Change search
Refine search result
1234 151 - 200 of 200
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gawelin, Ragnar Nilsson
    Enskilda Gymnasiet, Stockholm.
    Laminarization of Highly Turbulent Air Flow2015In: International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Applications, ISSN 2330-023X, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature has found ways to laminarize turbulent flows, as demonstrated by the high swim speed of dolphins and the silent flight of owls. Owls locate their prey by hearing and need to fly silently. In both cases it has something to do with the soft pliable surface of the moving body and the wavy pattern that occurs on the dolphin skin and the owl feathers. Our objective was to investigate whether a pipe lined with a hairy soft carpet would “laminarize” air flows. The degree of laminarization was determined by the velocity profile. Manual pressure measurements were done to determine the air velocity at cross sections along the pipe. Varying flow rates were tested before the hair was cut increasingly shorter. It was found that for some hair lengths the velocity profile approached the parabolic form of laminar flow at very high Reynolds number.

  • 152.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gehlin, Signhild
    Swedvac.
    30 years of Stock Conferences2009In: Abstract book and proceeding : Effstock 2009: 11th International conference on Thermal Energy Storage for Energy Efficiency and Sustainability / [ed] Signhild Gehlin, Stockholm: Energi- och Miljötekniska Föreningen / EMTF Förlag , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gehlin, Signhild
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Anneberg: residential heating with solar panels and seasonal underground thermal energy storage2000In: Transactions of the 4th International Building Installation Science and Technology Symposium, 2000, p. 165-172Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gehlin, Signhild
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Energibrunnen: Osynlig, flexibel och energibesparande1999In: Energi och miljö, ISSN 1101-0568, Vol. 70, no 8, p. 41-42Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 155.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gehlin, Signhild
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Solar heat storage plant in Anneberg: one of the ten largest in Europe2000In: Scanvac Newsletter, ISSN 0804-0745, no 1, p. 7-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 156.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gehlin, Signhild
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ventilationshearing: gymnasiebyn Luleå : Wibergsgården den 8 oktober 19971998Report (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gervet, Bruno
    Global energy accumulation and net heat emission2009In: International Journal of Global Warming (IJGW), ISSN 1758-2083, E-ISSN 1758-2091, Vol. 1, no 1/2/3, p. 378-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increase in the global air temperature is an inadequate measure of global warming, which should rather be considered in terms of energy. The ongoing global warming means that heat has been accumulating since 1880 in the air, ground and water. Before explaining this warming by external heat sources, the net heat emissions on Earth must be considered. Such emissions from, e.g., the global use of fossil fuels and nuclear power, must contribute to global warming. The aim of this study is to compare globally accumulated and emitted heat. The heat accumulated in the air corresponds to 6.6% of global warming, while the remaining heat is stored in the ground (31.5%), melting of ice (33.4%) and sea water (28.5%). It was found that the net heat emissions from 1880-2000 correspond to 74% of the accumulated heat, i.e., global warming, during the same period. The missing heat (26%) must have other causes, e.g., the greenhouse effect, the natural variations in the climate and/or the underestimation of net heat emissions. Most measures that have already been taken to combat global warming are also beneficial for the current explanation, though nuclear power is not a solution to (but part of) the problem.

  • 158.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gervet, Bruno
    Global warming is global energy storage2008In: Global Conference on Global Warming 2008, GCGW-08, Istanbul, Turkey, July 6 - 10, 2008 / [ed] I. Dinçer; T.H. Karakoç; A. Hepbaşlı; A. Midilli; C.Ö. Çolpan; S. Gündüz, TUBITAK, The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey , 2008, p. 561-568Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global air temperature increase is an inadequate measure of global warming, which rather should be considered in terms of energy. The ongoing global warming means that heat has been accumulating since 1880, in air, ground, and water. Before explaining this warming by external heat sources the net heat emissions on Earth must be considered. Such emissions, from e.g. the global use of fossil fuel and nuclear power, must contribute to global warming.The aim of this study was to compare globally accumulated and emitted heat. The heat accumulated in air corresponds to 6.6% of the global warming, while the remaining heat is stored in the ground (31.5%), melting of ice (33.4%), and sea water (28.5%). It was found that the net heat emissions 1880-2000 correspond to 74% of accumulated heat, i.e. the global warming, during the same period. The missing heat (26%) must have other causes; e.g. the greenhouse effect, natural variation of the climate, and/or underestimation of net heat emissions. Most measures already taken to combat global warming are beneficial also for current explanation, though nuclear power is not a solution but part of the problem.

  • 159.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Grein, Mohamed
    Kharseh, Mohamad
    Large-scale utilisation of renewable energy requires energy storage2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most types of renewable energy are available when the demand is low. So, summer heat is available during the warm season, when heating demand is low, and winter cold is available when the cooling demand is low. Therefore, seasonal storage of thermal energy is important for the large-scale utilization of thermal energy. Large-scale storage systems require large storage volumes. Such systems are therefore often constructed as Underground Thermal Energy Storage (UTES) systems. The UTES includes ATES, BTES and CTES i.e. thermal energy storage in aquifers, boreholes, and caverns. UTES systems have been developed during the last three decades and are now found all over the world. Sweden is one of the leading countries in this technology. This is underlined by the fact that borehole systems cover almost 20% of the Swedish heating demand. During the last decade it has been a UTES development towards larger systems for both heating and cooling. Here, different UTES applications are presented.

  • 160.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hallberg, Rolf O
    Sjöberg, Lennart
    Leaching of rock fractures: laboratory and field tests for borehole heat stores1988Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this project has been to employ chemical leaching to achieve sufficient hydraulic contact through fissures in the rock to enable them to serve as part of the circulation system of a borehole in the heat store.^The trials were carried out both in the laboratory and in the field.^The results obtained in the field were investigated by means of hydraulic tests that allowed the hydraulic conductivity to be determined.^The results were not as expected, rather they were the opposite.^Fissures in the rock were sealed instead of being opened up, and the hydraulic conductivity decreased instead of increasing.^The explanation for this lies in the fact that the leaching liquid, a solution of NaOH, became saturated by dissolved minerals which were then precipitated elsewhere in the fracture system.^However, this undesired result may turn out to have a number of geological engineering applications, as there is normally a greater need to seal fissures in rock than to open them.

  • 161.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hallberg, Rolf O.
    Sjöberg, Lennart
    Leaching of rock fractures: Laboratory and field tests for borehole heat stores1989In: Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology, ISSN 0886-7798, E-ISSN 1878-4364, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 99-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research project was to increase the hydraulic conductivity of fractured rock by pumping a leaching fluid (NaOH) through rock fractures. A 16-week field test was carried out in a borehole heat store consisting of 19 vertical boreholes to a depth of 15 m in gneissic rock. The leaching process was studied simultaneously in a laboratory test where rock samples from core drillings of the test site were used. The hypothesis that NaOH-solution would leach and thereby widen the fractuers, was not fulfilled. On the contrary, the fractures were sealed as the leaching test went on. The explanation for this is that the leaching rate was higher than expected, the leaching fluid was saturated and the dissolved minerals precipitated. In principle, the minerals were dissolved and moved from one part of the fractures to precipitate at another part, causing clogging. The effect of the leaching field test has been simulated by means of a numerical model. The conclusion is that a leaching of rock as described in this paper should be combined with a deposition tank for the clogging material in order to avoid precipitation in the rock fractures. The results of this project have demonstrated a way of sealing rock fractures that has many more applications in engineering geology.

  • 162.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hede, Hans
    Vörå R&D, Vörå, Finland.
    Crystal Plaster Double-Blind Test: internal report2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report summarizes the background, development and testing of the Crystal Plaster (CP), which refers to a (crystal) patch in which tiny quartz crystals are the active part in reducing pains. The physical background is the piezoelectric property of bone, i.e. bone subjected to pressure variations generates an electric current. The opposite, the piezoelectric effect is also at work, which means that if bone is subjected to an alternating electro-magnetic radiation then the bone will respond by volume changes and corresponding mechanical stress. The piezoelectric crystals of the CP are in different ways interacting with the corresponding properties of the body. It would be possible to read out much more of the test results from the CP tests that were made in 2006-2007. In any case, the performed study shows clearly that the Crystal Plaster reduces nociceptive pains. We can see that the placebo effect is adding to the results but the test also shows a clear difference between the Placebo and the real Crystal Plaster in favor of the real CP.

  • 163.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hellström, Göran
    Bergvärme - den nya folkrörelsen2004In: Miljöforskning : Formas tidning : för ett uthålligt samhälle, ISSN 1650-4925, no 5-6, p. 27-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 164.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hellström, Göran
    High temperature solar heated seasonal storage system for low temperature heating of buildings2000In: Solar Energy, ISSN 0038-092X, E-ISSN 1471-1257, Vol. 69, no 6, p. 511-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A preliminary study of a solar-heated low-temperature space-heating system with seasonal storage in the ground has been performed. The system performance has been evaluated using the simulation models TRNSYS and MINSUN together with the ground storage module DST. The study implies an economically feasible design for a total annual heat demand of about 2500 MWh. The main objective was to perform a study on Anneberg, a planned residential area of 90 single-family houses with 1080 MWh total heat demand. The suggested heating system with a solar fraction of 60% includes 3000 m2 of solar collectors but electrical heaters to produce peak heating. The floor heating system was designed for 30°C supply temperature. The temperature of the seasonal storage unit, a borehole array in crystalline rock of 60,000 m3, varies between 30 and 45°C over the year. The total annual heating costs, which include all costs (including capital, energy, maintenance etc.) associated with the heating system, were investigated for three different systems: solar heating (1000 SEK MWh−1), small-scale district heating (1100 SEK MWh−1) and individual ground-coupled heat pumps (920 SEK MWh−1). The heat loss from the Anneberg storage system was 42% of the collected solar energy. This heat loss would be reduced in a larger storage system, so a case where the size of the proposed solar heating system was enlarged by a factor of three was also investigated. The total annual cost of the solar heating system was reduced by about 20% to about 800 SEK MWh−1, which is lower than the best conventional alternative.

  • 165.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hellström, Göran
    Spillvärme gör flygplatsen snöfri2004In: Miljöforskning : Formas tidning : för ett uthålligt samhälle, ISSN 1650-4925, no 5-6, p. 38-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 166.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Lindblom, Jenny
    Condensation irrigation: a system for desalination and irrigation2005In: Energy and Life Journal, no 20, p. 61-66Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Lindblom, Jenny
    Subsurface irrigation by condensation of humid air2006In: Sustainable Irrigation Management, Technologies and Policies, WIT Press, 2006, Vol. 96, p. 181-189Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Condensation Irrigation (CI) is a combined system for solar desalination and irrigation. Solar stills are used to humidify ambient air flowing over the saline water surface in the stills. This warm, humid air is then led into an underground system of drainage pipes where it is cooled and vapour precipitates as freshwater. The condensed water and some humid air percolate through the pipe perforations and irrigate and aerate the ground. Mass and heat transfer in the soil-pipe system has been modelled to evaluate the theoretical productivity for these types of systems. For a presumed pipe configuration and climate, 3. 1 kg water per pipe-meter and day was condensed inside the buried pipe, yielding 2. 3 mm/d irrigation water. Pilot plants on the CI system and are now in operation in Tunisia and Algeria. Another CI plant is planned in Libya.

  • 168.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Lundin, S-E
    Bjerking Ingenjörsbyrå AB, Uppsala.
    Going underground: solar heat in Sweden2001In: CADDET renewable energy newsletter, ISSN 1350-0848, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 4-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A solar heating system with underground storage of warm water in hard rock to meet demand in the colder months is described. There are no heat pumps. The system is being developed in a residential area north of Stockholm and will serve 36 family houses, four rows of terraced cottages and a service/nursing home with a floor area of 9,000 square metres. The solar collectors are on the roof and heated water is fed to the underground store through a borehole system in the underlying granite. Details of the thermal properties of the granite are given together with costs of construction and running of the whole system. The project is planned to be up and running in late 2001

  • 169.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nordmark, Desiree
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Laboratorieförsök med vatten i virvelrörelse: Mätning av fysikaliska egenskaper1988Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vattnet stängdes in i ett äggformat kärl med en rotator i botten. En liten lufvolym lämnades i toppen och syrehalt pH mm mättes under de olika försöken.

  • 170.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Ritola, Jouko
    Sipilä, Kari
    Sellberg, Björn
    The combi heat store - a combined rock cavern/borehole heat store1994In: Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology, ISSN 0886-7798, E-ISSN 1878-4364, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 243-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1988, Sweden and Finland have collaborated bilaterally on thermal energy storage with respect to information exchange and collaborative R&D projects. The two countries have both investigated underground thermal energy storage for nearly two decades, and have similar bedrock-the Fenno-Scandian granitic rocks. This paper reviews the work performed in the field of combined rock cavern and borehole heat stores, concerned with construction technology, costs and design principles. One example is an asymmetric store, in the form of 40- to 60-m-long horizontal boreholes between two rock caverns, with the caverns themselves comprising only about 10% of the total storage volume. This design has a specific cost of $US0.40 million/ GWh and $US0.24 million/ GWh for storage capacities of 6 GWh and 36 GWh, respectively. Half of the total construction cost relates to the rock cavern part of the store.

  • 171.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Scorpo, Alberto Liuzzo
    TRL.
    Andersson, Olle
    Geostrata HB.
    Rydell, Leif
    XYLEM Water Solutions Manufacturing AB.
    Carlsson, Björn
    QTF Sweden AB, Kalmar.
    Long-term Long Term Evaluation of Operation and Design of the Emmaboda BTES.: Operation and Experiences 2010-20152016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The large-scale borehole layer (BTES) in Emmaboda was commissioned in 2010. Its aim was to make use of waste heat from the industrial processes at the Xylem plant. During all the years since its inception, additional heat sources have been included, and only now can the predicted annually amount of stored heat (3.6 GWh/year) be achieved. The average storage temperature is now 40-45oC. Very little of the injected heat has so been recovered (200 MWh) because the storage temperature was lower than expected. The reason for this is mainly that the amount of stored heat (12,000 MWh) is less than expected and that this heat also held a lower temperature than expected. Performed simulations based on actual storage data and presumed future operating data, show that the simulation model reasonably well predicts the future storage function. Initial circulation problems in the storage have been solved with the use of vacuum pumps for degassing of the liquid. The BTES has reduced the amount of annually purchased district heating by about 4 GWh. To further improve the system and reduce the heat losses, it is proposed to install a heat pump to heat withdrawal. This would enable the system to deliver high enough supply temperature for heating of the buildings. The system could then be operated according to planned annual heat injection/ extraction (3.6 GWh/2.7 GWh).

  • 172.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Scorpo, Alberto Liuzzo
    Andersson, Olof
    Geostrata HB.
    Rydell, Leif
    XYLEM Water Solutions Manufacturing AB.
    The HT BTES plant in Emmaboda: Report from the first three years of operation 2010-20132014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Emmaboda HT-BTES was taken into operation 2010. Since then ~10 GWh has been stored, only a fraction has been extracted, and a storage temperature of 40-45 oC has been reached. The purpose of the BTES is to utilize waste heat from the industrial processes. Heat sources have been added annually and in 2015 the predicted heat injection (3.6 GWh/year) will be reached. Performed simulations are based on actual heat injection and extraction. The simulation model can reasonably well predict the future operation of the BTES. Initial problems with circulating the heat carrier at a slight vacuum pressure have been solved by using vacuum pumps to degas the fluid. The BTES has reduced the amount of bought district heating by approximately 4 GWh/year. To improve the system further, and reduce heat losses, it is suggested that a heat pump should be installed for heat extraction.

  • 173.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Sellberg, B.
    Swedish Council for Building Research.
    Annex 8, Implementing Underground Thermal Energy Storage: IEA Energy Conservation Through Energy Storage1994In: Thermal energy storage: better economy, environment, technology ; proceedings ; August 22 - 25, 1994, Espoo, Finland / CALORSTOCK '94, 6th International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage / [ed] M.T. Kangas, Helsinki: Helsinki University of Technology , 1994, p. 335-339Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A newly started annex on implementation of underground thermal energy storage is described. The scope of the annex is to conserve energy, improve the environment by facilitating a broader use of Underground Thermal Energy Storage, UTES, in the building, into industrial, agricultural and aquaculture sectors. The objectives are to document successful and promising system applications and to identify boundary conditions, which make UTES economically feasible. The objectives also include proof of UTES environmentally benign by demonstration and information. The work-plan will be performed in several steps from state-of-the-art studies to R and D projects in the way to carry out user-friendly engineering tools and setting market barriers aside. The annex, which will be operated by task sharing, is divided into five sub-tasks with an estimated overall time schedule of three years

  • 174.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Skogsberg, Kjell
    Seasonal snow storage for cooling of hospital at Sundsvall2000In: Proceedings: TERRASTOCK 2000, 8th International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage : University of Stuttgart, Germany, August 28th until September 1st, 2000 / [ed] Martin Benner, Stuttgart: Universität Stuttgart , 2000, p. 245-250Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 175.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Skogsberg, Kjell
    Snow and ice storage for cooling applications: Keynote lecture2002In: Proceedings of Winter Cities Forum, Aomori City: Winter Cities 2002 Aomori Executive Committee , 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 176.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Skogsberg, Kjell
    The Sundsvall snow storage: six years of operation2006In: Thermal Energy Storage for Sustainable Energy Consumption: Fundamentals, Case Studies and Design. Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Thermal Energy Storage for Sustainable Energy Consumption - Fundamentals, Case Studies and Design, Izmir, Turkey, 6-17 June 2005, Dordrecht: Springer, 2006, p. 349-366Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ice storage for cooling is an ancient technology which was common until thebeginning of the 20th century, when chillers were introduced. During the past fewdecades new techniques using both snow and ice for comfort cooling and food storage have been developed. Cold is extracted from snow or ice by re-circulation of water or air between the cooling load and the snow/ice. The snow cooling plant in Sundsvall, Sweden, is used for cooling of the regional hospital. The stored natural and artificial snow is used for comfort cooling from May to August. It was taken into operation in June 2000 and is the first of its kind. Here the plant is described and the experience of its first six years of operation is presented.

  • 177.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Snijders, Aart
    IF Tech International.
    Stiles, Lynn
    Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Richard Stockton State College, Pomona.
    The use of aquifers as thermal energy storage (TES) systems2014In: Advances in Thermal Energy Storage Systems: Methods and Applications, Cambridge: Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2014, p. 87-115Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal underground thermal storage is typically achieved through advection in aquifers using wells (ATES), and conduction using boreholes (BTES). When ATES is coupled with heat pump (HP) systems it can result in providing direct cooling, with HPs providing additional cooling during peak conditions, and in the heating mode HPs can benefit from higher ground temperatures for higher efficiencies. Case studies with realized COPs ranging from 8 to 60 are discussed as a range of expected efficiencies. This chapter discusses proper practices for well and well field design, ensuring long-term thermal performance and best practices of optimizing systems for heating and cooling.

  • 178.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Sundin, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Snöupplag för säsongslagring av kyla1998Report (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Söderlund, Monika
    Solvärme och värmelagring1998Report (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Söderlund, Monika
    Solvärme och värmelagring: kompendium1991Report (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Söderlund, Monika
    Värmeinsamling från asfalt- och takytor: försök med ytsolfångare1984Report (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Söderlund, Monika
    Värmelagring i berg1983Report (Other academic)
  • 183.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Tuomas, Göran
    In-the-hole water hammer drilling for BTES applications2000In: Proceedings: TERRASTOCK 2000, 8th International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage : University of Stuttgart, Germany, August 28th until September 1st, 2000 / / [ed] Martin Benner, Stuttgart: Universität Stuttgart , 2000, p. 503-508Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 184.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Westerström, Göran
    Large rotating ice disc on ice covered river1997In: Weather, ISSN 0043-1656, E-ISSN 1477-8696, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 17-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 185.
    Nordell, Bo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Westerström, Göran
    Method for continuous measurement of ice cover thickness1995In: Cold Regions Science and Technology, ISSN 0165-232X, E-ISSN 1872-7441, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 389-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a method for continuous measurement of ice cover thickness. The measuring device consists of a water-filled bucket, floating with its brim at the water surface. A pipe is vertically mounted at the centre of the bucket and capped with an oil-filled balloon. The volume expansion of the formed ice results in a corresponding oil flow, from the balloon at the bottom of the bucket through the pipe into an expansion bucket above ground. By measuring the volume expansion continuously, the ice thickness can be determined at any time. The performance of preliminary laboratory tests confirmed the feasibility of the method.

  • 186.
    Reuss, M.
    et al.
    Bavarian Centre for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern).
    Proell, M.
    Bavarian Centre for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern).
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    IEA ECES -Annex 21: thermal response test2009In: Abstract book and proceedings : Effstock 2009: 11th International conference on thermal Energy Storage for Energy Efficiency and Sustainability / [ed] Signhild Gehlin, Stockholm: Energi- och Miljötekniska Föreningen / EMTF Förlag , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 187. Sanner, Burkhard
    et al.
    Nordell, Bo
    Underground thermal energy storage with heat pumps: an international overview1998In: Newsletter / IEA Heat Pump Center, ISSN 0724-7028, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 10-14Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The technology of underground thermal energy storage (UTES) has evolved considerably over the past 25 years. This article reviews this development and summarises the latest technologies and current trends for UTES with heat pumps. UTES is widely used for cold storage and combined cold and heat storage, particularly in Sweden, Canada and the Benelux countries (i.e. Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg). Some new applications are also discussed: industrial process cooling, road de-icing, heat and cold supply at petrol stations, etc. Heat pumps frequently form an integral part of these applications. In addition to this overview, the topical articles found in this issue of the IEA Heat Pump Centre Newsletter give more detail of applied techniques, and present examples from various countries.

  • 188.
    Scorpo, Alberto Liuzzo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gehlin, Signhild
    Swedish Centre for Shallow Geothermal Energy.
    A method to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of the ground by TRT analysis2017In: Ground Water, ISSN 0017-467X, E-ISSN 1745-6584, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 110-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An accurate knowledge of aquifers properties is important 2 in many disciplines, from hydrology to site characterization in order to designing and implementing remediation strategies, as well as geothermal ground source technologies. In par5 ticular, the groundwater flow rate is a fundamental parameter to be considered in the ground-coupled heat exchangers (GCHEs) design, together with the thermal properties of the ground. In fact, even relatively low flow rate entail temperature changes considerably lower than in the case of pure heat conduction (Gehlin and Hellström, 2003; Fan et al., 2007) and then relatively stable underground temper10 atures which allow heat pumps to operate with very efficient performance coefficients, thereby reducing energy costs (Lee et al., 2012). Moreover, an accurate knowledge of groundwater velocity and ground thermal properties allows a better design and dimensioning of the GCHE, with further reduction of costs. The objective of this paper is to propose an expeditious, graphical method to estimate the groundwater flow velocity from TRT analysis.  

  • 189.
    Scorpo, Alberto Liuzzo
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Gehlin, Signhild
    Swedish Centre for Shallow Geothermal Energy.
    Influence of regional groundwater flow on ground temperature around heat extraction boreholes2015In: Geothermics, ISSN 0375-6505, E-ISSN 1879-3576, Vol. 56, p. 119-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing popularity of ground-coupled heat pumps has resulted in almost20% of all Swedish family houses being heated this way. To avoid undesirableinteractions between neighboring boreholes and disturbance of the ground temperature, the general rule and recommendation of Swedish authorities is that the distance between two neighboring boreholes must be ≥ 20 m. However, according to previous studies, relatively low groundwater flow rates may significantly reduce the borehole excess temperature compared to the case of pure heat conduction. In this work the Influence Length is defined and its relations with flow rate, real thermal conductivity of the ground and effective thermal conductivity obtained by thermal response analysis are investigated. The aim of this study was to find a way to use the thermal response test as a means to determine the groundwater flow influence in order to reduce the borehole spacing perpendicular to groundwater flow direction. The results confirm that very low groundwater flow rates are enough to significantly reduce the Influence Length, hence this is a crucial parameter which should be considered. Moreover, a first estimation, even before the thermal response test analysis, of the Influence Length is possible if the knowledge of hydrogeological conditions of the site allows good predictions about real thermal conductivity of the ground and flow rate.

  • 190. Skogsberg, Kjell
    et al.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Cold storage applications2000In: Winter Cities 2000: Energy and Environment. Proceedings, Luleå, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 191. Skogsberg, Kjell
    et al.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Snow cooling in Sweden2006In: Thermal energy storage: 2006 EcoStock ; [10th International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage] ; May 31 - June 2, 2006, the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey ; proceedings, Pomona, NJ: Richard Stockton College of NJ , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 192.
    Skogsberg, Kjell
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    The Sundsvall hospital snow storage2001In: Cold Regions Science and Technology, ISSN 0165-232X, E-ISSN 1872-7441, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the summer, the regional hospital in Sundsvall in central Sweden requires 1000 MW h of cooling with a maximum cooling power 1500 kW. From the summer of 2000, seasonally stored snow will be utilised to meet the cooling demand. A storage area of 140×60 m with a capacity for 60,000 m3 (40,000 tons) of snow was constructed in 1999. Initially, about half of this volume will be stored. The storage consists of a shallow pit made of watertight asphalt. A layer of wood chips covering the snow reduces the natural melting to 20–30% of the total volume. Meltwater from the snow storage is pumped to the hospital. After cooling the hospital, the heated meltwater is re-circulated to the snow storage. When all the snow has melted, the wood chips will be burnt in a local heating plant. Luleå University of Technology is responsible for the scientific evaluation of the project. This paper describes the construction and the simulated operation of the snow storage system.

  • 193.
    Stephansson, Ove
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Småhus i berg: förstudie1981Report (Other academic)
  • 194. Sundin, E.
    et al.
    Lundberg, Angela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Semadeni-Davies, A.F.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Urban Snow Research at Luleå University of Technology2000In: Nordic Hydrological Conference 2000: Uppsala, Sweden 26-30 June 2000 / [ed] Torbjörn Nilsson, Uppsala: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, 2000, p. 608-615Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 195. Söderlund, Monika
    et al.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Solvärme från takytor för återladdning av markvärmesystem: teoretisk studie1986Report (Other academic)
  • 196. Tuomas, Göran
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Anna-Maria
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Thermal response test integrated to drilling2003In: Proceedings: Futurestock 2003, 9th International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage : Warsaw, Poland, September 1 - 4, 2003, Warszawa: PW Publishing House , 2003, p. 411-415Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 197.
    Tuomas, Göran
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Down-hole water driven hammer drilling for BTES applications2000In: Proceedings: TERRASTOCK 2000, 8th International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage : University of Stuttgart, Germany, August 28th until September 1st, 2000 / [ed] Martin Benner, Stutttgart: Universität Stuttgart , 2000, p. 503-508Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 198.
    Westerström, Göran
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Method for continuous measurement of frost depth in soil1994Report (Other academic)
  • 199.
    Yousefi, Bagher
    et al.
    Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Iran.
    Boroomand-Nasab, Saeed
    Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Iran.
    Moazed, H
    Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Iran.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    A brief review on application of solar desalination in irrigation to have a sustainable agriculture2017In: Desalination and Water Treatment, ISSN 1944-3994, E-ISSN 1944-3986, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review paper deals with seawater or saline water solar desalination systems for agriculture and irrigation. Since the future seems to face an increasing scarcity of irrigation water and fossil fuels, many countries encourage renewable energy driven desalination and irrigation to achieve a more sustainable agriculture. Today, however, only a fraction of existing desalination systems is solar driven. Such desalination irrigation systems deserve more attention and support. Here, we describe and discuss systems for condensation irrigation, distillation irrigation and greenhouses combined with solar stills.

  • 200.
    Yousefi, Bagher
    et al.
    Airrigation and Drainage Engineering Department, Faculty of Water Sciences Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz.
    Boroomand-Nasab, Saeed
    Airrigation and Drainage Engineering Department, Faculty of Water Sciences Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz.
    Moazed, Hadi
    Airrigation and Drainage Engineering Department, Faculty of Water Sciences Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz.
    Nordell, Bo
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Condensation Irrigation Field Test: Measurements of Soil Moisture2017In: International Journal of Basic Sciences & Applied Research, ISSN 2147-3749, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the growing population and scarcity of fresh water it is increasingly important to produce potable water by desalination of saline water. However, desalination requires energy and in a sustainable world it has to be based on renewable energy. Condensation irrigation (CI) is a method that combines desalination and irrigation. In such systems solar energy could be used to provide needed energy. By letting air flow over the water surface in a solar still with saline or polluted water, the air is humidified. The vapor-saturated airflow is then lead into buried pipes, where the air gradually cools and the water precipitates along the pipe surface. In current field study perforated PVC pipes were used i.e. the condensed water left the pipe through its walls and irrigated the surrounding soil. In PVC pipes without perforations the produced water was collected at the pipe outlet. A fan was used to force the air through the 25 m pipes of the CI system. The resulting amount of produced water per 8 hours for drinking water and irrigation was 4.0 and 6.0 l, respectively.

1234 151 - 200 of 200
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf