratory of Material and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Yin, Xiang
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University.
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Lu, Xiaohua
    Key Laboratory of Material and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Turning the solubility and lubricity of ionic liquids by absorbing CO22018In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 121, p. 223-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ionic liquids (ILs) attract high interest as lubricants or lubricant additives due to their special physicochemical characteristics. CO2 is a widely distributed gas. In many situations, its influence on lubricants cannot be avoided. In this work, three ILs are synthesized from choline and amino acids of glycine, l-proline and lysine, respectively. The influence of CO2 absorption on their solubility and lubricity is investigated. In general, it is interesting to find that the solubility is decreased and their lubricity is obviously improved after absorbing CO2, which is strongly related to their functional group (amino group) interactions with CO2. The formation of carbamate groups greatly increases the viscosity resulting in less solid contacts, and strengthens the interfacial adhesion between ILs and solids.

  • 20.
    Xi, Yinhu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Björling, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Mao, Junhong
    Theory of Lubrication and Bearing Institute, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System, Xi'an Jiaotong University.
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Application of an inclined, spinning ball-on-rotating disc apparatus to simulate railway wheel and rail contact problems2017In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 374-375, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Railway wheel-rail contacts involve various combinations of slip, rolling, and creepage. Traditionally, a twin-disc apparatus is used to simulate such problems. However, there are out of plane forces and motions involved in the actual situation. Therefore, the possibility of using a commercially-made, inclined-axis spinning ball-on-disc test rig was investigated to better simulate wheel and rail contact problems. By setting two angle parameters both the lateral and spin creepage can easily be applied to the contact. Traction measurements were conducted, and good agreement was found by comparing the present results with other available experimental data. The effects of the spin creepage on wear were studied in particular. An asymmetrical wear pattern was obtained from cases that applied a low longitudinal creepage and a spin creepage, corresponding to a rail running on a curved track. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this work is the first of its kind to be done using a laboratory-scale tribometer.

  • 21.
    Björling, Marcus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Bair, Scott
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Centre for High Pressure Rheology, G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA.
    Mu, Liwen
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Elastohydrodynamic performance of a bio-based, non-corrosive ionic liquid2017In: Applied Sciences: APPS, ISSN 1454-5101, E-ISSN 1454-5101, Vol. 17, no 10, article id 996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve performance of machine components, lubrication is one of the most important factors. Especially for use in extreme environments, researchers look for other solutions rather than common lubricant base stocks like mineral oils or vegetable oils. One such example is ionic liquids. Ionic liquids have been defined as molten salts with melting points below 100 °C that are entirely ionic in nature, comprising both cationic and anionic species. The industrial use of ionic liquids is mostly as solvents, electrolytes, extractants and catalysts. In tribological applications, ionic liquids are mainly studied in boundary lubrication and in pure sliding contacts. In this work, the elastohydrodynamic performance of a bio-based, non-corrosive, [choline][L-proline] ionic liquid is evaluated in terms of pressure-viscosity response, film forming capability and friction. The results show a pressure-viscosity coefficient of below 8 GPa-1 at 25 °C, among the lowest reported for any ionic liquid. The ionic liquid generated up to 70% lower friction than a reference paraffin oil with a calculated difference in film thickness of 11%. It was also shown that this ionic liquid is very hygroscopic, which is believed to explain part of the low friction results, but also has to be considered in practical applications since the water content will influence the properties and thus the performance of the lubricant.

  • 22.
    Björling, Marcus
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Bair, Scott
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Centre for High Pressure Rheology, G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405, USA;.
    Mu, Liwen
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325, USA;.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325, USA;.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Elastohydrodynamic Performance of a Non-Corrosive Non-Protic Ionic Liquid2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ionic liquids have been defined as molten salts with melting points below 100 degrees C that are entirely ionic in nature, comprising both cationic and anionic species. The industrial use of ionic liquids is mostly as solvents, electrolytes, extractants and catalysts. In tribological applications, Ionic liquids are mainly studied in boundary lubrication and in pure sliding contacts. In this work, the elastohydrodynamic performance of a non-corrosive, non-protonic ionic liquid is studied to assess the feasibility to use this kind of ionic liquid in machine components such as gears, rolling bearings and cam followers. This study includes ball on disc friction experiments in rolling sliding full film elastohydrodynamic lubrication at high slide to roll ratios, as well as film thickness measurements with optical interferometry. A commercially available paraffin oil has been used as a reference.

  • 23.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Hua, Jing
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Zhuang, Wei
    College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, National Engineering Technique Research Center for Biotechnology, Nanjing Tech University.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Engineering Hydrogen Bonding Interaction and Charge Separation in Bio-polymers for Green Lubrication2017In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 121, no 22, p. 5669-5678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthetic additives are widely used in lubricants nowadays to upgrade lubrication properties. The potential of integrating sustainable components in modern lubricants has rarely been studied yet. In this work, two sustainable resources lignin and gelatin have been synergistically incorporated into ethylene glycol (EG), and their tribological properties were systematically investigated. The abundant hydrogen bonding sites in lignin and gelatin as well as their interchain interaction via hydrogen bonding play the dominating roles in tuning the physicochemical properties of the mixture and improving lubricating properties. Moreover, the synergistic combination of lignin and gelatin induces charge separation of gelatin that enables its preferable adsorption on the friction surface through electrostatic force and forms a robust lubrication layer. This layer will be strengthened by lignin through the interpolymer chain hydrogen bonding. At an optimized lignin:gelatin mass ratio of 1:1 and 19 wt % loading of each in EG, the friction coefficient can be greatly stabilized and the wear loss was reduced by 89% compared to pure EG. This work presents a unique synergistic phenomenon between gelatin and lignin, where hydrogen bonding and change separation are revealed as the key factor that bridges the individual components and improves overall lubricating properties.

  • 24.
    Berglund, Kim
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Friction and Wear of Self-Lubricating Materials for Hydropower Applications under Different Lubricating Conditions2017In: Lubricants, ISSN 2075-4442, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-lubricating bearings in hydropower applications are often lubricated with water under boundary lubricating conditions. Polyhydric alcohols replacing water have shown the potential to reduce both friction and wear. The objective of this work is, therefore, to evaluate the effect of a polyhydric alcohol-based environmentally-acceptable lubricant (EAL) on the friction and wear of self-lubricating materials for conformal contacts under boundary lubricating conditions. The lubricating properties of four commercially-available self-lubricating bearing materials were investigated under three different lubricating conditions: dry, water and a new polyhydric alcohol-based EAL. Bearing materials include one metallic composite and three polymer composites. A reciprocating motion test rig was used to evaluate the wear and friction properties. Surface analysis was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and optical profilometry. Results show that the wear rate for the polymer composites is increased when water is present compared to dry operating conditions. The new polyhydric alcohol-based EAL substantially improves both friction and anti-wear performance of all four self-lubricating bearing materials compared to both dry and water conditions. Surface analysis indicates that the material transfer to the counter-surface is limited when the polyhydric alcohol-based EAL is used.

  • 25.
    Berglund, Kim
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Friction characteristics of environmentally adapted lubricants in boundary lubricated contacts2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Guo, Xiaojing
    Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai .
    Zhuang, Wei
    College of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Engineering, National Engineering Technique Research Center for Biotechnology, Nanjing Tech University.
    Chen, Long
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Ji, Tuo
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Hua, Jing
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Wang, Huaiyuan
    College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, Daqing.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Grafting Heteroelement-Rich Groups on Graphene Oxide: Tuning Polarity and Molecular Interaction with Bio-Ionic Liquid for Enhanced Lubrication2017In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 498, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two different heteroelement-rich molecules have been successfully grafted on graphene oxide (GO) sheets which were then used as lubricant additives in bio-ionic liquid. The grafting was processed with reactions between GO sheets and synthesized heteroelement-rich molecules (Imidazol-1-yl phosphonic dichloride and 1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl phosphonic dichloride, respectively). The modified GO (m-GO) was added into [Choline][Proline] ([CH][P]) bio-ionic liquid, and has been demonstrated effective additive in promoting lubrication. Different characterization techniques have been utilized to study the reaction between GO and the two modifiers. The effect of molecular structure of the modifiers on the rheological and tribological properties of m-GO/[CH][P] lubricants was systematically investigated. Both theoretical calculation and experimental results demonstrated that the introduced heteroelement-rich groups are beneficial to increase the robustness of lubrication film by intensified hydrogen bonding and enhance the lubricant/friction surface adhesion by increased polarity of the m-GO. As a result, the interfacial lubrication could be significantly improved by these newly developed m-GO/[CH][P] lubricants.

  • 27.
    Xi, Yinhu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. Theory of Lubrication and Bearing Institute, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor–Bearing System, Xi'an Jiaotong University.
    Almqvist, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Mao, Junhong
    Theory of Lubrication and Bearing Institute, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an.
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Linear Complementarity Framework for 3D Steady-State Rolling Contact Problems Including Creepages with Isotropic and Anisotropic Friction for Circular Hertzian Contact2017In: Tribology Transactions, ISSN 1040-2004, E-ISSN 1547-397X, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 832-844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the problem of 3D steady-state rolling contacts with dry friction for circular Hertzian contacts is formulated mathematically as a linear complementarity problem (LCP). The complementarity variables are the traction and the relative slip of contact regions, in which a polyhedral friction law is employed. The present work uses the general expressions describing the surface deformations due to uniform traction over a rectangular area on an elastic half-space to derive the influence coefficient matrix for rolling contact problems. Three possible creepage types—that is, longitudinal, lateral, and spin creepage—are considered in this work. Firstly, the numerical results are verified against the existing numerical solutions and good agreement has been found. Secondly, the anisotropic friction is studied by the verified approach. Some numerical examples are provided to illustrate the current LCP method for both isotropic and anisotropic friction in which the combined effects of the three kinds of creepage on the traction distribution are shown.

  • 28.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    He, Jian
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Li, Yifan
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Ji, Tuo
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Mehra, Nitin
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Molecular Origin of Efficient Phonon Transfer in Modulated Polymer Blends: Effect of Hydrogen Bonding on Polymer Coil Size and Assembled Microstructure2017In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 121, no 26, p. 14204-14212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular level engineering of polymer or polymer blends has been recently demonstrated effective strategy to regulate thermal conductivity. Such materials are of great interest to meet critical requirements of transparent, light weight, flexible, etc for thermal management in electronic applications. In this work, modulated polymer blends with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and biopolymers (lignin, gelatin) were designed and significantly enhanced thermal conductivity was achieved by tuning the intermolecular interaction among polymer components. The hydrogen bond interaction has been revealed as the major driving force that affects the polymer coil dimension in aqueous solution, the microstructure of coil-coil interaction in solid film and thus the thermal conduction. A solid relationship across molecular level interaction to macro-scale thermal conduction is constructed via careful characterization of the coil size in liquid phase and assembled microstructure in solid phase. Appropriate integration of biopolymers and PVA is essential to achieve synergistic effect. Specifically, thermal conductivity of polymer blend with 10% lignin and 10% G90 in PVA reaches 0.71 W/m·K, which is 184% enhancement as compared to pure PVA. This work reveals the fundamental molecular origin of polymer blends in association with thermal conductivity and has great potential to guide molecular engineering for superior physicochemical properties.

  • 29.
    Chen, Long
    et al.
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Ji, Tuo
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Mu, Liwen
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Wang, Huaiyuan
    College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, Daqing.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Pore size dependent molecular adsorption of cationic dye in biomass derived hierarchically porous carbon2017In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 196, p. 168-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hierarchically porous carbon adsorbents were successfully fabricated from different biomass resources (softwood, hardwood, bamboo and cotton) by a facile two-step process, i.e. carbonization in nitrogen and thermal oxidation in air. Without involving any toxic/corrosive chemicals, large surface area of up to 890 m2/g was achieved, which is comparable to commercial activated carbon. The porous carbons with various surface area and pore size were used as adsorbents to investigate the pore size dependent adsorption phenomenon. Based on the density functional theory, effective (E-SSA) and ineffective surface area (InE-SSA) was calculated considering the geometry of used probing adsorbate. It was demonstrated that the adsorption capacity strongly depends on E-SSA instead of total surface area. Moreover, a regression model was developed to quantify the adsorption capacities contributed from E-SSA and InE-SSA, respectively. The applicability of this model has been verified by satisfactory prediction results on porous carbons prepared in this work as well as commercial activated carbon. Revealing the pore size dependent adsorption behavior in these biomass derived porous carbon adsorbents will help to design more effective materials (either from biomass or other carbon resources) targeting to specific adsorption applications.

  • 30.
    Huang, Xianzhu
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Wu, Jian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    Key Laboratory of Material and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing .
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Tribological Properties of Porous PEEK Composites Containing Ionic Liquid under Dry Friction Condition2017In: Lubricants, ISSN 2075-4442, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NaCl particles were added into Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and its composites to produce porous PEEK-based materials by washing NaCl away after the high-temperature compression molding process. After that, an ionic liquid was added into the porous materials under vacuum condition. Carbon fibers (CF), as reinforcement, and PTFE, as an internal solid lubricant, were employed to prepare PEEK composites. Tribological properties under dry friction condition were studied on a ring-on-disc tribo-meter. The influence of CF and PTFE on tribological properties was carefully investigated. The results indicated that, in comparison with traditional PEEK composites (CF/PTFE/PEEK), the porous PEEK composites containing ionic liquid showed much better tribological properties. It is found that CF can help PEEK form effective pores to suck in the ionic liquid resulting in a better tribological performance. CF reinforced porous PEEK containing ionic liquid (p-CF/PEEK + IL) demonstrated the lowest friction coefficient (27% of CF/PTFE/PEEK) and the lowest wear loss (only 0.9% of CF/PTFE/PEEK). Long time tribological test revealed that the wear mass loss comes from the running-in period, while its wear is negligible after this period. It is also found that the addition of PTFE has a negative influence on the tribological behaviors, especially under high sliding velocity and applied load

  • 31.
    Xi, Yinhu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Almqvist, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Mao, Junhong
    Theory of Lubrication and Bearing Institute, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an.
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    A Complementarity Problem–Based Solution Procedure for 2D Steady-State Rolling Contacts with Dry Friction2016In: Tribology Transactions, ISSN 1040-2004, E-ISSN 1547-397X, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 1031-1038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem of steady-state rolling contact between two cylinders with dry friction was formulated into standard linear complementarity problems (LCPs) by using the explicit physical definition. For normal contact, the complementarity variables are the normal pressure and the gap. For the tangential contact, the traction distribution and relative slip are the variables obtained by solving the LCP. The frictional behavior is assumed to be governed by the Coulomb friction law, and LCP formulations of both similar elastic (Carter problem) and dissimilar elastic rolling contacts are presented in this work. Good agreement was found between the current LCP approach and publicly available software for both the rolling contact of similar elastic and dissimilar elastic cylinders. Moreover, the surface roughness was taken into account in this paper by the verified approach. The results show the initial slope of the traction - relative creepage curve decreases as the surface roughness increases.

  • 32.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, China.
    Guo, Xiaojing
    Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.
    Wu, Jian
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Ji, Tuo
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Chen, Long
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing University of Chemical Technology, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Hua, Jing
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Enriching Heteroelements in Lignin as Lubricating Additives for Bioionic Liquids2016In: A C S Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 4, no 7, p. 3877-3887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depolymerization and modification of lignin have been achieved simultaneously in a one-pot chemical reaction. Two heteroelement-rich modifiers, imidazol-1-yl phosphonic dichloride and 1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl phosphonic dichloride, were selected to react with lignin in this work. The modified lignin (m-lignin) is demonstrated as an effective lubricating additive for [choline][amino acid] ([CH][AA]) bioionic liquids. Different characterization techniques have been utilized to study the lignin depolymerization, reaction between lignin and modifiers and m-lignin/[CH][AA] interaction. The effect of the molecular structure of the modifiers on the rheological and tribological properties of m-lignin/[CH][AA] lubricants was systematically investigated. Density function theory is used to calculate the electronic structure of lignin, m-lignin, and [CH][AA]. The atomic natural charge analysis revealed the most negative charge on nitrogen bonded to a phosphorus atom and the strongest capability of forming hydrogen bonding with [CH][AA]. The introduced nitrogen and phosphorus elements not only increase the hydrogen bonding density in m-lignin/[CH][AA] but also enhance the polarity of the m-lignin, both of which facilitate a strong adhesion of lubricant on a metal surface and thus promote lubrication. A larger fraction of heteroatom groups in m-lignin contributes to a better lubrication property of these lubricants

  • 33.
    Chen, Long
    et al.
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Ji, Tuo
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Mu, Liwen
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Brisbin, Logan
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Guo, Zhanhu
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
    Khan, Mohammel A.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge.
    Young, David P.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Facile synthesis of mesoporous carbon nanocomposites from natural biomass for efficient dye adsorption and selective heavy metal removal2016In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 2259-2269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesoporous carbon with embedded iron carbide nanoparticles was successfully synthesized via a facile impregnation–carbonization method. A green biomass resource, cotton fabric, was used as a carbon precursor and an iron precursor was implanted to create mesopores through a catalytic graphitization reaction. The pore structure of the nanocomposites can be tuned by adjusting the iron precursor loadings and the embedded iron carbide nanoparticles serve as an active component for magnetic separation after adsorption. The microstructure of the nanocomposites was carefully investigated by various characterization techniques including electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, surface analyzer, magnetic property analyzer and etc. The newly created mesopores are demonstrated as a critical component to enhance the adsorption capacity of organic dyes and embedded iron carbide nanoparticles are responsible for the selective removal of heavy metal ions (Zn2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Cr6+ and Pb2+). Isotherm adsorption, kinetic study at three different temperatures (25, 45 and 65 °C) and cycling retention tests were performed to understand the adsorptive behavior of the nanocomposites with organic dyes (methylene blue and methyl orange). Together with the preferable removal of more toxic heavy metal species (Cr6+ and Pb2+), these mesoporous nanocomposites show promising applications in pollutant removal from water. The facile material preparation allows convenient scale-up manufacturing with low cost and minimum environmental impact.

  • 34.
    Ji, Tuo
    et al.
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Chen, Long
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Mu, Liwen
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Yuan, Ruixia
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Knoblauch, Michael
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Bao, Forrest Sheng
    College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, Daqing.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Wang, Huaiyan
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Green Processing of Plant Biomass into Mesoporous Carbon as Catalyst Support2016In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 295, p. 301-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four different plant biomass, bamboo, cotton, soft wood and hard wood, were utilized as carbon precursors to fabricate porous carbon catalyst supports via a chemical free approach. Large surface area with unique mesoporous structure was successfully created in the carbon, which made them suitable for catalyst support. After decorating silver nanoparticles onto these carbon supports, nitroaromatics reduction reactions were performed to evaluate the catalyst activity. Results indicate that chemical composition and surface groups of carbon supports determine the metal catalyst nucleation/growth while the porous microstructure of support affects the mass transport of reactant/product across the liquid/catalyst interface. Among the four selected biomass, porous carbon manufactured from soft wood acquires the highest average pore size, pore volume, mesopore volume fraction and best catalytic activity after decorating silver nanoparticles. This work not only presents an environmental benign process that converts natural biomass into effective porous carbon catalyst supports, but also offers a comprehensive understanding of biomass structure/composition relating to their suitability as catalyst support.

  • 35.
    Wu, Jian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing University of Chemical Technology, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Halogen-free ionic liquids as excellent lubricants for PEEK-stainless steel contacts at elevated temperatures2016In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 104, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced polymers sliding against steel under ionic liquids (ILs) has great potential applications. However, halogen-containing ILs (h-ILs) often induce high corrosive wear to steel. In this work, halogen-free ILs (hf-ILs) were used as neat lubricants to investigate the performance of poly(ether-ether-ketone)-AISI304 stainless steel (PEEK-304ss) contacts at elevated temperatures. The results indicate that hf-ILs with short alkyl chains show excellent anti-corrosion and antiwear properties. The wear rates of 304ss lubricated by hf-ILs at 160 °C are 3–71% of those by h-ILs. The friction coefficients of PEEK-304ss lubricated by hf-ILs are just 13–33% of those by h-ILs. The excellent performance of hf-ILs can be attributed to the reason that hf-ILs will not generate any halogen containing acid during the test

  • 36.
    Wu, Jian
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Mu, Liwen
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, School of Materials Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing University of Chemical Technology, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    High load capacity with Ionic liquid-lubricated tribological system2016In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 94, p. 315-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering polymers with high glass transition temperature have been widely used in dynamic friction systems by oil or solid lubrication. However, in high-load systems, oil lubrication is less efficient due to the viscosity decrease at higher temperatures induced by friction heat. [Bmim][PF6] ionic liquid was used and compared with traditional L-HM46 oil and solid PTFE. Taking advantage of high [Bmim][PF6] viscosity, strong steel-[Bmim][PF6] but poor PEEK-[Bmim][PF6] interaction, the [Bmim][PF6] lubricated PEEK/steel slide falls in hydrodynamic lubrication and elastohydrodynamic lubrication region under 150–1500 N. While the oil and PTFE both failed to lubricate under 800 N.

  • 37.
    Wu, Jian
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, USA.
    Mu, Liwen
    School of Materials Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology, Nanjing, PR China.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Dong, Yihui
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, PR China.
    High load capacity with ionic liquid-lubricated tribological system2016In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 94, p. 315-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering polymers with high glass transition temperature have been widely used in dynamic friction systems by oil or solid lubrication. However, in high-load systems, oil lubrication is less efficient due to the viscosity decrease at higher temperatures induced by friction heat. [Bmim][PF6] ionic liquid was used and compared with traditional L-HM46 oil and solid PTFE. Taking advantage of high [Bmim][PF6] viscosity, strong steel-[Bmim][PF6] but poor PEEK-[Bmim][PF6] interaction, the [Bmim][PF6] lubricated PEEK/steel slide falls in hydrodynamic lubrication and elastohydrodynamic lubrication region under 150–1500N. While the oil and PTFE both failed to lubricate under 800N.

  • 38.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Ji, Tuo
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Chen, Long
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Yuan, Ruixia
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Wang, Huaiyuan
    School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, Daqing.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Ionic Grease Lubricants: Protic [Triethanolamine][Oleic acid] and Aprotic [Choline][Oleic acid]2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 4977-4984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ionic liquid lubricants or lubricant additives have been studied intensively over past decades. However, ionic grease serving as lubricant has rarely been investigated so far. In this work, novel protic [Triethanolamine][Oleic acid] and aprotic [Choline][Oleic acid] ionic greases are successfully synthesized. These ionic greases can be directly used as lubricants without adding thickener or other additives. Their distinct thermal and rheological properties are investigated and well correlated to their tribological properties. It is revealed that aprotic ionic grease shows superior temperature and pressure tolerant lubrication properties than protic ionic grease. The lubrication mechanism is studies and it reveals that strong physical adsorption of ionic grease onto friction surface plays a dominating role for promoted lubrication instead of tribo-chemical film formation.

  • 39.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Wang, Huaiyuan
    School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, Daqing.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Lignin in Ethylene Glycol and Poly(ethylene glycol): Fortified Lubricants with Internal Hydrogen Bonding2016In: A C S Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 1840-1849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin, one of the most naturally abundant polymers, has been successfully incorporated into ethylene glycol (EG) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in this work and fortified lubricating properties were achieved in EG/lignin and PEG/lignin. The molecular interaction between lignin and EG (or PEG) has been revealed as hydrogen bonding, which serves as the dominating factor that determines the thermal, rheological, and tribological properties of the mixed systems of EG/lignin and PEG/lignin. The physicochemical properties of the mixed lubricants are tightly related to the state of internal hydrogen bonding (EG–EG, PEG–PEG, EG–lignin, PEG–lignin, and lignin–lignin) and are well correlated to their lubrication properties. Generally, larger lignin fractions lead to better lubricating performance in both EG and PEG systems. Lignin liquefaction in PEG has been addressed by catalytic degradation with the presence of sulfuric acid, which was then neutralized by triethanolamine for lubricant development. Lignin in PEG significantly improves the lubricating property at higher pressure conditions, where a wear reduction of 94.6% was observed. Lignin fortified EG and PEG based lubricants show outstanding noncorrosive characteristic to the mostly used metal materials such as aluminum and iron.

  • 40.
    Shu, Yudan
    et al.
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Zhang, Yumeng
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Lu, Xuaihua
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Li, Jiahui
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Lu, Linghong
    College of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University.
    Lubrication Behavior of Water Molecules Confined in TiO2 Nanoslits: A Molecular Dynamics Study2016In: Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data, ISSN 0021-9568, E-ISSN 1520-5134, Vol. 61, no 12, p. 4023-4030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Titanium (Ti) metal has been widely used in orthopedic implants, such as knee replacements and fracture fixation devices, where water is the base fluid of the lubricant. In this work, a series of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics have been carried out to investigate the microstructure and lubrication of water molecules confined in TiO2 nanoslits under shearing. The effects of varying slit gap widths (0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0 nm) and shear velocities (200, 100, 50, and 10 m/s) on the friction coefficients between TiO2 and water molecules were evaluated to shed light on the role of the confined water molecules on lubrication. Simulation results showed that the friction coefficient decreased as the slit width increased. Detailed analysis of water molecules microstructure revealed that water molecules confined in the slits were layered. Typically, all the water molecules in Layer 1 and some water molecules in Layer 2 could reach the sliding velocity of the wall, which were in agreement with the reported mobility of water molecules absorbed on TiO2 nanoparticles via nuclear magnetic resonance. As the width of slit gap increased, the average lifetime of the H-bonds between water molecules within and beyond Layer 1 reduced and the amount of free water increased accordingly, which caused a decrease in the friction coefficient. This understanding can be used to explain at the molecular scale the observation in our previous atomic force microscope experiment in which the higher roughness in TiO2 reflected a lower friction coefficient. 

  • 41.
    Shi, Yijun
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Non-corrosive and Biomaterials Protic Ionic Liquids with High Lubricating Performance2016In: Tribology letters, ISSN 1023-8883, E-ISSN 1573-2711, Vol. 63, no 1, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving non-corrosive and green ionic liquids is a big challenge for the tribologist. A kind of biomaterials-based protic ionic liquids (PILs) was synthesized in this paper. Rapeseed oil, group 1 mineral oil and one commercially available fully formulated gear oil were as used reference to study the property of the synthesized PILs. The copper strip standard corrosion test was employed to study the anti-corrosion property. The boundary lubrication and elastohydrodynamic lubrication performance of the lubricants was studied on an Optimol SRV-III oscillating friction and wear tester, and a WAM (model 11) ball-on-disk test rig, respectively. The lubricating mechanism of the synthesized PILs was also discussed in this paper

  • 42.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Ji, Tuo
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Chen, Long
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Mehra, Nitin
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Paving the Thermal Highway with Self-Organized Nanocrystals in Transparent Polymer Composites2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 42, p. 29080-29087Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phonon transfer is greatly scattered in traditional polymer composites due to the unpaired phonon frequency at the polymer/filler interface. A key innovation of this work is to build continuous crystal network by self-organization and utilize it as “thermal highway” that circumvents the long-existing interfacial thermal barrier issue in traditional composites. By tuning the molecular diffusion rate of dicarboxylic acids (oxalic acid, malonic acid, and succinic acid), different crystal structures including skeletal, dendrite, diffusion-limited aggregates, and spherulite were synthesized in PVA film. These continuous crystal structures benefit the efficient phonon transfer in the composites with minimized interfacial scattering and lead to a significant thermal conductivity enhancement of up to 180% compared to that of pure polymer. Moreover, the transparent feature of these composite films provides additional benefits in display applications. The post heat treatment effect on the thermal conductivity of the composite films shows a time-dependent behavior. These uniquely structured polymer/crystal composites are expected to generate significant impacts in thermal management applications.

  • 43.
    Berglund, Kim
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Performance of self‐lubricating materials for hydropower applications under different lubricating conditions2016In: Nordic Symposium on Tribology - NORDTRIB 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Shi, Yijun
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Vadivel, Hari
    Berglund, Kim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Studying the tribological properties of PEEK composites lubricated by different lubricants for hydropower turbine application2016In: Nordic Symposium on Tribology - NORDTRIB 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Xi, Yinhu
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Björling, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Mao, Junhong
    Theory of Lubrication and Bearing Institute, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Modern Design and Rotor-Bearing System, Xi'an Jiaotong University.
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Traction formula for rolling-sliding contacts in consideration of roughness under low slide to roll ratios2016In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 104, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the numerical results of a wide range of parameters in terms of the linear complementarity framework, an easy-to-use formula is presented by using the regression analyses to estimate the traction coefficient for rolling-sliding contacts under low Slide-to-Roll Ratio (SRR) domain for dry condition. The parameters include geometry, surface roughness, SRR and friction coefficient and contact radius. The formula's predictions are in good agreement with measurements using a ball on disc test rig. The results indicate that for steel-steel contact, the effects of third body layer and plasticity on the traction can almost cancel each other out. In addition, by revising the expression proposed by Masjedi and Khonsari, the formula is extended to estimate the cases under mixed lubrication.

  • 46.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Chen, Long
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Ji, Tuo
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Yuan, Ruixia
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Wang, Huaiyuan
    School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, Daqing.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    [N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone][C1–C4 carboxylic acid]: novel solvent system with exceptional lignin solubility2015In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 51, no 70, p. 13554-13557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel solvent systems composed of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone and C1–C4 carboxylic acid exhibit unique physicochemical properties, e.g. large polarity, low viscosity and excellent hydrogen bonding capacity, which have demonstrated excellent lignin solubility that outperforms conventional solvents and ionic liquids.

  • 47.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Guo, Xiaojing
    Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.
    Ji, Tuo
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Chen, Long
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Yuan, Ruixia
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Brisbin, Logan
    Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Wang, Huaiyuan
    School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Non-corrosive green lubricants: strengthened lignin–[choline][amino acid] ionic liquids interaction via reciprocal hydrogen bonding2015In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, no 81, p. 66067-66072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of novel green lubricants with dissolved lignin in [choline][amino acid] ([CH][AA]) ionic liquids (ILs) have been synthesized in this work. The effect of lignin on the thermal and tribological properties of the lignin/[CH][AA] lubricants was systematically investigated by means of thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and a friction and wear tester. The lignin in [CH][AA] has been demonstrated to be an effective additive to improve thermal stability, reduce the wear rates and stabilize the friction coefficients of lignin/[CH][AA] lubricants. Density function theory calculations on the electronic structure of [CH][AA] ILs reveal the atomic natural charge of ILs and their hydrogen bonding capability with lignin. Moreover, these green lubricants show excellent anti-corrosive properties against commercial aluminum and iron boards. The strong physical adsorption of [CH][AA] ILs onto the steel surface and the reciprocal hydrogen bonding between [CH][AA] ILs and lignin synergistically contribute to the enhanced lubrication film strength and thus the tribological properties of these new lubricants. This work provides a new perspective on utilizing complete bio-products in advanced tribological lubrication systems. In addition, this will open a new application venue for lignin to improve product value in lignocellulosic biomass utilization.

  • 48.
    Mu, Liwen
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, School of Materials Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, School of Materials Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology.
    Fan, Jingdeng
    School of Materials Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology.
    Zhou, Zhongxin
    School of Materials Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing University of Chemical Technology, State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Wang, Huaiyuan
    School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Self-Lubricating Polytetrafluoroethylene/Polyimide Blends Reinforced with Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles2015In: Journal of Nanomaterials, ISSN 1687-4110, E-ISSN 1687-4129, article id 545307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ZnO nanoparticle reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene/polyimide (PTFE/PI) nanocomposites were prepared and their corresponding tribological and mechanical properties were studied in this work. The influences of ZnO loading, sliding load, and velocity on the tribological properties of ZnO/PTFE/PI nanocomposites were systematically investigated. Results reveal that nanocomposites reinforced with 3 wt% ZnO exhibit the optimal tribological and mechanical properties. Specifically, the wear loss decreased by 20% after incorporating 3 wt% ZnO compared to unfilled PTFE/PI. Meanwhile, the impact strength, tensile strength, and elongation-at-break of 3 wt% ZnO/PTFE/PI nanocomposite are enhanced by 85, 5, and 10% compared to pure PTFE/PI blend. Microstructure investigation reveals that ZnO nanoparticles facilitate the formation of continuous, uniform, and smooth transfer film and thus reduce the adhesive wear of PTFE/PI.

  • 49.
    Shi, Yijun
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Minami, Ichiro
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Grahn, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Björling, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Boundary and elastohydrodynamic lubrication studies of glycerol aqueous solutions as green lubricants2014In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 69, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the boundary and elastohydrodynamic lubricating behaviour of glycerol and its aqueous solutions are discussed in both rolling and sliding contacts with a view on assessing the use of glycerol as a green lubricant. To understand the lubricating mechanism, the film thickness of glycerol and its aqueous solutions were studied at different velocities. The results show that the viscosity of glycerol can be controlled for a wide range by adding different amounts of water. The lubricating behaviour of glycerol in all lubricating regimes can be improved by adding water. The results suggest that glycerol aqueous solutions have great potential to replace rapeseed oils as environmentally friendly base oils in several applications.

  • 50.
    Zhu, Jiahua
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Mu, Liwen
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Chen, Long
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Wang, Huaiyuan
    School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University.
    Feng, Xin
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology.
    Interface-strengthened polyimide/carbon nanofibers nanocomposites with superior mechanical and tribological properties2014In: Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 1022-1352, E-ISSN 1521-3935, Vol. 215, no 14, p. 1407-1414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A self-assembling molecule, n-octadecane phosphate, is successfully synthesized and used to modify the surface property of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Both untreated CNFs (CNFs(u)) and treated CNFs (CNFs(t)) are incorporated in polyimide (PI) as filler to study the interfacial­property-determined thermal, mechanical, and tribological properties of their corresponding nanocomposites. At room temperature, the mechanical properties of PI/CNFs(t) including elongation-to-break, tensile strength, bending strength, and impact strength are remarkably improved by 150%, 29.4%, 26.7%, and 183%, respectively, in comparison with the PI/CNFs(u) composites. At 150 °C, the enhancement of the elongation-to-break reaches 250%, while the tensile and flexural-strength enhancement reduce to 2.8% and 20.4%. In addition, the tribological properties of PI/CNFs(t) composite are also improved due to the better interfacial interaction between the filler and the matrix. Microstructure analysis of the fracture surface directly reveals the better dispersion quality of CNFs(t) in PI and superior interfacial adhesion with the introduced assembling layer.

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