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  • 151.
    Kaialy, Waseem
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Alhalaweh, Amjad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Velaga, Sitaram
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.
    Nokhodchi, Ali
    Chemistry and Drug Delivery Group, Medway School of Pharmacy, University of Kent.
    Influence of lactose carrier particle size on the aerosol performance of budesonide from a dry powder inhaler2012In: Powder Technology, ISSN 0032-5910, E-ISSN 1873-328X, Vol. 227, p. 74-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of carrier particle size on properties of dry powder and its effect on dry powder inhaler (DPI) performance. Commercial α-lactose-monohydrate, a commonly used carrier in DPI formulations, was carefully sieved to obtain different lactose size fractions, namely Lac A (90–125 μm), Lac B (63–90 μm), Lac C (45–63 μm), Lac D (20–45 μm), and Lac E (< 20 μm). The lactose samples were analysed in terms of size, shape, solid state, density, and flowability. Lactose particles were blended with budesonide (< 5 μm) powder to generate five different formulations. These formulations were then evaluated in terms of budesonide-lactose adhesion properties, drug content homogeneity, and in vitro aerosolisation performance. The results demonstrated that lactose samples with smaller particle volume mean diameter have higher amorphous lactose content, higher true density (linear, r2 = 0.9932), higher surface smoothness (linear, r2 = 0.8752), smaller angularity (linear, r2 = 0.921), smaller bulk density, higher porosity (linear, r2 = 0.914), poorer flowability, and higher specific surface area. In general, the smaller the lactose particles the smaller are the budesonide-lactose adhesion properties. Budesonide formulated with smaller lactose particles exhibited smaller aerodynamic diameter and higher amounts of budesonide were delivered to lower stages of the impactor indicating improved DPI aerosolisation performance. However, the use of lactose particles with smaller volume mean diameter had a detrimental effect on budesonide content homogeneity and caused an increase in the amounts of budesonide deposited on oropharyngeal region. Therefore, particle size of the lactose within dry powder inhaler formulations should be selected carefully. Accordingly, higher drug aerosolisation efficiency of lactose particles with smaller size may have to be balanced due to considerations of other disadvantages including poorer flowability, reduced formulation stability, higher potential side effects, and higher dose variability.

  • 152.
    Karlsson, Martin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Berglund, Lotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Införandet av e-portfolio på Hälsovägledarprogrammet2014In: NU 2014 :: Umeå 8-10 oktober : abstracts, Umeå: Umeå universitet. Pedagogiska institutionen , 2014, p. 85-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Karvelis, Petros
    et al.
    Laboratory of Knowledge and Intelligent Computing, Department of Computer Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Epirus.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Faleij, Ragnar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Georgoulas, George
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Mansouri, Sina Sharif
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Nikolakopoulos, George
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    A Laser Dot Tracking Method for the Assessment of Sensorimotor Function of the Hand2017In: 2017 25th Mediterranean Conference on Control and Automation, MED 2017, Piscataway. NJ: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017, p. 217-222, article id 7984121Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of sensorimotor function is crucial during the rehabilitation process of various physical disorders, including impairments of the hand. While moment performance can be accurately assessed in movement science laboratories involving highly specialized personnel and facilities there is a lack of feasible objective methods for the general clinic. This paper describes a novel approach to sensorimotor assessment using an intuitive test and a specifically tailored image processing pipeline for the quantification of the test. More specifically the test relies on the patient being instructed on following a zig-zag pattern using a handled laser pointer. The movement of the pointer is tracked using image processing algorithm capable of automating the whole procedure. The method has potential for feasible objective clinical assessment of the hand and other body parts

  • 154.
    Kassberg, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Larsson-Lund, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Ability to manage everyday technology after acquired brain injury2013In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 27, no 13-14, p. 1583-1588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate and describe how persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) manage everyday technology (ET) in their daily activities and to explore whether the ability to manage ET was related to the severity of the disability. Method: Eighty-one persons with ABI were observed while managing ET by using the Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META). The Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) was used to assess the severity of disability after the ABI. A computer application of a Rasch measurement model was used to generate measures of the participants’ ability to manage ET and the measures were compared groupwise with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Results: The degree of severity of disability had a significant main effect on the ability to manage ET. The groups with severe and moderate disability exhibited a significantly lower ability to manage ET compared to the group with good recovery. Conclusion: The result indicates that the ability to manage ET in daily activities can be related to the global severity of disability after ABI. This demonstrates the importance of considering the ability to manage ET to support the performance of activities at home, at work and in society in persons with ABI.

  • 155.
    Kikhia, Basel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Bengtsson, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Distance- Spanning Technology.
    Synnes, Kåre
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Sani, Zaheer ul Hussain
    Hallberg, Josef
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Signals and Systems.
    Creating digital life stories through activity recognition with image filtering2010In: Aging friendly technology for health and independence: 8th International Conference on Smart Homes and Health Telematics, ICOST 2010, Seoul, Korea, June 22-24, 2010 ; proceedings / [ed] Yeunsook Lee, Berlin: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2010, p. 203-210Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents two algorithms that enables the MemoryLane system to support persons with mild dementia through creation of digital life stories. The MemoryLane system consists of a Logging Kit that captures context and image data, and a Review Client that recognizes activities and enables review of the captured data. The image filtering algorithm is based on image characteristics such as brightness, blurriness and similarity, and is a central component of the Logging Kit. The activity recognition algorithm is based on the captured contextual data together with concepts of persons and places. The initial results indicate that the MemoryLane system is technically feasible and that activity-based creation of digital life stories for persons with mild dementia is possible.

  • 156.
    Kikhia, Basel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Boytsov, Andrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Hallberg, Josef
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Sani, Zaheer ul Hussain
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Synnes, Kåre
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Structuring and Presenting Lifelogs based on Location Data2014In: Pervasive Computing Paradigms for Mental Health: 4th International Symposium, MindCare 2014, Tokyo, Japan, May 8-9, 2014, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Pietro Cipresso; Alaksandar Matic; Guillaume Lopez, Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2014, p. 133-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifelogging techniques help individuals to log their life and retrieve important events, memories and experiences. Structuring lifelogs is a major challenge in lifelogging systems since the system should present the logs in a concise and meaningful way to the user. In this paper the authors present an approach for structuring lifelogs as places and activities based on location data. The structured lifelogs are achieved using a combination of density-based clustering algorithms and convex hull construction to identify the places of interest. The periods of time where the user lingers at the same place are then identified as possible activities. In addition to structuring lifelogs the authors present an application in which images are associated to the structuring results and presented to the user for reviewing. The system is evaluated through a user study consisting of 12 users, who used the system for 1 day and then answered a survey. The proposed approach in this paper allows automatic inference of information about significant places and activities, which generates structured image-annotated logs of everyday life.

  • 157.
    Kikhia, Basel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Boytsov, Andrey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Hallberg, Josef
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Sani, Zaheer ul Hussain
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Synnes, Kåre
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Structuring and presenting lifelogs based on location data2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifelogging techniques help individuals to log their life and retrieve important events, memories and experiences. Structuring lifelogs is a major challenge in lifelogging systems since the system should present the logs in a concise and meaningful way to the user. In this article the authors present a novel approach for structuring lifelogs as places and activities based on location data. The structured lifelogs are achieved using a combination of density-based clustering algorithms and convex hull construction to identify the places of interest. The periods of time where the user lingers at the same place are then identified as possible activities. In addition to structuring lifelogs the authors present an application in which images are associated to the structuring results and presented to the user for reviewing. The proposed approach allows automatic inference of information about significant places and activities, which generates structured image-annotated logs of everyday life.

  • 158.
    Knutsson, Anders
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå university.
    Karlsson, Berndt H.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå university.
    Örnkloo, Katarina
    Department of Oncology, Umeå University.
    Landström, Ulf
    Statshälsan/Prevab, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå.
    Wiklund, Maria Lennernäs
    Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Kåre
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå university.
    Postprandial responses of glucose, insulin and triglycerides: Influence of the timing of meal intake during night work2002In: Nutrition and Health, ISSN 0260-1060, p. 133-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to study the postprandial responses of glucose, insulin and triglycerides to meal intake at different clock times during night work. Eleven night shift working nurses participated. Identical test meals were ingested at 19:30, 23:30 and 03:30, and contained 440 kcal/ 1860 kJ of energy (33 E% fat, 51 E% carbohydrate, 16 E% protein). The food intake was standardized three days before the first test meal. Blood samples were drawn just before the test meals were ingested and thereafter at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 minutes. The postprandial responses were estimated as the total area under the curve (AUC) and significance testing was done using repeated measures ANOVA. The highest insulin level was found after meal intake at 23:30, and the lowest after meal intake 03:30. The glucose response showed the same pattern. The insulin response to food intake in night working nurses is more pronounced in the night compared with morning and evening. The results would have implications for metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in night workers.

  • 159.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Activity: ArctiChildren project: A good example of giving voice and space to students in an international cross-border network2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 160.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Activity: Collaboration between homes and school: Some Aspects on Developing Collaboration between Participants in the Swedish Project2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 161.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Activity: Creating opportunities for diversity and unpredictability: inviting children to be co-researchers2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 162.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Activity: Psychosocial Well-being: the concept and the situation in the Northern school communities2003Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 163.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Activity: Research with schoolchildren to increase well-being2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 164.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Activity: ’The golden rule’ and enabling technology: Schoolchildren’s experiences give perspectives on promoting health literacy2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 165.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Future health2018In: Addressing Societal Challenges / [ed] Editors Johan Frishammar Åsa Ericson, Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2018, p. 71-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Good health has always been crucial to people’s life situation.Throughout the history of health care, cures for diseaseshave been discovered, and great strides have been made toallow humans to live longer and healthier lives. However, newchallenges arise, for example, mental ill-health in childrenand young adults, coping with an older population, and servicingsparsely populated areas, such as the Arctic regions.Moreover, increased migration brings unique challenges andliving in a digital world increase health risks. However, inevery challenge, there is an opportunity. At LTU, health is aprioritized area, with a focus on innovative interdisciplinaryresearch, for example, including the perspective of health inArctic living, widening educational research to include healthpromotion, and exploring technology within the e-health field.One possible approach is to support people to increase controlover and improve their health at individual and organizationallevels, as well as using social innovations to promotehealth with a “cool” northern perspective.

  • 166.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Giving voice and space to children in health promotion2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest for children's health is a global issue and concerns are voiced in areas of children's psycho-social health and well-being, in many countries including Sweden. There have been a number of research projects undertaken on children's health alerting us of the decrease in children's psycho-social health and well-being, although it seems as if children's perspectives are rare. Therefore the overall aim of this thesis is to describe and develop an understanding of schoolchildren's lived experiences of health and ill health, as well as health promotion activities through children's perspectives. The 128 children who participated were selected from one school district in northern Sweden. The studies included 10 children in a pilot study as well as 99 children age 10-12, all of them attending grades 4-6 in the smallest and largest schools in the school district, one suburban and one rural (I). Twenty- three of these children were invited to an interview (II, III). In addition all the 19 children in a 4th grade class, 11 boys and 8 girls, from a suburban school participated in a one year health promotion project (IV). Data was collected through narratives in search for the children's lived experiences, by using open letters (I,II,III), drawings (IV), individual interviews (II,III), and group discussions (I,IV). The data was analyzed using a hermeneutic phenomenological data analysis (I,III,IV), and a phenomenological-hermeneutical data analysis (II). The findings of the four different studies included in this thesis can be summarized under the headings; Being met as a "we" - relationships to others and to oneself, Being caught in life's challenges, Being relaxed and powerful, and Friendship is like an extra parachute. The children's lived experiences point at the importance of being trusted, respected, included, involved and met as a "we". From this thesis it can be understood that including children in health promotion is a matter of openness and humbleness, suggesting adults, be it parents, health care professionals, teachers or researchers, taking on an empowered child perspective.

  • 167.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Hälsofrämjande möten och samtal i primärvården2013In: Omvårdnad i primärvården, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, p. 81-99Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 168.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Interviewing children: an ethical discussion about the imbalance of power and suggestions on how to handle it2007In: School, culture and well-being: ArctiChildren research and development findings from Northern Finland, Sweden and Norway, and North-West Russia, Rovaniemi: Lapland University of Applied Sciences, 2007, p. 23-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 169.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    “It’s important to take care of each other”: health promotion in schools based on Swedish schoolchildren’s experiences2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 170.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    "Like the cement in a brick wall": Health Promotion in schools according to students, school staff and politicians2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lärande och fysisk aktivitet: elevers upplevelser i ord och bild2002In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 20-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 172.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation. Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    "On top of the world": promoting health and equity in children andyouth in the arctic region2019In: WAIORA: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 173.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Partners in the Arctic: Student-driven health promoting activities in northern Sweden2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The point of departure was the interest in partnering with students inviting them to be actively part of health promotion efforts in school to examine what possible benefits partnerships with students can offer and ways of implementation. The aim was to examine how studentsin the arctic region of the world experienced creating, leading and participating in student-driven health promoting activities in cooperation with their teacher. Inspired by the PAAR method (participatory appreciative action research) 19 Swedish students, ages 10 - 11 participated in health promotion work in school.The questions posed to the students were - What makes you feel good in school? - If you got to decide what health promoting activities to do what would be your choice?Then they participated through creating, leading, participating in and evaluating their own and their peers’ health promoting activities. The student’s health promoting activities included tools such as music, massage, physical activity and the outdoors . The comprehensive understanding of how students in the arctic region of the world experienced creating, leading and participating in student - driven health promoting activities in cooperation with their teacher, revealed three key points; i) When students were asked to choose health promoting activities, they were not only in line with existing research but were able to reflect on how to develop praxis, ii) Students are competent to lead health promoting activities with the support of their teacher and participating in health promoting activities lead by their peers, iii) The group assignment in this study offer one example of implementing health promoting activities in school to increase health literacy. This study can serve as an example of viewing students as partners and giving them voice and space in health promotion and the concept of the “Arctic gate” for health promotion is suggested.

  • 174.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Picture this - our dream school!: Swedish schoolchildren sharing their visions of school2011In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 509-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to make visible, and understand, possible opportunities for school improvement based on schoolchildren’s lived experience and visionary ideas of school. Schoolchildren aged 10–12 from the northern part of Sweden participated in the study. The phenomenological analysis resulted in three themes, with no particular order of preference: the school of ‘Friendship and involvement’, the school of ‘Work and play’ and the school of ‘Places and spaces’. The comprehensive understanding of the children’s dream school is the school of ‘Friendship, freedom and fun’, which is discussed with school improvement in mind.

  • 175.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Research with a child perspective2006In: NERA's 34th Congress, Örebro 9-11 March, 2006: Abstracts, Nordic educational research association, NERA , 2006, p. 131-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Schoolchildren's health and wellbeing is in focus in this paper which attempts to share part of a classroom research project within the Arctic Children project. A class of 18 schoolchildren ages 10-11 years old in a suburban school in the northern part of Sweden participated in the study. The aim was to widen the understanding of working with a child perspective in health promotion activities in the classroom setting. The schoolchildren were divided into smaller groups and given the task to plan and conduct wellbeing activities for their classmates. The board of Welfare in Sweden indicates in their resent guidelines that the school health care are to be more prevention and promotion oriented. The results that emerged in this study are discussed in light of these guidelines. In addition this paper try to illuminate problems as well as possibilities with a perspective of conducting research with children as suppose to on children.

  • 176.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Student-driven health promotion activities2013In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 113, no 5, p. 407-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The aim was to examine how students experienced creating, leading and praticipating in student-driven health promoting activities in cooperation with their teacher. Design/methodology/approach - Inspired by the PAAR method (participatory appreciative action research) 19 Swedish students, ages 10-11 participated in health promotion work in the classroom through creating, leading, participating in and evaluating their own and their peers’ health promoting activities.Findings - The analysis of the student’s health promoting activities resulted in three themes; (i) the friendly touch (ii) the outdoor run for fun (iii) the sounds of well-being, including health promotion tools such as music, massage, physical activity and the outdoors.Originality/value - The comprehensive understanding of how students experienced creating, leading and participating in student-driven health promoting activities in cooperation with their teacher, revealed three key points; i) When students were asked to choose health promoting activities, they were not only in line with existing research but were able to reflect on how to develop praxis, ii) Students are competent to lead health promoting activities with the support of their teacher and participating in health promoting activities lead by their peers, iii) The group assignment in this study offer one example of implementing health promoting activities in school to increase health literacy

  • 177.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Taking on a child’s perspective2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 178.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Berglund, Lotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tossavainen, Mia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nilsson, Kristina L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Health on thin ice: a pilot study of giving voice to youth, adults and elderly in urban planning to promote health2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 179.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    ArctiChildren project: A good example of giving voice and space to students in an international cross-border network2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 180.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    School leaders + Student Voice = Educational reform2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By shared leadership, school leaders can, together with teachers and students, be a winning team making educational reform possible. Traditionally, student voices have rarely been taken into account in education reforms, and to some extent this is still the case, although interest in including them has increased over the past two decades. The importance of exploring the school experiences of students and the way they learn have been stressed in policy documents and by international researchers. The aim of this presentation is to share how giving voice to students can contribute to educational reform. The point of departure is Swedish students’ positive experiences of their learning environment through the use of visual narratives. Four themes were found: (1) knowing the needs of mind and body, (2) embracing each other in mutual support, (3) learning in a facilitating environment, and (4) using a variety of learning modalities. Students wished to have a voice in setting the curriculum, favored a variety of assignments, and sought to expand their learning environment beyond the classroom. Finally, challenges and opportunities for school leaders and teachers to embrace the task to critically reflect on how optimum learning conditions may be achieved while also meeting school goals are discussed.

  • 181.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    The power of appreciation: promoting schoolchildren’s health literacy2016In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 611-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore Swedish children’s positive experiences of health and well-being, and their thoughts on how health literacy can be promoted.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Totally, 121 schoolchildren between the ages of 10 and 14 from three schools in two municipalities in the northern part of Sweden shared their lived experiences through individual written reflections.

    Findings

    The phenomenological analysis resulted in one theme, appreciation as fuel for health and well-being, and four sub-themes: feeling a sense of belonging; being cared for by others; being respected and listened to; and feeling valued and confirmed. The understanding of the schoolchildren’s experiences of health and well-being and their thoughts on how health literacy can be promoted revealed that appreciation in different forms is the key dimension of their experiences of health and well-being.

    Practical implications

    The findings of this study point to the necessity of promoting health education that includes reflection and action-awareness of one’s own and others’ health as well as the competence to know how and when to improve their health. Such health education can contribute to the development of health literacy in young people, an essential skill for the twenty-first century.

    Originality/value

    This study’s originality is that the authors added the concepts of appreciative inquiry and student voice to the study of health literacy with children.

  • 182.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Hertting, Krister
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad university,.
    Health Literacy in an age of technology: schoolchildren's experiences and ideas2017In: International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, ISSN 1463-5240, E-ISSN 2164-9545, Vol. 55, no 5/6, p. 234-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he aim of this paper was to explore opportunities to promote schoolchildren’s health literacy based on their own experiences and ideas. Research suggests the necessity for health literacy to be included into the school curriculum, and to view health promotion as part of lifelong learning. There is also a need to involve schoolchildren in developing health literacy so they can find strategies to improve their health. However, there is limited research on the best practices of health literacy, based on the schoolchildren’s own experiences and ideas. In this article, a secondary analysis of the data from two previous studies was performed. In total, 540 schoolchildren aged 10–15 from the northern regions of Finland, Sweden, Norway and Russia participated by sharing their experiences in written reflections or by completing an open question in a survey. Two questions were posed to gather the data in the secondary analysis: ‘What signifies the schoolchildren’s experiences of health and well-being?’ and ‘What are the strategies to promote health and well-being suggested by the schoolchildren?’ The results show that people and interactive technology support schoolchildren’s health literacy. The schoolchildren highlighted the importance of being cared for, confirmed by and connected to others. They also stressed the importance of being in an environment that enabled them to participate and thus be engaged, which made them empowered to take care of their own health and well-being. In addition, they identified empowering aspects of technology as a tool in health promotion that created health opportunities for the schoolchildren.

  • 183.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Bergmark, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Hertting, Krister
    Nyström, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Lögdberg, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Grape, Monica
    Project: ArctiChildren InNet2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Sedan 2003 har jag varit delaktig i Arctic Children, ett forsknings- och utvecklingsprojekt med övergripande mål att förbättra barn och ungdomars psykosocialahälsa och välbefinnande. Ett givande samarbete som inkluderar norra delarna av Sverige, Finland, Norge och Ryssland som sedan 2012 gått in i projektets tredje fas för att ta sig an gemensamma utmaningarna kopplat till barn och ungdomars psykiska, psykologiska, emotionella, sociala och andliga hälsa med hjälp av empowerment och informations-och kommunikationsteknik (IKT).

  • 184.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Eliasson, Benitha
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Henriksson, Annica
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Lundqvist, Catarina
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Nordstrand, Annika
    Norrbotten County Council.
    Health and learning: building a common bridge challenging educationalscience and school development2018In: NERA2018 - 46th Congress: Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 185.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Bykachev, Kirsi
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Karppi, Jussi
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Kumpulainen, Kirsti
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Sormunen, Marjorita
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Turunen, Outi
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Turunen, Hannele
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Thompson, Lucy
    University of Aberdeen.
    Wilson, Philip
    University of Aberdeen.
    Breivik, Elin Anne
    Norwegian Centre for e-Health Research.
    Hege Fagerheim, Siv
    Norwegian Centre for e-Health Research.
    Larsen, Frank
    Norwegian Centre for e-Health Research.
    Experiences of using eHealth to improve psychiatry services for children andadolescents in peripheral areas2017In: Ninth International Congress of Arctic Social Sciences: People and Place (ICASS IX), 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 186.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Hallberg, Josef
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    A slice of the win-win game: Swedish schoolchildren’s ideas on gamification to promote physical activity and cognitive ability2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Hallberg, Josef
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Gamification of health education: Schoolchildren’s participation in the development of a serious game to promote health and learning2018In: Health Education, ISSN 0965-4283, E-ISSN 1758-714X, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 354-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The use of modern technology has many challenges and risks. However, by collaborating with schoolchildren, ideas to effectively promote health and learning in school can be identified. This study aimed to examine how a participatory approach can deepen the understanding of how schoolchildren relate to and use gamification as a tool to promote physical activity and learning.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Inspired by the concept and process of empowerment and child participation, the methodological focus of this study was on consulting schoolchildren. During a 2-month period, 18 schoolchildren (10–12-years-old) participated in workshops to create game ideas that would motivate them to be physically active and learn in school.

    Findings

    The phenomenological analysis resulted in one main theme, ‘Playing games for fun to be the best I can be’. This consisted of four themes with two sub-themes each. The findings offer insights on how to increase physical activity and health education opportunities using serious games in school.

    Originality/value

    The knowledge gained provides gamification concepts and combinations of different technological applications to increase health and learning, as well as motivational aspects suggested by the schoolchildren. The findings are discussed with health promotion and health education in mind.

  • 188.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Hertting, Krister
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    eHealth and eLearning Go Hand in Hand2015In: Empowering School eHealth Model in the Barents Region, Rovaniemi: Lapland University of Applied Sciences, 2015, p. 43-51Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 189.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Hertting, Krister
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Health promoting interactive technology: Finnish, Norwegian, Russian and Swedish students' reflections2016In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 505-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate Finnish, Norwegian, Russian and Swedish students' reflections and ideas on how interactive technology can be used to promote health in school. The data were collected in the northern part of these four countries, and 630 students aged 13-15 filled out the World Health Organization's 'Health Behavior in School-Aged Children' self-completion questionnaire with one additional open question, which is analyzed in this article (n = 419). The phenomenological analysis resulted in four themes: A sense of control, Balancing enjoyable options, Sharing with others and Learning made easier. The students point out that interactive technology promotes empowerment and independence, reduces stress and makes learning easier. They argue for a healthy balance of Internet use for it to be health promoting. According to the students, good relationships increase well-being; and interactive technology can offer a way to socialize, provide a tool for meeting and making new friends, help when not feeling well and give support when encouraging classmates. We argue, based on the findings of the present study and previous research, that students need a combination of freedom and meaningful relationships with adults who have an empowered child perspective, to fully take advantage of the empowering effects of interactive technology. We suggest, as implications for practice, that teachers, school leaders and health care professionals find ways to act as partners using an appreciative process, asking questions on what works well, to make interactive technology an enabling technology to increase health literacy, thus improving health and well-being in students.

  • 190.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
    Egenmakt, jämlikhet och effektivitet: hur kan e-hälsotjänster inom barn- och ungdomspsykiatrin möta de ungas behov?2018In: BUP kongress: Moderna tider på BUP, Luleå, april 24-25, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 191.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Hälsovägledning: från tanke till ord och handling2006Book (Other academic)
  • 192.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Melander-Wikman, Anita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    From rocking horse to rocking chair in good health2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 193.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Melander-Wikman, Anita
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    From rocking horse to rocking chair in good health: research methods for intergenerational knowledge sharing in health promotion2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of this presentation is to discuss research methods for data collection togive voice throughout the lifespan including children, adults and elderly. More specifically,the aim is to present research methods to capture intergenerational experiences ofpsychosocial well-being, and transformation of knowledge between age groups. Subjectivewell-being is people’s positive evaluation of their lives including pleasant emotions,fulfillment and satisfaction. The methods are based on the concept of salutogenese, focusingon empowerment combining written and oral, individual and group methods to access variousforms of communication. The focus is on self-determination, ability to influence andparticipation as dimensions of empowerment, which lead us to an approach that is solutionfocusedwith a starting point in the participants’ own experiences of psychosocial well-being.First reflective narratives – open letters – are offered to the children, adults and elderly as away to share their experiences, thoughts and ideas on how to amplify health and well-being.Then participants meet in different constellations, focus groups, to share their healthpromoting experiences first with each homogeneous group; children, adults and elderly, thenin mixed age groups. The purpose of the heterogeneous focus groups are to develop the openletters, with health promotion ideas the individual participants have written, in order todeepen the understanding of how health promotion activities can be designed in differentcontexts. The purpose of the homogeneous focus groups are to make knowledgetransformation possible between different age groups, both as a way to enrich the discussionabout the topic as well as to empower the participants. Based on research showing thatpsychosocial well-being increase when people are listened to, taken seriously and have thepossibility to participate, these research methods may not only be ways to collect researchdata but promote health and well-being as well.

  • 194.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation. Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Lundqvist, Catarina
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Nyström, Lena
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Henriksson, Annica
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Nordstrand, Annika
    Norrbotten County Council.
    "Hälsoskolan": the national government, local authorities and university in a joint effort to promote health literacy in arctic children and youth2019In: WAIORA: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Lundqvist, Catarina
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Nyström, Lena
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Henriksson, Annica
    Norrbotten Association of Local Authorities.
    Nordstrand, Annika
    Norrbotten County Council.
    The Health Dialogue as a Tool to Increase Health Literacy: Schoolchildren’s and Professional’s Perspectives.2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehabilitation.
    Melder, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Existential health: A valuable dimension when promoting health throughout the life-course in Sweden2019In: WAIORA: Promoting Planetary Health and Sustainable Development for All, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 197.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Berglund, Lotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Project: Health on thin ice - urban planning for good helth in cold climates2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Stadsplaneringen i kallt klimat och dess betydelse för god hälsa diskuterades när forskare från Sverige, Norge och Finland träffades på Wibergsgården, Luleå tekniska universitet (LTU), i slutet av februari. -Vi har en het idé om god hälsa i kallt klimat, säger Catrine Kostenius, biträdande professor i hälsovetenskap vid Institutionen för hälsovetenskap.Tillsammans med Kristina Nilsson, professor i arkitektur, LTU, var hon värd för evenemanget tillsammans med projektledare Mia Tossavianen.Den tvärvetenskapliga forskargruppen har deltagare från LTU, Trondheim Norwegian University of Science och Oulu University i Finland.Samarbetet mellan forskargrupperna i Hälsopromotionsgruppen och Arkitektur har gjort ett pilotprojekt med innevånare och yrkesverksamma inom stadsplanering och hälsovård i Luleå och Pajala kommuner.De har nu gått samman med forskarkollegor från Finland, Norge och Sverige, och nästa steg är att använda delade kunskaper och erfarenheter från att utveckla en metod för att planera stadsmiljön för god hälsa i kallt klimat.- Det känns väldigt spännande att samarbeta med våra grannländer för utbyta goda erfarenheter och med förenade krafter utveckla användbara metoder som kombinerar hälsa och stadsplanering, säger Kristina Nilsson.

  • 198.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Berglund, Lotta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Tossavainen, MIa
    Projekt: Hälsa på hal is - Stadsplanering för god hälsa i kallt klimat2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett forskarteam från Luleå tekniska universitet har fått regionala medel för att undersöka hur kyla, is, mörker och snö kan användas som en resurs för god hälsa. Förundersökningen Hälsa på hal is ska ge ett förbättrat underlag för planering av attraktiva utemiljöer som lockar till fysisk aktivitet i kallt klimat.– Samarbetet i projektet mellan forskare från Hälsopromotionsgruppen och forskargruppen i Arkitektur är nytt. Här kopplas två kompetensområden ihop och vi får en mer komplett syn och utveckling inom människors hälsa, som båda grupperna jobbar med. Mötet mellan människor med olika kunskap och erfarenheter gör att barriärer bryts och något nytt kan skapas, säger projektledare Mia Tossavainen. Förundersökningen innehåller två workshops och nu har den första workshopen hållits i Luleå med de fyra forskarna och de 25 experterna som på olika sätt jobbar med människor. Pensionärer, studenter och kommunanställda var några av de olika expertgrupperna som deltog. De ska tillsammans ta reda på hur man ska gå tillväga för att få reda på vad som lockar människor att röra sig utomhus på vintern. Nästa workshop hålls i Pajala och då ligger fokus på hur utemiljöerna kan planeras och byggas. Då deltar experter i planering och projektering från Pajala- och Luleå kommun samt bland annat Trafikverket, BDX och Lulebo. Miljöerna ska byggas i Luleå och Pajala och ska stimulera till bättre folkhälsa, bosättningar och etablering av nya företag. Metodiken baseras på människors upplevelser om vad som är attraktivt och hälsofrämjande. De regionala medlen kommer från Norrbottens läns landsting och länsstyrelsen Norrbotten. Institutionen för Hälsovetenskap, LTU, är sökande och projektledare Mia Tossavainen kommer att leda och organisera arbetet. Ett nära samarbete hålls med de vetenskapliga ledarna som är Catrine Kostenius (Hälsovetenskap), och Kristina L Nilsson (Arkitektur), samt medfinansiärerna Tyréns AB, Northland Resources, Luleå kommun (stadsbyggnadskontoret) och Pajala kommun. Lotta Berglund (Hälsovetenskap) ingår också i projektgruppen

  • 199.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Nyström, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Health promotion with children in the classroom2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 200.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
    Nyström, Lena
    Hälsopromotion med eleverna i klassrummet2008In: Barns trivsel i nord: aktiviteter for psykososial trivsel fra skoler i Barentsregionen, Oslo: Gyldendal Norsk Folag AS , 2008, p. 61-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
1234567 151 - 200 of 544
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